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Andrew Adams

Designer of the hand-printed typeface Uncensored (2013). I am not entirey sure, but this could be the same Andrew Adams in Orem, UT, who designed a Deseret typeface in 2016. The latter Andrew Adams graduated from Utah Valley University in 2014. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brigham Young's Deseret alphabet

Brigham Young was one of Utah's pioneers. This page has a historical study of the Deseret alphabet. A quote from the Salt Lake Tribune (2000): "It was another of Brigham Young's bold and audacious experiments, University of Utah History Professor Dean May said. ... It was also extremely expensive to typeset the new characters and only four books were ever published: two elementary school readers, one partial Book of Mormon and one full Book of Mormon." [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brion Zion

Designer of Beehive, a Deseret alphabet font. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Daniel U. Thibault
[Urhixidur Fonts Type Foundry]

[More]  ⦿

Deseret for the Mac

Free Deseret language kit for the Mac. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Edward J. Bateman

Designer in 1995 of a Deseret alphabet font called Deseret. It can be found here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Evertype (was: Everson Typography)
[Michael Everson]

Michael Everson's (b. Norristown, PA, 1963) brilliant pages on Celtic and other languages and on font standards, featuring the following sub-pages:

  • CeltScript describes Michael's contributions to unicode in general and to Celtic typography in particular. He created (commercial) Celtic fonts such as Gaillimh (1989, bitmap font), Ceanannas (1993), Duibhlinn (1993, after Monotype Series 24), Everson Mono Gaelic (1995, hybrid sans), Acaill (1997, based on the Watts type, an early 19th century transitional angular form of Gaelic type; it was renamed and further developed into a unicode-compliant typeface called Dumha Goirt in 2011), Corcaigh (1997), Darmhagh Underwood (1993, a "rough" monowidth font based on the typeface used on the old Underwood manual typewriter), and Loch Garman (1999, after Baoithin, Colm Ó Lochlainn). He is working on Cluain (Gaelic modern grotesque), Cois Life (his take on the hybrid Queen Elizabeth type), Darmhagh (Underwood), Doolish (Gaelic modern round, after Biggs), Lóbháin (after Louvain), Páras (after the Paris type).
  • Everson Mono is a huge free monospaced font family started in 1994, but still being adjusted in 2010. As Michael puts it, Everson Mono is a simple, elegant, monowidth font. I designed it primarily to make glyphs available in support of all the non-Han characters in the Basic Multilingual Plane of ISO/IEC 10646-1 (BMP = Unicode, if you prefer), though I hope that users may find it a pleasant alternative to Courier and Monaco for general purposes, e-mail, and so forth. I have found it quite legible at sizes as small as 4 points. It is lighter and a bit looser than Courier.
  • Ogham fonts created by Michael Everson (and free for download): Beith-Luis-Nion, Pollach, Maigh Nuad, Craobh Ruadh, Everson Mono Ogham, Cog, Crosta. Mac and PC. This page also has TITUS Ogham by Jost Gippert, and Ragnarok Ogham by David F. Nalle from Scriptorium.
  • Inuktitut fonts designed by Everson include Allatuq (1998, hand-printed glyphs), Everson Mono Inuktitut, Jiniiva Maanaku, Naamajuttaaqqauq, Sikaagu.
  • The Sutton signwriting fingerspelling fonts created by Everson are free.
  • List of language lists.
  • Fonts for the Sami language of the Barents region.
  • Gaelic Typefaces: History and Classification.
  • Armenian encoding on the web.

Elsewhere, one can find rare Everson creations such as Musgrave (1994).

MyFonts sells these typefaces:

  • Allatuq.
  • Ceanannas.
  • Duibhlinn.
  • Timenhor.
  • Loch Garman. Everson: : Loch Garman is based on Baoithmn, designed by Viktor Hammer and Colm Ó Lochlainn; Baoithmn was based on Hammerschrift, which was related to Hammer's American Uncial -- though Loch Garman is more authentic Gaelic font than American Uncial. He continues: American Uncial sucks. It is inauthentic and it's not even attractive. It has a "dot" on the i (which it shouldn't) which makes it look like an í (which it doubly shouldn't). Hammer Uncial isn't much better. In my own view, the only one of Hammer's Uncials that I have seen that was any good was Pindar, and then only in its reworking as Baoithín (with Colm ÓÓ Lochlainn).
  • Teamhair (1993). A monowidth font based on the typeface used on the old Sears Tower Gaelic manual typewriter.
  • Teamhair Tower (1999). The rough version of Teamhair.
  • Dumha Goirt.
  • Corcaigh.
  • Doire (1993). A monowidth font based on the typeface used on the old Royal Gaelic manual typewriter.
  • Doire Royal (1999). A rough version of Doire.
  • Darmhagh Underwood.

