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Type scene in Ohio



[Ornament #1557 from the Cincinnati Type Foundry's specimen book of 1882]

Luc Devroye
McGill University
Montreal, Canada
lucdevroye@gmail.com
http://luc.devroye.org
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1919 Type Foundry
[Scott Sullivan]

1919 Type Foundry presents the typographic work of Scott Sullivan, who is currently a graphic design major at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, scheduled to graduate in 2009. About the name: The year 1919 was the year that the Bauhaus school opened in Weimar, Germany. It was roughly the year 1919 when Modernism and Constructivism were born in Germany and the U.S.S.R., respectively. All fonts are heavily based in geometry, therefore: Dosim OKT, Geovlad (2009, constructivist, based on the posters of Georgii and Vladimir Stenberg), 44X34X (2009, futuristic, free). The Triflig Paradigm is another project of his. There he is developing some fonts such as Moon Man, and one can download Gnashraw-Spaced (2009) and two of his FontStruct (pixel) fonts, pgdm001 and pgdm002 (2009). Designmoo link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

AArrgghh! Typefaces
[Jonathan Smith]

AArrgghh! Typefaces used to offer shareware fonts by Jonathan Smith (Cleveland, OH) of Rhode Island Soft Systems: New Land Contour, All-Hearts, Bunny-Lips, Confetti, El-RioLobo (1993, Mexican simulation face), Elbjorg-Script, Essential-Times, Firey, Glifik, Gyptienne (hieroglyphics), Hero-Outline, Hirosh (oriental simulation face; an exact copy of Sukiyaki, made in 1968 by Gene Eidy for Lettergraphicvs International), Ice-CreamSandwich, Ice-Snow, Made-InTheUSA, New-LandContour, New-LandInline, New-LandOutline, New-LandSport, Ol'54, Planetz, Porter-Lil'Kaps (gorgeous late night show display font), Religious, RockArt, Spider-WebBlock, The-Score, Wet-Paint.

Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Abby Kirkpatrick

Columbus, OH-based designer of the slab serif typeface Odwalla (2013), which was custom-made forv the Odwalla drinks. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Hines

Adam Hines (Raindrop Creative, Columbus, OH) designed the bold modular squarish face Breathe (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Ladd

Graphic designer in Cincinnati, OH. FontStructor, who made the octagonal face Ladd Block (2011). MyFonts link. His commercial faces include Cut Block (2012: white-on-black sketched letters), Tape Back (2012), Inked Balterm (2011, a monoline hand-drawn sans with ball terminals added in) and Inked Classic (2011, blackboard bold).

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Albert J. Kim
[Reference Type Foundry]

[More]  ⦿

Altered Ego Fonts (was: Sooy Type Foundry, STF)
[Brian Sooy]

Altered Ego Fonts is the 2003-born sibling of STF, the Sooy Type Foundry. See also Sooy Co. Brian Sooy is the Elyria, OH-based designer of font families such as Chevron (1994, a condensed font), Eclectics (dingbats: Bundle, Medley, Pixelweb, Web), VerveMM (1999, multiple master font at Adobe), Acolyte, Veritas (1995, multiple master text fonts), Benderhead (Garagefonts; Benderhead AEF followed in 2006), ITC Coventry (1998, grunge font), EclecticWeb (dingbats), American Spirit STF (2001, American symbols), ArkeoBT (2003, Bitstream, a readable bitmap font family), Lil Milton (2006), AE Prosperity (2011, a slightly aged old map style script), and Greenbriar AEF (2005, a 12-style hypnotic and gothic family).

Brian, who also runs Brian Sooy&Co, calls his fonts trendy and neo-humanist. Check Alphabets Inc for EclecticOne, EclecticTwo, EclecticPixel (2004, pixel dingbats), Greenbriar (hexagonal), Temerity, Chevron and Veritas, and the Bitstream Type Odyssey CD (2001) for most of his collection.

FontShop link.

Corporate work includes the Lucerna Bible Font for the New Living Translation Bible of Tyndale House Publishers in 1995, which was based on Veritas.

Showcase of Brian Sooy's typefaces at MyFonts. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

American Greetings Corporation
[Courtney Kent Rhodes]

In 1996, the American Greetings Corporation company issued a number of mostly script and blackletter fonts, whose names all start with CAC. These can now be found on many font archives. A partial list: CACCamelot, CACChampagne, CACFuturaCasual, CACFuturaCasualBold, CACFuturaCasualBoldItalic, CACFuturaCasualMedItalic, CACKrazyLegs, CACKrazyLegsBold, CACLaskoCondensed, CACLaskoEvenWeight, CACLeslie, CACLogoAlternate, CACMoose, CACNormHeavy, CACOneSeventy, CACPinafore, CACSaxonBold, CACShishoniBrush, CACValiant, Care-Bear-Family, ShishoniBrush. Founded in 1906 and based in Cleveland, American Greetings Corporation no longer develops or sells fonts.

Six of the CAC fonts were designed and produced by graphic designer and Vietnam veteran Courtney Kent Rhodes from Westlake, OH, who worked for AGC from 1988 until 2003.

Dafont link [removed]. Archive of most of the CAC fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Caputo

American designer in Columbus, OH, of the hand-printed Pooch Scrawl (2009, FontCapture). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Weber

Andrew Weber (Azzurro 360) is the designer of Andrew's Handwriting (2007, handwriting). Born in 1987, he lives in Indiana and Ohio. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andy Hayes
[Hucklebuck Design Studio]

[More]  ⦿

Anika LaGruth

Student at Ohio State University in 2013 and 2014. Columbus, OH-based designer of the angular typeface Still Old Greek (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aoife Mooney

Irish graduate from the type design program at the University of Reading in 2010, who joined Hoefler&Frere-Jones in New York in 2011 as type designer.

She designed Magnimo while at Reading. Aoife writes: from the Latin Magna, meaning great or large, and the Indic Anima, meaning spirit or soul. Magnimo is a big-hearted typeface with many moods and voices. I am quite impressed by this three-style typeface (Regular, Italic, Upright Italic), which, with its lively angular design, seems just right for green party and energy drink magazines. All the extra features expected of a 2010 typeface are there, including a matching and nicely balanced Greek, and coverage of most European diacritics. Additional scans: i, ii, iii.

Based in Brooklyn, she worked as a full-time typeface designer for the globally acclaimed Hoefler & Frere-Jones Type Foundry in New York City. While at H&FJ, Aoife worked as part of the design team on a number of typeface design projects including the Idlewild family.

She moved to Akron, Ohio, where she continues to work as a freelance typeface designer for H&FJ. She is a part-time teacher at Kent State University, and participates in Crafting Type. [Google] [More]  ⦿

April Sadowski

Aibrean's Studio (translated as "April Studio") has been owned and operated by April Sadowski since 2003 in Xenia, OH. She created the squarish modular face Modal (2009, FontStruct). Other FontStruct faces include MoxBox (2009, squarish), Dripple (2009, dot matrix), Polaris (2009) and Squirls (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Arlyn Eve Simon
[School of Art, Ohio University, Athens]

[More]  ⦿

Baltimore&Ohio Railroad Historical Society
[Jack Aaron Rodriguez]

Jack Aaron Rodriguez made a font called Baltimore&Ohio R.R. Co. Loco.&Pass. Equipt. Cars Lettering (2004) for the Baltimore&Ohio Railroad Historical Society. Jack lives in Riverdale, MD. Kenneth Van Mechelen made B&OStation (2005), B&OLoco (2005), EMD (2006), and B&OX (2005). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bart Blubaugh

Type designer, letterer and calligrapher located in Willoughby Hills, OH. Ex-student at the University of Reading (2003) who designed Owyhee (2003). In 2008, he created Cora, a 6-style corporate-look sans with a large x-height.

In 2011, he did Katie's Font.

MyFonts link. Behance link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Bedoodle
[Susan Derrick]

Susan Derrick's foundry in Dayton, OH. Her fonts can be bought at MyFonts. Alternate URL. The list of creations (2005): Ancestry (caps), Angeline, Angelique (both curly scripts), Banderole, Fred and Ginger (two-line display face), Garden Gate (gate-inspired curly script), Monogram, Oxymoron (simple sans), Relativity, Scrapbook, Beads (dingbats) and Beading. In 2006, some handwriting fonts by Matthew Derrick were added: Funnies, Grimble Castle, Paparazzi, Scratch Pad, Selvin, Love Me and Wavy Gravy. Additions in 2009: Barack, Mrs. Obama, Malia (upright connected script), Violette (female script), Abbatia (ornaments), Frame Ups (frames), Sasha (didactic font with lines). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Benn Coifman
[RailFonts.com]

[More]  ⦿

Beth Rufener
[Ornaments of Grace]

[More]  ⦿

Bill Roach

Ohioan Bill Roach (b. 1966) created the script face Goldilocks (2009, +Reprised), Hollow Roachian Futhark (2009, runic), Anfalas (bumpy poster font), and the techno face Glyphstream (2009).

In 2012, he published a number of medieval style typefaces: Throrian, Mirkwood Chronicle, Gothic Birthday Cake, Elementary Gothic (+Bookhand), EG Dragon Caps, Renny Hybrid, Bruce, East Anglia (Lombardic).

Abstract Fonts link. A second Dafont link. FontM link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Billy Jacobs
[Coffee Bin Fonts]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Bob Aufuldish
[fontboy.com]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Brian Crick

Brian Crick (b. Jamestown, NY, 1976) is working on a very original font, Positronic Effigy. His Ironweaver (2003) is the thinnest of the thin (almost gothic or bewitched) beauties. Check also Oberto (2003). Positronic Toaster (2009) is a very nice modern interpretation of the French upright scripts of the nineteenth century. Brian runs Brian Crick Web Site Design in Cleveland Heights, OH.

