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[Linocut emulation typefaces include Nika Nekrasova's Messy Linocut 2D (2011, 2D Typo).]








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Adriana Esteve Hernandez
[Adriprints]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Adriprints
[Adriana Esteve Hernandez]

Adriana Hernandez (b. Miami, FL) established Adriprints in 2008. She is located in Munich, Germany.

Her fonts include Kicks (2012, a fun hand-printed typeface for children's books), Stitching Kit (2010, dings), Fiddleshticks (2009, linocut), Sorbet and Sorbet Wide (2009, like architectural letters), Fancypants (2010, curly lettering), Stitchin Crochet (2009, dingbats), Trellis (2009, hand-printed), and Draft Punk (2009, comic book style).

Font Squirrel link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Affenprinz Belmondo
[Büo Sequenz]

[More]  ⦿

Amber Cross

Illustrator Amber June Cross (Sarasota, FL) designed the brushy The Scream-style typeface Sorry For The Pentagram (2015) during her studies at Ringling College of Art & Design. In 2017, she designed the runic emulation typeface Runic, and the curly Heffner. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Art nouveau typefaces by Nick Curtis
[Nick Curtis]

Art nouveau revivals by Nick Curtis include the following free typefaces.

  • Bala Cynwyd NF (2001, 2007) is an Arts&Crafts style poster typeface inspired by lettering of Dard Hunter.
  • MadisonSquareIncised, MadisonSquareNF (2001, 2007).
  • MunchausenNF (2003, 2007). Based on a poster for an exhibition by Ludwig Heinrich Jungnickel (1911). This is inbetween art deco and art nouveau.
  • RivannaNF (2002, arts and crafts style): Rivanna NF revives Max Joseph Gradl's Gradl Zierschriften, an art nouveau typeface from 1903. Rivanna NF Pro was done in 2010 by CheapProFonts.
  • Runy-Tunes, RunyTunesRevisited (1999, 2001, 2007).
  • SmorgasbordNF (2003, 2007). Based on this poster by André C. de Takacs (1912).
  • TobaccoRoadNF (2002, 2007). This is based on a poster for an art exhibition, designed by Eva Volkel in 1912. It is typical of style of the Austrian Secession school---combining medieval forms with late art nouveau styles.
  • ValleyGrrrlNF (2003, 2007). ValleyGrrrlNF (Nick Curtis) is based on Johann Cissarz's poster lettering in Erste Hoehenluft Radfahr-Bahn (1897).

There are also commercial art nouveau typefaces:

  • Abbey Road NF. After Joseph W. Phinney's Abbey Old Stytle (1901).
  • Aint Baroque NF (2009). An art nouveau/psychedelic-style variation on Milton Glaser's Baby Teeth Baroque from 1968.
  • Deukalion NF (2006). A fun art nouveau headline face.
  • Elefantasia NF (2012) is based on Elefanta, a font by the Karl Brendler & Söhne foundry in Vienna.
  • Foxcroft and Foxcroft Shaded (2005). An art nouveau family based on Vassar (1887, Farmer, Little&Co).
  • Graphic Stylin NF (2006). A script stencil typeface with an art nouveau feel.
  • Half Full NF (2011). A bold weight of Glass Antiqua (Franz Paul Glass, 1912, Genzsch&Heyse).
  • Hupp Antiqua NF (2006). A gorgeous display typeface pair first done in 1909 by Otto Hupp for Klingspor. This one has a Basque A.
  • Inglenook Corner NF (2005). Based on the lettering of Laurence Schall, as presented in Lewis F. Day's 1910 classic, Alphabets Old and New.
  • Jugendstil Borders NF (2011).
  • Millrich Moravian NF (2010). A revival of Bohemian (1918, a jugendstil typeface by Miller&Richard). Millrich Olivian NF (2014) revives Olivian.
  • One Good Urn NF (2005). Based on the art nouveau lettering of J. M. Bergling in Art Alphabets and Lettering (1914).
  • Petrushka NF (2012): based on the art nouveau typeface Petrarka (1900, Schelter & Giesecke).
  • Rough Cut NF (2006, linocut). A grunged up version of the art nouveau typeface Daphne.
  • Schweimann Moderne NF (2014).
[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

BA Graphics
[Robert Alonso]

Bob Alonso (b. Bronx, NY, 1946, d.2007), the founder of BA Graphics in 1994, was a prolific American type designer. With 33 years of experience at NewYork's Photo Lettering, he specialized in calligraphic script typefaces, but not exclusively so. BA Graphics was located in Chester, NY, and later in Toms River, NJ, and now sells its fonts through MyFonts. Many of its fonts published after Alonso's death in 2007 were completed by John Bomparte.

