TYPE DESIGN INFORMATION PAGE last updated on Mon Oct 21 11:23:03 EDT 2019

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LUC DEVROYE


ABOUT







William Hagar

New York-based typefounders who published their work in Specimen of printing types and ornaments, from the type and stereotype foundry of William Hagar (New York, 1850). William Hagar was born in 1798 in Rutland, VT. He moved to New York in 1816 where he worked with Elihu White at the White Type Foundry. In 1823, he took over George B. Lothian's part of the foundry of Lothian&Pell to form Hagar&Pell, who were the first to introduce Scotch to American printersi (Hagar had asked David Bruce Jr. to cut the punches for the lightface series). This company was dissolved in 1830. Hagar's Scotch never sold well---the first successful Scotch family was credited to James Conner, who had bought the original punches and a few more cuts by Edwin Starr. In 1835 Hagar returned to typefounding to buy an interest in the foundry of his friend, Elihu White. This became White&Hagar. White died in 1836, and Hagar continued until 1839. From 1840 until 1842 he was a partner of George B. Lothian, who had a legendary temper. The company William Hagar was established a bit later thanks to the purchase by Caleb Bartlett, Hagar's friend, of the machinery of James Conner who had financial problems. In 1845 Hagar purchased his partner's interests, and he was the sole owner until 1852 when he sold the foundry to his sons, William and John. He died in 1863. The business declined due to the inexperience of the children and the mounting competition and would later become ATF. In 1887, the business was sold to three other New York typefounders.

Among digital revivals of its typefaces, we cite Apple Pie (2009, William Hagemann, FontMesa), an extension of an ornate Bodoni all caps typeface by Hagar, ca. 1850. See also AWT Hagar Concave Tuscan Shade (2013, Dick Pape.

EXTERNAL LINKS
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INTERNAL LINKS
Foundries of the 19th century ⦿ Type scene in Vermont ⦿ Type scene in New York ⦿ Modern style [Bodoni, Didot, Walbaum, Thorowgood, Computer Modern, etc.] ⦿ Dick Pape's typefaces ⦿ Tuscan fonts ⦿








file name: Dick Pape A W T Hagar Concave Tuscan Shade 2013







Luc Devroye ⦿ School of Computer Science ⦿ McGill University Montreal, Canada H3A 2K6 ⦿ lucdevroye@gmail.com ⦿ http://luc.devroye.org ⦿ http://luc.devroye.org/fonts.html