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Gujarati fonts



[Indian languages illustration by Compare Infobase Pvt]

Luc Devroye
McGill University
Montreal, Canada
lucdevroye@gmail.com
http://luc.devroye.org
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ACES Consultants

Indic font makers. They made fonts such as AkrutiOfficeShyama for Gujarati. [Google] [More]  ⦿

aczone

ItxBeng (Bengali, 1997), ItxGuj (Gujarathi, 1997, by Shrikrishna Patil), NCS_CSX+ (URW's Sanskrit, 1994), Xdvng (1997). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ami Shah

Ami Shah (Mumbai) drew various experimental Latin alphabets in 2012. During her studies at IDC, IIT Bombay, she designed IDC Gujarati (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anna Mackova

Anna Sabachova Mackova is an illustrator / designer in Teplice, Czechia. She created Type Diary (2013) in which several hand-drawn alphabets are presented. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anupam

Free truetype fonts (ISFOG family) for Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Gujarati, Tamil, Punjabi, Bengali, Assamese, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Oriya. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ascender Corporation

Elk Grove Village, IL-based company established in 2004, which specializes in font development, licensing and IP protection. It rose from the ashes of a major fire at Agfa/Monotype at the end of 2003. Its founders are Steve Matteson (type designer, formerly with Agfa/Monotype), Thomas Rickner (of Microsoft fame, where he hinted many Microsoft families), Ira Mirochnick (founder and President of Monotype Typography Inc in 1989 (where he was until 2000) and a Senior Vice President and director of Agfa Monotype Corporation (2000-2003), a self-proclaimed expert in font licensing issues and IP protection), and Bill Davis (most recently the Vice President of Marketing for Agfa Monotype). Also included in this group are Josh Hadley, Brian Kraimer, Jim Ford (since 2005), and Jeff Finger (as Chief Research Scientist, since 2006). On December 8, 2010, Ascender was acquired by Monotype for 10.2 million dollars.

Their typefaces include Endurance (2004, Steve Matteson, an "industrial strength" Grotesk designed to compete with Helvetica and Arial; it supports Greek, Cyrillic and East European languages).

In April 2005, Ascender announced that it would start selling the Microsoft font collection, which is possibly their most popular collection to date. They also started selling and licensing IBM's Heisei family of Japanese fonts in April 2005: Heisei Kaku Gothic, Heisei Maru Gothic and Heisei Mincho. Also in 2005, they started distributing Y&Y's Lucida family.

In October 2005, Ascender announced the development of Convection, a font used for Xbox 360 video games. Their South Asian fonts cover Bengali, Devanagari, Gujarati, Gurmukhi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil and Telugu, and include Ascender Uni, Ascender UniDuo and Arial Unicode for general use across all Indic languages, and, in particular, the Microsoft fonts Vrinda (Bengali), Mangal (Devanagari), Shruti (Gujarati), Raavi (Gurmukhi), Tunga (Kannada), Kartika (Malayalam), Latha (Tamil) and Gautami (Telugu). Khmer SBBIC (2011) is a Khmer font at Open Font Library.

It does more type trading and licensing than type creation, although Steve Matteson has contributed fairly well to their new typefaces. Their brand value took a hit when they started selling scrapbook, handwriting and wedding fonts under the name FontMarketplace.com.

Recent contributions: Crestwood (2006, a house face, possibly by Steve Matteson) is an updated version of an elegant semi-formal script typeface originally released by the Ludlow Type Foundry in 1937.

In 2009, they started a subpage called GoudyFonts.Com to sell their Goudy revivals.

In 2010, they announced a new collection of OpenType fonts created specifically for use in Microsoft Office 2010: Comic Sans 2010 (including new italic and bold italic fonts), Trebuchet 2010 (including new black&black italic fonts), Impact 2010, Pokerface 2010, Rebekah 2010 and Rebus Script 2010. Ligatures in Comic Sans?

New releases.

View Ascender's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ashish Kalpund

Born and brought up in Mumbai, Ashish Kalpund graduated from Sir J.J. Institute of Applied Art in 2009. He explains about his ornamental typeface Kundankari (2011): Kundankari, is a prime example where art of jewelry making helps complement the beauty of an Indian woman. Introduced by Mughals, this art form is still prevalent in the states of Rajasthan and Gujarat. This jewelry involves the process of embellishing pearls and precious stones in a frame of goldstring. Another link. In 2010, he made several experimental typefaces. [Google] [More]  ⦿

AsianType Font Foundry

Wide range of Hindi and Gujarati fonts. Download GSOnline, made by Gujarat Samachar. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Asmita

Asmita (1999) was at one poin a free Gujarati truetype font. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Atul and Saurabh

Atul and Saurabh designed the free Gujarati font AU (2001) for Amar Ujala. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Avinash Chopde
[itrans]

[More]  ⦿

Bhagwan Nebhraj Thadani

Winnipeg-based designer of a set of 23 Hindi, Sanskrit, Gujarati, Marathi and Sindhi-Devnagari truetype fonts (20 USD for the set). See also here. The Bhagwan has a Bachelor of Engineering degree (1952) from the University of Poona, India, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree (1965) from Bombay University. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brahmasutra

Site with fonts representing all Indic scripts (all made by C-DAC, Pune): AS-TTDurga-Normal, BN-TTDurga-Normal, DV1-TTYogesh-Normal, DV-TTYogesh-Normal, GJ-TTAvantika-Normal, KN-TTUma-Normal, ML-TTKarthika-Normal, OR-TTSarala-Normal, PN-TTAmar-Normal, TL-TTHemalatha-Normal, TM-TTValluvar-Normal. [Google] [More]  ⦿

CDAC

CDAC is Pune's Center for Development of Advanced Computing. They sell typefaces for all Indic languages. They introduced the Indian Script FOnt Code (ISFOC) standards to enable composing Indian language text. Scripts covered include Devnagari (Hindi, Marathi), Gujarati, Punjabi, Kannada, Bengali, Assamese, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Oriya, Sanskrit, Diacritic Roman, Sinhalese, Bhutanese, Nepali, Tibetan. Useful type catalogs in PDF for Devnagari (Hindi, Marathi), Gujarati, Punjabi, Kannada, Bengali, Assamese, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Oriya, Sanskrit, Diacritic Roman, Sinhalese, Bhutanese, Nepali, Tibetan, PersoArabic (Urdu Open Type, Kashmiri Open Type, Sindhi Open Type, Nashir True Type fonts). Type subpages with catalogs. The Indian Script FOnt Code (ISFOC) standards were invented by CDAC for their software products, Most of their fonts follow this standard. Scans from 1996: Swastik, Zodiac signs, National heroes, Dashavtar. [Google] [More]  ⦿

C-DAC, GIST PUNE: Gujarati

Free Gujarati fonts made in 2005-2006: GIST-GJOTPrachi-Bold, GIST-GJOTPrachi-BoldItalic, GIST-GJOTRishita-Italic, GIST-GJOTRishita-Normal, GIST-GJOTSumitra-Bold, GIST-GJOTSumitra-BoldItalic, GIST-GJOTSumitra-Italic, GIST-GJOTSumitra-Normal, GIST-GJOTVenu-Bold, GIST-GJOTVenu-BoldItalic, GISTGJOTChitraBold, GISTGJOTChitraBoldItalic, GISTGJOTChitraCondenseBoldItalic, GISTGJOTChitraCondensed-Bold, GISTGJOTDamodarBold, GISTGJOTDamodarBoldItalic, GISTGJOTDamodarItalic, GISTGJOTDamodarNormal, GISTGJOTKaminiBold, GISTGJOTKaminiBoldItalic, GISTGJOTKaminiItalic, GISTGJOTKaminiNormal, GISTGJOTKapilaBold, GISTGJOTKapilaBoldItalic, GISTGJOTKapilaItalic, GISTGJOTKapilaNormal, GISTGJOTPiyushBold, GISTGJOTPiyushBoldItalic, GISTGJOTPiyushItalic, GISTGJOTPiyushNormal, GISTGJOTPrabhaBold, GISTGJOTPrabhaBoldItalic, GISTGJOTPrabhaItalic, GISTGJOTPrabhaNormal, GISTGJOTPratikBold, GISTGJOTPratikBoldItalic, GISTGJOTPratikItalic, GISTGJOTPratikNormal, GISTGJOTRohitBold, GISTGJOTRohitBoldItalic, GISTGJOTRohitItalic, GISTGJOTRohitNormal, GISTGJOTShreedeepBold, GISTGJOTShreedeepBoldItalic, GISTGJOTShreedeepItalic, GISTGJOTShreedeepNormal, GISTGJOTSnigdhaBold, GISTGJOTSnigdhaBoldItalic, GISTGJOTSnigdhaItalic, GISTGJOTSnigdhaNormal. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cyberscape Multimedia Limited

Company in Mumbai (with offices in Bangalore) that made these Malayalam fonts: AkrutiMal1, AkrutiMal2 (2002). They also created the Kannada font LangscapeKndPadma. Here, you can download their Devanagari family Gargi, and their Gujarati font family Padmaa. They also made the well-known Akruti font family which can be downloaded here: AkrutiBng2Bold, AkrutiBng2Normal, AkrutiDev2Normal, AkrutiGuj1Normal, AkrutiGujL1Bold, AkrutiKnd1Bold, AkrutiKnd1Normal, AkrutiMal2Bold, AkrutiMal2Normal, AkrutiOri1Bold, AkrutiOri1Normal, AkrutiPnj2Bold, AkrutiPnj2Normal, AkrutiTlg2Bold, AkrutiTlg2Normal, AkrutiTml1Bold, AkrutiTml1Normal. These fonts cover Devanagari, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali, Oriya, and Gurumukhi. [Google] [More]  ⦿

David Brezina

Czech designer (b. Brno) who graduated in Informatics at the Masaryk University in Brno in 2005, spent a term at the Denmark's Designskole in Copenhagen in 2004 and graduated with distinction from the MA in Typeface Design at the University of Reading in 2007, where he wrote a thesis on his typefaces called Skolar and Surat. Skolar won an award at Paratype K2009. It was designed with scholarly and multilingual publications in mind. See, e.g., Skolar Devanagari.

From 2004 to 2007, he ran his own design studio DAVI, with projects in graphic, web and interface design. Back in Brno, he worked with Tiro Typeworks (Canada) as an associate designer. At ATypI 2008 in St. Petersburg, he spoke about multi-script typography.

