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LUC DEVROYE


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University of Heidelberg [Samuel Xie]

At the Institute of Chinese Studies of the University of Heidelberg, a series of free high quality Chinese truetype fonts, named HDZB 5, 6, through 96 (with some numbers missing). Alternate URL.

  • HDZB_5: Traditional Chinese Ancient Stamp Font. Description: Used in the seals and stamps of ancient times. This is one of the most elegant traditional Chinese fonts around.
  • HDZB_6: Traditional Chinese Poster Font. Description: This font is sometimes used in posters.
  • HDZB_10: Traditional Chinese Shu Font. Description: This Chinese font gives people the feeling of fluidity and comfortability.
  • HDZB_25: Traditional Chinese Seal Script Font. Description: This traditional Chinese font is frequently used on seals or stamps. It evolved organically out of the Zhou dynasty script, arising in the Warring State of Qin. The Qin variant of seal script became the standard and was adopted as the formal script for all of China in the Qin dynasty, and was still widely used for decorative engraving and seals (name chops, or signets) in the Han dynasty. Ever since, its predominant use has been in seals, hence the English name. The literal translation of its Chinese name is decorative engraving script, because by the time this name was coined in the Han dynasty, its role had been reduced to decorational inscriptions rather than as the main script of the day.
  • HDZB_27: Traditional Chinese Changing Style Font. Description: This traditional Chinese font changes in style depending on different Chinese characters. It sometimes feels like a handwritten style.
  • HDZB_24: Traditional Chinese Regular Yan Style Font. Description: This traditional Chinese font is one of the traditional Chinese regular style fonts. It follows the styles of one of the greatest Chinese calligraphers in Tang Dynasty, Yan Zhenqing.
  • HDZB_35: Simplified Chinese Black Changing Font. Description: This simplified Chinese font is normally used in large prints, posters, or books.
  • HDZB_36: Simplified Chinese Regular Script Font. Description: This simplified Chinese font follows the style of the regular, or standard script of Chinese calligraphy. The regular script, also called standard script, or Kaishu, is the newest of the Chinese script styles (appearing by the Cao Wei dynasty ca. 200 CE and maturing stylistically around the 7th century), hence most common in modern writings and publications (after the Ming and sans-serif styles, used exclusively in print).
  • HDZB_37: Simplified Chinese Clerical Script Font. Description: This simplified Chinese font follows the clerical script style, or Lishu. The clerical script, also formerly chancery script, is an archaic style of Chinese calligraphy which evolved in the Warring States period to the Qin dynasty, was dominant in the Han dynasty, and remained in use through the Wèi-Jìn periods. Because of its high legibility to modern readers, it is still used for artistic flavor in a variety of functional applications such as headlines, signboards, and advertisements. This legibility stems from the highly rectilinear structure, a feature shared with modern regular script (kaishu). In structure and rectilinearity, it is generally similar to the modern script; however, in contrast with the tall to square modern script, it tends to be square to wide, and often has a pronounced, wavelike flaring of isolated major strokes, especially a dominant rightward or downward diagonal stroke. Some structures are also archaic.
  • HDZB_39: Simplified Chinese Shu Font. Description: This Chinese font gives people the feeling of fluidity and comfortability.
  • HDZB_7: Traditional Chinese Clerical Script Font. Description: This traditional Chinese font follows the clerical script style, or Lishu. The clerical script, also formerly chancery script, is an archaic style of Chinese calligraphy which evolved in the Warring States period to the Qin dynasty, was dominant in the Han dynasty, and remained in use through the Wèi-Jìn periods. Because of its high legibility to modern readers, it is still used for artistic flavor in a variety of functional applications such as headlines, signboards, and advertisements. This legibility stems from the highly rectilinear structure, a feature shared with modern regular script (kaishu). In structure and rectilinearity, it is generally similar to the modern script; however, in contrast with the tall to square modern script, it tends to be square to wide, and often has a pronounced, wavelike flaring of isolated major strokes, especially a dominant rightward or downward diagonal stroke. Some structures are also archaic.
  • HDZB_70: Simplified Chinese Thick Black Font. Description: This simplified Chinese font is mostly used in artistic posters, headlines or other occasions to emphasize the importance.
  • HDZB_74: Traditional Chinese Regular Script Font. Description: This traditional Chinese font is one of the most commonly used fonts. The regular script, also called standard script, or Kaishu, is the newest of the Chinese script styles (appearing by the Cao Wei dynasty ca. 200 CE and maturing stylistically around the 7th century), hence most common in modern writings and publications (after the Ming and sans-serif styles, used exclusively in print). It looks extremely elegant, yet also very formal.
  • HDZB_75: Simplified Chinese Regular Script Font. Description: This Simplified Chinese font is one of the most commonly used fonts. The regular script, also called standard script, or Kaishu, is the newest of the Chinese script styles (appearing by the Cao Wei dynasty ca. 200 CE and maturing stylistically around the 7th century), hence most common in modern writings and publications (after the Ming and sans-serif styles, used exclusively in print). It looks extremely elegant, yet also very formal.
  • HDZB_86: Traditional Chinese Amber Font. Description: This traditional Chinese font is named after amber, the precious stone, for its style and shape. It is frequently used on posters, newspaper headings, etc. It looks artistic.
  • HDZB_9: Traditional Chinese Kan Ting Font. Description: This traditional Chinese font is frequently used in posters, newspaper headings. While it lacks the feeling of formality, it is artistic.
  • HDZB_96: Traditional Chinese Thick Song Font. Description: This traditional Chinese font is also frequently used in posters, newspaper headings, and art works.

EXTERNAL LINKS
University of Heidelberg
MyFonts search
Monotype search
Fontspring search
Google search

INTERNAL LINKS
Chinese fonts ⦿ Chancery hand, cancellaresca ⦿








file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 10


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 24


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 27


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 35


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 36


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 37


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 39


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 5


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 6


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 7


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 70


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 74


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 75


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 86


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 9


file name: Heidelberg Chinese Z B 96







Luc Devroye ⦿ School of Computer Science ⦿ McGill University Montreal, Canada H3A 2K6 ⦿ lucdevroye@gmail.com ⦿ http://luc.devroye.org ⦿ http://luc.devroye.org/fonts.html