John Bomparte wrote this obituary: Throughout his career at the legendary Photo-Lettering, Inc. (one that spanned four decades), Bob created original typefaces and tailored type by modifying, revising and filling out families, fashioning pieces of type for hand-lettered jobs, as well as being involved with the updating of a number of well-known logotypes. Bob was blessed with natural teaching abilities; and those in social and professional circles who had the good fortune to know him considered him not just a type designer but a mentor and a friend. As one such person close to him put it, he was a "graphic technician... back when computers were not even in site for graphic arts, he would take on any intricate&complex graphic project that others would shy away from and come up with a solution that achieved a masterpiece. I'll always remember someone saying 'this can't be done' and Bob saying let me see it and a short time later, there it was --done&perfect. I would like to think that attitude rubbed off on me. Along with this gift for teaching and explaining the complex, Bob exhibited a level of professionalism that was unsurpassed. A number of years ago when the need came to make the transition from the traditional to digital way of creating fonts, he rose to the challenge admirably. Towards the last few years of Photo-Lettering, Bob played a vital role in the conversion to digital, of many of the typefaces within the collection, notably those fonts that carry the prefix PL. More recently, Bob Alonso released several fonts through ITC, Adobe and his independent foundry, BA Graphics. Bob was on the cutting edge of his best work, and in the circumstance of his untimely passing, left a measure of unfinished designs. However, the spirit of his typographic talents and his fine sense of humor lives on through the many much-loved, and popular fonts he has left us: fonts such as Cookie Dough, Equate, Elephant Bells and Pink Mouse, to name a few.

Alonso created these typefaces:

FontShop link. Klingspor link.

View Bob Alonso's typefaces. View the BA Graphics typeface collection. An alphabetic listing of Alonso's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Bob Anderton

British designer of these typefaces:

Linotype link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Büo Sequenz
[Affenprinz Belmondo]

Sankt Gallen, Switzerland-based studio with seven participants: Anna Furrer, Andrea Nolli, Moni Rimensberger, Joa Schmied, Sascha Tittmann, Jürg Waidelich, Amanda Züst. Designers of these free typefaces: Lietz Block (2008, heavy poster sans), Hedge Flow (2008, floriated), Nordstern (2004, a simple organic sans family in Hell, Normal and Dunkel, designed by Rolf Benjamin Fleischmann), Marsmonster (2005, rounded techno style by Affenprinz Belmondo).

In 2008, they published the hairy multiline typeface Mink and the linocut emulation typeface Linostate. Dafont link. They also designed the blackletter typeface Heinrich. [Google] [More]  ⦿

David Westwood

Born in the UK in 1949. He trained in the UK, worked for EMI Records and Saatchi&Saatchi and later moved to Southern California, wghere he started his own illustration studio, the David Westwood Studio for lettering (brush style, wood style). Designer of the lino-cut effect font Westwood (Letraset, 1991).

FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ellie Ewart

Graduate of Swansea Metropolitan Undiversity. Swansea, UK-based creator of Linocut Typeface (2012), which was developed during her design studies. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Felippe Cavalcanti

Recife, Brazil-based designer of the linocut / xylographic typeface Lampiao (2018). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Henry Cohn

UK-based FontStructor who made these typefaces in 2014: Stencil Class, Stencil Funk, Formal Dragon, Casual Dragon, Gothic Hand (blackletter), Slice, Font, Cheap Spaceship, Dickson, Katholikes (Greek simulation), Grotesque Italic, Clunky Gadget, Hirschfeld (ultra-condensed, based on the signature of one of cartoonist Al Hirschfeld), Strange Square, Traianus Scvlpta, Odd Oval, Traianvs, Canary, Canary Demi, Double Trouble, Metropolis (constructivist: based on Boris Bilinsky's poster for the 1927 film Metropolis), Albrecht, Fittin Justice (+Bold), Serif Ultra, Confessions of a Sinner (Cohn writes: A replica of the lettering I carved into a linocut book cover that I made for my favourite book: The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg), Fake Kitsch, 1 Brick Letters, Gainst The Wind, Top Serif, Suggestion (+Bold: art deco).

In 2015, Cohn created Stencil Funk (psychedelic style).

Typefaces from 2016: Fittin Justice Bold (letters fit together through the middle), Seeing Double.

Dafont link. Creative Market link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jeff Levine
[Jeff Levine: Additional typefaces]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Jeff Levine: Additional typefaces
[Jeff Levine]

This is a list of fonts by Jeff Levine not categorized anywhere else on my pages.

[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Jeroen J.W. van der Ham
[JOEBOB Graphics]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Jim Rimmer

Jim Rimmer (b. Vancouver, 1934, d. 2010) was one of the great contemporary type designers whose creations had a lot of flair, individuality, and charm. Based in New Westminster (near Vancouver, BC), Jim Rimmer was also an illustrator. Obituary in the Globe and Mail, dated April 27, 2010.

He designed Albertan (Albertan No.977, Albertan No.978 Bold) and Cloister (2000; a roman type family originally done by Morris Fuller Benton) in the Lanston collection. He also designed typefaces like Juliana Oldstyle (1984), Nephi Mediaeval (1986), Kaatskill (1988; a 1929 typeface by Goudy, revived and optimized for Lanston in type one format; the Kaatskill Italic was done by Rimmer based on Goudy's Deepdene), RTF Isabelle (Roman and Italic; 2006. A pair of delicate serif typefaces based on typefaces by Elizabeth Friedlander) and Fellowship (1986).

ATypI link. Jim began work as a letterpress compositor in 1950. He entered the field of graphic design in 1963, working as a designer lettering artist and illustrator, and freelanced in this capacity from 1972 to 1999 in the same capacity. In 1960, he began collecting letterpress printing and typefounding equipment, and operated a private press and foundry (Pie Tree Press&Type Foundry). FontShop link.