MyFonts link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Brian Kniceley

Brian Kniceley is a sign artist at the Cedar Point amusement park in Sandusky, Ohio. At Letterhead Fonts, he designed Henderson Roman, Henderson Church Text, Strong Nouveau, Strong Italic, Strong Angle, Equinox (caps and flourishes), Strong Caliope, LHF Strong Tea House (2000). Many of his fonts have a Western influence. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brian Sooy
[Altered Ego Fonts (was: Sooy Type Foundry, STF)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Briana Arnold

During her Visual Communication Design studies at Northern Kentucky University, Briana Arnold (Ft. Mitchell, KY and Cincinnati, OH) created the rounded squarish sans typeface Aero (2012). She also created the sans face Sequent in 2012, which was designed for screens.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brittany Deighton

Based in Kent, Ohio, Brittany Deighton founded Warehouse Design with Jesse Snyder. At Warehouse, one can buy some icon font sets from them, such as Miniglyph, Parks and Rec, and Snack Time. Together, they designed the slabby wood type typeface Ohio, and Medical Icons in 2013, while Brittany was studying in the Visual Communication Design program at Kent State University. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cale LeRoy

Graphic designer in Columbus, OH. Tissues (2012) is a hand-drawn ornamental caps typeface inspired by organs, muscles, and tissues of the human body. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Camika Blackwell

During her graphic design studies at Columbus College of Art and Design, Camika Blackwell (Cleveland, OH) created the connect-the-dots typeface Spacial (sic) Constellation (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carl J. Wehner

Dayton, OH-based creator of an animal-themed ornamental caps typeface in 1926. Its patent application. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carl Ricco

Akron, OH- based designer (b. 1980) of Slag Version One (2006, grunge) and Meatpie (2006, grunge). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Casa De Toad Fonts

Dead Crack Babies (famous grunge font), Half Tone, My Left Font, Times and Times Again. All free, from Cleveland, OH. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charles Nix
[New Fonts]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Charles Paxton Zaner

Famous American teacher of penmanship. Author of Lessons in Ornamental Penmanship (1920), Gems of Flourishing (1888), and The New Zanerian Alphabets (1900, Zaner & Bloser, Columbus, OH). This site describes his story: In 1888, Charles Paxton Zaner founded the Zanerian, College of Penmanship, in Columbus, Ohio. The schools curriculum included courses that prepared students for careers as penmen who, at that time, wrote by hand most of the documents used by business and industry. The school also trained students to become teachers of penmanship, illustrators, engravers, and engrossersspecialists in the kind of ornamental writing used for diplomas and certificates. In 1891, Zaner sold a share of the Zanerian to Elmer Ward Bloser, whom he met in 1883 while the two men were students at Michaels Pen Art Hall. Bloser, who had been working as an instructor at the Spencerian Business College in Cleveland, was a superb penman, and he had accumulated the capital necessary to sustain the college in its early days (when its three instructors had only three pupils). By 1895, the Zanerian College of Penmanship had become the Zaner-Bloser Company, an institution that offered courses in penmanship, published professional materials about handwriting and illustration, and sold handwriting supplies. In 1904, Zaner-Bloser published The Zaner Method of Arm Movement, a landmark text that taught the simplified style of writing learned by students at the Zanerian to children in elementary schools all over the United States. This book also applied the findings of psychologists who had discovered that young children completed manual tasks more easily if allowed to use the large arm movements that were natural to them at their early stage of motor skills development.

In 2006, Paul Hunt designed a set of connected calligraphic scripts, called P22 Zaner.

Link to some of his books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charles S. Wilkin
[Prototype Experimental Foundry]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Christian Ghirardi

Sign designer from Columbus, OH. Creator of Fleur de Wee (2005, Chank's place), a dingbat font of shields and fleur-de-lys interpretations, and Fowl Play (2005, 26 bird silhouettes). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Horst

Designer in Cincinnati, OH, b. 1982, who has mainly designed tattoo and black metal faces. Portfolio. In 2010, he made Horst Roman Gothic. In 2011, he added Horst Blackletter (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chuck Masterson

Cincinnati, OH-based student who designed Cyril (2005, serif). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cincinnati Type Foundry

Cincinnati-based foundry (est. 1817), also called Oliver&Horace Wells, Horace Wells, Agant, and L.T. Wells, Agent. Among digitizations, we find French Ionic (Dan X. Solo, Solotype: quite ugly--based on an 1870 Clarendon derivative by the Cincinnati Type Foundry).

Free specimen book on the web: Fifteenth book of specimens Compact Edition from the Central Type Foundry (1882, Cincinnati). At the time of that printing, Henry Barth was president, assisted by Charles Wells and William P. Hunt.

Judy Ko revived a condensed didone typeface from the Cincinnati Type Foundry typeface called Condensed No. 4 in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Claude Fayette Bragdon

Claude Fayette Bragdon (b. Oberlin, OH, 1866-1946) was an American architect, writer, and stage designer based in Rochester, New York, up to World War I, and in New York City after that. He was known for his creative geometric ornaments. At some point, he proposed this modern American italic for architectural plans. Check also his set of modern small letters. This page shows his art nouveau art. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cleveland Type Foundry

Foundry in Cleveland that existed from 1875 until 1892, when it was absorbed by ATF. It was also called H.H. Thorpe Mfg. Co. Its original designs include Koster Initials and Litho (a curly Victorian face digitally revived by Nick Curtis in 2007 as Cleveland Litho NF; Curtis says that it comes from an 1898 specimen book but that contradicts the ATF date). They published Catalogue and Book of Specimens From the Cleveland Type Foundry. The H.H. Thorp Mfg. Co., 147 St. Clair Street, Cleveland, Ohio (176 pages, 1880), Catalogue and Price List of Type and Material (ATF 1893 Specimen) (1893), and Catalogue and book of specimens of type faces and printing material and machinery (1895).

Another Curtis revival, Yum Yum NF (2008) is said to be based on Mikado from an 1893 Cleveland specimen book. And in 2008, Nick Curtis continued with a revival of the geometric display face Morning Glory (1893), and a revival of Oxford called Really Big Shoe NF (2009). One of CTF's most famous typefaces is the faux-Chinese font Chinese (1883, later called Mandarin). In 2010, Nick Curtis redid Geometric, a typewriter style face, and called it Linndale Square NF.

In 2013, the Victorian capitals typeface Oxford No. 2 (from the 1893 catalog) provided the inspiration for the digital typeface MFC Damask (Brian J. Bonislawsky and Jim Lyles, Monogram Fonts Co). MFC Damask Flourish (2013) is a floriated caps typeface from the same source. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Coffee Bin Fonts
[Billy Jacobs]

Navarre, OH-based foundry run by artist/designer Billy Jacobs (b. 1958). His font creations are based on 19th century advertising type found in tradecards, catalogs and periodicals from that era.

His 2006 designs: Drugstore, Horsfords, Hoyts German Cologne (art nouveau), Letterhead, Soap Box, The Youths Companion (+Shaded: Victorian).

Klingspor link.

MyFonts selection. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Courtney Kent Rhodes
[American Greetings Corporation]

[More]  ⦿

Courtney Kent Rhodes
[Courtney Rhodes Design]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Courtney Rhodes Design
[Courtney Kent Rhodes]

Courtney Rhodes Design is the foundry of graphic designer and Vietnam veteran Courtney Kent Rhodes from Westlake, OH. Six of the CAC fonts of the American Greetings Corporation were designed and produced by Rhodes, who worked for AGC from 1988 until 2003. Dafont link. Archive of most of the CAC fonts. In 2011, she created the round tip brush face Darby Display, and the comic book face Blunder Display (2011). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Damon Shuler

Columbus, OH-based creator of the hand-printed poster face Nomad (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Daniel Orbach

Industrial design student at the University of Cincinnati (2012). Behance link. He created Fudge Slab (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Dard Hunter

William Joseph Dard Hunter was born in 1883 in Steubenville, OH, and died in 1966 in Chillicothe, OH. One of the most influential graphic designers to come out of the American Arts and Crafts movement around 1900-1910. The face "Dard Hunter" by James Grieshaber at P22, complete with Arts and Crafts Ornaments, is based on his designs. Bala Cynwyd NF (2008) and Nickley NF (1997, an arts and crafts font) by Nick Curtis are other digital revivals of his lettering.

The Mountain House Press Types were designed and cut by Dard Hunter between 1912 and 1915, and by Dard Hunter Jr. (b. 1917) in 1937-39, for the private use of their Mountain House Press.

A Specimen of Type (Dard Hunter Jr., 1940, Paper Museum Press, Cambridge, MA) is a small booklet shows a roman type started in 1936 by Dard Hunter Jr. under the guidance of Professor Otto F. Ege. Apologies for the poor quality of the digital pics, which were taken under challenging conditions in the dungeon of a gothic library.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Darrek Robertson

Professional photographer in Westerville, OH. During his studies at Columbus College of Art and Design, Darrek created a great typographic poster that celebrates the fifth and sixth symphonies of Beethaven (2013). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

David Knox

In 1855, David Know started producing wood type in Fredericksburg, OH, together with Edwin and Thomas Ferry, John McNulty, and M.S. Richards. The latter four were on strike at the W.T. and S.D. Day Co., a competing wood type manufacturer in the same city, and left that company to start with Knox. A flood destroys the plant in 1858, and that was it. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Deleterious Design
[Frederick Awich]

Born in Dayton, OH, in 1991, Frederick Awich founded the Deleterious Design foundry in North Brunswick, New Jersey, in 2010. His first fonts were Infringe (display sans) and UndercoverLovahh (hand-printed face). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Derek Prince Wilson

Graphic designer in Cleveland, OH, who created the Nut and Bolt typeface in 2013.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Doug Best

Cincinnati, OH-based designer of these typefaces in 2011: Frakked (blackletter), Spartan, Octagon, Modern Wood, Wasabi (a free Asian calligraphic simulation face; +Shogun, +Samurai, +Ninja). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

El-Asa Crawford

Design student at the University of Cincinnati. Creator of Pointed Sans-Serif (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Elizabeth Crutcher

During her graphic communication studies at the University of Cincinnati in 2012, Elizabeth Crutcher designed a hairline typeface. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Elmer Ward Bloser

Pennsylvanian penman, 1865-1929. He became penmanship instructor at G.W. Michael's Pen Art Hall in Oberlin, OH. The school and Bloser relocated to Delaware, OH. He worked briefly with Platt Spencer Rogers in 1885. He purchased a third interest in the Zanerian Art College in 1891---the latter was founded in 1888 by C.P. Zaner (who also had a third). The third third belonged to Zaner's cousin, Lloyd M. Kelchner. After Kelchner left, Zaner and Bloser were partners of the Zanerian College and the Zaner and Bloser Company. Zaner died in 1918 or 1919, and Bloser ran it by himself until his own death in 1929. He wasa gentle hard-working and talented penman and a great teacher. Bloser and Zaner were two of America's most influential penmen. Picture of Bloser, Zaner and Kelchner. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Eric West

Cincinnati, OH-based designer who is working on First Glance (2005, serif) and a revival of Imre Reiner's Gotika (2005). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Evan Scott Sharfe

Cincinnati, OH-based creator of the thin avant-garde sans face Zephyr (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fantazia Fonts
[Jackie Piert]

In 1994, Fantazia published a 2500-font CD (431MB), with fonts in TTF, T1 formats for both Mac and PC. The packages changed names over the years---they were called Fantazia Concepts, and Fantazia Fonts and Sounds at some point. The fonts names are recognized by their prefix, FZ. The mother company, Fantazia Concepts Inc, used to be located at PO Box 5142, Willowick, OH 44095 (1-(216)-951-5666, fax 1-(216)-951-9241). It seems to have disappeared though. [Google] [More]  ⦿

fontboy.com
[Bob Aufuldish]

Bob Aufuldish is an Affiliate Associate Professor at the California College of Arts and Crafts. Currently, he is Design Director of Sputnik CCAC, a student-staffed design office producing work for the College. Bob has a BFA and MFA in graphic design from Kent State University, Ohio. Fontboy (est. 1995, San Anselmo, CA, principals: Bob Aufuldish and Kathy Warinner, now called Aufuldish&Warinner) made OldMoney (truetype), Baufy (1994), RoarShock, Punctual (a connect-the-dots typeface family), NewClearEra, Viscosity (1996, with Kathy Warinner), Whiplash (1994). Mostly baroque modernism fonts. The Roarshock dingbats remind me of Zapf Dingbats, while Armature (1997) is just a regular semi-grunge font. Armature Neue (1997-2010) and Armature Neue Sans (2014) are monoline typeface families. Panspermia is the king of grunge. RoarType One is a "pixel" font where each pixel has been replaced by two alternating characters from the RoarShock dingbats.