His typefaces include

  • CODAN (2005): a typeface inspired by the city of Copenhagen.
  • Yunnan (2004): oriental simulation face. Discussion on typophile.
  • Skolar and Surat (2008). Skolar was designed for multilingual scientific publications and is a serifed face in the Menhart tradition. It was published in 2009 by Type Together, and it is also listed by Rosetta Type. Skolar Basic (2009, Type Together) is the official name of this 6-style text family. Surat is an accompanying Gujarati family. Related to that, he wrote The evolution of the Gujarati typographic script (2007, University of Reading). Rosetta writes: Skolar was originally designed for academic publications: its vast character set caters for 90+ Latin-script languages, and its Greek and Cyrillic extensions together with Latin transliterations add support for another 70+ languages. All scripts are available with small caps, superior and inferior letters, five sets of numerals and alternate character forms (see note about the versions below). A comprehensive set of arrows (easily accessed via OpenType) and bullets round off the character set to meet the needs of even the most complex editorial and academic text settings. The light and extrabold styles (upright and italics) were designed with help from Anna Giedrys and Elena Schneider. Skolar's Cyrillic harmonises well with the Latin in its careful balance of distinctive styling and solid performance. Designed in consultation with Alexandra Korolkova, it supports most Slavic languages as well as many others like Kazakh and Mongolian. Additionally, Skolar includes language-specific forms for Serbian and Bulgarian. The Greek is a modern interpretation of the classic styles found in academic works, and is characterised by lively, fluid forms and varying stress. It includes both monotonic and polytonic Greek, and was designed in consultation with Irene Vlachou and Gerry Leonidas. Complete Skolar family also supports Indic scripts Devanagari and Gujarati distributed separately. Skolar has received international praise at the 2008 ED Awards, and was also shortlisted as one of the best typefaces that year by I LOVE TYPOGRAPHY. In 2009, the Cyrillic was awarded a Special Diploma at the international type design competition Modern Cyrillic, and won the first prize in Granshan's Cyrillic text type category.

Blog. Myfonts link. Klingspor link. Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam on the topic of multilingual type design. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Debian Indic Fonts

Free Indic fonts that come with Debian:

  • Bengali: Ani (2002, by Anirban Mitra), JamrulNormal (2004, by Deepayan Sarkar), LikhanNormal (2003, Deepayan Sarkar), Lohit-Bengali (2003, Automatic Control Equipments, Pune), Mitra (2002), muktinarrow (2003, Mukta Bangla Font Project), muktinarrowbold (2003, Mukta Bangla Font Project).
  • Devanagari: Gargi_1.7 (2005, by Prof Jitendra Shah, IndicTrans Team; matching English glyphs by URW++, Cyrillic glyphs added by Valek Filippov in 2002), Lohit-Hindi (2003, Automatic Control Equipments, Pune).
  • Gujarati: aakar-MagNet (2003, by MagNet Web Publishing in Mumbai), Lohit-Gujarati (2001, Automatic Control Equipments, Pune), padmaa-Bold (2003, Cyberscape Multimedia in Bangalaore), padmaa-Medium (2003, Cyberscape Multimedia in Bangalaore), Rekha-medium (2003, by MagNet Web Publishing in Mumbai).
  • Kannada: Sampige.
  • Malayalam: malayalam, RachanaMedium (2004, by Hussain KH, and Chitrajan R (Rachana)).
  • Oriya: utkal (2003, Andy White and Rajesh Pradhan).
  • Punjabi: Lohit-Punjabi (2001, Automatic Control Equipments, Pune), Saab (2004, by Bhupinder Singh and Sukhjinder Sidhu). The Opentype version of Saab is here.
  • Tamil: Lohit-Tamil (2001, Automatic Control Equipments, Pune).
  • Telugu: Pothana2000 (2000-2005, by K. Desikachary), TAMu_Kadambri-Regular (1999, by Kamban Software), TAMu_Kalyani (1999, by Kamban Software), TAMu_Maduram (1999, by Kamban Software), TSCu_Comic (1999, by Tukalram Gopalrao), TSCu_Paranar-Bold (1999, by Tukalram Gopalrao), TSCu_Paranar-Italic (1999, by Tukalram Gopalrao), TSCu_Paranar (1999, by Tukalram Gopalrao), TSCu_Times (1999, by Tukalram Gopalrao), Vemana2000 (2005, by K. Desikachary).
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Dot Georgoulas

Australian graduate of the MATD program at the University of Reading in 2012. Dot's graduation typeface is Nari (2012), which is a stylish serifed family for Latin and Gujarati. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Download Gujarati Fonts

Many free Gujarati truetype fonts: AkrutiOfficePriyaNormal, LangscapeDevPriyaNormal, LangscapeShyamaNormal, AkrutiGujWeb, AkrutiOfficePriyaNormal, AkrutiOfficeShyamaNormal, AKLitePriyaNormal, AKLiteShyamaNormal, AkrutiDevPriyaNormal, AkrutiGujShyamaNormal. Fonts by Apurva Ashar and/or ACES Consultants. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Download Gujarati Fonts

Free Gujarati truetype and type 1 font Sambhaav, by Hitarth Consultants, Nilam Doctor. Sambhaav is also the name of the newspaper the font is used for. [Google] [More]  ⦿

EK Type
[Sarang Kulkarni]

Type design collective in India, est. 2013, managed by Sarang Kulkarni (Mumbai). Typefaces from 2011 by Hanif Kureshi include Painter Umesh, Painter Kafeel, and Painter Suhail.

In 2013, Girish Dalvi and Yashodeep Gholap co-designed Ek Devanagari at Ek Type for Hindi, Marathi, Sanskrit, Konkani and Nepali. It is a contemporary, humanist, monolinear typeface available in seven weights. Its companion, also designed by them, is the humanist sans typeface family Ek Latin (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Elmar Kniprath
[Indolipi]

[More]  ⦿

Elmar Kniprath
[Elmar's Indic]

[More]  ⦿

Elmar's Indic
[Elmar Kniprath]

A free package by Elmar Kniprath (2001) for writing Assamese, Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali, Panjabi, Rajasthani, Sanskrit, Sinhalese, Tamil, Telugu and Latin transliteration. Fonts included are e-Asamiya, e-Bengali, e-Gujarati, e-IndicSerif-Bold, e-IndicSerif, e-Kannada, e-Latin, e-Malayalam, e-Nagari, e-Panjabi, e-Sinhala, e-Tamil, e-Telugu. [Google] [More]  ⦿

FSF India

The free software foundation of India, in conjunction with Cyberscape Multimedia Limited, Bangalore (developers of Akruti Software for Indian Languages) have released a set of TTF fonts for nine Indian scripts (Devanagari, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali, Oriya, and Gurumukhi) under the GNU General Public License (GPL). Direct download page. Font names: AkrutiBng1Normal, AkrutiBng2Bold, AkrutiBng2Bold, AkrutiBng2Normal, AkrutiDev1Bold, AkrutiDev1Normal, AkrutiDev2Normal, AkrutiGuj1Bold, AkrutiGuj1Normal, AkrutiGuj2Bold, AkrutiGuj2Normal, AkrutiKnd1Bold, AkrutiKnd1Normal, AkrutiKnd2Bold, AkrutiKnd2Normal, AkrutiMal1Bold, AkrutiMal1Normal, AkrutiMal2Bold, AkrutiMal2Normal, AkrutiMal2Normal, AkrutiOri1Bold, AkrutiOri1Normal, AkrutiOri2Bold, AkrutiOri2Normal, AkrutiPnj1Bold, AkrutiPnj1Normal, AkrutiPnj2Bold, AkrutiPnj2Normal, AkrutiTlg1Bold, AkrutiTlg1Normal, AkrutiTlg2Bold, AkrutiTlg2Normal, AkrutiTml1Bold, AkrutiTml1Bold, AkrutiTml1Normal, AkrutiTml1Normal, AkrutiTml2Bold, AkrutiTml2Bold, AkrutiTml2Normal, AkrutiTml2Normal. [Google] [More]  ⦿

