TYPE DESIGN INFORMATION PAGE last updated on Sat Jun 24 00:09:46 EDT 2017

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Apple Fonts

Alternate URL. The history of all fonts used and produced by Apple. A brief summary of this:

  • Corporate fonts and brand identity
    • Motter Tektura (designed by Othmar Motter of Voralberger Graphic in 1975): before the first Macintosh, Apple used Motter Tektura to accompany the Apple logo. "According to the logo designer, Rob Janoff, the typeface was selected for its playful qualities and techno look, in line with Apple's mission statement of making high-technology accessible to anyone."
    • Apple Garamond, the new corporate font used when the Macintosh was introduced in 1984. ITC Garamond (Tony Stan, 1977) was condensed to 80% of its normal width by Bitstream, who also adjusted and hinted it. Apple Garamond was used in most of Apple's marketing. The Wikipedia comment: "Many typographers consider ITC Garamond in general, and Apple Garamond in particular, to be poorly designed typefaces. A common viewpoint is that the algorithmic scaling distorted the typeface."
    • Myriad Pro: starting in 2002, Apple began using Myriad Pro Semibold (a sans serif face) in its marketing, gradually replacing Apple Garamond. MyriadPro and MyriadApple can be downloaded here.
    • Gill Sans Regular: used in the marketing of the Newton PDA.
  • Fonts of the original Macintosh All but one of these bitmap fonts were due to Susan Kare. The fonts were originally named after stops along the Paoli, Pennsylvania commuter train line: Overbrook, Merion, Ardmore, and Rosemont. Later, under pressure from Steve Jobs, names of world cities were chosen. A number of different variants of each font were algorithmically generated on-the-fly from the standard fonts. Bold, italic, outlined, underlined and shadowed variations were the most common.
    • Cairo: a bitmap dingbat font, most famous for the dogcow at the 'z' character position.
    • Chicago (sans-serif): the default Macintosh system font in System 17.6.
    • Geneva (sans-serif): designed for small point sizes and prevalent in all versions of the Mac user interface.
    • London (blackletter): an Old English-style font.
    • Los Angeles (script): a thin font that emulated handwriting.
    • Monaco (sans-serif, monospaced): a fixed-width font well-suited for 912 pt use.
    • New York (serif): a Times Roman-inspired font.
    • San Francisco: a ransom note face.
    • Venice (script): a calligraphic font designed by Bill Atkinson.
  • Fonts in Mac OS X
    • Lucida Grande: the primary system font in Mac OS X (all versions). Lucida Grande looks like Lucida Sans, but has more glyphs. It covers Roman, Cyrillic, Hebrew, Arabic, Thai and Greek. Many of its 2800+ glyphs were added by Michael Everson to the original collection.
    • Mac OS X ships with a number of high-quality typefaces, for a number of different scripts, licensed from several sources.
    • LastResort (designed by Michael Everson of Evertype): used by the system to display reference glyphs in the event that real glyphs needed to display a given character are not found in any other available font. Wikipedia states: "The glyphs are square with rounded corners with a bold outline. In the left and right sides of the outline, the Unicode range that the character belongs to is given using hexadecimal digits. Top and bottom are used for one or two descriptions of the Unicode block name. A symbol representative of the block is centered inside the square. By Everson's design, the typeface used for the text cut-outs in the outline is Chicago, otherwise not included with Mac OS X. The LastResort font has been part of Mac OS since version 8.5, but the limited success of ATSUI on the classic Mac OS means that only users of Mac OS X are regularly exposed to it."
    • Apple Symbols: a dingbat font that complements the symbols from Lucida Grande, inttroduced first in Mac OS X 10.3 ("Panther").
    • Zapfino (a calligraphic typeface designed by and named after renowned typeface designer Hermann Zapf for Linotype, based on an example he first drew in 1944): Zapfino utilizes the most advanced typographic features of the truetype format, and is partially included in OS X as a technology demo for ligatures and character substitutions.
    • Mac OS X Snow Leopard comes with four new fonts in 2009: Chalkduster (emulating chalk on a blackboard), Menlo (a monospaced family based on Bitstream's Vera Sans Mono that replaces Monaco for applications such as Terminal and code editors; see also Deja Vu Sans Serif Mono), Heiti SC and TC and Hiragino Sans GB.
  • Fonts used in other devices
    • Espy Sans: designed in 1993 by Apple's Human Interface Group designed the typeface Espy Sans specifically for on-screen use. It was first used for the Newton OS GUI and later integrated into Apple's eWorld online service.
    • eWorld Tight: a bitmap font used for headlines in Apple's eWorld. The metrics of eWorld Tight were based on Helvetica Ultra Compressed.
    • Chicago (see above): bitmap typeface used in Apple's iPod music player since 2001.

EXTERNAL LINKS
Apple Fonts
MyFonts search
Monotype search
Google search

INTERNAL LINKS
Typography ⦿ Pixel/bitmap fonts ⦿ Dingbats (original) ⦿ Blackletter fonts ⦿ Type scene in California ⦿ Blackboard type ⦿ Garalde or Garamond typefaces ⦿ Fonts for programming ⦿ Eric Gill and his typefaces ⦿








file name: Tony Stan I T C Garamond Book 1977


file name: Tony Stan I T C Garamond Light 1977


file name: Tony Stan I T C Garamond Narrow Ultra 1977


file name: Tony Stan I T C Garamond 1976


file name: I T C Garamond Poster by Evgenia Skalyha 2015


file name: Charles Bigelow Kris Holmes Lucida Grande 1994


file name: Apple Symbols 2003 2006


file name: Myriad Pro Cyrillic 2015


file name: Myriad Pro Cyrillic 2015b


file name: Robert Slimbach Carol Twombly Fred Brady Christopher Slye Myriad Pro 1992


file name: Robert Slimbach Carol Twombly Fred Brady Christopher Slye Myriad Pro 1992b


file name: Robert Slimbach Carol Twombly Fred Brady Christopher Slye Myriad Pro 1992d


file name: Robert Slimbach Carol Twombly Fred Brady Christopher Slye Myriad Pro 1992e


file name: Hermann Zapf Zapfino


file name: Geneva







Luc Devroye ⦿ School of Computer Science ⦿ McGill University Montreal, Canada H3A 2K6 ⦿ lucdevroye@gmail.com ⦿ http://luc.devroye.org ⦿ http://luc.devroye.org/fonts.html