Typefaces at Emigre include the very funny dingbats Zeitguys One and Two (1994) and Big Cheese (1992).

Bio at Emigre. MyFonts site. FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Franklin Type&Stereotype Foundry

Cincinnati-based foundry, also called Franklin Type Foundry, and Allison&Smith. Publishers of Convenient book of specimens Franklin Type Foundry (1889, Cincinnati).

Examples of the thousands of images in this 457-page book: Aesthetic, Armenian, Art Initials, Bank Not Black Extended, Card Gothic, Chancel, Circular Script, Condensed Title No. 3, French Clarendon, French Clarendon Shaded, Hogarth, Japanesque No. 3, Latin Condensed, Moslem, Queen Bess Script, Radiant, Ringlet, St. Louis, Steel Plate, Teutonic, Title Text, Title Text Open, Trojan, Unique.

Digital revivals include MFC Brass Rules Petit (2013, Monogram Fonts Co). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Frederick Awich
[Deleterious Design]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Gabriel Schut

Canton, OH-based creator of a hilarious typographic poster called Gentleman (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gavin Thompson

North Olmsted, OH-based creator of Galthop (2009), a typeface that is based on scans of glasses. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Genie

During her studies at Ohio State University, Genie designed the hand-printed typeface GeeKnee (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gina Grittner

Graphic designer in Cincinnati, OH. She writes about her typeface Abe (2012): Abe Regular was designed to give the classic typeface Din a humanist touch. With a focus on subtle contrast, natural curves and a dancing baseline; Abe is the less intense, country version of the rigid classic.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gorilla Ink

Designer of the artificial language font Angelic Writing (2011). He is based in Ohio. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Greg Ponchak
[SINDSINDSIND]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Haik Avanian

Haik Avanian is probably Armenian, but he lives in Toledo, OH, where he practices graphic design, digital photography and an occasional custom type design. Behance link. He created the condensed upright monoline sans face Autopilot (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hannah Steinberg

Hannah is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati's College of Design (Bachelor of Science in Design). She grew up in Cincinnati and currently lives in San Francisco.

In 2012, she created the multined typeface simply called Illumination.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Harris Corporation

Company in Melbourne, FL, which seems no longer interested in making fonts. This page tells its history: Alfred and Charles G. Harris set up the Harris Automatic Press Company in 1895 in Niles, OH. The Harris Automatic Press Company was responsible for many printing innovations during the early 1900s including the first commercially successful offset lithographic press and the first two-color offset press. In 1957 Harris-Seybold merged with Intertype Corporation (and thus Harris inherited the Harris-Intertype library!), a world leader in typesetting equipment. The resulting Harris-Intertype Corporation would be responsible for many subsequent innovations in the typesetting industry. In 1974 the name of the company was changed to Harris Corporation, and four years later Harris moved its headquarters from Cleveland to Melbourne, FL. Harris sold its printing equipment business in 1983, and today is a large high tech and communications firm. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Heidi Adams

A graduate of NC State's College of Design, Heidi created a slabby monoline typeface there in 2009. Born in Columbus, OH, she lives in Raleigh, NC. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Helena Ahlstrom Jole

Designer of the free fonts Helena'sHand (handwriting), and Scrapbook-Chinese (Chinese characters). Helena grew up in Ohio and graduated from Brigham Young University. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Henry Schuenemann

Born in 1866 in Cleveland, OH. Credited with the design of Oxford (1888). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hucklebuck Design Studio
[Andy Hayes]

Andy Hayes (Hucklebuck Design Studio, springfield, OH) created Reverend Italic (2011), an architectural drawing italic as seen on Foundfont. Priest Condensed (2011) is a condensed wood type headline face. It is unclear if they also made the grotesk face Modelfont (2011). Vanity Numbers (2009) is a number font based on old Californian license plates. Model Plane Slab (2009) is a slab serif headline face with wood type influences. In 2010, they made M.C. Gothic Condensed. Grain-O (2011) is another grotesk headline face.

In 2012, Andy Hayes desgned Bad Postcard and Postal Gothic. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hydro 74
[Joshua M. Smith]

Joshua M. Smith (Centerville, OH) runs Hydro74, which is located in Sanford and/or Orlando, FL. His faces take their themes often from metal rock bands, the goth scene, blackletter, and grunge. They can be bought at MyFonts or here. See also here. More direct access.

His typefaces: Gestapo Dirty, Gestapo Tech, Terra Firma, Rehab, MissionUK, Messiahcom, Kogji, New York Corp, Texan, Grace For The Fallen. Free fonts include Beast, Broken74, Gatecrashertexan, Heresy, MeaniesThick, MegalomaniaItalic, MegalomaniaNormal, MilitarizeConform, MoogwaiItalic, MoogwaiNormal, MoogwaiThinOblique, OmnipotenceBlack, PietyBlack, Platipus, Proclivitydark, Proven, Resurrection, Revolution, Sacrafical, SailorJerry, Spitfire (2010, tattoo face), Submit, SubmitItalic, SubmitThinItalic, TripleXXX, Conform, Meanies, Megalomania, Moogwai, Platipus, Resurection, Revolution, Proven, Gate Crasher, Agnostic, Working Class hero (Western), Blasphemy, Disestarlishmentarianism, Napalm Vertigo, Black Mass (2005, blackletter / tattoo face).

In 2009, he fired up his creative mind, and started working on a new batch of display faces: Muerte Black, West Coast Soul, Iron Fist, Nue Black, Uber Black (+Caps, blackletter), Le Venom (a phenomenal high-contrast art deco face), Avante (art deco, counterless), Nue Goth (blackletter), The Thickness (ultra fat), Script, Razor Black, Martyr Black, Sentry Black, Imperial Black, Thai Black, Dayton Black (racecar lettering), Slash Black (blood and guts font), Burial Black (blackletter), Cadaver Ink (gothic), Czar (hairline sans), Tramp Stamp, Wolfstien Electro (in the spirit of Sinaloa), Viper Black (scary), Catalyst Solid (ulta fat), Calypso (sans), Suture Slab (gothic), Venice Black (gothic), Black Mamba (metal rock band lettering, Cyrillic influences), Tyranny Gothic (blackletter), Blackmail Sect (more blackletter), Sailor Jerry (bilined), Napalm Vertigo (army stencil), Heresy Gothic (blackletter grunge), Working Class Hero (Western grunge), Golden Age, La Santisma Muerte (scary).

Free faces at Legacy of Defeat, as of 2011: H74Cairissian, H74DemonRacer, H74EastZombieHigh, H74Federation, H74GhettoWolves (scary), H74InfectedZombies, H74Pistola, H74SnakeOilEmbossed, H74SnakeOilSolid (2011, constructivist), H74Spitfire, H74TheBlackBureau, H74TheGoldenDawn, H74TheGoldenDawnItalic, H74ThunderScript, H74ZombieAttack, Black Label Whiskey, Armored, Blood Tonic, H74 Cadaver Ink (2011, tattoo face), Cortez, Damn Hippies, H74 False Idols (2011), Heathen, Kremlin Ink, H74 Kustom Style (2011, a tattoo/graffiti font), Moscow Moonshine, San Loscisco (2011), Blood Tonic (2011), Snake Whiskey (2011), Time Is Money (2011), Valkyrie (2011), Viva Los Vatos (2011), Warriors (2011), West Coast Soul (2011), Yo Santos (2011).

Commercial faces done in 2011: H74 Warriors (2011), H74 Viva Los Vatos (2011, cholo graffiti), H74 Snake Whiskey (2011, spurred Western face), H74 Norway Black (2011), H74 Her Majesty (2011, spurred face), H74 Muerte (2011), H74 Hellfire (2011, spurred family), H74 Luckys Flash (2011), H74 Le Venom (2011, art deco), H74 Dishonor, H74 Cobra (tattoo face), H74 Pistola (2011, a tattoo font), H74 San Loscisco, H74 Wizard Nip (brush), H74 Wizard Staff, H74 The Black Bureau (black slab serif headline face), H74 Zombie Allegiance, H74 Monniker, H74 El Librador, H74 Eastern Star, H74 Dead Empire, H74 Black Diamond, H74 Alcazar, H74 Corpse Black, H74 Corpse Paint.

Production in 2012: Achilles, Bootleggers, Chingon, Hernandez, Kuso, Malice, Muerte Wolf, Pendejo, Pinche Muerte, The Order, Witness.

Typefaces from 2013: The Pricks, Ocelot Piss, The Witches, Wizard Tit, Conquest, Wizard Dick, Riverside, Dirty Sanchez, Corpus Delicti, Warlock Ghetto Wolves, Spitfire.

Typefaces from 2014: Thunder Pussy, The Kült, The Clap, Shit Script, Prison Bitch, Hëavy Mëtal, Fucktura Heavy, Fucktura Thin, Go Fuck Yer'Se;lf, Drop Anchor, Camp Cooter, Born to Lose.