His bio, in his own words: Michael Everson, based in Westport, Co. Mayo, is an expert in the writing systems of the world. He is active in supporting minority-language communities, especially in the fields of character standardization and internationalization. He is one of the co-authors of the Unicode Standard, and is a Contributing Editor and Irish National Representative to ISO/IEC JTC1/SC2/WG2, the committee responsible for the development and maintenance of the Universal Character Set. He is a linguist, typesetter, and font designer who has contributed to the encoding in of many scripts and characters. In 2005 and 2006 his work to encode the Balinese and N'Ko scripts was supported by UNESCO's Initiative B@bel programme. Michael received the Unicode "Bulldog" Award in 2000 for his technical contributions to the development and promotion of the Unicode Standard. Active in the area of practical implementations, Michael has created locale and language information for many languages, from support for Irish and the other Celtic langauges to the minority languages of Finland. In 2003 he was commissioned by the United Nations Development Programme to prepare a report on the computer locale requirements for Afghanistan, which was endorsed by the Ministry of Communications of the Afghan Transitional Islamic Administration. He prepared a number of fonts and keyboard layouts for Mac OS X 10.3 (Panther). Michael moved to Tucson, Arizona at the age of 12. He studied German, Spanish, and French for his B.A. at the University of Arizona (1985), and the History of Religions and Indo-European Linguistics for his M.A. at the University of California, Los Angeles (1988). He moved to Ireland in 1989, and was a Fulbright Scholar in the Faculty of Celtic Studies, University College Dublin (1991). In 2010, he made Timenhor, a Latin-script font whose glyphs are based on the uncial letterforms of Coptic manuscripts. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. Speaker at ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik.

Dafont link. View Michel Everson's commercial typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

George Douros
[Unicode Fonts for Ancient Scripts]

[More]  ⦿

Greg Kearney

Designer in 1991 of the font Deseret (Deseret alphabet). [Google] [More]  ⦿

James Kass

Ripon, CA-based designer of Code2000, Code2001 and Code2002, free Unicode fonts. The shareware font Code2000 has 36000 glyphs, including Japanese and all European languages. He has free downloadable Unicode charts, info on Unicode in Netscape/HTML, the freeware Ol Cemet' (or JKSantal) font. His free Code2001 includes Old Persian Cuneiform, Deseret, Tengwar, Cirth, Old Italic, Gothic, Aegean Numbers, Cypriot Syllabary, Pollard Script, and Ugaritic. James Kass is located in Lake Isabella, CA. Discussion by the typophiles (with complaints about the wide spacing, the letters g, 2, J, and other typographic matters). The font is the default at the JSTOR site.

Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

John H. Jenkins

John H. Jenkins' proposal for encoding the Deseret Alphabet in ISO/IEC 10646. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Joseph Spicer

Owensville and/or Vincennes, IN-based art student (b. 1985) and designer of the Courier-like Shavian font Shaw Mono (2004), ChordBoxes (2010, to create chord diagrams), Bee Skep (2004, for Deseret), Box Puzzle Font (2010), Litterae Ignotae (2010: A Lingua Ignota (Latin for unknown language) was described by the 12th century abbess of Rupertsberg, Hildegard of Bingen, who apparently used it for mystical purposes. To write it, she used an alphabet of 23 letters, the litterae ignotae), Seftos Nandor (2004, for an artificial language called Lower Geldorian), Sëftos Parathenia (2005, also in the Seftos script), this decorative serif (2006, experimental), Alberne Handlung (2007, a narrow all-caps Latin and Cyrillic face), Swartsbok (2007, a nice gothic font), Lumaro (2007, in the style of Times-Roman), Duck Hunt (2004, fat display face, based on the lettering of the title of the game), Anquietas (2004, "the Ancient alphabet from Stargate"), Gothic Book (2005), and Dadh Ath (2004, containing the Ath characters used to write Baronh created by Morioka Hiroyuki and used in Sekai no Monshou). Spicer now lives in Terre Haute, IN. Another web page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Joshua Erickson