G. Nagarjuna
[Samyak]

[More]  ⦿

GIST Downloads

This was a sub-site of C-DAC, India's main commercial font and language software maker. It used to have free Tibetan and Gujarati fonts. For a while, it offered commercial products for all Indic languages, including Tibetan and Nepali. Then, finally, it went the way of all big companies--unreadable pages with hard-to-find stuff, often hidden in PDF files. For good old times' sake, here are the font names (published as a courtesy to them--wish they would do this themselves): AS-Abhijit, AS-Amrut, AS-Arbindo, AS-Bidisha, AS-Bipin, AS-Debashish, AS-Durga, AS-Kaali, AS-Kailash, AS-Maya, AS-Mrinal, AS-Parshuram, AS-SantoshItalic, AS-Satyajit, AS-Savita, AS-Shyamal, AS-Sushmita, AS-Tagore, BN-Abhijit, BN-Amrut, BN-Arbindo, BN-Bidisha (see also here), BN-Bipin, BN-Debashish, BN-Durga, BN-Kaali, BN-Kailash, BN-Maya, BN-Mrinal, BN-Parshuram, BN-Santosh, BN-Satyajit, BN-Savita, BN-Shyamal, BN-Sushmita, BN-Tagore, DR-Kunzang, DV-Aakash, DV-Aishwarya, DV-Ajay, DV-Akshar, DV-Alankar, DV-Amruta, DV-Aniket, DV-Anjali, DV-Basant, DV-Bhargav, DV-Bhima, DV-Brinda, DV-Chhaya, DV-Devendra, DV-Dhruv, DV-Diwakar, DV-Gandhar, DV-Ganesh, DV-Hemant, DV-Jamuna, DV-Jayesh, DV-Jivan, DV-Kartik, DV-Kishor, DV-Latika, DV-Madhu, DV-Makarand, DV-Manisha, DV-Manohar, DV-Mayur, DV-Megha, DV-Meghadoot) def, DV-Mohini, DV-Nandan, DV-Natraj, DV-Ninad, DV-Nisha, DV-Prakash, DV-Pramod, DV-Preetam, DV-Purva, DV-Radhika, DV-Raghav, DV-Rahul, DV-Rajashri, DV-Rakesh, DV-Raman, DV-Ranjita, DV-Rohini, DV-Sachin, DV-Sagar, DV-Sajan, DV-Samata, DV-Samir, DV-Sanket, DV-Shalaka, DV-Sharad, DV-Shefali, DV-Shishir, DV-Shital, DV-Shridhar, DV-Shrikant, DV-Subodh, DV-Sumeet, DV-Surekh, DV-Surkhiyan, DV-Sushil, DV-Swapnil, DV-Swaraj, DV-Vallabh, DV-Varun, DV-Vasuki, DV-Vasundhara, DV-Vijay, DV-Vimal, DV-Vinit, DV-Vishakha, DV-Yamini, DV-Yogesh, DV-Yogesh, GJ-Anamika, GJ-Anand, GJ-Avantika, GJ-Balram, GJ-Bela, GJ-Chitra, GJ-Damodar, GJ-Devaki, GJ-Dinakar, GJ-Dwarika, GJ-Dynamic, GJ-Gagan, GJ-Gopika, GJ-Kalpana, GJ-Kamini, GJ-Kanoj, GJ-Kapila, GJ-Kaumudi, GJ-Keshav, GJ-Kirit, GJ-Kishan, GJ-Krishna, GJ-Krishna, GJ-Kusum, GJ-Madan, GJ-Manasi, GJ-Mangal, GJ-Mira, GJ-Mohan, GJ-Mukul, GJ-Nayan, GJ-Nirmal, GJ-Piyush, GJ-Prabha, GJ-Pratik, GJ-Purnima, GJ-Radhey, GJ-Ritesh, GJ-Rohini, GJ-Rohit, GJ-Sabarmati, GJ-Sandeep, GJ-Shila, GJ-Shreedeep, GJ-Shrinath, GJ-Snigdha, GJ-Sucheta, GJ-Sujit, GJ-Swati, GJ-Taapi, GJ-Tara, GJ-Vidya, GJ-Yashoda, ISFOC-BR1, ISFOC-BR2, ISFOC-BR3, ISFOC-BR7, ISFOC-BR8, KN-Basava, KN-Bharat, KN-Brindavan, KN-Chinmaya, KN-Kamala, KN-Kamanna, KN-Kasturi, KN-Kaveri, KN-Nandi, KN-Padmini, KN-Pampa, KN-Pankaj, KN-Radhey, KN-Ragini, KN-Rajani, KN-Rajeshwari, KN-Ranna, KN-Seema, KN-Seema-Light, KN-Seema, KN-Seeta, KN-Shankar, KN-Shravan, KN-Smita, KN-Sumitra, KN-Uma, KN-Vatapi, ML-Aathira, ML-Ambili, ML-Anakha, ML-Anjali, ML-Aparna, ML-Ashtamudi, ML-Aswathi, ML-Atchu, ML-AyilyamBold, ML-BeckalBold, ML-Bhavana, ML-Chandrika, ML-Chithira, ML-Devika, ML-Gauri, ML-Geethika, ML-Gopika, ML-Guruvayur, ML-Indulekha, ML-Jaya, ML-Jyothy, ML-Jyotsna, ML-Kala, ML-Kamini, ML-Kanika, ML-Karthika, ML-Kaumudi, ML-Keerthi, ML-Leela, ML-Malavika, ML-Mammiyoor, ML-Mayoori, ML-Nalini, ML-Nandini, ML-Nanditha, ML-Nila, ML-Onam, ML-Periyar, ML-Pooram, ML-Poornima, ML-Ravivarma, ML-Revathi, ML-Rohini, ML-Sabari, ML-Sankara, ML-Sarada, ML-Sruthy, ML-Sugatha, ML-Suparna, ML-Surya, ML-SwathyBold, ML-Thakazhi, ML-Theyyam, ML-Thiruvathira, ML-Thunchan, ML-Vaisali, ML-Varsha, ML-Vinay, ML-Visakham, ML-Vishu, ML-Yashasri, PN-Amar, PN-Baisakhi, PN-Baljit, PN-Bishan, PN-Chandra, PN-Chetan, PN-Deeler, PN-Dipak, PN-Gurudev, PN-Hira, PN-Jasbir, PN-Jasjit, PN-Jaspal, PN-Jeevan, PN-Joginder, PN-Kanvaljit, PN-Kapil, PN-Karan, PN-Karishma, PN-Kavita, PN-Komal, PN-Manjit, PN-Nanak, PN-Nitu, PN-Pratap, PN-Randhir, PN-Satabir, PN-Sonam, PN-Sukhabir, PN-Sushil, SD-Natraj, SD-Surekh, SH-Harmony, SH-Namal, SY25-Election, SY30-Jain, SY31-Mudras, SY32-Music, TB-Youtso (for Tibetan), TB1-Youtso, TL-Amma, TL-Anuradha, TL-Atreya, TL-Charminar, TL-Godavari, TL-Gurazada-BoIdItalic, TL-Harshapriya, TL-Hemalatha, TL-Krishna, TL-Nannaya, TL-Pratima, TL-Rayancha, TL-Tanmayi, TL-Tikkana, TL-Vennela, TL-Vishaka, TM-Abhirami, TM-Amala, TM-Appar, TM-Archana, TM-Aruna, TM-Arunagiri, TM-Avvai, TM-Bharathi, TM-Chanakya, TM-Chandra, TM-Chetan, TM-Chitra, TM-Gopur, TM-Heena, TM-Hema, TM-Ilango, TM-Kalyani, TM-Kamal, TM-Kamban, TM-Kannadasan, TM-Kapilan, TM-Komala, TM-Krishna, TM-Lalitha, TM-Lathika, TM-Madhu, TM-Madhuram, TM-Nakkeran, TM-Nambi, TM-Neha, TM-Padma, TM-Pattinathar, TM-Poornima, TM-Poovai, TM-Radhika, TM-Rajarajan, TM-Rama, TM-Ramiya, TM-Ratna, TM-Ravindra, TM-Rekha, TM-Seema, TM-Shiva, TM-Sudhir, TM-Swetha, TM-Umesh, TM-Valluvar, TM-Vaman, TM-Venu, TM-Virendra, Tarpobane-Black. [Google] [More]  ⦿

GNU Freefont (or: Free UCS Outline Fonts)
[Steve White]

The GNU Freefont is continuously being updated to become a large useful Unicode monster. GNU FreeFont is a free family of scalable outline fonts, suitable for general use on computers and for desktop publishing. It is Unicode-encoded for compatability with all modern operating systems. There are serif, Sans and Mono subfamilies. Also called the "Free UCS Outline Fonts", this project is part of the larger Free Software Foundation. Scans: FreeMono, FreeMonoBold, FreeMonoBoldOblique, FreeMonoOblique, FreeSans, FreeSansBold, FreeSansBoldOblique, FreeSansOblique, FreeSerif, FreeSerifBold, FreeSerifBoldItalic, FreeSerifItalic. The original head honcho was Primoz Peterlin, the coordinator at the Institute of Biophysics of the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. In 2008, Steve White took over. Participants and credits, as of the end of 2010, with Unicode range responsibilities:

  • URW++ Design&Development GmbH. URW++ donated a set of 35 core PostScript Type 1 fonts to the Ghostscript project.
    • Basic Latin (U+0041-U+007A)
    • Latin-1 Supplement (U+00C0-U+00FF)
    • Latin Extended-A (U+0100-U+017F)
    • Spacing Modifier Letters (U+02B0-U+02FF)
    • Mathematical Operators (U+2200-U+22FF)
    • Block Elements (U+2580-U+259F)
    • Dingbats (U+2700-U+27BF)
  • Yannis Haralambous and John Plaice. Yannis Haralambous and John Plaice are the authors of Omega typesetting system, which is an extension of TeX. Its first release, aims primarily at improving TeX's multilingual abilities. In Omega all characters and pointers into data-structures are 16-bit wide, instead of 8-bit, thereby eliminating many of the trivial limitations of TeX. Omega also allows multiple input and output character sets, and uses programmable filters to translate from one encoding to another, to perform contextual analysis, etc. Internally, Omega uses the universal 16-bit Unicode standard character set, based on ISO-10646. These improvements not only make it a lot easier for TeX users to cope with multiple or complex languages, like Arabic, Indic, Khmer, Chinese, Japanese or Korean, in one document, but will also form the basis for future developments in other areas, such as native color support and hypertext features. ... Fonts for UT1 (omlgc family) and UT2 (omah family) are under development: these fonts are in PostScript format and visually close to Times and Helvetica font families.
    • Latin Extended-B (U+0180-U+024F)
    • IPA Extensions (U+0250-U+02AF)
    • Greek (U+0370-U+03FF)
    • Armenian (U+0530-U+058F)
    • Hebrew (U+0590-U+05FF)
    • Arabic (U+0600-U+06FF)
    • Currency Symbols (U+20A0-U+20CF)
    • Arabic Presentation Forms-A (U+FB50-U+FDFF)
    • Arabic Presentation Forms-B (U+FE70-U+FEFF)
  • Yannis Haralambous and Wellcome Institute. In 1994, The Wellcome Library The Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine 183 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE, England, commissioned Mr. Haralambous to produce a Sinhalese font for them. We have received 03/09 official notice from Robert Kiley, Head of e-Strategy for the Wellcome Library, that Yannis' font could be included in GNU FreeFont under its GNU license: Sinhala (U+0D80-U+0DFF).
  • Young U. Ryu at the University of Texas at Dallas is the author of Txfonts, a set of mathematical symbols designed to accompany text typeset in Times or its variants. In the documentation, Young adresses the design of mathematical symbols: "The Adobe Times fonts are thicker than the CM fonts. Designing math fonts for Times based on the rule thickness of Times =,, +, /, <, etc. would result in too thick math symbols, in my opinion. In the TX fonts, these glyphs are thinner than those of original Times fonts. That is, the rule thickness of these glyphs is around 85% of that of the Times fonts, but still thicker than that of the CM fonts." Ranges: Arrows (U+2190-U+21FF), Mathematical Symbols (U+2200-U+22FF).
  • Valek Filippov added Cyrillic glyphs and composite Latin Extended A to the whole set of the abovementioned URW set of 35 PostScript core fonts, Ranges: Latin Extended-A (U+0100-U+017F), Cyrillic (U+0400-U+04FF).
  • Wadalab Kanji Comittee. Between April 1990 and March 1992, Wadalab Kanji Comittee put together a series of scalable font files with Japanese scripts, in four forms: Sai Micho, Chu Mincho, Cho Kaku and Saimaru. The font files were written in custom file format, while tools for conversion into Metafont and PostScript Type 1 were also supplied. The Wadalab Kanji Comittee has later been dismissed, and the resulting files can be now found on the FTP server of the Depertment of Mathematical Engineering and Information Physics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo: Hiragana (U+3040-U+309F), Katakana (U+30A0-U+30FF). Note that some time around 2009, the hiragana and katakana ranges were deleted.
  • Angelo Haritsis has compiled a set of Greek type 1 fonts. The glyphs from this source has been used to compose Greek glyphs in FreeSans and FreeMono. Greek (U+0370-U+03FF).
  • Yannis Haralambous and Virach Sornlertlamvanich. In 1999, Yannis Haralambous and Virach Sornlertlamvanich made a set of glyphs covering the Thai national standard Nf3, in both upright and slanted shape. Range: Thai (U+0E00-U+0E7F).
  • Shaheed Haque has developed a basic set of basic Bengali glyphs (without ligatures), using ISO10646 encoding. Range: Bengali (U+0980-U+09FF).
  • Sam Stepanyan created a set of Armenian sans serif glyphs visually compatible with Helvetica or Arial. Range: Armenian (U+0530-U+058F).
  • Mohamed Ishan has started a Thaana Unicode Project. Range: Thaana (U+0780-U+07BF).
  • Sushant Kumar Dash has created a font in his mother tongue, Oriya: Oriya (U+0B00-U+0B7F). But Freefont has dropped Oriya because of the absence of font features neccessary for display of text in Oriya.
  • Harsh Kumar has started BharatBhasha for these ranges:
    • Devanagari (U+0900-U+097F)
    • Bengali (U+0980-U+09FF)
    • Gurmukhi (U+0A00-U+0A7F)
    • Gujarati (U+0A80-U+0AFF)
  • Prasad A. Chodavarapu created Tikkana, a Telugu font family: Telugu (U+0C00-U+0C7F). It was originally included in GNU Freefont, but supoort for Telugu was later dropped altogether from the GNU Freefont project.
  • Frans Velthuis and Anshuman Pandey. In 1991, Frans Velthuis from the Groningen University, The Netherlands, released a Devanagari font as Metafont source, available under the terms of GNU GPL. Later, Anshuman Pandey from Washington University in Seattle, took over the maintenance of font. Fonts can be found on CTAN. This font was converted the font to Type 1 format using Peter Szabo's TeXtrace and removed some redundant control points with PfaEdit. Range: Devanagari (U+0900-U+097F).
  • Hardip Singh Pannu. In 1991, Hardip Singh Pannu has created a free Gurmukhi TrueType font, available as regular, bold, oblique and bold oblique form. Range: Gurmukhi (U+0A00-U+0A7F).
  • Jeroen Hellingman (The Netherlands) created a set of Malayalam metafonts in 1994, and a set of Oriya metafonts in 1996. Malayalam fonts were created as uniform stroke only, while Oriya metafonts exist in both uniform and modulated stroke. From private communication: "It is my intention to release the fonts under GPL, but not all copies around have this notice on them." Metafonts can be found here and here. Ranges: Oriya (U+0B00-U+0B7F), Malayalam (U+0D00-U+0D7F). Oriya was subsequently dropped from the Freefont project.
  • Thomas Ridgeway, then at the Humanities And Arts Computing Center, Washington University, Seattle, USA, (now defunct), created a Tamil metafont in 1990. Anshuman Pandey from the same university took over the maintenance of font. Fonts can be found at CTAN and cover Tamil (U+0B80-U+0BFF).
  • Berhanu Beyene, Prof. Dr. Manfred Kudlek, Olaf Kummer, and Jochen Metzinger from the Theoretical Foundations of Computer Science, University of Hamburg, prepared a set of Ethiopic metafonts. They also maintain the home page on the Ethiopic font project. Someone converted the fonts to Type 1 format using TeXtrace, and removed some redundant control points with PfaEdit. Range: Ethiopic (U+1200-U+137F).
  • Maxim Iorsh. In 2002, Maxim Iorsh started the Culmus project, aiming at providing Hebrew-speaking Linux and Unix community with a basic collection of Hebrew fonts for X Windows. The fonts are visually compatible with URW++ Century Schoolbook L, URW++ Nimbus Sans L and URW++ Nimbus Mono L families, respectively. Range: Hebrew (U+0590-U+05FF).
  • Vyacheslav Dikonov made a Braille unicode font that could be merged with the UCS fonts to fill the 2800-28FF range completely (uniform scaling is possible to adapt it to any cell size). He also contributed a free Syriac font, whose glyphs (about half of them) are borrowed from the free Carlo Ator font. Vyacheslav also filled in a few missing spots in the U+2000-U+27FF area, e.g., the box drawing section, sets of subscript and superscript digits and capital Roman numbers. Ranges: Syriac (U+0700-U+074A), Box Drawing (U+2500-U+257F), Braille (U+2800-U+28FF).
  • Panayotis Katsaloulis helped fixing Greek accents in the Greek Extended area: (U+1F00-U+1FFF).
  • M.S. Sridhar. M/S Cyberscape Multimedia Limited, Mumbai, developers of Akruti Software for Indian Languages (http://www.akruti.com/), have released a set of TTF fonts for nine Indian scripts (Devanagari, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali, Oriya, and Gurumukhi) under the GNU General Public License (GPL). You can download the fonts from the Free Software Foundation of India WWW site. Their original contributions to Freefont were
    • Devanagari (U+0900-U+097F)
    • Bengali (U+0980-U+09FF)
    • Gurmukhi (U+0A00-U+0A7F)
    • Gujarati (U+0A80-U+0AFF)
    • Oriya (U+0B00-U+0B7F)
    • Tamil (U+0B80-U+0BFF)
    • Telugu (U+0C00-U+0C7F)
    • Kannada (U+0C80-U+0CFF)
    • Malayalam (U+0D00-U+0D7F)
    Oriya, Kannada and Telugu were dropped from the GNU Freefont project.
  • DMS Electronics, The Sri Lanka Tipitaka Project, and Noah Levitt. Noah Levitt found out that the Sinhalese fonts available on the site metta.lk are released under GNU GPL. These glyphs were later replaced by those from the LKLUG font. Finally the range was completely replaced by glyphs from the sinh TeX font, with much help and advice from Harshula Jayasuriya. Range: Sinhala (U+0D80-U+0DFF).
  • Daniel Shurovich Chirkov. Dan Chirkov updated the FreeSerif font with the missing Cyrillic glyphs needed for conformance to Unicode 3.2. The effort is part of the Slavjanskij package for Mac OS X. range: Cyrillic (U+0400-U+04FF).
  • Abbas Izad. Responsible for Arabic (U+0600-U+06FF), Arabic Presentation Forms-A, (U+FB50-U+FDFF), Arabic Presentation Forms-B (U+FE70-U+FEFF).
  • Denis Jacquerye added new glyphs and corrected existing ones in the Latin Extended-B (U+0180-U+024F) and IPA Extensions (U+0250-U+02AF) ranges.
  • K.H. Hussain and R. Chitrajan. Rachana in Malayalam means to write, to create. Rachana Akshara Vedi, a team of socially committed information technology professionals and philologists, has applied developments in computer technology and desktop publishing to resurrect the Malayalam language from the disorder, fragmentation and degeneration it had suffered since the attempt to adapt the Malayalam script for using with a regular mechanical typewriter, which took place in 1967-69. K.H. Hussein at the Kerala Forest Research Institute has released "Rachana Normal" fonts with approximately 900 glyphs required to typeset traditional Malayalam. R. Chitrajan apparently encoded the glyphs in the OpenType table. In 2008, the Malayalam ranges in FreeSerif were updated under the advise and supervision of Hiran Venugopalan of Swathanthra Malayalam Computing, to reflect the revised edition Rachana_04. Range: Malayalam (U+0D00-U+0D7F).
  • Solaiman Karim filled in Bengali (U+0980-U+09FF). Solaiman Karim has developed several OpenType Bangla fonts and released them under GNU GPL.
  • Sonali Sonania and Monika Shah covered Devanagari (U+0900-U+097F) and Gujarati (U+0A80-U+0AFF). Glyphs were drawn by Cyberscape Multimedia Ltd., #101, Mahalakshmi Mansion 21st Main 22nd "A" Cross Banashankari 2nd stage Banglore 560070, India. Converted to OTF by IndicTrans Team, Powai, Mumbai, lead by Prof. Jitendra Shah. Maintained by Monika Shah and Sonali Sonania of janabhaaratii Team, C-DAC, Mumbai. This font is released under GPL by Dr. Alka Irani and Prof Jitendra Shah, janabhaaratii Team, C-DAC, Mumabi. janabhaaratii is localisation project at C-DAC Mumbai (formerly National Centre for Software Technology); funded by TDIL, Govt. of India.
  • Pravin Satpute, Bageshri Salvi, Rahul Bhalerao and Sandeep Shedmake added these Indic language cranges:
    • Devanagari (U+0900-U+097F)
    • Gujarati (U+0A80-U+0AFF)
    • Oriya (U+0B00-U+0B7F)
    • Malayalam (U+0D00-U+0D7F)
    • Tamil (U+0B80-U+0BFF)
    In December 2005 the team at www.gnowledge.org released a set of two Unicode pan-Indic fonts: "Samyak" and "Samyak Sans". "Samyak" font belongs to serif style and is an original work of the team; "Samyak Sans" font belongs to sans serif style and is actually a compilation of already released Indic fonts (Gargi, Padma, Mukti, Utkal, Akruti and ThendralUni). Both fonts are based on Unicode standard. You can download the font files separately. Note that Oriya was dropped from the Freefont project.
  • Kulbir Singh Thind added Gurmukhi (U+0A00-U+0A7F). Dr. Kulbir Singh Thind designed a set of Gurmukhi Unicode fonts, AnmolUni and AnmolUni-Bold, which are available under the terms of GNU license from the Punjabu Computing Resource Center.
  • Gia Shervashidze added Georgian (U+10A0-U+10FF). Starting in mid-1990s, Gia Shervashidze designed many Unicode-compliant Georgian fonts: Times New Roman Georgian, Arial Georgian, Courier New Georgian.
  • Daniel Johnson. Created by hand a Cherokee range specially for FreeFont to be "in line with the classic Cherokee typefaces used in 19th century printing", but also to fit well with ranges previously in FreeFont. Then he made Unified Canadian Syllabics in Sans, and a Cherokee and Kayah Li in Mono! And never to be outdone by himself, then did UCAS Extended and Osmanya.... What next?
    • Armenian (serif) (U+0530-U+058F)
    • Cherokee (U+13A0-U+13FF)
    • Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics (U+1400-U+167F)
    • UCAS Extended (U+18B0-U+18F5)
    • Kayah Li (U+A900-U+A92F)
    • Tifinagh (U+2D30-U+2D7F)
    • Vai (U+A500-U+A62B)
    • Latin Extended-D (Mayanist letters) (U+A720-U+A7FF)
    • Osmanya (U+10480-U+104a7)
  • George Douros, the creator of several fonts focusing on ancient scripts and symbols. Many of the glyphs are created by making outlines from scanned images of ancient sources.
    • Aegean: Phoenecian (U+10900-U+1091F).
    • Analecta: Gothic (U+10330-U+1034F)
    • Musical: Byzantine (U+1D000-U+1D0FF)&Western (U+1D100-U+1D1DF)
    • Unicode: many miscellaneous symbols, miscellaneous technical, supplemental symbols, and mathematical alphanumeric symbols (U+1D400-U+1D7FF), Mah Jong (U+1F000-U+1F02B), and the outline of the domino (U+1F030-U+1F093).
  • Steve White filled in a lot of missing characters, got some font features working, left fingerprints almost everywhere, and is responsible for these blocks: Glagolitic (U+2C00-U+2C5F), Coptic (U+2C80-U+2CFF).
  • Pavel Skrylev is responsible for Cyrillic Extended-A (U+2DEO-U+2DFF) as well as many of the additions to Cyrillic Extended-B (U+A640-U+A65F).
  • Mark Williamson made the MPH 2 Damase font, from which these ranges were taken:
    • Hanunóo (U+1720-U+173F)
    • Buginese (U+1A00-U+1A1F)
    • Tai Le (U+1950-U+197F)
    • Ugaritic (U+10380-U+1039F)
    • Old Persian (U+103A0-U+103DF)
  • Primoz Peterlin filled in missing glyphs here and there (e.g., Latin Extended-B and IPA Extensions ranges in the FreeMono family), and created the following UCS blocks:
    • Latin Extended-B (U+0180-U+024F)
    • IPA Extensions (U+0250-U+02AF)
    • Arrows (U+2190-U+21FF)
    • Box Drawing (U+2500-U+257F)
    • Block Elements (U+2580-U+259F)
    • Geometrical Shapes (U+25A0-U+25FF)
  • Jacob Poon submitted a very thorough survey of glyph problems and other suggestions.
  • Alexey Kryukov made the TemporaLCGUni fonts, based on the URW++ fonts, from which at one point FreeSerif Cyrillic, and some of the Greek, was drawn. He also provided valuable direction about Cyrillic and Greek typesetting.
  • The Sinhala font project has taken the glyphs from Yannis Haralambous' Sinhala font, to produce a Unicode TrueType font, LKLUG. These glyphs were for a while included in FreeFont: Sinhala (U+0D80-U+0DFF).