Dafont link. Legacy of Defeat is a related site with their free fonts. Behance link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Jack Aaron Rodriguez
[Baltimore&Ohio Railroad Historical Society]

[More]  ⦿

Jackie Piert
[Fantazia Fonts]

[More]  ⦿

Jacob Wells

Student at the University of Cincinnati, who is from Villa Hills, KY. Creator of Tux Serif (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jacqueline D. Lipton

Professor of Law, Co-Director, Center for Law, Technology, and the Arts, Associate Director, Frederick K Cox International Law Center, Director, Cyberspace Law and Policy Office, Case Western Reserve University School of Law, Cleveland, OH. She wrote an authoritative article on digita typeface protection entitled To © or Not to ©? Copyright and Innovation in the Digital Typeface Indust (2009). Abstract: Intellectual property rights are often justified by utilitarian theory. However, recent scholarship suggests that creativity thrives in some industries in the absence of intellectual property protection. These industries might be called IP's negative spaces. One such industry that has received little scholarly attention is the typeface industry. This industry has recently digitized. Its adoption of digital processes has altered its market structure in ways that necessitate reconsideration of its IP negative status, with particular emphasis on copyright. This article considers the historical denial of copyright protection for typefaces in the United States, and examines arguments both for and against extending copyright protection to digital typefaces. It compares copyright law with alternative methods of protection for digital typefaces. It also suggests that the digital typeface industry may be a useful lens through which to consider broader claims about the application of intellectual property law to IP's negative spaces in the digital age. The article is meant for the US market, and, while really well-researched, it is a bit vague in its recommendations---it does not take any strong position. It is cautious (most lawyers are), and seems to want more typeface design protection laws (most lawyers do). In her conclusions, Lipton states Because copyright protection can potentially chill innovation, it is necessary to consider relevant market factors in more detail before making a determination about the need to extend copyright to digital typeface designs as such, or to their code. If such an extension is to be made, copyrights granted for digital typefaces should only be thin. Copyrights should also only be available prospectively and not retroactively. This should mitigate concerns about propertization of the public domain. [Google] [More]  ⦿

James Beams

Creator at Ohio State University of the handwriting font Sribble Normal (sic). [Google] [More]  ⦿

James Martin

James Martin is from Cincinnati but works as a designer in Atlanta. The computer mouse served as the catalyst for the funky Mousetrap alphabet (2006-2007). Not a font. In 2012, he created the free octagonal font Aluap Sans. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jared Geizer

Montville, OH-based creator of the squarish pixelish typeface Square Synapse Light (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jasen Melnick

Graduate of the Myers School of Art at the University of Akron, OH, who lives in Cleveland, OH. Behance link. Creator of a sketched alphabet called Retro Nouveau (2011). This is not a font yet, I understand. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jason Carter

Graphic designer in Oxford, OH, who created the paper fold typeface Paper (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jason Nolan
[Ultimate Font Download]

[More]  ⦿

Jay Batchelor

American designer, b. 1973, based in Cincinnati, OH. Between 2002 and 2010, he created Rebel Caps. Rebel Redux and Chemy Retro (art deco) followed in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jeff Bensch

Ex-student from the University of Toledo, b. 1971. Creator of the flamed dingbat and alphading fonts J-Flames (2011), Up In Flames (2008), Up In Flames Too (2008), Up No Flames (2008), Flames VI (2007), Flames V (2007), Gothic Flames (2007), Roman Flames (2009), Flames IV (2007), Flamesiii (2006, blackletter), Flames 2 (2006), Flames (2005), Bensch Gothic (2008), Bensch Gothic Flames (2008). PHuture (2008) breaks with his style and is a high-contrast rounded LED simulation face made in 2008.

Typefaces from 2010-2011: What UP (2011, gridded), Headshot (2011), PHUTUREphlamesPHAST (2011), PHUTUREphlames (2011), Gothferatu (2010, a spiky tattoo parlour blackletter face), Skyline (2010), Hexcellent (2011).

Typefaces from 2012: Fontmageddon.

Typefaces from 2014: Skylinesketch, Fast Block Flames, Hot Librarian, Hot Secretary, UpTop, Synced, Small Tall.

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jennifer Grube

Graphic designer in Bellefontaine, OH, who created the wide slab serif typeface family Sailor Serif in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jeremy Jett

Cincinnati, OH-based design student who created Wonka (2012, Victorian decorative face). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jesse Snyder
[Warehouse Design]

[More]  ⦿

Jessica A. Edmiston

Cincinnati-based graphic designer and illustrator. Behance link. She created a number of custom typefaces in 2008-2009. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jim Flora

Illustrator and album cover artist in the 1940s and 1950s, b. Bellefontaine, OH, 1914, d. Rowayton, CT, 1998. He lived mostly in Rowayton, CT. Irwin Chusid writes: Flora's album covers pulsed with angular hepcats bearing funnel-tapered noses and shark-fin chins who fingered cockeyed pianos and honked lollipop-hued horns. Yet this childlike exuberance was subverted by a tinge of the diabolic. Flora wreaked havoc with the laws of physics, conjuring flying musicians, levitating instruments, and wobbly dimensional perspectives. Taking liberties with human anatomy, he drew bonded bodies and misshapen heads, while inking ghoulish skin tints and grafting mutant appendages. He was not averse to pigmenting jazz legends Benny Goodman and Gene Krupa like bedspread patterns. On some Flora figures, three legs and five arms were standard equipment, with spare eyeballs optional. His rarely seen fine artworks reflect the same comic yet disturbing qualities. "He was a monster," said artist and Floraphile JD King. So were many of his creations.

His headline in a 1953 issue of Park East Magazine inspired Nick Curtis to create the font Cool Cat Jim NF (2005). Another Jim Flora font by Nick Curtis is Flora Dora NF. P22 Type Foundry has released Flora Mambo (2010), a font set based on playful hand-lettering from the 1955 Jim Flora Mambo For Cats RCA Victor album cover. The set includes Flornaments, consisting of 72 miniature figure icons (dingbats) from Flora artworks. Scans of some of his album covers and illustrations: Collaboration, Dog, Kallao set, Solomon's Seal (1942), The Day the Cow Sneezed (1957), Self Portrait. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Joe Puckett

Joe Puckett (Columbus, OH) created the cistom typeface BurType for the snowboarding brand Burton in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jon C. Lund

Digital illustrator who made some fonts. He lives in Hudson in rural Ohio, where his company, The Archetype Press, produces classic poster-style artwork in digtal format. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jonathan Smith
[AArrgghh! Typefaces]

[More]  ⦿

Joseph Stitzlein

Portland, OR-based creative director where he works at Nike. Before settling at Nike in Portland, he worked at Landor Associates, Stone Yamashita Partners, Chronicle Books, Pentagram, and CKS Partners and was living some of that time in San Francisco. He graduated from the College of DAAP at the University of Cincinnati.

His type designs include the Sgiv1Text family in 1999, at first done as an OEM for Silicon Graphics Inc. This SGI corporate typeface evolved a couple of years later into the retail font Monolein (T-26).

He also designed the Sempra Energy Corporate Typeface and the modern family ITC Tactile (2002). The latter font family won an award at the TDC2 2003 competition.

FontShop link. Klingspor link. Behance link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Joshua M. Smith
[Hydro 74]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Justin Cownden

Illustrator and designer from Cleveland, OH, who created a modular typeface in 2011. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Kati Best

During her studies in Batavia, OH, Kati Best created the typeface Hello Mr. Fox (2013), which is characterized by its tall ascenders and vintage look. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Katie Major

Graphic designer at Go Media, a creative agency based in Cleveland, Ohio. She created three fonts, Celest, Diffraction, and Identity Theft. The font link is broken though. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Kayane Kouzoujian

Graphic designer and artist in New Albany, OH, who created a Latin pixel typeface, Kitabat (2014), and an Arabic typeface (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ken Gross
[Rustbelt Type]

[More]  ⦿

Kenneth Van Mechelen

Designer at the Baltimore&Ohio Railroad Historical Society of the railroad lettering fonts B&OStation (2005), B&OLoco (2005), EMD (2006), and B&OX (2005). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Kent Barns

Beele Center, OH-based type designer Kent Barns created Dolsáb (2011) and Remedia (2013, an 18-weight sans). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Kerra Sunderlin

Cincinnati-based graphic designer who created the modern typeface Klare in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Kevin Cornett

During his design studies, Kevin Crnett (Bowling Green, OH) created the modular typeface Modern Hand (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Kyle Christopher Bennett

Graphic communication design student at the University of Cincinnati. During his studies, he created a high-contrast display typeface (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Lady Timeless

Jane, aka Lady Timeless, aka GraphXGoneWild created a number of dingbats. Born in 1961, she lives in Ohio. In her own words: These Dingbats were all created by me (Lady Timeless). Some of the files were created from using OutLaw by Designs Poser graphics (with permission) and some were created from The Big Box of Art clipart, but some are my own original designs too. The fonts, all dated 2005-2006: 12HalloweenSignsLT, 7DingbatSlatsLT, CaliKatsPathDrawsLT, CathysArtDecoDings, FreakyCommentBalloonsLT, CatsvsDogsLT, CharmHoldersLT, FencedInLT, JewelryPartsLT, LadyFootwearLT, MakeYourOwnPetsLT, PostItLT, SilhouettesfromPoserLT, WindowsLT. Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Leah Kroeger

During her studies at Northern Kentucky University, Leah Kroeger (Cincinnati, OH) created the slab serif typeface Audacity (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Looseleaf Fonts
[Nathanael Bonnell]

Nathanael Bonnell studied in Cincinnati, OH, and set up the Looseleaf Fonts commercial foundry in 2012 in Wyoming, OH. Before that, he created Cyril, a Cyrillic typeface. Creator of the retro minimalist geometric beauty Yoshiko (2006)---disregard the typophiles' comments, because this one is going to live a glorious life. His third project, Salamander (2006), a classic roman with a luscious italic to boot, is another winner. However, probably because of pressure from Linotype, which owns the name Linotype Salamander, the latter font was renamed Newt. In 2009, Newt Serif was published by Cabinet Type / Veer.

In 2010 he published the angular flared Solveig family. Solveig Text and Solveig Display followed in 2013.

The Looseleaf Foundry published the serifed typeface Walleye (2013), which covers Latin, Cyrillic and Greek.

Klingspor link. Blogspot link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Lydia Tissandier

Oxford, OH-based designer of Kiddovian (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

M. Leavitt

Columbus, OH-based illustrator who studied at the Columbus College of Art and Design. Working on this serif face (2005). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Manfred Westreicher

Graphic designer in Cincinnati, OH. Behance link.