Designer in 2007 of a number of Deseret fonts (Deseret is a phonetic alphabet invented in 1868 by Brigham Young): AdamicBee, Bee-Skep-Serif, DeseretBee, HoneyBee, HuneyBee, Thin-TuBee-Blunt-Hollow, Times New Deseret (2007), TuBee-Blunt, TuBee-Blunt-Hollow, TuBee-Blunt-Shadow1, TuBee-Round, TuBee-Round-Hollow, TumbleBee, ZarahemlaBee (the last font was made with John Jenkins). He also has a small archive of other Deseret fonts. Currently, he is a graduate student of chemistry at UCLA. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mark Thomas Marcantano

Creator of New Deseret (2013), which was designed during his studies in Provo, UT. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mark Williamson

Designer of a public domain Unicode font in 2005 called MPH 2B Damase. It can be found here. Created by Mark Williamson, it covers Armenian, Cherokee, Coptic (Bohairic subset), Cypriot Syllabary, Cyrillic (Russian and other Slavic languages), Deseret, Georgian (Asomtavruli and Nuskhuri but no Mkhedruli), Glagolitic, Gothic, Greek (including Coptic characters), Hebrew, Latin, Limbu, Linear B (partial coverage of ideograms and syllabary), Old Italic, Old Persian cuneiform, Osmanya, Phoenician, Shavian, Syloti Nagri (no conjuncts), Tai Le (no combining tone marks), Thaana, Tifinagh, Ugaritic, Vietnamese. See also here. The font is used by the popular Debian Linux software. Mark Williamson also designed a free fonts for Osmanya, Ugaritic and Shavian called Andagii (2003). His Penuturesu covers Linear B.

Mark contributed to the GNU Freefont project, which used these ranges:

  • Hanunó?o (U+1720-U+173F)
  • Buginese (U+1A00-U+1A1F)
  • Tai Le (U+1950-U+197F)
  • Ugaritic (U+10380-U+1039F)
  • Old Persian (U+103A0-U+103DF)

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Michael Everson
[Evertype (was: Everson Typography)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Omniglot

On the origin of Deseret: "The Deseret Alphabet was devised as an alternative to the Latin alphabet for writing the English language. It was developed during the 1850s at the University of Deseret, now the University of Utah, and was promoted by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, also known as the "Mormon" or LDS Church, under Church President Brigham Young (1801-1877). The name Deseret is taken from a word in the Book of Mormon and means "honeybee". It reflects the LDS use of the beehive as a symbol of cooperative industry. Brigham Young's secretary, George D. Watt, was among the designers of the Deseret Alphabet and is thought to have used the Pitman English Phonotypic Alphabet of 1847 as the model. The LDS Church commissioned two typefaces and published four books using the Deseret Alphabet. The Church-owned Deseret News also published passages of scripture using the alphabet on occasion. In addition, some historical records, diaries, and other materials were handwritten using this script, and it had limited use on coins and signs. There is also one tombstone in Cedar City, Utah, written in the Deseret Alphabet. However, the alphabet failed to gain wide acceptance and was not actively promoted after 1869. Today, the Deseret Alphabet remains of interest primarily to historians and hobbyists." This page at Omniglot has a copy of the glyphs, and some links to fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ria Anderson

Oakland, CA-based graphic designer and typographer. She created RF Franklin Phonetic (2011), RF Shavian (2011), and RF Deseret (2011). These were all designed to be part of the RF Phonetic Suite, a group of typefaces designed to support historic phonetic English alphabet reform. She also completed the Tamil typefaces Jatiya (2007, Tamil complement to the open-source Latin/Greek/Cyrillic typeface Gentium, designed by Victor Gaultney) and Surai (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

The Deseret alphabet

In the 1850s, George D. Wyatt designed the (Mormon) Deseret alphabet, proposed by Brigham Young. The final version of the alphabet had 38 characters and each represented a unique sound in the English language. [Google] [More]  ⦿

The Deseret Alphabet and Computers

Deseret is being given space in Unicode 3.1. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Unicode Fonts for Ancient Scripts
[George Douros]

This is a fantastic source of free high-quality fonts for scripts of the greater Aegean vicinity, Egyptian Hieroglyphs, Meroitic, Sumero-Akkadian Cuneiform, Musical Symbols and all Symbol Blocks in the Unicode Standard. George Douros is their Greek font designer. His free fonts come with this exemplary footnote: In lieu of a licence: Fonts in this site are offered free for any use; they may be opened, edited, modified, regenerated, posted, packaged and redistributed. Many of his fonts contributed to important section in the GNU Freefont project. Here is the list:

  • Aegean (2007-2012). Covers Basic Latin, Greek and Coptic, Greek Extended, some Punctuation and other Symbols, Linear B Syllabary, Linear B Ideograms, Aegean Numbers, Ancient Greek Numbers, Ancient Symbols, Phaistos Disc, Lycian, Carian, Old Italic, Ugaritic, Old Persian, Cypriot Syllabary, Phoenician, Lydian, Archaic Greek Musical Notation. Other things in it: Linear A, Cretan Hieroglyphs, Cypro-Minoan, Ancient Greek Alphabets, Phrygian, Old Italic Alphabets (Cumaean, Archaic Etruscan, Neo Etruscan, Ancient Latin, Lugano, Faliscan, Marsiliana, Messapic, Middle Adriatic South Picene, North Picene, Oscan, Umbrian), the Arkalochori Axe and Anatolian Hieroglyphs.
  • Aegyptus (2007) and Gardiner. Over 7000 hieroglyphs. In addition, we have Basic Latin, Greek and Coptic, Egyptian Transliteration characters, some Punctuation and other Symbols.
  • Akkadian (2007). Basic Latin, Greek and Coptic, some Punctuation and other Symbols, Ugaritic, Cuneiform, Cuneiform Numbers and Punctuation.
  • Alexander (2007, text typeface built around the Greek letters originally designed by Alexander Wilson in 1744; compare with Wilson Greek (1996, Matthew Carter) and Junicode (2006, Peter S. Baker)). The Latin and Cyrillic parts are based on Garamond.
  • Alfios. Lowercase upright Greek were designed in 1805 by Firmin Didot (1764-1836) and cut by Walfard and Vibert. The typeface, together with a complete printing house, was donated in 1821 to the new Greek state by Didot's son, Ambroise Firmin Didot (1790-1876). Lowercase italic Greek were designed in 1802 by Richard Porson (1757-1808) and cut by Richard Austin. They were first used by Cambridge University Press in 1810. Capitals, Latin and Cyrillic, as well as the complete bold weights, have been designed in an attempt to create a well-balanced font. The font covers the Windows Glyph List, Greek Extended, various typographic extras and some Open Type features (Numerators, Denominators, Fractions, Old Style Figures, Historical Forms, Stylistic Alternates, Ligatures); it is available in regular, italic, bold and bold italic.
  • Anaktoria. Douros: Grecs du roi was designed by Claude Garamond (1480-1561) between 1541 and 1544, commissioned by king Francis I of France, for the exclusive use by the Imprimerie Nationale in Paris. Greek in Akaktoria is based on a modern version of Grecs du roi prepared by Mindaugas Strockis in 2001. Lowercase Latin stems from the titles in the 1623 First Folio Edition of Shakespeare. Scott Mann & Peter Guither prepared a modern version for The Illinois Shakespeare Festival in 1995. Cyrillic has been designed to match the above Greek and Latin.
  • Analecta (2007, Byzantine style). An ecclesiastic scripts font, in Byzantine uncial style, covering Basic Latin, Greek and Coptic, some Punctuation and other Symbols, Coptic, typographica varia, Specials, Gothic and Deseret.
  • Anatolian
  • Aroania: In 1927, Victor Julius Scholderer (1880-1971), on behalf of the Society for the Promotion of Greek Studies, got involved in choosing and consulting the design and production of a Greek type called New Hellenic cut by the Lanston Monotype Corporation. He chose the revival of a round, and almost monoline type which had first appeared in 1492 in the edition of Macrobius, ascribable to the printing shop of Giovanni Rosso (Joannes Rubeus) in Venice. Aroania is a modern recast of Victor Scholderer's New Hellenic font, on the basis of Verdana.
  • Asea (Latin-Greek-Cyrillic).
  • Atavyros. Douros writes: Robert Granjon (1513-1589) produced his Parangonne Greque typeface (garmond size) at the instigation of Christophe Plantin as a counterpart to Garamond's Grec du roi, in Antwerp Holland, between 1560--1565. It was used in Plantin's multilingual Bible of 1572. Versions of Granjon's type were used for the 1692 edition of Diogenes Laertius and for the Greek-Dutch edition of the New Testament in 1698, both published by Henric Wetstenium in Amsterdam. A digital revival was prepared by Ralph P. Hancock for his Vusillus font in 1999. Latin and Cyrillic are based on a Goudy typeface.