His metal typefaces at Pie Tree Press include:

  • Juliana Oldstyle (1981; McGrew says 1984): It represents my first attempt at cutting a metal type. I drew my letters completely freehand, hoping to capture a punchcut look. My artwork was then reduced and made into a dry transfer sheet, which I rubbed onto type-high typemetal blanks. I then cut the letters and electroformed copper matrices.
  • Nephi Mediaeval (1983, for private use; McGrew gives the date 1986): It was inspired by the Subiaco type of the Ashendene Press and by its inspiration, the type of Sweynheym and Pannartz. My design breaks away from those types slightly in form and is softer in general feeling. In time I will cut other sizes.
  • Fellowship (1984; McGrew says 1986). Designed and cut by Jim Rimmer, and cast by him for private use: The design is the result of the feeling of joviality and 'fellowship' I experienced at the meeting (American Typecasting Fellowship in Washington, D.C.). The design was not so much drawn as it was written. The letters were written quickly in a calligraphic manner with an edged pencil and then enlarged and inked to make a dry transfer sheet. As in my two previous designs (see Juliana Oldstyle and Nephi Mediaeval), Fellowship was cut not in steel, but in type metal, and then electroplated to make castable matrices.
  • Albertan 16pt, 1985
  • Garamont [not entirely sure that this was done in metal]
  • Cartier Roman 14pt, 2004
  • Cree Syllabic 14pt, 2006
  • Duensing Titling 12, 14, 18, 24, 36, 48&60pt, 2004-07. Duensing in use.
  • Hannibal Oldstyle 18pt, 2003
  • Quill 14pt, 2006
  • Stern 16pt, 2008. This was his last completed typeface.

In 1970, Jim made his first film type, Totemic. This sturdy text type was revived in 2015 by Canada Type as Totemic, and contains as an extra a et of stackable totems.

Jim has designed and produced a collection of digital types, and over the past 20 years has designed and cut six metal types. He recently completed a Monotype Large Comp type named Hannibal Oldstyle, is currently cutting 14 point matrices for Cartier Roman, and is making drawings for the cutting of a 14 point Western and Eastern Cree. Samples and discussion of his Cree typeface.

Jim in action in 2003. According to Gerald Giampa from Lanston, Jim is the most talented type designer alive in 2003. About his typefaces, I quote McGrew: Fellowship was designed and cut by Jim Rimmer in Vancouver in 1986, and cast by him for private use. He says, "The design is the result of the feeling of joviality and 'fellowship' I experienced at the meeting (American Typecasting Fellowship in Washington, D.C.). The design was not so much drawn as it was written. The letters were written quickly in a calligraphic manner with an edged pencil and then enlarged and inked to make a dry transfer sheet. As in my two previous designs (see Juliana Oldstyle and Nephi Mediaeval), Fellowship was cut not in steel, but in type metal, and then electroplated to make castable matrices." Juliana Oldstyle was designed and cut in 1984, as a private type. He says, "It represents my first attempt at cutting a metal type. I drew my letters completely freehand, hoping to capture a punchcut look. My artwork was then reduced and made into a dry transfer sheet, which I rubbed onto type-high typemetal blanks. I then cut the letters and electroformed copper matrices." Nephi Mediaeval was designed and cut in 1986, for private use. He says it "was inspired by the Subiaco type of the Ashendene Press and by its inspiration, the type of Sweynheym and Pannartz. My design breaks away from those types slightly in form and is softer in general feeling. In time I will cut other sizes."

In 2012, Rimmer Type Foundry was acquired by Canada Type. The press release: Canada Type, a font development studio based in Toronto, has acquired the Rimmer Type Foundry (RTF) from P22 Type Foundry, Inc. The RTF library contains the complete body of work of Canadian design icon Jim Rimmer (1934-2010), who was an enormous influence on Canadian type design and private press printing, and the subject of Richard Kegler's documentary, Making Faces: Metal Type in the 21st Century. The RTF library contains many popular font families, such as Albertan, Amethyst, Credo, Dokument and Stern, as well as quite a few analog designs that were never produced in digital. Now that Rimmer's work has been repatriated, it will be remastered and expanded by Canada Type, then re-released to the public, starting in the fall of 2012. Jim's analog work will also be produced digitally and available to the public alongside his remastered and expanded work. Once Jim's designs are re-released, part of their sales will be donated to fund the Canada Type Scholarship, an award given annually to design students in Canada. This will be done in coordination with the Society of Graphic Designers of Canada (GDC), the national professional association that awarded Jim Rimmer with the prestigious GDC Fellowship in 2007.

Jim Rimmer digitized Elizabeth (+Italic). From 2006 until 2012, the Rimmer Type Foundry collection was offered by P22. It included:

  • RTF Albertan: A great text family developed between 1982 and 2005. In 2013, it as remastered by Canada Type and reissued as Albertan Pro, calling it a first post-Baskerville-post-Joanna typeface.
  • RTF Alexander Quill: An artsy fartsy (in the good sense) and slightly 1920s Czech type family.
  • RTF Amethyst: A tall ascender serif family.
  • RTF Cadmus: A stone slab or Greek simulation face. P22 writes: Rimmer's re-working of a design done by Robert Foster, a hand lettering artist. Foster's type, named Pericles, is a style that he used for a time in lettering magazines and advertising headings. The design is based closely on early inscriptional Greek, but is less formal than the sans types of Foster's time. Cadmus keeps the proportions of Pericles but is overall less quirky than the Foster design. This was further expanded by Canada Type as Cadmus Pro (2016).
  • RTF Cotillion (1999): A tall ascendered Koch inspired sans family. Looks quite like Bernhard Modern.
  • RTF Credo: A six-weight sans family.
  • RTF Dokument: An extensive sans family: Dokument was my attempt to make a Sans Grotesque in the general weight of News Gothic (for the Dokument regular) but took nothing from News Gothic. I used some of the basic forms of my Credo series, but made many on-screen changes and broke away entirely from Credo on the range of weights. My plan was to make a typeface that will fill the requirements of financial document setting; things like annual reports and other such pieces of design. It is my hope that the large family of weights and variants will suit Dokument to this kind of work. This family was created in 2005 and published in 2006. A reworking by Patrick Griffin at Canada Type eventually led to Dokument Pro (2014).
  • RTF Elizabeth: An elegant tall ascender typeface about which Rimmer writes: Elizabeth Roman and its companion Italic were designed as a pair by Elizabeth Friedlander, and cut and cast for decades by the historic Bauer foundry of Germany.
  • RTF Fellowship: A standard script.
  • RTF Lancelot Titling: A roman titling typeface with Koch-like influences.
  • RTF Lapis: A calligraphic serif, inspired by Rudolf Koch.
  • RTF Posh Initials: A formal script.
  • RTF Poster Paint: A fat irregular poster font inspired by Goudy Stout.
  • RTF Zigarre Script: A bouncy brush script with rough outlines.
  • RTF Canadian Syllabics (2007): This font was developed as a metal typeface by Jim Rimmer for a special project and is now available in digital form. Containing over 700 glyphs in OpenType format, this font covers most Canadian Aboriginal Languages. RTF Canadian Syllabics is a more calligraphic version of the syllabary developed by Reverend James Evans for the languages of the native tribes of the Canadian provinces in the early 1800s. Jim Rimmer originally designed the characters for the Eastern and Western dialect Cree to be cut as a metal font. The digital version then grew to include all the characters of the Canadian Syllabics Unicode block.
  • Nephi Mediaeval (2007), a type heavily reflective of the semi roman of Sweynheim and Pannartz (in Jim's words).
  • Stern (2008, RTF) was simultaneously released both digitally and in metal. Named after the late printer Christopher Stern (WA), it is an upright italic intended for poetry. Colin Kahn (P22) has expanded the Pro digital version (originally designed by Jim Rimmer) for a variety of options. The set features Stern Aldine (Small x-height Caps with standard lower case), Regular, Tall Caps (with standard lc)&Small Caps with x-height caps in place of lc). Youtube. David Earls writes: I've heard people say that letterpress gives warmth, but I prefer to think of it as giving humanity. That the types interaction on a page is so dependent on the punch cutter, the caster, the compositor, the printer, the humidity, the papermaker and inkmaker gives it a humanity, not a warmth, and decries the demise of letterpress. In 2013, Canada Type remastered Stern as Stern Pro---this typeface now covers Greek, and is loaded with Opentype features.
  • RTF Loxley (2010): The style of Loxley is based on early Roman typefaces, such as the "Subiaco" type of the late 1400s that was also inspirational to Frederick Goudy for his "Franciscan", "Aries" and "Goudy Thirty" type typefaces. Loxley displays some of Jim's particular left handed calligraphy and is in a similar style to his "Fellowship" and "Alexander Quill" typefaces, both of which were made in metal and digital formats. In 2013, Canada Type published a remastered and expanded version simply called Loxley.

FontShop link.

Jim Rimmer passed away early on January 8, 2010. His friend Richard Kegler (P22) wrote this obituary the next day: Jim was a multi-talented type designer, graphic artist, bookbinder, printer, letterer, technician and a most generous teacher. He was never glory-seeking and turned down most speaking engagements offered to him, not out of vanity or indifference, but rather thinking that he was not worthy of being given a spotlight. Jim offered free typecasting instruction to anyone who asked and came to visit him in his studio in New Westminster BC. He took as much time as needed and was generous to a fault. Anyone who took him up on this open invitation can attest to the intense and elegant chaos of his studio and work habits. I was fortunate enough to know Jim but for only a few years. What started as a business arrangement grew into a mutual respect and ongoing correspondence that I can only describe as life changing for me. His kindness and generosity were exceptional and his diplomacy even when given the opportunity to speak ill of anyone else was measured and kind. Jim's dedication to the craft of type design and related arts was beyond most if not all contemporaries. After his "retirement" from his professional life as a graphic artist and illustrator, he tirelessly worked on type designs for book projects where all aspects of his skills were applied. His book "Leaves from the Pie Tree" (I encouraged him to change the title from his original plan to call it "Droppings from the Pie Tree"...a truly self-effacing Jim Rimmerism) is the best single tome that summarizes his life and work. He designed the bookıs typeface in Ikarus (as he had with the 200+ other type design he created), cut the matrices and cast the type, wrote the text using an autobiographical introduction and continued to explain the process he used to cut pantographic matrices for his metal typefaces. The multi-colored lino cut illustrations, book design, individual tipped in sheets and attention to press work and binding would be impressive for one specialist to complete on each component. The fact that Jim did all of this himself is awe inspiring. A trade edition of this book has been printed by Gaspereau press but does not hint at the grandeur of the beautiful book that is Pie Tree. Jim's follow up of his edition of Mark Twain's Tom Sawyer (set in his Hannibal Oldstyle font designed for and fitted onto on a monotype composition caster) was recently completed and is equally if not more imposing as a fine press book, but with a sympathetic humor and humanity that would knock the stuffing of any other fine press attempt at the same material. Almost two years ago I visited Jim for a week and filmed footage for a documentary on his cutting of the Stern typeface. For various reasons the finishing of the film has been delayed. I truly regret that Jim could not see the finished version. With the film and his Pie Tree book, Jim generously conveys information on making metal type that has otherwise been largely lost and previously limited to a now defunct protective guild system. It was his wish that the information and craft be kept alive. Jim's last email to me was in classic Jim form hinting at his tireless dedication to his work: details of a new type family for a new book. He was one of the great ones. He will be missed.