Creator of Mixom (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Marcus Burlile

Born in Columbus, OH, in 1970. Catalog of Marcus Burlile's typefaces:

  • [T-26]: AblefontA (the Harry Potter display font; it includes Able-New (2003); Sarah McFalls made the free imitation face Lumos), Baluster, Cactus Patch, COLONISTA, DeadMuleCanyon, Deadbugs, DustEnna, DustGoldy, DustGutter, DustPiece, DustWesten (Dust is a Western family made in 1996), Eekers (Halloween dingbats), MillHarrow, Relatives (dingbats), Sagember, SixGunShootout, SpareParts, Thornforms (1994, dingbats), Colony, Cothral, SpareParts, SparePartsToo, Anvilregular, COLONIST, Flytrap, FlytrapBrier, Sillbat, Stelefont, StelefontBevel, Widows (1994, faces of widows and the weapons used to kill their spouses).
  • At Raw Types in Burke, VA, he designed Astilets (dingbats), Dry Gulch (western), Millharrow, Lilyin, Autumnull.
  • Garagefonts: Phantomekanix (great robot dingbats), Beartrap, Hallow, Mudhole, Ravine, Rockcrawler and Sidewinder.
  • Plazm: Stelefont (1993), Widows (1994), Flytrap (1995), GhostTown (1995), Ablefont (1993), Anvil (1993), Autumnull (1995), Colony (1993), Pilgrim (1993), Reckon (1996), Sillbat (1994), Spiderust (1995), Thistlem (1995), Kitsch (1993), COLONIST.
[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Margaret Gray

A graduate of the University of Cincinnati, Ohio and of the Atelier national de Recherche typographique (Paris). She is a professor of applied typography at the Ecole Estienne in Paris since 1994. Her work is centered around the use of writing within an architectural context, as a vehicule of information, or an element of architectural identity. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Marissa McIntire

Oxford, OH-based designer of the pixelish typeface Techtonic (2014), which was created during her studies at Miami University. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Marjorie Chan's ChinaLinks2

Chinese font links. A great resource brought to you by Marjorie Chan at Ohio State. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mark Kusek
[Wood Type Impressions]

[More]  ⦿

Matt Roth

Born in Cleveland, Matt Roth studied at Ohio University, and lives in Athens, OH. Fiji (2012) is a serifed typeface developed in Don Adleta's Letterform Design class at Ohio University. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Matt Schoch

Ohio-based graphic designer (b. 1991) who created the rounded futuristic faces Veracity (2008) and Evolution (2008). See also here, where Evolution is credited to Schoch and Paul Willocks. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Matthew Anderson

Climate activist and lead designer for 350.org. His abridged CV in his own words: Born in Columbus, Ohio. Played with Legos. Loved to draw. Played drums in a high school band. Started messing around in Photoshop. Became a vegetarian. Studied green architecture at Western. Discovered that making posters and websites was more fun than building models. Moved to Washington DC to intern at Free Range. Moved to San Francisco to work for 350. Made some good friends. Ate too many burritos. Moved to Brooklyn for the hell of it.

In 2014, Matthew created the free sans typeface family Klima for the climate movement: Klima is my version of a more relaxed DIN: slightly wider, with a similar geometric foundation but more plainspoken. In three weights with obliques, free for non-commercial, non-climate denial use. It is exquisite and quite good, except perhaps that the italics are just obliques (slanted romans). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Matthew Cordes

During his studies in Columbus, OH, Matthew Cordes created the customized typeface Arctic Circle (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Matthew Derrick

Designer in 2006 at Bedoodle, a foundry located in Dayton, OH, of the handwriting fonts Funnies, Grimble Castle, Paparazzi, Scratch Pad, Selvin, and Wavy Gravy. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Max Burnside

Cincinnati, OH-based and/or San José, Costa Rica-based designer of the techno ornamental caps typeface Alex Young (2013), named after a DC-area producer and DJ for whom the typeface was created.

In 2014, he made the squarish typefaces Elite and This Way To Costa Rica.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Michael Scarpitti

Mike graduated from Ohio State University with a degree in philosophy. Prolific Columbus, OH-based designer (b. Columbus, OH) whose fonts are mainly available through Scriptorium. Many of his fonts were influenced by roman inscriptional or Trajan types. These include Caesario (1993, a Trajan column font based on Goudy's drawings from 1936), Minerva (1993), Falconis and Vespasiano. Other typefaces with ancient origins include DeBellis, Pomponianus, Praitor, Jerash (1993, with Nalle), Macteris Uncial (1993), Antioch (1993), and Corbei Uncial.

He prepared a set of fonts based on a medieval Latin British manuscript (Pontifica, 1999) and another one called Orlock, based on the lettering in a poster for the German German expressionist silent film Nosferatu. Pontifica was redesigned in 2009 based on the source manuscripts from the Papal Archive. He writes: Pontifica is an example of protogothic calligraphy, a style developed at the monestery of St. Gall in the 12th century to replace Carolingian minuscule with a more efficient and compact system of lettering. Ultimately it became the progenitor of the gothic lettering styles of the late Medieval period.

Viw Michael Scarpitti's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Mikala Marrone

Oxford, OH-based designer of Word Up (2013), a hand-printed outline typeface. [Google] [More]  ⦿

MMST Inc

GD&T font is a safety symbol truetype font for 49USD: "Professionally designed Windows TrueType font that contains the complete QS-9000 critical characteristics and safety symbol set, as well as the entire set of ASME GD&T symbols." From MMST Inc in Willoughby, OH, 49USD. MMST stands for Metrology e URL listed for MMST, Inc. Metrology Methods Support Technology. The founder and owner is Wayne Knazek. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Morgan Holliday

During her studies at Miami University in Cincinnati, OH, Morgan Holliday designed an untitled modular typeface (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Morgan Murray

Graphic designer in Cincinnati, OH. She created the sharp-edged display typeface Razor in 2014 using FontStruct. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Nathan Eady

Based in Galion, OH, Nathan Eady (b. 1974) used the free tools Inkscape and FontForge to make the free architectural lettering font family Blooming Grove (2009, Open Font Library). Blog. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Nathanael Bonnell
[Looseleaf Fonts]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Neil Wengerd

Graphic design student at Kent State University. In 2009, he started work on a Bauhaus-style face called Neuehaus. [Google] [More]  ⦿

New Fonts
[Charles Nix]

New York-based foundry run by Charles Nix (b. 1967, Ohio). Fonts: Melaka, Batak, Nani, Tuk Tuk, Christmas (a softened blackletter with Christmas ornaments), Nix Rift (serif), Huta Bulon, Samosir, Island Special. Batak became ITC Batak (2002). MyFonts write-up. Charles Nix digitized the Augereau family for George Abrams in 1997 and manages the Abrams Legacy Collection, which also offers Abrams Venetian.

The company consists of Charles Nix (font design), Stefano Arcella (ornament design), and Wong Chee Yee (digitizing).

Typefaces in the New Fonts collection are derived from a rich variety of sources - from 15th century Spain to 21st century Sumatra. The Sumatran Series of fonts is inspired by hand-painted letterforms from commercial signage in the tiny village of Tuk Tuk on the island of Samosir in Northern Sumatra. The series consists of six faces: Batak, Nani, Tuk Tuk, Samosir, Melaka, and Huta Bolon.

FontShop link. Klingspor link.

View Charles Nix's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Nick Ross

Designer in Cincinnati, OH, who created some custom faces in 2010, such as Heinz Schenker. He is a student at the University of Cincinnati's College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Oberlin Business College

This college in Oberlin, Ohio, was well-known in the 19th century for its penmanship studies. C.A. Barnett, J.T. Henderson and J.N. Yocom published the Oberlin Business College Compendium of Penmanship (1901). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ohio State University

Pick up the Phonetic family of truetype fonts, in Monotype's TimesNewRoman style. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ohio Type Foundry

Cincinnati-based foundry, also called Guilford&Jones, and Williams&Jones. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ornaments of Grace
[Beth Rufener]

Rittman, Ohio-based creator of a set of 23 Victorian-style vintage fonts called Church in the Wildwood (2014). She also made a free set of Victorian drop caps called Month of Sundays (2014). Along the same Victorian rustic wood emulation theme, she published the layered typeface family Sunday Best (2014).

Home page. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Oswald Bruce Cooper

Influential designer and type designer, motivated by beautiful advertising type (b. Mountgilead, Ohio, 1879, d. Chicago, 1940). Picture. He was angry at Goudy for his Goudy Heavyface (1925), which resembles Cooper Black a bit too much (check this 2002 video). MyFonts link. Cooper died of cancer. His faces include:

  • The well-known Cooper family done at Barnhart Brothers&Spindler: Cooper (1918-19), Cooper Stencil (1921), Cooper Black (1922; Linotype version, acquired from Barnhart Brothers&Spindler in 1924 by Schriftguß AG in Dresden; Elsner&Flake version; other versions exist by ParaType, Bitstream, Scangraphic, Mecanorma, Adobe, and URW++), Cooper Italic (1924), Cooper Old Style (1919), Cooper Initials (1925), Cooper Hilite (1925), Cooper Black Condensed (1926), Cooper Black Italic (1926), Cooper Fullface (1928). Bitstream offers an 11-style Cooper family. Cooper Black made it to American Typefounders (ATF). One of the original drawings for Cooper Fullface was rejected by ATF but digitally revived by Nick Curtis in 2008 as Ozzi Modo Plump NF and Ozzi Modo Squooshed NF in 2008.

    Ian Lynam revived many styles from 2010-2013, under names such as Cooper Old Style, Cooper Initials, Cooper Italic, Cooper Fullface Italic. Lynam writes: Cooper OldStyle is the result of Barnhart Brothers&Spindler type foundry representatives Richard N. McArthur and Charles R. Murray having met with Oswald Cooper and his business partner Fred Bertsch in 1917. Due to other commercial design firms adopting Cooper's style of lettering throughout the Midwest, both companies came to an agreement to create a family of types based on Cooper's advertising lettering. McArthur and Murray saw the biggest potential in the super-bold advertising lettering that would become Cooper Black, but agreed that a roman weight old style should be executed first, the logical progenitor to a family or related types. The foundry requested that the roman have rounded serifs so as to more specifically correlate to the planned bold. This was the first of many tactical strategies in type design between type designer and foundry, most specifically McArthur and Cooper, whose back-and-forth relationship in designing, critiquing, and modifying letterforms was integral in shaping the oeuvre of type designs credited to Cooper. While it was Cooper's sheer talent in shaping appealing and useful alphabets that made his work so popular, McArthur's role as critic and editor has gone largely un-noted in the slim amount of writing of length about Cooper's work. Cooper and McArthur went back and forth over the design of the roman face for nearly two years with Cooper, constantly redrawing and revising the typeface to get it to a castable state. The capitals were successively redrawn by Cooper, with particular care paid to the "B" and "R" to make them relate formally. The lowercase was redrawn numerous times, as were experiments in shaping the punctuation. McArthur requested a pair of dingbats to accompany the typeface, along with a decorative four leaf clover ornament "for luck". Cooper included a slightly iconoclastic, cartoonish paragraph mark, as well as decorative end elements, a centered period, and brackets with a hand-drawn feel. The final typeface is a lively, bouncy conglomeration whose rounded forms dazzle and move the eye. Originally called merely "Cooper" in early showings, the name was later revised to "Cooper Oldstyle". The typeface met with a warm reception upon release in 1919, the public favoring its advertising-friendly, tightly-spaced appearance. Sales were moderate, and the face was considered a success. Cooper originally drew the figures the same width as the "M" of the font, but revised them to the width of the "N" at the request of McArthur. Early versions of drawings of the slimmer figures are noted as "cruel stuff" in accompanying notes by Cooper, though they were versioned out into far more elegant numerals than the earlier stout figures. Both versions of the numerals are included in the digital release, as are the ornamental elements. In 1925, McArthur and Murray requested a set of ornamental initials. Cooper designed the initials open-faced on a square ground surrounded by organic ornament. The initials were "intended to be nearly even in `color value' with that of normal text type". The letterforms themselves are a medium-bold variation on the Cooper OldStyle theme, lacking the balance of Cooper's text faces, but charming nonetheless.