  • Avdira. Douros: Upright is based on the lowercase Greek letters in the typeface used by Demetrios Damilas for the edition of Isocrates, published in Milan in 1493. A digital revival was prepared by Ralph P. Hancock for his Milan (Mediolanum) font in 2000. Italic Greek were designed in 1802 by Richard Porson (1757-1808) and cut by Richard Austin. They were first used by Cambridge University Press in 1810.
  • Maya. Maya covers the glyphs in J. Eric S. Thompson's A Catalog of Maya Hieroglyphs (1962, University of Oklahoma Press).
  • MusicalSymbols (2007) or Musica (2013). Basic Latin, Greek and Coptic, some Punctuation and other Symbols, Byzantine Musical Symbols, (Western) Musical Symbols, Archaic Greek Musical Notation.
  • UnicodeSymbols (2007, in the Computer Modern style) and UniDings (2013). It has every imaginable symbol: Basic Latin, Latin-1 Supplement, Latin Extended-A, IPA Extensions, Greek, Cyrillic, Cyrillic Supplementary, General Punctuation, Superscripts and Subscripts, Combining Diacritical Marks for Symbols, Letterlike Symbols, Number Forms, Arrows, Mathematical Operators, Miscellaneous Technical, Control Pictures, Optical Character Recognition, Box Drawing, Block Elements, Geometric Shapes, Miscellaneous Symbols, Dingbats, Miscellaneous Mathematical Symbols-A, Supplemental Arrows-A, Supplemental Arrows-B, Miscellaneous Mathematical Symbols-B, Supplemental Mathematical Operators, Miscellaneous Symbols and Arrows, CJK Symbols and Punctuation, Yijing Hexagram Symbols, Vertical Forms, Combining Half Marks, CJK Compatibility Forms, Specials, Tai Xuan Jing Symbols, Counting Rod Numerals, Mathematical Alphanumeric Symbols, Mahjong Tile Symbols, Domino Tile Symbols.
  • Symbola (2013) is an unbelievably rich font. It contains Basic Latin, IPA Extensions, Spacing Modifier Letters, Combining Diacritical Marks, Greek and Coptic, Cyrillic, Cyrillic Supplement, General Punctuation, Superscripts and Subscripts, Currency Symbols, Combining Diacritical Marks for Symbols, Letterlike Symbols, Number Forms, Arrows, Mathematical Operators, Miscellaneous Technical, Control Pictures, Optical Character Recognition, Box Drawing, Block Elements, Geometric Shapes, Miscellaneous Symbols, Dingbats, Miscellaneous Mathematical Symbols-A, Supplemental Arrows-A, Braille Patterns, Supplemental Arrows-B, Miscellaneous Mathematical Symbols-B, Supplemental Mathematical Operators, Miscellaneous Symbols and Arrows, Supplemental Punctuation, Yijing Hexagram Symbols, Combining Half Marks, Specials, Byzantine Musical Symbols, Musical Symbols, Ancient Greek Musical Notation, Tai Xuan Jing Symbols, Counting Rod Numerals, Mathematical Alphanumeric Symbols, Mahjong Tiles, Domino Tiles, Playing Cards, Miscellaneous Symbols And Pictographs, Emoticons, Ornamental Dingbats, Transport And Map Symbols, Alchemical Symbols, Geometric Shapes Extended, Supplemental Arrows, and Symbols of occasional mathematical interest.
  • Unidings. Various glyphs and icons.

Since George permits redistribution, I am offering his work for download here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Urhixidur Fonts Type Foundry
[Daniel U. Thibault]

Daniel U. Thibault (computer scientist at RDDC Valcartier, Quebec) designed the Kzinti (2002, his interpretation of Larry Niven's "dots-and-commas" Kzinti script), 3Strands-Regular (2002, rope font), Apollonian (2002, a Greek-based late-mediaeval secret alphabet attributed to Apollonius of Tyana), Deseret (2002), Drow_Angular, Drow_Rounded (2002, originally designed by the on-line Elven Kingdom of Arèthane), KhemiticHieratic (2003, role-playing face), MIB2 (2002, alien glyphs from Men in Black II), Matoran (2003, glyphs by the LEGO group for its Bionicle world), Nug-Soth (2002, a secret alphabet), Passage_du_Fleuve (2002, an occult script derived from Hebrew). [Google] [More]  ⦿