Sumner Stone: Jim's insights into Goudy's typefaces in particular, and his devotion to doing everything in his own shop made me think he was perhaps Fred's reincarnation, but it took me awhile to realize this due to the self-deprecating personality you so accurately describe. His passing is truly a great loss to our craft.

Rod McDonald: I would like to relate a telephone conversation I had with Jim last month because I believe it shows his incredible spirit, and wonderful sense of humor. My wife and I visited Jim in November and were delighted to hear that his doctors had pronounced him cancer free. He looked good, just a little tired, but that was to be expected after his recent radiation treatment. Of course he was also anxious to get back to work. Less than two weeks later I received an email from him informing me that they had discovered that the cancer had spread to his lungs and, not only was it inoperable, he now only had six months to live. This sudden turn of affairs was devastating for me and I called him, hoping I think, to hear that it wasn't as bad as it sounded. He said it was bad and apparently nothing could be done. However he felt he would outlive the six months and in fact we even talked of getting together in the fall. The conversation then turned to his latest type family and when I gently asked him how long he thought it it would take to complete he simply said "I've got lots of time, after all I'm only going to be dying during the last fifteen minutes". I knew Jim for thirty-five years and will miss him more than his work, and that's saying a great deal.

In 2012, Canada Type, which had purchased Rimmer's designs started publishing some of Jim's lesser known designs. These include Cotillion Pro (2012, a very graceful typeface with high ascenders), Fellowship (2013, calligraphic), Poster Paint (2012, a take on Goudy Stout), Zigarre Script and Zigarre Rough (2012, brush scripts that were actually drawn with a marker), and Alexander Quill (2012, a calligraphic monastic typeface).

In 2013, Canada Type remastered several of Rimmer's typefaces, including in particular Isabelle Pro: Isabelle is the closest thing to a metal type revival Jim Rimmer ever did. The original metal typeface was designed and cut in late 1930s Germany, but its propspects were cut short by the arrival of the war. This was one of Jim's favourite typefaces, most likely because of the refined art deco elements that reminded him of his youthful enthusiasm about everything press-related, and the face's intricately thought balance between calligraphy and typography. Not to mention one of the most beautiful italics ever made. Lancelot Pro (2013) is a calligraphic all caps typeface based on Rimmer's digital original from 1999.

Pictures: Jim Rimmer casts 48pt ATypI keepsake (by John Hudson), Remembering Jim Rimmer (Facebook group), In his studio, a picture taken by the Globe and Mail. Another pic. Making Faces (trailer) (movie by Richard Kegler).

Klingspor link. ContentDM collection. Jim Rimmer at the Fine Press Book Association. Rimmer Type Foundry link.

View all typefaces by Jim Rimmer. An alphabetical listing of Jim Rimmer's typefaces. Catalog of Jim Rimmer's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

JOEBOB Graphics
[Jeroen J.W. van der Ham]

Dutchman Jeroen van der Ham ("joebob"), who is based in s'Hertogenbosch, designed mostly handwriting fonts: Black Hand (2018), Caput (2018: a crayon font),Manus Smooth (2017), Four Hand (2017), Maneo (2017), Tater Todd (2016), Creta (2016, crayon font), Hillbelly (2016, rough brush script), Hesster Mofet (2016, brush script, renamed from Hesster Moffett), Coalhand Luke (2014, crayon or chalk script), Dear Joe 6 (2014), Dextera (2014, by Geert Dijkers), Stone Hand Saul (2014, a scribbly hand), Manus (2014), Dear Joe Hannes (2013), Winston Nero (2013, a hipster cartoon font), Serious Sally (2012), Inkydoo (2012, +Serif), Serial Sue (2012), Calligra Phillip (2012), Mixtape Mike (2012, a fat finger face), Dear Joe 3 (2010), Brushtip and Brushtip Travis (2010, two of his nicest typefaces, with a calligraphic and rough-edged touch), Vince Hand II (2010), Crossword Belle (2009), BrushtipTerrence (2009), Brushtip Texe (2009), OnetrickTony (2009), Christel Line (2009, +Black), Etch A Sketch (2009, grunge), DearJoe 5 Casual (2008), PencilPete (2008, handwriting).

Fonts added in 2007: Curly Joe, Sinister Sam (calligraphic), VincHand (handwriting of Vincent Haenen), DearJoe5, Moan Hand, FancyPens (a calligraphic pen).

Fonts added in 2006: FlutSaus (hand-printed; done with Hilde Rikken), Amorrisline, Hilde Caps (based on the handwriting of 9-year old Hilde Rikken), C rial, Hildinia Donut, BrunoBook, BuffaloStance, Stam Pete (grunge), CrosswordBill, DearJoe 1, JoeHand 2, Kali Graff, Bearer Fond.