    SoftMaker did a complete Cooper Black Pro series in 2012, including Cooper Black Pro Stencil.

  • Oz Handicraft (Bitstream, 1991) was created by George Ryan in 1990 from a showing of Oswald Cooper's hand lettering found in The Book of Oz Cooper (1949, Society of Typographic Arts, Chicago). In that book, you can also find two great essays by Cooper written in 1936-1937, Leaves from an Imaginary Type Specimen Book and As an experiment: 15 serifs applied to stems of similar weight to test serif influence in letter design. Modern Roman Capitals.
  • Fritz (Font Bureau, 1997) was created by Christian Schwartz who was inspired by a characteristic handlettered ad from 1909, as well as the single word "Robusto" drawn for Oz Cooper's own amusement. In 1998, Fritz was honored by the NY Type Directors Clubs TDC2 competition.
  • Boul Mich. Mac McGrew: Boul Mich. During the period of "modernistic" typography of the 1920s, BB&S, the large Chicago typefoundry, brought out Boul Mich in 1927, the name being an advertising man's idea for a tie-in with the fashion advertising of the smart shops on Chicago's Michigan Boulevard [Avenue], according to Richard N. McArthur, then advertising manager of BB&S. An unidentified clipping with a bit of hand-lettering had been sent to the foundry; Oswald Cooper of Cooper Black fame was asked to sketch the missing letters to guide the foundry's pattern makers in cutting a new face, but he disclaimed any credit for the design. Apparently there is no truth in the persistent myth that Boul Mich was named for Boulevard Saint-Michel in Paris. Compare Broadway. Digitally revived in 2010 by Ian Lynam at Wordshape and a few years earlier by Dan Solo as well.
  • Dietz Text.
  • Packard, first handlettered for use in ads for the Packard Motor Company in 1913, and later converted to metal by BB&S. The bold weight is credited to Morris Fuller Benton (ATF, 1916), but it is highly probable that Benton did the adaptation for both weights. A digital version of this was done by Nick Curtis in 2008 under the name Packard Patrician NF. Steve Jackaman and Ashley Muir created Packard New Style in 2011, and the slightly grungier Packard Old Style also in 2011. Mac McGrew: Packard is ATF's adaptation of a distinctive style of lettering done by Oswald Cooper in advertisements for the Packard Motor Car Company, in 1913. Packard Bold followed in 1916. The latter is credited to Morris Benton, again closely following Cooper's original lettering, and it is quite likely that Benton did the actual adaptation of the first face also. These faces retain a handlettered appearance partly by the slightly irregular edges of strokes, partly by a number of alternate characters. Both were quite popular for several years.
  • Pompeian Cursive (1927): a calligraphic script designed for BBS to compete with Lucian bernhard's Schoenschrift. Ian L=ynam found the orioginal drawings and based his Pompeian Cursive (2010) on it.
  • Cooper's handlettering also inspired Matt Desmond, who created the beautiful face Cagliostro (2011, free at Google Web Fonts).
Klingspor link. FontShop link. Linotype link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Paige Hake

During her studies at Miami University, Paige Hake (Oxford, OH) created the modular typeface Under The Sea (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Patricia Lillie

From Ashtabula, OH, Patricia Lillie (b. 1958) is the respected designer of the wonderful (shareware) Poptics dingbat fonts series (I, II and III) in 1993. See also here or here. Please read her remarks about rip-off font sellers. She sold many wonderful wonderful wonderful dingbat fonts via Eyewire: Gargoil, Fidelma, Lil Creatures (great!), Lil Ancients, Lil Critters, Lil Dings, Lil Fishies, Lil Stuff, Lil Features, Lil Folks, Lil Faces, Lil Events, Lil Flowers, Mini Pics Doohickies, Lil Edibles and Lil Vehicles. These were marketed by Image Club Graphics as their MiniPics series in 1995. She also had display fonts such as Horsefeathers, WhimsyICG, Whassis, Farrier, Shatterday, Chilada and Chilada Dos (1994), Burweed, Alleycat, Ashtabula, Damosel, and Syllogon. [T-26] designer of Ashtabula, Damosel, DamoselDingbats.

Review of Poptics by Fred Showker. Noteworthy is that Poptics became Poptics Delux in 2010, and is now a pay font at MyFonts.

Other fonts: Fidelma (at Type Quarry), Samson, Delilah, Benderville, ElegeionScript (2001, formal handwriting), ITC Tickle (2001), ITC Tickle Too, ITC Cinderella (2002), Miss Kitty Deluxe (2009, comic book face), Zarlino (2011, a brand new bastarda blackletter family), Boppa Delux (2011, an elegant bold display family). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Proportional Lime
[Shane Brandes]

Oberlin, OH-based foundry of Shane Brandes (b. Lakefield, MN, 1974), who made the historic semi-blackletter revival Augsburger2009 (2009), which was inspired by one of Ernhardt Ratdolt's (1442-1528) many beautiful typefaces. Ratdolt was a printer from Augsburg, hence the name. River Liffey (2009) is based on a typeface used by James Williams an Irish printer active in Dublin during the late 18th century. Rising Sun (2009, blackletter) was inspired by Gering and Remboldt's work during the late 1490s in Paris.

Charlemagne (2010) is an imaginary medieval script. Fleurious (2010) are ornaments. Sweynheym Pannartz (2010) is modeled after an example Conrad Sweynheym and Arnold Pannartz used in their early printing venture in Subiaco, Italy which began around 1465. Ballard (2010) was inspired by a font used by Henrie Ballard, who operated on Fleet Street at the Signe of the Bear in London from ca. 1597-1608. White Now (2010) is a music note font. Enn'agrammaton (2010) is a cryptographic font. Pluton (2010) is a fixed width font with over 1400 glyphs. Old Venexia (2010) simulates an irregular medieval type. Black Tie (2010) is a simple monoline sans family. Azabercna (2010) is based on gothic principles. Alchimistes (2010) is a medieval symbol face, while Florati (2010) provides a set of ornamental caps. Wappenstein (2010) is an angular stone-carved face: The font Wappenstein was inspired by the carving on a memorial stone located in Paderborn, Germany. The stone was a Epitaph of the Brenkener family, and the carver is known as the Meister des Brenkener Familienepitaphs. The carving, dating to 1562, currently is curated by the Erzbischöfliches Diözesanmuseum in the city of Paderborn and was originally in the Brenkener Pfarr Kirche. Boston 1851 (2010) is based on a stereotype used by Wier and White, Printers of Boston, that was created by the New England Stereoype Foundry under the auspices of Hobart and Robbins, also of Boston. Cruxially (2010) is a 500-glyph dingbat font with crosses.

Gaspardo (2011) is an art deco display face. Anguillette (2011) is a quaint grungy face. Ernst (2011) is a very simple but large hand-printed face. The blackletter face Schoeffer (2011) is based on Typ.7:146/148G also known as Gesellschaft für Typenkunde plate no. 258, by Peter the Younger (son of Peter Schoeffer), cut ca. 1509-1520. Printers in Marks is a printer mark dingbat face created in 2011. Cat E Poultry (2011) is a scanbat face of cats. Lucas Brandis (2011) is based on section headings used by printer Lucas Brandis,the first printer to operate in the city of Lübeck around 1473.

Creations in 2012: Vine Street, Nicolaus Kesler (a blackletter type based on one of the typefaces of Basel-based Nicolaus Kessler, 15th century), Modality Antiqua (straight-edged and mechanical), Martin Crantz (2012: Martin Crantz (or sometimes Krantz) of the three, including Ulrich Gering and Michael Friburger, that set up a press at the Sorbonne in 1470 was likely the fellow who had the technical know how how to cast the type itself, hence the name of this new face that is based on his work.). Modality Antiqua and Modality Novus are explorations of the octagonal principle. Zainer is a rough-edges renaissance era typeface named after Augsburg-based printer Günther Zainer who was active from 1468 until 1478. Swine And Roses is based on a Free Mason script. Ammurapi is a Ugaritic script face.

Typefaces from 2013: Michael Wenssler (an incunabula / blackletter typeface based on Michael wenssler typeface from 1482), Andreae (a Fraktur based on a 16th century font by Hieronymus Andreae, who first worked as woodblock cutter and then became a publisher in the city of Nuremberg until his death in 1565), Dropsomaniacal (Lombardic), Therhoernen (grungy medieval script after a Cologne-based printer Arnold Therhoernen, active from 1470 until 1483), Rusch (a 1000-glyph revival of a late 15th century antiqua by Adolf Rusch von Ingweiler, who was active in Strasbourg from 1460 until 1489), Gutknecht (a Schwabacher based on a font used by Jobst Gutknecht, a printer in Nuremburg from 1514 until 1542). The rough blackletter typeface Kachelofen and Konrad Kachelofen are named after Konrad Kachelhofen, a printer in Leipzig active from 1482 until 1529. Albrecht Pfister (2013) is a textura face based on Biblia Paperum, which was printed by Pfister in Bamberg, ca. 1460. Amerbach 883 (2013) is a rotunda typeface based on a typeface by Basel-based printer and typefounder Johann von Amerbach, who was active from 1477 until 1513.

Typefaces from 2014: Lion of Antwerp (an incunabula typeface: Gerard Leeu met his untimely end in a work-related altercation in 1492. He was a notable printer in both the cities of Gouda and Antwerp. This font face is based on the "Die gesten of gheschienisse van romen" typeface, ca. 1481.), Hildegardis (an alphabetic cipher that was invented in the 12th century by Hildegard von Bingen to obscure a language called Lingua Ignota. The exemplar was found in the Riesencodex), Lady Vittoria (vampire script), Trowel.