Fontspace link. Download link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gujafont

A free Gujarati font made in 1998. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gujarat Samachar

Gujarati font GS Online for the Gujarat Samachar newspaper. TrueType for Mac and PC. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gujarat Samachar Online

The free Gujarati truetype font Gopika (1997). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gunjan Panchal

Vadodara, India-based creator of several Gujarati display typefaces (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gupta Vishnu
[Saraswati Soft]

[More]  ⦿

Harsh Kumar

Indian type designer, who worked at some point for the Konkan Railway Corporation. He created free Marathi / Hindi truetype fonts, Shivaji and Shusha in the 1990s. He also made the fonts Vakil (Gujarathi) and Sandhu (Gurmukhi). Another source. Harsh Kumar has started BharatBhasha and contributed to the GNU Freefont project for these ranges:

  • Devanagari (U+0900-U+097F)
  • Bengali (U+0980-U+09FF)
  • Gurmukhi (U+0A00-U+0A7F)
  • Gujarati (U+0A80-U+0AFF)
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Hindi Rinny

Lively South Asian type blog covering Bengali, Devanagari, Gujarati, Gurmukhi, Kannada, Malayalam, Oriya, Perso-Arabic, Sinhala, Tamil, Telugu, Tibetan. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hitarth Guj Preyas

The free Hitarth Guj Preyas fonts for Gujarati. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Indian Type Foundry (ITF)
[Satya N. Rajpurohit]

ITF is located in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. It was co-founded in 2009 by Peter Bilak (Typotheque) partnered with Rajesh Kejriwal (Kyoorius Exchange) and Satya Rajpurohit. They intend to cover Non-Latin and Latin fonts. Their first type family was Fedra Hindi (2010, by Bilak and Rajpurohit).

In 2010, Satya N. Rajpurohit published the Kohinoor family for Latin, Devanagari and Tamil. Kohinoor Gurmukhi followed in 2011. The long term plan is to make Kohinoor support all official writing scripts of India. Kohinoor Gujarati is at the last stage of development and will be published soon. Kohinoor Bengali, Kohinoor Malayalam, and Kohinoor Kannada are scheduled for 2012.

ITF Devanagari was published in 2011.

In 2013, Satya Rajpurohit created the Latin typefaces Pilcrow and Pilcrow Soft. Also in 2013, Peter Bilak left ITF to pursue other interests.

In 2014, Sanchit Sawaria and Jyotish Sonowal finished the free Google Web Font Khand, an 8-style family of compact mono-linear fonts with very open counter forms. Developed for display typography, the family is primarily intended for headline usage. Its Latin is from Satya Rajpurohit, and Khnad carries the Indian Type Foundry label. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

indianlanguages.com

Jump page for most Indian languages: Telugu, Bengali, Gurmukhi, Oriya, Malayalam, Gujurati, Tamil, Kannada, Sanskrit, Marathi and Hindi. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Indic OpenType fonts

Free Indic OpenType fonts have been released under the GNU General Public License:

  • Gargi-1.3-r3 (2003) by Cyberscape Multimedia ltd (Bangalore).
  • Lohit Gujarati, Lohit Punjabi and Lohit Hindi (2001, Automatic Control Equipments, Pune). Lohit Hindi, Lohit Tamil and Lohit Bengali can be downloaded from Google Web Fonts.
  • Pothana2000 (2000, a Telugu font by K. Desikachary).
  • Rekha-medium (2003, MagNet Web Publishing Pvt. Ltd, Mumbai).
  • Saab (2004, a Gurmukhi font by Bhupinder Singh and Sukhjinder Sidhu).
  • aakar-MagNet (2003, MagNet Web Publishing Pvt. Ltd, Mumbai): based on the glyphs of Padma, which in turn is based on Akruti.
  • Padmaa Medium and Bold (2003, Cyberscape Multimedia Ltd, Bangalore). The OT font was created by Prof. Jitendra Shah.
  • utkal medium (2003, an Oriya font by Andy White).
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Indica (or: Summit India)

Indian language software for Mac and PC by Summit india. Contains fonts (not free) for Hindi, Gurumukhi, Gujarati, Bengali/Assamese, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu, Punjabi, Kannada and Oriya. PDF file with a catalogue of their fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

IndiX

Free software. The IndiX library contains the IndiX shaping engine that converts Indic text in Unicode to Glyphs from OpenType fonts. It does conversions (UTF-8 to UCS-2), tagging of the text with script and syllable, reordering of logical syllables to visual syllables, and conversion of the visual syllable of characters to a renderable syllable of glyphs. IndiX supports nine Indic scripts and comes with the required Saral series of OpenType fonts. Vedic Sanskrit is added. The IndiX library is used in enabling X11 for Indic text and in the IndiX applications, oprint, netprint. 'oprint' is a tool which converts Indic text to PostScript using OpenType font. When you download the package, you can find these free truetype fonts by R.K. Joshi and his team at the Centre for Development of Advanced Computing, Mumbai, all dated 2005:

  • SaralBengaliSans (with Vinay Saynekar)
  • SaralGujaratiSans (with Vinay Saynekar)
  • SaralGurumukhiSans (with Omkar Shende)
  • SaralHindi.ttf
  • SaralHindiSans
  • SaralKannadaSans
  • SaralMalayalamSans (with Rajith Kumar K.M.)
  • SaralOriyaSans (with Rajith Kumar K.M.)
  • SaralTamil.ttf
  • SaralTamilRoman (with Rajith Kumar K.M.
  • assisted by Ms. Jui Mhatre and Ms. Supriya Kharkar)
  • SaralTeluguSans (with Omkar Shende)
  • VS190205 (also called VedicSanskrit).
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Indolipi
[Elmar Kniprath]

Indolipi is a multipurpose tool box for indologists and linguists that contains Open Type fonts for most Indian scripts, a Latin font for "instant" transliteration of Indic scripts, and a Unicode based Latin font for writing of scientific texts in a western language containing all transliteration signs used by indologists as well as all presently valid IPA signs. All fonts were made from 2004 until 2006 by Elmar Kniprath (Asien-Afrika institut, University of Hamburg, Germany): e-Bengali OT (for Assamese and Bengali), e-Grantamil (for Grantha Sanskrit, Tamil and Manipravala), e-Grantha OT (for Sanskrit), e-Gujarati OT, e-Kannada OT, e-Malayalam OT (for modern Malayalam), e-Malayalam OTC (for Malayalam with classical orthography), e-Nagari OT (for Sanskrit and Nepali), e-Nagari OTH (for Hindi), e-Nagari OTM (for Marathi), e-Nagari OTR (for Rajasthani), e-Panjabi OT (for Gurmukhi script), e-Sinhala OT, e-Tamil OT (for modern Tamil), e-Tamil OTC (for Tamil with classical orthography), e-Telugu OT, e-Latin Indic (for "instant" Latin transliteration of Indic Unicode texts), e-PhonTranslit UNI (for writing indological texts in a language based on Latin script, also containig all valid IPA signs and a lot of arrows, mathematical and logical signs). [Google] [More]  ⦿

InProS (Intellectual Property Solutions)

Indian language fonts for PC and Mac. Commercial site from Houston, TX: maker of fonts and software products. Fonts include Hindi [ex: SheelRekha, RoopLekha, Kamal], Gujarati [ex: Shefali, Nita, Anarkali, Agni], Punjabi [ex: Pushpa, Suman, Badal, Arup], Bengali [Jayanti, BornaMala], Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Sanskrit [ex: Sansipro], Malayalam and Assamese. Fonts for transliteration include Diplomat and MonoPali. HTML editors for these languages as well. Free Om_SuniKanth font. Run by Sunny Kallara. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Institute of Indology and Tamil Studies

As part of the University of Cologne (Germany), the IITS (Institute of Indology and Tamil Studies) published its own truetype font, IITS, which is used for the transliteration of Sanskrit, Pali, Prakrit, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Urdu and Dravidian Languages. Other Indian and Tamil fonts can be downloaded too. These include Adhawin-Tamil (K. Srinivasan, 1995), BengaliAssamese Vijay (Vijay K. Patel, 1995), Gayathri (Ethno Multimedia, 1993), Gujarati (Vijay K. Patel, 1996), Janaranjani (EthnoMultimedia, 1993), Kannada Vijay (Vijay K. Patel, 1995), Mantra (Shrikrishna Patil, 1994), Malyalam Vijay (Vijay K. Patel, 1995), Nepali Vijay (Vijay K. Patel, 1994), Progoty (Chetona Software Cafe, 1997), Palladam (T. Govindaraj, 1989-1990), PunjabiSans (Atech, 1991), RK Sanskrit, Tamil Vijay (Vijay K. Patel, 1995), Telugu Vijay (beware: need to type 5 to 7 keys to get one character). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Isay Solomonovich Slutsker

Russian type designer (b. Orel, Russia, 1924, d. 2002). He lost both legs in World War II, but persevered and graduated in 1949 from the Moscow Printing Institute. He started working at the Type Design Department of VNIIPoligraphmash (National Printing Research Institute). From 1991 he worked for ParaType, Moscow. Isay Slutsker worked for major Soviet publishers, Khudozhestvennaya Literatura and Prosveshcheniye, designing and illustrating general fiction literature and textbooks. Slutsker designed many typefaces for a number of scripts and writing systems. Among his Cyrillic and Latin designs are Baltica (1951-2, a spin-off of Candida-Antiqua by Jakob Erbar; in co-operation with Vera Chiminova; Paratype did a revival in 1998); Bruskovaya Gazetnaya ('Slab-serif newstype', 1949; in co-operation with Alexandra Korobkova); Mysl (1986, a makeover of the typeface originally created by Vera Chiminova in 1966); PT Caslon (1962 and 1992, a version of the ATF Caslon; assisted by Tatiana Lyskova and Manvel Shmavonyan; also called Caslon 540); ITC Franklin Gothic Cyrillic (1993; assisted by Tatiana Lyskova); PT BT Humanist 531 Cyrillic (1988, based on the Bitstream version of Syntax, by Hans Eduard Meier; assisted by Manvel Shmavonyan); PT BT Geometric Slabserif 712 (1999, based on the Bitstream version of Monotype Rockwell; assisted by Manvel Shmavonyan); MyslNarrowC (1992-1996, at Intermicro, together with Svetlana Ermolaeva and Emma Zfcharova). Slutsker's Greek typefaces are Obyknovennaya Novaya ('New Standard', 1950s); Rublenaya Slutskera ('Slutsker Sans'; 1960s); Chronos (1980s). Isay Slutsker created several typefaces for Hindi, Bengali, Gujarati and Kannada. He designed two Amharic and one Hangul typeface, Inmin. Slutsker's Humanist 531 Cyrillic was among the winners of Kyrillitsa'99 and won an award at Bukvaraz 2001.

Russian bio. FontShop link. Klingspor link.