His oldest fonts: BillieBarred (multiple-lined handwriting), BillieBob (a great poster typeface), BillieBoldHand, BillieKid (nice stencil font), BobTag, CalamityJoe, CrappyJoe, DearJoeItalic, DearJoe II, DearJoe IV (antique handwriting, 2005), DoctorBob, FruscianteHand, FuturexBob, JoeBobstraight, JoeHand, MarkerMoeII, MoanLisa (2001, linocut style), Onepunch Jim Outline, Detour Dork (2002).

His fonts are available from MyFonts. Fontspace link. Font Squirrel link. Fontsy link. Alternate URL. Dafont link. Typoasis link. Abstract Fonts link. Klingspor link. Another Fontspace link.

View Joe Vander Ham's typefaces. Abstract Fonts link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

José de Mendoza y Almeida

Influential French type designer, born in Sèvres in 1926, d. 2018. He worked with Maximilien Vox in the early 1950s. From 1954 to 1959 he was the assistant of Roger Excoffon at the Fonderie Olive, Marseille. From 1985 until 1990, he was a professor at the Imprimerie Nationale, Paris, where his students included Thierry Puyfoulhoux, Frank Jalleau, and Poul Søgren. Neufville republished many of his fonts. Thesis on Mendoza by Lucie Jullian for her graduation from Estienne in 2008. In 2010, Martin Majoor and Sébastien Morlighem published José de Mendoza y Almeida (Bibliothèque Typographique). List of his fonts:

FontShop link. Linotype link. FontShop link. Wikipedia link. Showcase of Mendoza's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Larabie Fonts
[Ray Larabie]

Well over 500 original designs by Ray Larabie formerly from from Port Credit/Mississauga, Ontario, but now in Nagoya, Japan. Fontspace link. Dafont link. Abstract Fonts link. Another URL. Another URL. Fontsy link.

Ray Larabie's fonts were originally free. The site was discontinued in the summer of 2001. Ray Larabie started a second life in his new commercial foundry, Typodermic, which opened in the Autumn of 2001.

The following fonts are free: Blue Highway (1996-2011, based on American road signs, +Linocut), Strenuous, Shlop (2001, blood drip font), Tofu, Electoral Blue, Embargo, Lunaurora, MarqueeMoon, President Gas (nice stencil font), Motorcade, Overload, Baltar (2010), Dignity of Labour (1999), DirtyBakersDozen (1998, military stencil), Mufferaw (2000), Kimberley (2002), Typodermic, Mexcellent (2000, a great triline and 3D face), Minya (old typewriter font), PulseState, Quinquefoliate, Yadou, Para-Aminobenzoic, Hydrogen Whiskey, Metal Lord (an Iron Maiden font made in 1996), Golden Girdle, DazzleShips, Kredit, Minisystem, Boron, RiotAct, GlazKrak (1996), SoRunDown (1997; visions of Detroit in 2010), YellowPills, Fake Receipt, Tinsnips, Lucky Ape, Bailey's Car, Icicle Country, Home Sweet Home, Let's Eat, Giant Tigers, RoboKoz, Snidely, Xtra-Flexi-Disc, Fluoride Beings, Field Day Filter, Bramalea Beauty (1998), Braeside Lumberboy (stencil font), Oliver's Barney, Rothwell, Fragile Bombers, Yawnovision, Superheterodyne, Massive Retaliation, Instant Tunes, Neurochrome, Xenowort, Balcony Angels, Neuropol Deluxe, Quadaptor, Deftone Stylus, Lady Starlight, LetterSet, Map of You, First Blind, Larabiefont (monospaced, 1999), Monofonto (monospaced, 1999), Orange kid, Thiamine (1999), Green Fuzz, Gunplay (stencil font), Mail Ray Stuff, Walshes Outline, Mississauga, Union city blue, Carbon Phyber (1999-2009), Carbon Block, Plain Cred, First Blind, Walshes, Credit river, Dendritic Voltage, Neuropolitical, Poke, Port Credit, Lesser Concern, Kustom Kar, Mold Papa, Kleptocracy, Blue Highway D, Hots, Coolvetica, Holy Smokes, Chinese Rocks, sudbury Basin, Lilliput steps, Hurontario, Participants, Adriator (1999), Airmole (2000), Airmole Antique (2000), Ethnocentric, Biting My Nails, Biting Outline, Dyspepsia, Vanilla Whale, Libel Suit, Effloresce, BeatMyGuest, DreamOrphans, EffloresceAntique, EnnobledPet, Euphorigenic, EyeRhyme, GotNoHeart, Hamma Mamma Jamma (1998), Octoville, PlainCred1978, Plasmatic, RadiosinMotionHard, Densmore (a modern stencil font), RadiosinMotion (a morse font), Sexsmith, ShouldveKnown, ShouldveKnownShaded, 20thCenturyFontItalic, Counterscraps, Cretino, Crystal Radio Kit, Duality, Echelon (1999, + Italic), Effloresce, Fabian, KenyanCoffee, MinyaNouvelle, OliversBarney, Oil Crisis (2002, car dingbats), SybilGreen (2000), Tork (2000), Degrassi, Vibrocentric, Rafika (stencil font), Berylium, Pakenham, Steelfish (see here), Bullpen, Almonte Woodgrain, Sandoval, Sappy Mugs (2002, mugshots), Colourbars, Unispace, Urkelian (1998), Subpear, Stasmic, StreetCred (1998), Zekton Dots, Vademecum, Vectroid (2000), Zeroes One (1999).