Creative Market link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Prototype Experimental Foundry
[Charles S. Wilkin]

Commercial foundry, est. 1994 in Brooklyn by Charles Wilkin (b. Buffalo, NY). Designers selling their fonts through them include

  • Charles Wilkin: Sequence, Policy, Velvet (1995, also at Plazm), Superchunk (which includes funny Picasso-esque dingbats of faces), Spin (1994), Spaceboy, Hi-Light (2002, an upright script family), Poly Anna (2001), Phink, DeScripto (grunge calligraphy), Decline, Broken, Dink (1994), Euphoria, Fatboy, Interstate60, MagnetoHalfSerif, PJCT (2003, sans).
  • John Wiese: Halo, Petulia, Cat Woman, Caitanya.
  • Robert Beck: Table Manners.
  • Frank Ford: Ghetto Prince (calligraphic grunge script).
  • 52mm: Kaiju (Hebrew simulation font).
  • Keith Tatum: Gliche.

Free fonts by Charles Wilkin: Creep (1995), Cypher (1997), Nude (1995), Pixely (2002).

Alternate URL. At MyFonts. Dafont link. Personal web site.

View Charles Wilkin's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

RailFonts.com
[Benn Coifman]

Benn is an electrical engineering professor at Ohio State. Benn Coifman's site specializes in commercial railroad train and train lettering fonts. Also included (for free) are a crossword font, a population font, a car font, and a cartography font, all designed by Ben. Check RoadSign, a complete collection of US road signs. He also has a 1940s automobile font, the text font Rio Grande (1998) and a WWII plane font. He also made the BankGothic lookalikes Gotthard and Zephyr. Other designers at RailFonts are Clifford J. Vander Yacht and Otto M. Vondrak.

Dafont link. Abstract Fonts link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Reference Type Foundry
[Albert J. Kim]

Small foundry run by Albert J. Kim of Toledo, OH, who made the Adagio sans family in 1994. The fonts Aspire (1994, calligraphic) and HeadlineNews (1993) were shareware. I do not think this outfit is still up. Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Richard Polt

Creator (at Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH) of the old typewriter font Remington Noiseless (2005), a font made with Fontifier.

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Richie Guere

Richie Guere (Fairborn, OH) made the handwriting face Guyer (2009, Fontcapture font). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Rick Courtney

Graphic designer in Youngstown, OH, who created the grungy typeface Piece of Mine (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Riley McQuown

During her studies in Columbus, OH, Riley McQuown designed the display typeface Snail Mail (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Robert Donona

Cleveland, OH-based expert in American film type, who is launching himself in type design. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Roy Rothstein

Cleveland, OH-based type designer actiive in the 1950s and 1960s. He made several photo lettering and metal typefaces. These include Layout Gothic No.1, 2, 3, and Roys Gothic No.2, 3.

Mac McGrew writes: Layout Gothic was an attempt to do in metal some of the things that advertising artists were demanding of photolettering with its new-found 'freedom" of tight spacing. Roy Rothstein, a Cleveland typographer, redesigned several characters for the Alternate Gothics; these were specially cast by ATF about 1959, and other characters were trimmed for very close fitting. Similar heavier gothics had been made about 1951: Roys Gothic No.2 by Rothstein in collaboration with Jack Forman, Roys Gothic No.3 by Rothstein, and Roys Gothic No.4, an adaptation of Helvetica Extra Bold Condensed, imported from Germany. All this was done in the 60-point size; other sizes were furnished photographically. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Rustbelt Type
[Ken Gross]

Free truetype font MapBats by Ken Gross, 1998. Ken is a map designer and editor at Rustbelt Cartography in Cleveland, OH. The font is not on the web page. It used to be at Jami's site. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ryan Clark
[Ryan vs Clark]

[More]  ⦿

Ryan Clark

Dayton, OH-based designer at Virb. Also, front-end coder, illustrator and typographer. He says about Liberator (2011, Lost Type Coop): This bomber-inspired face provides a masculine punch to any project or design.

Creative Market link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ryan Lewis

Creator of a an unnamed roman typeface in 2010 while studying at Ohio University. Ryan works as a graphic designer in Athens, OH. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ryan Smith

This Ryan Smith is from Akron, OH. His site is called Design by Smitty. He is scheduled to graduate from Ohio University's School of Fine Arts in 2012. He created a peppy slab serif typeface called Rubio (2012), which was named after his grandfather James Rubio who ran Rubio's Homemade Italian Spaghetti Sauce from 1958 until 1984. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ryan vs Clark
[Ryan Clark]

Ryan versus Clark is the Ohio-based typefoundry that created these fonts in 2014: Tattoo Deco, Liberator (Light, Medium, Heavy). I assumem, but could not find that information anywhere on the web site, that the owner is Ryan Clark. Creative Market link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Samuel Dixon

Youngster from Ohio who made the primitive handscripted TF2 Professor (2007). I am bit puzzled, because the copyright says that TF2 Professor is due to Andrea Wicklund. In any case, it was made with Fontifier. [Google] [More]  ⦿

School of Art, Ohio University, Athens
[Arlyn Eve Simon]

Offers a graphic design program, in which Arlyn Eve Simon teaches typography. She designed a nice typeface sold by Galapagos. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Scott Gladd

Graphic designer in Hilliard, OH, who made some nice logotypes. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Scott Sullivan
[1919 Type Foundry]

[More]  ⦿

Shain Picard

Shain Picard (Columbus, OH) designed the artsy hairline display typeface Kadsen Light (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Shane Brandes
[Proportional Lime]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

SINDSINDSIND
[Greg Ponchak]

Greg Ponchak (SINDSINDSIND) is a graphic designer in North Royalton (Cleveland), OH. His company was called SINDSINDSIND, but in 2013, Thinkdust was publishing his typefaces as well.

He created the minimalist high-contrast Qag (2009, Mostar Design Company), Muneris (2010, squarish), some experimental typefaces, the minimalist geometric sans face Monolite (2013), Berque (2010, a minimalist rounded sans face with hints of DIN), Kolg Gothic (2011), Jirue (2011, high-contrast didone), Kajf (2011, piano key face), NERC (2011, avant-garde), ARGN (2011, a rounded monospaced stencil family), FOSU (2010, hairline avant-garde sans, at HypeForType), and Squoosh Gothic (2014, a headline sans).

Behance link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Spencerian penmanship

From Encyclopaedia Britannica: Style of cursive script developed by Platt Rogers Spencer (d. 1864) of Geneva, Ohio. Energetically promoted by five sons and a nephew, the Spencerian method became the most widely known system of handwriting instruction in the third quarter of the 19th century. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Spiffingly Delicious

Ohio-based creator of Mitt romney, the Font (2011), a techno face. The designers are "Mel" and "Christina". [Google] [More]  ⦿

Stephen Politte

In 2013, Tommy Isbell (Parma Heights, OH) and Stephen Politte (Cleveland, OH) codesigned a 3d typeface called ShowSicle. Stephen also designed Minimal Icon Set in 2013.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Stephen Rapp

American calligrapher, letterer, and type designer (b. 1953, Indianapolis, IN) located in Lakewood, OH, and/or Kent, OH. As a lettering artist for American Greetings since 2000, he has designed and developed numerous proprietary fonts. He specializes in beautiful script typefaces. Stephen's commercial fonts can be found in both Veer and P22/IHOF collections. Creator of these fonts:

  • Baghadeer (2013). A very tall ronde typeface.
  • Bramble (2005, P22): an organic hand-printed font family.
  • ChaiTea (2007, P22): a flowing script.
  • Chatter: hand lettering for a card design that was both humorous and trendy. Proprietary.
  • DeSoto (2009) is a family of 4 faces based on a few letters from a 1958 DeSoto magazine ad. Joe Newton at Veer created butterfly ornaments and swashes.
  • Hiatus (2010-2013): a connected chancery hand.
  • Hollie Hobbie: proprietary hand-printed face.
  • Memoir (2008): an elegant connected script.
  • Montague Script (2008): a connected calligraphic brush script that won a "Certificate of Excellence in Type Design" award in the 55th Annual Type Directors Club Exhibition and an award at TDC2 2009. In 2014, it was followed by Montague Script Bold.
  • New Cuisine (2012). Sure to be a winner, this upright signage script oozes warmth and charm.
  • Raniscript: 2009, upright connected script) from 2009.
  • Shoebop (2006, 2012): retro connected lettering / signage face.
  • Slapjack (2013). A broad-edged calligraphic script.
  • Tai Chi (2003, P22): a calligraphic oriental simulation font.
  • Custom fonts by Rapp were created for American Greetings, AGI and a few private clients. As of 2014, they include Longhand Plain&Swash, Chick Flick, Ciao Bella, AGI Typewriter, AGI Serif, AGI Hand, Chickadee, Madeline, Rough Draft Pro, Cafe Noire, Cantoni Pro, Milk and Honey, Line Dance and Vickery Script.

See also here. MyFonts link. Klingspor link. Behance link. Creative Market link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Susan Derrick
[Bedoodle]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Tobias Brauer

Tobias Brauer is a graphic design professor from Cincinnati, OH. He runs a blog that occasionally discusses type. In 2014, he published the sans typeface Apposite, originally designed in 2012. Tobias writes: In its earliest versions and derivations, the design of Apposite experienced aesthetic influence by trying to engineer a hybrid between Helvetica and FF DIN. However, as Apposite’s design progressed, and became much more refined, it also developed into a visual voice that speaks in a contemporary tone, reflecting Swiss, German, and American characteristics.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Todd Childers

Todd Childers (b. 1964) is an Associate Professor at the Bowling Green State University School of Art (Graphic Design, 1995-present), who lives in Toledo, OH. He designed the Usher family (1999) at Garagefonts. Usonian is a concrete block font. Fraktura is a marriage between Futura and Fraktur. And Burnout-2000 (2000, Garagefonts) is a grunge font done when those were popular.

CV. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin: All type is dimensional. FontShop link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Tolbert Lanston

American type man (b. Ohio, 1844, d. Washington, 1913) who founded Monotype Corporation Ltd in 1897. Monotype history. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Tommy Isbell

In 2013, Tommy Isbell (Parma Heights, OH) and Stephen Politte (Cleveland, OH) codesigned a 3d typeface called ShowSicle. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ultimate Font Download
[Jason Nolan]

This is as much an ultimate font download as my uncle's manure pool. $19.95 gets you 10,000 fonts now. The owner, Jason Nolan, claims: I have received the permission from all the font creators to include their work in my download. Hmmmm... right. Jason Nolans is located in Columbus, Ohio, and Dublin, Ireland, which is asking 12 US dollars for a download of 4000 mostly shareware and freeware fonts. Located in 1785 O'Brien Rd, Columbus, OH 43228. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Victor Einhardt

Columbus, OH-based designer (b. 1979) of Victor's Pixel Font (2005). Alternate URL. Yet another URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Warehouse Design
[Jesse Snyder]

The Warehouse is a collaborative effort between Brittany Deighton (Kent, Ohio) and Jesse Snyder, who is located in Ohio. We also find a mention of Wilmington, NC, more recently.