View some of Isay Slutsker's digital typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

itrans
[Avinash Chopde]

itrans is Avinash Chopde's freeware Indian Language Transliteration package. It includes a lot of free fonts: the Devnac PostScript Type III Font, the ItxGuj PostScript Type 1 and TrueType Gujarati (Donated by Shrikrishna Patil to ITRANS), the ItxBeng PostScript Type 1 and TrueType Bengali (Donated by Shrikrishna Patil to ITRANS), the Bengali - bwti metafont package, by Abhijit Das, Romanized Sanskrit (CSUtopia, type 1), the Washington Indic Roman TrueType fonts, the Washington Tamil metafont, the Kannada metafont, Xdvng (from the jtrans package, TrueType and type 1), Pun (a PostScript punjabi font), Frans Velthuis's Devnag Metafont, for Devanagari v1.6 (1998). Alternate site. At one point in the early 1990s, Chopde was assiociated with Avid Technology, Inc., Tewksbury, Mass. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jalpa Shah

Mumbai, India-based designer of the Gujarati display typeface Babuchak (2014). She developed this in a class taught by Rucha Suryawanshi. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Janmeja Singh Johl

Famous Sikh photographer. Designer of the font BJanmeja5A. Free Punjabi font (Janmeja2920a (2002)). Ads for Elfring and Linotype. Other free fonts at the site: JanmejaGujratiNormal JanmejaKanadaNormal JanmejaMalyalamNormal JanmejaOriyaNormal JanmejaSinhalaNormal JanmejahindiThin JanmejaTeluguNormal, all made by him in 1997. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jharna Panchal

Vadodara, India-based creator of the Latin display typeface Baroda (2013), which was inspired by the shapes of buildings in Baroda City, Gujarat. Jharna graduated from the University of Baroda. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jonny Pinhorn

Type designer and India enthusiast. British designer who obtained an MA in typeface design from The University of Reading (2009), based on his typeface Venkat. He is working on Venkat Tamil.

In 2012, he published the free sans serif typeface Karla at Google Web Fonts.

In 2013, Pinhorn designed Saguna (Indian Type Foundry) for Gujarati.

In 2014, Jonny Pinhorn and Manushi Parikh codesgned Teko (Google Fonts, Indian Type Foundry)). Teko is an Open Source typeface that currently supports the Devanagari and Latin scripts. This font family has been created for use in headlines and other display-sized text on screen. Five font styles make up the initial release. Codesigned with Jonny Pinhorn. With Lipi Raval, Jonny Pinhorn designed the Google Web Font Kalam (also via the Indian Type Foundry) in 2014. Kalam is a handwriting-style typeface supporting the Devanagari and Latin scripts. The fonts have each been optimised for text on screen. Each font contains 1,025 glyphs, which includes many unique Devanagari conjuncts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Kalapi Gajjar-Bordawekar

Indian graduate of the MATD program at the University of Reading in 2012. Gajjar's graduation typeface is Mila (2012), a Latin / Gujarati / Tamil multi-script typeface specifically designed for children's books.

Kalapi works at the London office of Dalton Maag. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Karambir Singh Rohilla

Indian type designer in New Delhi whose creations cover Devanagari, Gurumukhi, Gujarati, Bengali / Assamese, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Oriya. I could not locate the fonts on the web site. Futuristic Hindi face (2011).

In 2013, he designed a Bengali typeface for small portable devices, called AR Hebe Sans. He also did an unnamed Oriya typeface in that year.

Alternate site. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Keya Vadgama

Freelance designer in Pickering, Ontaro. Creator of the child-friendly Gujarati font Ojara Sans (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Krishna Software

HWP is a commercial Hindi word processor for Hindi/Sanskrit, Gujarati, Punjabi, Bengali/Assamese, and Latin/Roman form (diacritics). The demo zip file has six truetype fonts: BengaMedium, BengaMedium, GujarMedium, HindiMedium, Latin, PunjaMedium, all by Krishna Software (1993). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Laval Chabon

Québec City-based creator (b. 1952) of the octagonal font Vegesignes (2009, FontStruct). This font also appeared in 2010 at Open Font Library. It consists of almost 7,615 glyphs.As of 2014, 188 languages care covered, inclufing Afrikaans, Arabic, Archaic Greek Letters, Armenian, Baltic, Basic Cyrillic, Basic Greek, Basic Latin, Bengali, Catalan, Central European, Cherokee, Devanagari, Dutch, Euro, Farsi, Georgian, Gujarati, Hanunó'o, Hebrew, Igbo Onwu, IPA, Kannada, Kazakh, Lao, Malayalam, Myanmar, New Tai Lue, N'Ko, Ogham, Oriya, Pashto, Pinyin, Polytonic Greek, Romanian, Runic, Sindhi, Syriac, Tai Le, Tai Tham (Lanna), Telugu, Thaana, Thai, Tibetan, Turkish, Uighur, Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics, Urdu, Vietnamese, Western European.

Dafont link. Fontspace link. Aka Leaurend-Lavie-Hyppere (Laval) Chabon and as Joseph Rosaire Laval Frandey Leaurend Lavie Hyper Chabom. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Lisa Timpe

German-born graduate of the MATD program at the University of Reading, class of 2013. For her graduation program, she created the soft and flowing typeface family Mellow.

She writes: Mellow is a playful serif type family supporting Latin and Gujarati. It has a characteristic quirkiness and texture. With dynamic curves and strokes mellow shows nice fluidity especially in its italic. Mellow likes being used in long texts as well as for display purposes and feels most comfortable in a cultural environment. Publications should not be too conventional or serious because mellow wouldn't like it a lot. [Google] [More]  ⦿

magajmari.com

Free Gujarathi font (Akshay, or Gopika), and free Hindi font (Bindu). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mahendra Patel

Indian type designer and typographer who received the Gutenberg Prize in 2010. Professor Patel retired from the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, in 2003, and presently s an adjunct professor at Symbiosis Institute of Design and MIT Institute of Design, both at Pune. His type design activities:

[Google] [More]  ⦿

Microsoft: New Fonts in Windows 7

The list of new fonts in Windows 7 in 2009:

  • Aparajita, Aparajita Bold, Aparajita Bold Italic, Aparajita Italic: Devanagari family originally designed in 2001 by Modular Infotech, Pune, India.
  • Ebrima, Ebrima Bold: Microsoft fonts from 2008 with many symbols and special characters.
  • Gabriola: Script face by John Hudson (2008).
  • IskoolaPota Bold.
  • Khmer UI, Khmer UI Bold: By Microsoft (2008).
  • Kokila, Kokila Bold, Kokila Bold Italic, Kokila Italic: Devanagari family originally designed in 2001 by Modular Infotech, Pune, India.
  • Meiryo UI, Meiryo UI Bold, Meiryo UI Bold Italic, Meiryo UI Italic:
  • Microsoft New Tai Lue, Microsoft New Tai Lue Bold: A 2008 family by Microsoft, DynaComware and Ascender.
  • Microsoft PhagsPa, Microsoft PhagsPa Bold: A 2008 family for Mongolian by Microsoft, DynaComware and Ascender.
  • Microsoft Tai Le, Microsoft Tai Le Bold: A 2008 family by Microsoft, DynaComware and Ascender.
  • Raavi Bold: Gurmukhi face by Raghunath Joshi (Type Director) and Apurva Joshi (2008).
  • Sakkal Majalla, Sakkal Majalla Bold: Arabic family by Mamoun Sakkal (2008).
  • Segoe UI Light, Segoe UI Semibold, Segoe UI Symbol: Controversial family by Microsoft (2008), said to be corporate theft on the part of Microsoft, with as victim Frutiger---Segoe is basically identical to the typeface Frutiger.
  • Shonar Bangla, Shonar Bangla Bold: Bengali face by Microsoft (2008).
  • Shruti Bold: Gujarati face by Raghunath Joshi (Type Director) and Vinay Saynekar (2008).
  • Tunga Bold: Kannada face by Raghunath Joshi (Type Director) and Vinay Saynekar (2008).
  • Utsaah, Utsaah Bold, Utsaah Bold Italic, Utsaah Italic: Devanagari family originally designed in 2001 by Modular Infotech, Pune, India.
  • Vani, Vani Bold: Telugu family by Muthu Nedumaran (2008).
  • Vijaya, Vijaya Bold: Tamil family originally designed in 2001 by Modular Infotech, Pune, India.
  • Vrinda Bold: Bengali face by Raghunath Joshi (Type Director) and Vinay Saynekar (2008).
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Mitz Mistry

Creator of these typefaces in 2013: Negrot (monoline rounded Latin stencil), Kanta Script (Indian type Foundry, for Gujarati). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Modular Infotech Pvt. Ltd.

Company in Pune, which made these freely available Tamil Opentype fonts in 2003: SUNDARAM_0806, SHREE_TAM_OTF_0807, SUNDARAM_0808, SUNDARAM_0810, SUNDARAM_0812, SUNDARAM_0819, SUNDARAM_0820, SUNDARAM_0821, SUNDARAM_0823, SUNDARAM_0824, SUNDARAM_0827, SUNDARAM_0830, SUNDARAM_0831, SUNDARAM_1341, SUNDARAM_1342, SUNDARAM_1351, SUNDARAM_1352, SUNDARAM_2852, SUNDARAM_2865, SUNDARAM_3811. Type catalog with over 2,700 fonts for Devanagari, Gujarati, Punjabi, Bengali, Assamese, Oriya, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu and Malayalam.

Modular Infotech specializes in Indian language fonts since 1982. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Modular Systems

Modular Systems from Pune, India, offers about 20 free truetype fonts for most Indic languages. The fonts are all called Shree something and appear incomplete. Covered are Assamese, Bengali, Hindi (Devanagri), Gujarati, Kannada, Malayalam, Oriya, Punjabi, Tamil and Telugu. In 1992, they made the Malayalam fonts Shree-Mal-0501W, Shree-Mal-0502. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Monika Shah

Sonali Sonania and Monika Shah covered Devanagari (U+0900-U+097F) and Gujarati (U+0A80-U+0AFF) in the GNU Freefont project. Glyphs were drawn by Cyberscape Multimedia Ltd., #101, Mahalakshmi Mansion 21st Main 22nd "A" Cross Banashankari 2nd stage Banglore 560070, India. Converted to OTF by IndicTrans Team, Powai, Mumbai, which was headed by Prof. Jitendra Shah. Maintained by Monika Shah and Sonali Sonania of janabhaaratii Team, C-DAC, Mumbai. This font is released under GPL by Dr. Alka Irani and Prof Jitendra Shah, janabhaaratii Team, C-DAC, Mumabi. Janabhaaratii is a localisation project at C-DAC Mumbai (formerly National Centre for Software Technology). It was funded by TDIL, Govt. of India. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Monotype

Monotype sells fonts for the following languages: Amharic, Aksara Kaganga, Arabic, Armenian, Balinese, Burmese, Cambodian, Chinese, Coptic, Devanagari (Hindi/Marathi/Nepali), Farsi, Georgian, Glagolitic, Gujerathi, Gurmukhi (Punjabi), Hebrew, Japanese, Javanese, Jawi, Kannada, Korean, Laotian, Lontarak, Malayalam, Old Bulgarian, Oriya, Pushto, Sindhi, Sinhalese, Surat Pustaha, Syriac, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Urdu, Vietnamese. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Monotype

Gujarathi fonts at Agfa Monotype: ITR Chitra, ITR Gopal, Monotype Gujerati, ITR Krishna, ITR Mohan, ITR Narsi, ITR Omkar. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Omniglot

Gujarati font link and jump page by Omniglot. Gujarati is an Indo-Aryan language spoken by about 45 million people in the Indian state of Gujarat. This syllabic alphabet was adapted from the Devanagari to write the Gujarati language. The earlist document in Gujarati script dates from 1592. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Padrnya Naik

Graphic and type designer in Mumbai, who made the Latin display typeface Deputsa (2013), and custom typefaces Vodafone Urdu (2013, to match Vodafone Latin) and Virgin Mobile Gujarati (2013, for for Virgin Mobile India, to match the Virgin Mobile Distro font).