The early commercial fonts at Typodermic included Amienne (2004, brush script), Asterisp (named Aplha through Iota, asterisks, 2000), Bomr (2002), Jillican, Tank (2004, an octagonal face), Telidon Ink and Wyvern. Rare Larabie fonts. Mass download. Direct access to some fonts. Noteworthy is that Neuropol is the font in the official logo of the 2006 Olympic Winter Games. Roxio's new Easy Media Creator 7 includes 36 updated Ray Larabie freeware fonts with expanded character sets, kerning, Euro symbol and installable embedding: Arnprior, Baveuse, Berylium, Berylium Bold Italic, Blue Highway (based on the US highway series E font), Blue Highway Condensed, Blue Highway D Type, Blue Highway Bold, Blue Highway Linocut, Burnstown Dam, Carbon Block, Credit Valley (+ B, I,&BI), Earwig Factory, Hurry Up, Kredit, Krystoid, Minya Nouvelle (+ B, I,&BI), Neuropol, Planet Benson 2, Pupcat (unicase), Stereofidelic, Sybil Green (2000, girlish font), Teen (+ B, I, BI, Light, and Light Italic)), Velvenda Cooler, Velvenda MegablackWaker.

Fonts made in 2004-2005: Stentiga (free), Boopee, Zalderdash, First Blind 2, Fenwick Outline, Amienne, Induction, Huxtable, Good Times, Euphorigenic, Neuropolitical, Effloresce, Squealer, Axaxax, Coolvetica, Cretino, Heroid (comic book).

Catalog of the typefaces in the Larabie Fonts collection. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Letters&Numbers (or: Seagull Hut).
[Ursula Hitz]

Ursula Hitz (Letters&Numbers) is located in Shoreham-by-Sea (Brighton), UK, and/or London, where she is a freelance designer. Originally a free font designer, she became commercial in 2010 via MyFonts. She also sells her fonts via her own web site, Seagull Hut.

She is the creator of Ursula Handschrift (2009) and Habana Vieja (a 3d font inspired by street lettering in Havana).

In 2010, she made Ursula Capitals (2010, a vertically striped sketch face), Doodle Pen, Paint Hand, Brush Stroke, Pastel Crayon, Universketch, Unisketch (which appears to be the same as Universketch) and Sketch Script.

In 2011, she made Lino Stamp (linocut, grunge).

In 2012, Ursula created Kind Type (brushy watercolor painted typeface).

Typefaces from 2013: Olivier (fattish brush script).

Behance link. Her blog is called Seagull's Eye.

Typefaces from 2014: Allen Keys.

Typefaces from 2015: Lilly (an artsy poster typeface) soon renamed Lilycat.

Typefaces from 2016: Crayon Hand.

Typefaces from 2017: Fabric Shapes.

Klingspor link. Behance link. Abstract Fonts link. Dafont link. Blogspot link.

View Ursula Hitz's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Marisol Ortega

Designer and illustrator living in Seattle, WA, who created a linocut alphabet in 2016. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Martina Balke

Designer of Stempel LT Std 1 and 2 (2002) in the Linotype Taketype 5 collection. Stempel Std2 (2002) is a white on black informally hand-printed caps set, perhaps emulating linocut.

MyFonts link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Michael Scarpitti

Mike graduated from Ohio State University with a degree in philosophy. Prolific Columbus, OH-based designer (b. Columbus, OH) whose fonts are mainly available through Scriptorium. Many of his fonts were influenced by roman inscriptional or Trajan types. These include Caesario (1993, a Trajan column font based on Goudy's drawings from 1936), Minerva (1993), Falconis and Vespasiano. Other typefaces with ancient origins include DeBellis, Pomponianus, Praitor, Jerash (1993, with Nalle), Macteris Uncial (1993), Antioch (1993), and Corbei Uncial.

He prepared a set of fonts based on a medieval Latin British manuscript (Pontifica, 1999) and another one called Orlock (1993), a linocut style typeface based on the lettering in a poster for the German German expressionist silent film Nosferatu.

Pontifica was redesigned in 2009 based on the source manuscripts from the Papal Archive. He writes: Pontifica is an example of protogothic calligraphy, a style developed at the monestery of St. Gall in the 12th century to replace Carolingian minuscule with a more efficient and compact system of lettering. Ultimately it became the progenitor of the gothic lettering styles of the late Medieval period.

View Michael Scarpitti's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Miloš Ćirić

Serbian book illustrator, graphic arts teacher and phototype, woodtype and linocut letter type designer, b. Despotovo, 1931, d. Belgrade, 1999. His sons Rastko and Vukan write about both aspects of his life. His CV: he graduated in 1954 from the Academy of Applied Arts, Belgrade and took his Masters Degree in 1959, under Professor Mihailo S. Petrov. He was professor at the Faculty of Applied Arts, University of Arts, Belgrade from 1964 until 1997. He was Head of the Graphic Department from 1974 to 1975. His publications include Graphic identification 1961-1981 (SKZ, Belgrade, 1982), Graphic communications 1954-1984 (Vajat, Belgrade, 1986), Heraldry 1 (University of Arts, Belgrade, 1983) and Coat-of-Arms of Belgrade, Heraldry 2 (Cicero, Belgrade, 1991). Most of Ćirić's types were for Cyrillic, while some have Latin alphabets as well. Many would be classified today as poster types, type to accompany illustrations. The list of his typefaces:

  • Rastko, Latin, 1955: It is a versal typeface made in only one weight. Rastko himself thinks it was devised as light, almost linear and it was a part of his character.
  • Vukan, Latin, 1960: Named after his second son, Vukan, this is a sharply cut orthogonal typeface.
  • Galerija Grafiki kolektiv, Cyrillic, 1962 (Graphic Collective Gallery): A beautiful Cyrillic display face. This was the first of his typefaces transformed in a computer font.
  • Triptihon, Cyrillic, 1962 (Triptych): Another cut face, but this time really taken from the sample made in linocut. The prototypical Cyrillic poster face.
  • Akademija, Cyrillic, 1966 (Academy): This typeface was made for the University and Academy where he worked. It was designed so that it can be used equally well on the paper, metal plates, seals, plaques and everything else Academy needed. He used similar typefaces on book covers and charters, in solemn situations. Rastko: Although one may think it is an ordinary serif face, it contains Cira's specific typographic handwriting. The shapes are almost geometrically reduced thus providing a decorative effect, legibility and possibility to be transferred in all materials..
  • Bolsko, Latin, 1966/67/68: Bol is a small place on the island Brač. This simple condensed headline typeface was designed for pedagogical purposes made to be used for lectures at the Faculty of Applied Arts abd in its graphic identity.
  • Devojačko, Cyrillic, Latin, 1969 (Maiden): A curly affectionate face.
  • Ćirićica, Cyrillic, 1970/72: This typeface was designed as a result of the first research on transforming Serbian handwritten Cyrillic into constructive letterforms. The raw model was the manuscript of the Fourth Gospel (John's Gospel) written at time of Despot Djurdje Barnković (1428) created then by by a Inok from Dalša. The result was a letterform of optimal proportions. The study was made on the occasion of the opening of the new building of the National Library, Republic of Serbia.
  • Vojničko, Cyrillic, 1975 (Soldiers): When designing this typeface Ćirić consulted the book Blue Line of Life (Plava linija života) by Branko V. Radičević, a book about monuments and tombstones posted along roads. It is a sentimental ornamental headline face.
  • Face VMA, Latin, 1976/77: A big project for the Military Medical Academy (abbreviated VMA) in which the letters had to be constructed on grids using rulers and compass only. The result is a Bank Gothic look.
  • Bogradsko, Cyrillic, Latin, 1982: This typeface was used for designing the covers and title of his second book of graphic communications.
  • Duklja, Cyrillic, Latin, 1984: In this case the typeface makes basis of graphic identification. As a model for designing the typeface of Montenegrin Lexicographic Institute was a text from leader seal of Petar, Prince of Duklja. Ira wrote that he enlarged and systematize the letters from the drawing which was made in time when the seal was in good condition and that he wanted to preserve the freshness of irregularities and that there were several weights in each letter while their height is only optically the same. It seems that save for that irregularity which inspired and provocative vagueness this model could not offer many clear stylistic characteristics. But what ira could read from those forms is the language of their linocuts and cut symbols. Thus his personal style naturally added to all that was missing to finish the face. In compromise between typeface with serifs and sanserifs in combination of legibility and universal applicability he saw practical solution for many tasks.
  • Iva's typeface, Cyrillic and Latin, 1986: Rastko: My brother's daughter, Iva, was the first child that joined our family of applied artists. Ćirić immediately awarded himself with the title of granddad, opened the door of his studio and showed her all those games and toys from the world of the applied and other arts. Apart from the crazy games, obligatory signum and many other things Iva got many picture books which her grandpa made from time to time. The picture books contained poems, drawings, pictures and of, course letters. On one of those picture books entitled Grandpa' Stories I have found, so far, the only place where the typeface was used. It is a type of typeface imitating relief forms.
  • Vukov bukvar, Cyrillic, 1987 (Vuk's Abecedary): One of the rare typefaces with lower case letters, this typeface is dignified and named after Vuk Kardžić.
  • Sava's face, Cyrillic, 1987: A gorgeous old slavonic style typeface with upper and lower case.
  • Epitaf, Cyrillic (Epitaph, my name, unknown year): An unpublished typeface found by his sons in the files. Ćirić used it to write names of births and deaths of friends and family members in a notebook. It could be seen as a prototype for tombstones.
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MyFonts: Lino cut typefaces

A small collection of commercial lino cut or woodcut typefaces. [Google] [More]  ⦿

MyFonts: Linocut typefaces

Commercial linocut typefaces include

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Nick Curtis
[Art nouveau typefaces by Nick Curtis]

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Nika Nekrasova

Type designer born in 1986 in Lviv, Ukraine. She created the Kafkaesque woodcut face Messy Linocut 2D (2011, 2D Typo).

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ray Larabie
[Larabie Fonts]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Robert Alonso
[BA Graphics]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Robert Young

Designer in Montreal who studied at UQAM (class of 1997) and created the circle-and-arc typeface Trois Ponts (2011) and the experimental alphabets Octogone (2011) and Paralysis (2011).

In 2013, he added the modular typeface Katoe and the 3d futuristic outline typeface Space. In 2018, he published the free linocut typeface Peter Peich in honor of Paul Peter Piech (b. 1920, Brooklyn, NY, d. 1996, Portcawl), printer and linocut artist. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ursula Hitz
[Letters&Numbers (or: Seagull Hut).]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Veronica Comin

As a student at Les Gobelins in Paris, Veronica Comin designed the Scream-inspired typeface Chido (2017). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Yuriy Skomorokhov

During his studies in Moscow, Yuriy Skomorokhov created a blackletter and an Old Slavonic typeface. [Google] [More]  ⦿