One can buy some icon font sets from them, such as Stilts 92013), Narwhal (2013), Miniglyph, Parks and Rec, and Snack Time. Together, they designed the slabby wood type typeface Ohio, Medical Icons, Survival Icons, Bike Icons and Transit Icons in 2013.

Creative Market link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

William Addison Dwiggins

Martinsville, Ohio-born illustrator, calligrapher, typographer, book designer, author, type designer and puppeteer, 1880-1956 (Hingham, MA). Pic (1955). All his typefaces were designed for the Mergenthaler Linotype Company, where he worked for 27 years. He also was Acting Director of the Harvard University Press, 1917-1918. In 1919, he founded the Society of Calligraphers, Boston, and was in fact an accomplished calligrapher, who drew many ornaments and designed many jackets. Dwiggins studied lettering under Goudy in Chicago while a student at Frank Holme's School of Illustration. When Goudy moved to Hingham, Dwiggins followed and was to work there for the rest of his life. As a puppeteer, he often used the pseudonym Dr. Hermann Puterschein. Bio by Nicholas Fabian. Flickr picture group for Dwiggins. Among his writings, I cite

  • "Some why's and wherefore's of the shapes of roman letters" (1919), a short essay full of quotes, some good, but mostly derogatory, regarding the main text types in vogue at the time, such as Century, Caslon, Cheltenham, Pabst, Cadmus and Scotch.
  • "WAD to RR, a letter about type design", Department of Printing and Graphic Arts, Harvard College Library, Cambridge, MA, 1940. In this letter to a friend, RR, entirely written in a beautiful hand, he explains how to make type.
MyFonts link. Scans of a roman alphhabet and roman capitals. He designed these typefaces:
  • Arcadia (1943-1947). Mac McGrew: Arcadia was an experimental face designed by William A. Dwiggins for Mergenthaler in 1943-47, used in Some Random Recollections, by Alfred A. Knopf for the Typophiles as Chapbook XXII in 1949.
  • Caledonia (1938-1939). Known as Transitional 511 at Bitstream, New Caledonia at Adobe, and New Caledonia at Linotype. See C651 Roman on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, 2002. Nicola Caleffi complains that New Caledonia and BT 511 are too weak and miss old style figures.

    Mac McGrew: Caledonia and Caledonia Italic were designed by William A. Dwiggins for Linotype in 1938, with Caledonia Bold and Bold Italic added two years later. A Bold Condensed version was produced by Lino for newspaper head- line use. Caledonia has been described as a modernization of Scotch Roman (and Caledonia is the ancient name for Scotland), but it is more than that. It also shows the influence of the Bulmer typeface, with a large portion of Dwiggins' individuality. He describes the face as having a "liveliness of action. [...] quality is in the curves---the way they get away from the straight stems with a calligraphic flick, and in the nervous angle on the under side of the arches as they descend to the right." Being designed specifically for the Linotype and its mechanical limitations, rather than being adapted from a foundry face, Caledonia Italic is particularly successful, and the whole family has become very popular. In text sizes, short descenders may be cast on nominal body sizes, while the more handsome long descenders (not made for italics) require one point larger body size. Compare Baskerville, Bulmer, Scotch.

  • Caravan Borders (1938). Four fonts available at Linotype (1976).
  • Charter (1946). Mac McGrew: Charter was an experimental, special-purpose face designed by William A. Dwiggins for Mergenthaler between 1937 and 1942. An upright script, only the lowercase and the few other characters shown were completed. For tests, these were combined with Electra caps. It was used in a limited edition book, The Song Story of Aucassin and Nicolete, designed and printed in 1946 by S. A. Jacobs at the Golden Eagle Press, Mt. Vernon, New York, with Electra small caps in place of regular caps.
  • Eldorado (1953). Created after a 16th century early roman lowercase by Jacques de Sanlecque the elder. Revived in 1993 at Font Bureau as Eldorado by David Berlow, Jane Patterson, Tobias Frere-Jones, and Tom Rickner. Mac McGrew: Eldorado is a contemporary roman designed by W. A. Dwiggins for Linotype about 1950, based on early Spanish models. The lowercase is compact, with a small x-height and long ascenders. Several italic letters have cursive or decorative forms; also notice the cap Y, with curved, serifless arms.
  • Electra (1934-1935). Known as Transitional 521 at Bitstream. Mac McGrew: Electra is a contemporary modern face designed by W. A. Dwiggins for Linotype. The light weight was drawn in 1935, the bold a few years later. Aside from its readability and distinctive character, Electra is distinguished by a choice of italic forms. Electra Italic is really a sloped roman, while Electra Cursive, released in 1944, is more nearly a conventional italic form; only the lowercase is different. Like a number of the better Linotype faces, Electra also has a choice of short descenders, which will cast on the nominal body, or long descenders, which must be cast one point larger. Compare Fairfield. A digital reviaval was done by Jim Parkinson in 2010: Parkinson Electra.
  • Experimental 267D.
  • Falcon (published in 1961) is an experimental font. Mac McGrew: Falcon was designed during World War II for Linotype by William A. Dwiggins and released in 1961. It seemed to him, he said, "to hit the middle ground between mechanical exactitude and the flow and variety of a written hand-suggesting some of that flow and variety but controlling it, so the letter can be repeated."
  • Hingham (1937-1943). Mac McGrew: Hingham was an experimental newspaper face, originally called Newsface, designed between 1937 and 1943 by William A. Dwiggins, for improved readability. Only the 7-point size was cut by Mergenthaler, and it was used only for tests.
  • Metro (1929-30). This famous sans serif family was published by Linotype in 1936-1937. It is also called Metroblack, and sometimes dated 1928. In digital format, it is known as Geometric 415 at Bitstream, and Metro Office, Metro #2, Metrolite, Metromedium and Metroblack at Linotype. It is DH Sans at FontHaus. It was revived as Examiner NF by Nick Curtis (2009). It lives another life as Grosse pointe Metro at Group Type. Mac McGrew: Metrolite and Metroblack were designed by William A. Dwiggins and introduced by Linotype in January 1930, as the first American faces to join the trend to sans serif started by Futura and Kabel. These faces are less mechanical than the European imports, and were promoted as being less monotonous and illegible. The first two weights were soon followed by Metrothin and Metromedium. In 1932 several characters were redesigned; thereafter the series was promoted as Metrothin No.2, Metrolite No.2, Metromedium No.2, and Metroblack No.2, including the redesigned characters, but the original characters were available as extras. Metrolite No.2 Italic was shown in 1935, along with Lining Metrothin and Lining Metromedium, which are like the small caps of the regular faces. Italics for Metromedium No.2 and Metroblack No.2 were shown in 1937. Metrolite No.4 Italic and Metrothin No.4 Italic are essentially the same design but narrower, for mechanical purposes. Unique Capitals are made for some sizes of Metrothin and Metromedium. Alternative figures are made as follows: Gothic No. 39, for Metrothin No.2, similar to Spartan Light. Gothic No. 40, for Metrolite No.2, similar to Spartan Medium. Gothic No. 41, for Metroblack No.2, similar to Spartan Black. Gothic No. 42, for M etrothin No.2, similar to Kabel Light. Gothic No. 43, for Metrolite No.2, similar to Kabel Medium. Gothic No. 44, for Metromedium No.2, similar to Kabel Bold. Gothic No. 45, for Metroblack No.2, similar to Sans Serif Extra Bold.
  • Stuyvesant (1942-1947). Mac McGrew: Stuyvesant and Stuyvesant Italic were designed in 1942-47 by William A. Dwiggins, inspired by a quaint Dutch type cut by J. F. Rosart about 1750, and used in 1949 in The Shelby Letters, from the California Mines, 1851-1852, published by Alfred Knopf. An entirely different Stuyvesant, a novelty design, was made by Keystone before 1906, perhaps before 1900.
  • Tippecanoe (1944-1946). McGrew writes: Tippecanoe was an experimental face designed in 1944-46 by William A. Dwiggins for Mergenthaler, on the Bodoni-Didot theme. It was used in a book by Elizabeth Coatsworth, a friend of Dwiggins, The Creaking Stair, published in 1949 by Coward-McCann. Compare Louvaine Bold [by Morris Fuller Benton]..
  • Winchester (1944). Revived as ITC New Winchester by Jim Spiece. Mac McGrew: Winchester Roman and Winchester Uncial with their italics were completed in 1944 by William A. Dwiggins, the Uncial being an experiment aimed at making the English language easier to read by eliminating some of the ascenders and descenders typically used in this language. Italic caps and other characters were drawn in 1948 but not cut. Although made on Linotype matrices by Mergenthaler, fonts of hand type were cast and used only by Dwiggins and Dorothy Abbe beginning in 1950 at the Piiterschein-Hingham Press, where they were partners until his death in 1956. In the specimen shown here, the uncial f appears in both italic alphabets. A regular italic f was cut but apparently not cast.

Matt Desmond created Dwiggins Deco in 2009 and writes: This typeface was originally designed in 1930 by W.A. Dwiggins as the cover for the book "American Alphabets" by Paul Hollister. Only the 26 letters of the alphabet were included on the cover, so the rest of the numbers, punctuation, symbols, and accented characters have been crafted in a matching [art deco] style. A free version called Dwiggins Initials KK was designed in 2012 by John Wollring.

Linotype link. FontShop link. Klingspor link.

View digital typoefaces based on the work of Dwiggins. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

William H. Mowry

The US patent office showed its profound incompetence by granting Mowry (from Dayton, OH) in 1989 a patent for the design of a typeface of numerals. [Google] [More]  ⦿

William Hugh Gordon

Author of Lettering for Commercial Purposes, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1918. He liked full round ovals, condensed vertical elements and a slightly broken alignment. He was one of the main American designers of commercial lettering during the early part of the 20th century. His students included Ross F. George.

Additional link, where we find his Black Face Poster alphabet from 1918. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

William Lilly

Ohio-based calligrapher. [Google] [More]  ⦿

William Sandwick

Designer from Cleveland, OH, who created an upright connected script for American Greetings Corporation (also in Cleveland, OH) in 1970. He did another script for them in 1964. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Wood Type Impressions
[Mark Kusek]

Without Walls is Mark Kusek's company in Powell, OH. It sells a CD called Wood Type Impressions, which contains eight complete wood type fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