Padrnya studied type design in the TypeMedia program at KABK in Den Haag, 2011-2012. Before that, in 2009, she graduated from Sir J. J. Institute of Applied Art, Mumbai.

Her KABK graduation project in 2012 consisted of the development of Lehiya about which she writes: Lehiya is a Devanagari text typeface which is designed for extended reading in Hindi and Marathi. With a compact, squarish look, it is inspired primarily by the calligraphic style of old Jain manuscripts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Pravin Satpute

Indian type tech person in Mumbai, who has calls himself an "internationalization engineer" and who has contributed to numerous free or open font projects, most notably the GNU Freefont project of the Free Software Foundation. Pravin Satpute, Bageshri Salvi, Rahul Bhalerao and Sandeep Shedmake added these Indic language ranges:

  • Devanagari (U+0900-U+097F)
  • Gujarati (U+0A80-U+0AFF)
  • Oriya (U+0B00-U+0B7F)
  • Malayalam (U+0D00-U+0D7F)
  • Tamil (U+0B80-U+0BFF)
Oriya was subsequently dropped from all GNU Freefont fonts. In December 2005 the team at www.gnowledge.org released a set of two Unicode pan-Indic fonts: "Samyak" and "Samyak Sans". "Samyak" font belongs to serif style and is an original work of the team; "Samyak Sans" font belongs to sans serif style and is actually a compilation of already released Indic fonts (Gargi, Padma, Mukti, Utkal, Akruti and ThendralUni). Both fonts are based on Unicode standard. You can download the font files separately.

Other fonts by him incude Meera (2007, a Malayalam font done with Hussain K H, Suresh P, and Swathanthra Malayalam Computing, a font in the Liberation Fonts collection, and fonts in the Lohit project. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Puja Khurana

During her studies in Banagalore, India, Puja Khurana created a 3d outline typeface called Experimental Type (2014). Phonebooth buttons inspired her to design the sans typeface Dial (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

R. K. Joshi

Typography professor R.K. Joshi's pages. He was born in 1936 and died in San Francisco in 2008. He was a poet, calligrapher, designer, researcher, teacher and type specialist. Above all, he was respected and influential. From 1952 until 1956, he studied at the Sir J.J. Institute of Applied Art in Mumbai. From 1956 until 1960, he was an artist at D.J. Keymer, and from 1961-1983 he was art director at Ulka Advertising in Mumbai. But his best years were still to come. From 1983 until 1996, he was Professor of visual communications at the Industrial Design Center of IIT, Mumbai, and he was with CDAC, Mumbai, formerly NCST, from 1997 until his death. Radio interview. Obituary at TDC. Pages by Design India on him.

His contributions to the type world:

  • Quoting CDAC, he made pioneering efforts to establish aesthetics of Indian letterforms through workshops, seminars, international conferences, exhibitions and demonstrations. He revived academic, professional and research interest in Indian calligraphy, typography and computer-aided type design.
  • He created Vinyas, a digital type font design environment providing a comprehensive set of interactive tools for the generation of calligraphic fonts (callifonts) using a skeletal approach.
  • Typecaces: Vishakha (Devanagari), Vibhusha (Bengali), Vidhan (Oriya), and Viloma (Tamil).
  • His students at the Industrial Design Centre included Deborani Dattagupta (Bengali calligraphic typefaces), P.M. Hashim (headline type for a Malayalam daily), Anand Bhandarkar (drop caps), Rajeev Prakash (text face), G.V. Sreekumar (text face for Malayalam), and Apurva Joshi (titling faces).
  • He experimented with random fonts. Check this example of a random font, based his Vinyas software (1991).
  • He won an award at Bukvaraz 2001 for Raghu (or Raghindi, which can be downloaded here and here. It was developed with with the help of Vinay Saynekar. With Amresh Mondkar, Jui Mhatre and Supriya Kharkar, Joshi and Saynekar developed RaghuBengaliSans (2005). With Riddhi Joshi, Jui Mhatre and Supriya Kharkar, he created RaghuGujaratiSans (2005). R.K. Joshi, assisted by Jui Mhatre, Supriya Kharkar and Kruti Dalvi, created RaghuHindiSans (2005). R.K.Joshi and Omkar Shende, assisted by Seema Mangaonkar, Jui Mhatre and Supriya Kharkar made RaghuKannadaSans (2005). R.K.Joshi and Rajith Kumar K.M., assisted by Nirmal Biswas, Jui Mhatre and Supriya Kharkar developed RaghuMalayalamSans (2005) and RaghuOriyaSans (2005). R.K. Joshi and Omkar Shende, assisted by Supriya Kharkar and Jui Mhatre, made RaghuPunjabiSans (2005) and RaghuTeluguSans (2005). RaghuTamilRoman (2005) was done by R.K. Joshi and Rajith Kumar K.M., assisted by Jui Mhatre and Supriya Kharkar.
  • Joshi made the first OpenType font for Hindi (Mangal) and Tamil (Latha, with Vikram Gaikwad). Mangal became a Microsoft face, but some designers such as Mohd Asif Ali Rizvan think that it is an eyesore.
  • Speaker at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon and at ATypI 2002 in Rome. His presentation in Rome was memorable and thrilled all participants.
  • Developer of Deshanagari, a common script for all Indian Languages.
  • Joshi was involved in the standardization of codes for Marathi and has worked exhaustively to implement Vedic Sanskrit codes for Unicode.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Rajesh&Dinesh

Rajesh&Dinesh made the Gujarati font MONARCH_GUJARATI. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Rosetta Type Foundry

Rosetta is an independent foundry, set up in 2011 by David Brezina, José Scaglione and Veronika Burian, with a strong focus on multi-script typography. It is headquartered in Brno, Czechia. Other designers include Amélie Bonet and Titus Nemeth. They specialize in multilingual typefaces.

Fonts at the time of the start-up include Aisha (Titus Nemeth: Arabic, Latin), Maiola (Cyrillic, Greek, Latin), Nassim (Arabic, Latin), Roxane (Devanagari, Latin), and Skolar (Cyrillic, Greek, Latin, Gujarati).

In 2011, they published Neacademia (by Sergei Egorov). Neacademia is a Latin and Cyrillic type family inspired by the types cut by 15th century Italian punch-cutter Francesco Griffo da Bologna for the famous Venetian printer and publisher Aldus Pius Manutius. The family is designed for lengthy texts.

In 2012, Arek (Latin/Armenian) by Khajag Apelian was published by Rosetta Type Foundry.

Interview by MyFonts. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ruchin Shah

Mumbai-based designer who created several fonts for Gujarati in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Samaj Setu

Dead link. This had a free Gujarati truetype font, GUJFONTNET4KUTCH by Net4Kutch. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Sambhaav

Gujarati font Sambhaav for the Sambhaav newspaper. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Samyak
[G. Nagarjuna]

Samyak is a free Opentype Unicode font family developed in 2005-2006 that covers Devanagari, Gujarati, Latin, Malayalam, Oriya, Tamil. The fonts are amyakSans, SamyakSans_Bengali, SamyakSans_Gujarati, SamyakSans_Gurmukhi, SamyakSans_Malayalam, SamyakSans_Oriya, SamyakSans_Tamil. The project is managed by G. Nagarjuna at the Homi Bhabha Centre For Science Education, Tata Institute Of Fundamental Research, V.N. Purav Marg, Mankhurd, Mumbai 400 088, India. Contributors include Rahul Bhalerao, Sandeep Shedmake, Bageshri Salvi, and Pravin Satpute. The fonts are based on earlier work, namely:

  • Gargi-1.3: HBCSE, TIFR, for Devanagari
  • Padma: Cyberscape Multimedia ltd for Gujarati
  • ThendralUni: 2003, by A. Umar for Tamil
  • Utkal: Andy White, Rajesh Pradhan for Oriya
  • Mukta: Mukta Bangla Font Project 2003 for Bengali
  • AkrutiMal2Normal: Cyberscape Multimedia Ltd for Malayalam
  • Saab: Bhupinder Singh and Sukhjinder Sidhu. Copyright 2004 for Gurumukhi
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Sandesh

Producers of the free Gujarati font Sandesh Normal (2000). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Sandesh

Gujarati font Akshu1 for the Sandesh newspaper. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Santhosh Thottingal

Palakkad, Kerala-based computer scientist. He is responsible for Autonym Font (2013). He explains: A font that can render all language autonyms. If we want to show a large number of languages written in their own scripts (autonyms), we cannot apply the usual webfonts to it. This is because when each script requires a webfont, we will end up using a large number of webfonts. This can cause large bandwidth usage. An example of this use case is a language selector on a website. Autonym font tries to solve this. The font contains glyphs and opentype rules for rendering the language autonyms. And it contains only those glyphs for a language. The glyphs for the font are taken from a large number of free licensed fonts.

The sources for the glyphs, by language, are:

  • Main: FreeSans.
  • Arabic: Droid Arabic Naskh
  • Tibetan: Jomolhari
  • Bengali: Lohit Bengali
  • Telugu: Lohit Telugu
  • Tamil: Meera Tamil
  • Odia: Lohit Odia
  • Malayalam: Meera
  • Kannada: Lohit Kannada
  • Gujarati: Lohit Gujarati
  • Devangari: Lohit Devangari
  • Khmer: Hanuman
  • Thai: Droid Sans Thai
  • Chinese: WenQuanYiMicroHei
  • Lao: Phetsarath
  • Divehi: FreeFontThaana
  • Javanese: TuladhaJejeg
  • Myanmar: TharLon

Open Font Library link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Santosh Kshirsagar
[Shruti]

[More]  ⦿

Saral Fonts

From Norway: "Saral Soft offers different collections of TrueType fonts for various Indian languages/alphabets." Included are Hindi, Gujarathi, Marathi, Tamil, Punjabi, and Bengali. From the readme file at this download site: Saral is a series of OpenType fonts in 9 Indic scripts for 12 Indian languages. These fonts have been designed and developed under the type font design directorship of Prof. R. K. Joshi and the fonters team at C-DAC, Mumbai (formerly NCST). Fonters team: Prof. R.K.Joshi, Vinay Saynekar, Rajith Kumar K.M., Omkar Shende, Sarang Kulkarni, Amresh Mondkar, Jui Mhatre, Kruti Dalvi, Nirmal Biswas, Seema Mangaonkar, Supriya Kharkar, Riddhi Joshi, Lokesh Karekar. SaralHindi has been designed and developed by Prof. R. K. Joshi (TypeFont Design Director, Visiting Design Specialist at C-DAC Mumbai), assisted by Ms. Jui Mhatre and Ms. Supriya Kharkar and Ms. Kruti Dalvi at C-DAC Mumbai (formerly NCST) under IndiX2, Project funded by TDIL, Department of Information Technology, Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, Govt. of India. SaralTamil has been designed and developed by Prof. R. K. Joshi (TypeFont Design Director, Visiting Design Specialist at C-DAC Mumbai) in association with Mr. Rajith Kumar K. M. (TypeFont Designer), assisted by Ms. Jui Mhatre and Ms. Supriya Kharkar at C-DAC Mumbai (formerly NCST) under IndiX2, Project funded by TDIL, Department of Information Technology, Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, Govt. of India. RRSaralTamil and RKSaralHindi are free at the latter site. [Google] [More]  ⦿

SaralSoft

Commercial Indian language fonts. SaralSoft Hindi demo truetype font. Also, a Marathi demo font, and truetype fonts for Gujarati, Hindi and Tamil. The demos are quite useless, don't bother. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Sarang Kulkarni
[EK Type]

[More]  ⦿

Saraswati Soft
[Gupta Vishnu]

Gupta Vishnu designed the Gujarati font Sandesh (2000) at Saraswati Soft. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Sarjudas

A Gujarathi and a Hindi font. Called Sarjudas and Hari. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Satya N. Rajpurohit

Satya is co-founder of the The Indian Type Foundry (ITF) in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India, in 2009. ITF is India's first digital type foundry providing Unicode compliant fonts. He studied at the National Institute of Design (NID) in India and interned with Linotype in Germany. He has also worked at Dalton Maag (London) and L2M3 (Stuttgart). He now works full time at ITF, creating original fonts in all the major Indian scripts along with their Latin companions. Satya studied graphic design at the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, India, where he specialized in motion picture graphics.

His type work includes this experimental display face (2006), this minimalist face (2007), this experimental sans (2007), Rail India (2007, an Indic simulation face) and this Devanagari (Hindi) typeface (2007). With Peter Bilak, he created Fedra Hindi (2010, ITF). In 2010, he received the SOTA Catalyst Award and published the Kohinoor family for Latin, Devanagari and Tamil.

In 2012, he designed the type family Engrez Sans. With Jyotish Sonowal, he designed the beautiful semi-calligraphic Tulika Bengali. It includes support for the Assamese, Bengali, Bishnupriya Manipuri, Garo, Kokborok, Meitei, and Mundari languages. Kohinoor Latin (2012) is a low-contrast humanist sans-serif suitable for both body and the display text.

The Indian Type Foundry published several typefaces at Google Web Fonts in 2014: Hind, Kalam, Karma, Teko and Rajdhani. Rajdhani is an Open Source typeface supporting both the Devanagari and the Latin scripts. The font family was developed for use in headlines and other display-sized text on screen. Its initial release includes five fonts. Satya Rajpurohit and Jyotish Sonowal developed the Devanagari component in the Rajdhani fonts together, while the Latin was designed by Shiva Nallaperumal.

In 2014, Sanchit Sawaria and Jyotish Sonowal finished the free Google Web Font Khand, an 8-style family of compact mono-linear fonts with very open counter forms. Developed for display typography, the family is primarily intended for headline usage. Its Latin is from Satya Rajpurohit, and Khnad carries the Indian Type Foundry label.

. Behance link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Satya N. Rajpurohit
[Indian Type Foundry (ITF)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

SDL, IIT Madras

Free fonts from SDL, IIT Madras covering most Indic scripts: iitmoriya, iitmbeng, iitmguj, iitmhind, iitmipa, iitmkann, iitmmal, iitmpunj, iitmsans, iitmtam, iitmtel, iitmuni. [Google] [More]  ⦿

SGCCI Gujarati font

Free Gujarati truetype font called Vakil. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Shruti
[Santosh Kshirsagar]

Shruti is an OpenType font for Gujarati. It is based on Unicode, contains TrueType outlines and has been designed for use as a UI font by Raghunath Joshi (type director) and Santosh Kshirsagar. It is in the Microsoft font collection since 2001. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Sonali Sonania

Sonali Sonania and Monika Shah covered Devanagari (U+0900-U+097F) and Gujarati (U+0A80-U+0AFF) in the GNU Freefont project. Glyphs were drawn by Cyberscape Multimedia Ltd., #101, Mahalakshmi Mansion 21st Main 22nd "A" Cross Banashankari 2nd stage Banglore 560070, India. Converted to OTF by IndicTrans Team, Powai, Mumbai, which was headed by Prof. Jitendra Shah. Maintained by Monika Shah and Sonali Sonania of janabhaaratii Team, C-DAC, Mumbai. This font is released under GPL by Dr. Alka Irani and Prof Jitendra Shah, janabhaaratii Team, C-DAC, Mumabi. Janabhaaratii is a localisation project at C-DAC Mumbai (formerly National Centre for Software Technology). It was funded by TDIL, Govt. of India. [Google] [More]  ⦿

South Asia Language Resource Center (SALRC)

Based at the University of Chicago, links and suggestions for free fonts are given for these languages: Assamese, Baluchi, Bengali, Brahui, Dzongkha, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Kashmiri, Kodagu, Lahnda, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali, Oriya, Panjabi (Gurmukhi), Panjabi (Shahmukhi), Pashto, Sanskrit, Sindhi, Sinhala, Tamil, Telugu, Tibetan, Tulu, Urdu. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Sridhar Murthy Srikantham

Sridhar Murthy Srikantham is a graphic and type designer, b. 1963, Andhra Pradesh, India. He has a BFA from JNTU, Hyderabad. He created Telugu fonts for the following newspapers: Eenadu (Linotron 202), Vartha Andhara Jyothi, Andhra Bhoomi Sakshi, and Andhra Prabha Prajashakti. He also made Telugu fonts for Microsoft through Modular Infotech, Pune. He designed a typeface for the Naga Tribes called New Script. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. Speaker at ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik.

M/S Cyberscape Multimedia Limited, Mumbai, are the developers of Akruti Software for Indian Languages. They released a set of truetype fonts for nine Indian scripts (Devanagari, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali, Oriya, and Gurumukhi) under the GNU General Public License (GPL). One can download the fonts from the Free Software Foundation of India WWW site. Contributions to the GNU Freefont project:

  • Devanagari (U+0900-U+097F)
  • Bengali (U+0980-U+09FF)
  • Gurmukhi (U+0A00-U+0A7F)
  • Gujarati (U+0A80-U+0AFF)
  • Oriya (U+0B00-U+0B7F)
  • Tamil (U+0B80-U+0BFF)
  • Telugu (U+0C00-U+0C7F)
  • Kannada (U+0C80-U+0CFF)
  • Malayalam (U+0D00-U+0D7F)
Note: GNU Freefont dropped Oriya, Kannada and Telugu from its program at some point due to the absence of font features neccessary for display of text in their respective languages. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Steve White
[GNU Freefont (or: Free UCS Outline Fonts)]

[More]  ⦿

Summit Information Technologies Limited (or: Summit Infotech)

Producers of the free KrishnaWeb family (2003) of Gujarati fonts. They also made Manorama (2000) and Panchari (2001) for Malayalam. KrishnanItalic (2000) is here. HTChanakya (2002) covers Hindi. Panchari is here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Sun Microsystems

Sun has two free truetype fonts for download: Saraswati5Normal and Saraswati5Bold. These were developed in 2001 and 2002, respectively, by CDAC, Pune, in cooperation with Sun. The Unicode compliant fonts provide support for Hindi, Bengali, Gurmukhi, Gujarati, Tamil, Malayalam, Telugu, and Kannada. Horribly complicated download procedure involving registration. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Terrapin Font Services

British font service house: can sell you most of the commercial fonts. Sells also fonts for Albanian, Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Estonian, Farsi, Greek, Gujurati, Hindi, Hungarian, Japanese (Katakana, Hiragana, Kanji), Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Punjabi, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovene, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese, Welsh. Has barcode fonts, and is a special distributor of the Royal Mail Barcode font. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ubuntu: Indic fonts

Free Indic fonts:

  • Bengali: JamrulNormal, LikhanNormal, muktinarrow, muktinarrowbold, Ani, Lohit-Bengali, Mitra.
  • Hindi/Devanagari: Gargi_1.7, Chandas, Kalimati, Lohit-Hindi, Samanata.
  • Gujarati: Rekha-medium, aakar-MagNet, Lohit-Gujarati, padmaa-Bold, padmaa-Medium.
  • Kannada: KedageBold, KedageNormalItalic, KedageNormal, KedageBoldItalic, MalligeBold, MalligeNormalItalic, MalligeNormal, MalligeBoldItalic.
  • Malayalam: racotf04, malayalam.
  • Oriya: utkal.
  • Punjabi: Saab, Lohit-Punjabi.
  • Tamil: TAMu_Kadambri-Regular, TAMu_Kalyani, TAMu_Maduram, TSCu_Comic, TSCu_Paranar, TSCu_Times, TSCu_Paranar-Bold, TSCu_Paranar-Italic, Lohit-Tamil.
  • Telugu: Pothana2000, Vemana2000.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

UniType

Commercial Windows XP packages sold with foreign language fonts in TrueType and PostScript, called GlobalSuite, GlobalWriter and GlobalOffice. Includes most foreign languages. For example, in the Cyrillic sphere, they have Bulgarian, Byelorussian, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian, Ukrainian plus over 50 additional Cyrillic languages such as Azeri, Kazakh, Kirghiz, Moldavian, Mongolian, Tadzhik, Tatar, Turkmen and Uzbek. And for North Indian, they have Assamese, Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Punjabi, and Sanskrit. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Utkarsh project

Gujarati project where one has these free fonts: Aakar, Rekha. Both are by MagNet Web Publishing Pvt. Ltd. in Mumbai, and are free GNU public license fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

varun

Varun is a Gujarathi truetype font. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Vijay Kumar Patel

Fort Worth, TX-based creator of a commercial font collection that covers most Indian languages: Gujarati Radhika, Gujarati Priti, Gujarati Palana, Hindi Vijay, Assamese Vijay, Bengali Vijay, Tamil Vijay, Telugu Vijay, Sanskrit Vijay, Punjabi Vijay, Malayalam Vijay, Malayalam Radhika, Kannada Vijay, Marathi Vijay, Nepali Vijay, Oriya Vijay, Indian Artwork-Vijay. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Vinu Chaitanya

Indian graphic design student who lives in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. He is working on this futuristic typeface (2007). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Viren Vora's page

Free archive of Gujarati fonts in one zip file such as Hitarth_Guj_Preyas_Normal and Sambhaav_Normal (Hitarth Consultants), GSOnline, Chg1993 and Akshay. Plus links to the other Indian fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

vishwakosh

One free Gujarati truetype font, AkrutiGujWeb, by K. C. Consultants (Ahmedabad), designed by Apurva Ashar. [Google] [More]  ⦿