TYPE DESIGN INFORMATION PAGE last updated on Fri Oct 31 11:17:49 EDT 2014

SEARCH THIS SITE:
IMAGE SEARCH:


Skyline Typefaces



[Corvinus Skyline was designed in 1934 by Imre Reiner. The digital typeface shown was created in 1991 by Group Type]

Luc Devroye
McGill University
Montreal, Canada
lucdevroye@gmail.com
http://luc.devroye.org
Up to main font page
Up to main font index page



SWITCH TO INDEX FILE


Alec Julien
[Haiku Monkey]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alex Sheldon
[Match&Kerosene]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ann Pomeroy

Designer of fonts such as ETwentyFive (1990). At FontHaus, she designed the modern typeface APCorvinus Skyline, Bubba Bold, DecoWave, FSKeyNote, Sitcom, Spire (FontHaus, after an original condensed skyline didone by Sol Hess now in the Lanston Collection as LTC Spire; since 2006, also available at Group Type), Stadion, Tata One, and Tutu One. In 2006, when Solsburg's Group Type was started, some of her fonts started appearing there, such as Spire, Spire Monoline, Spire Extra Light, a condensed didone family heavily based on Sol Hess's Spire (Lanston), Corvinus Skyline (1991; a revival of a condensed modern family by Imre Reiner by the same name), Sitcom.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Bauersche Schriftgiesserei

Frankfurt-based foundry started in 1837 by Johann Christian Bauer. At the end of the 19th century, the new owner was Georg Hartmann. On its staff, it had designers such as Konrad F. Bauer [Alpha (1954), Beta (1954), Folio (1956-63), Imprimatur (1952-55), Volta (1956), Verdi (1957), Impressum (1963), all made with Walter Baum], Lucian Bernhard [Bernhard Condensed, 1912], Hugo Steiner-Prag [Batarde, 1916], Julius Diez [vignetten, 1912], Henri Wieynck [Trianon, 1906; Cursive Renaissance, 1912; Wieynck-Kursiv, 1912], Georg Hartmann, Paul Renner [Futura, 1937], Emil Rudolf Weiß [Weiß Fraktur, 1924], Berthold Wolpe [Handwerkerzeichen, 1936; Hyperion, 1950; Rundgotisch, 1938] and F.H. Ernst Scheidler [Legend, 1937]. In its glory period, Bauer's leader was Heinrich Jost (1889-1949), from 1922 until 1948, who with punchcutter Louis Hoell made a beautiful version of Bodoni, now known as Bauer Bodoni. A New York office was set up in 1927, but after the 1960s, the foundry declined and finally closed its doors in 1972. Its typefaces were passed on to its Barcelona branch, Fundición Tipográfica Neufville. See also here. Digitized faces include Futura ND (Paul Renner, redigitized by Marie-Therésè Koreman at Neufville in 1999), Edison Swirl SG (late 1800s, digitized by Spiece Graphics), Gable Antique Condensed SG (late 1800s, digitized by Spiece Graphics), Weiß (Bitstream, based on a family made in 1924-1931 by Emil Rudolf Weiss), Bauer Bodoni (1926, FT Bauer, made by Heinrich Jost and Louis Hoell), Bauer Bodoni (Adobe version), Candida (1936, now digitized at FT Bauer), Charme (1957, now available from FT Bauer), Impressum, Imprimatur, Venus (1907-1927, now at FT Bauer), Venus and Hermes (both available at Linotype; Venus is also at URW), Volta (1955), and Phyllis (1911). Other faces: Bernhard Cursive (1962), Constantia, Hellenic Wide (1962), Lucian (1962), Cantate (1962), Gillies Gothic (1962), Horizon (1962), Folio (1962), Bauer Beton (1962), Bauer Topic (1962), Bauer Classic (1962), Elizabeth (1962), Cartoon (1962), Trafton Script, Astoria, Lilith, Legend (1937), Fortune, Folio Kursiv, Folio Grotesk (1960), Cantate (1958), Papageno (1958), Verdi (1957), Amalthea (1957), Magic (1955), Steile Futura Kursiv (1955), Columna (1955), Maxim (1955), Tivolischmuck (1950), Symphonie (1938, by Imre Reiner, in 1945 called Stradivarius), Weiß Antiqua (1950), Legende (1950), Quick (1950), Ballé Initials (1940), Beton (1940), Corvinus (1934), Bernhard Roman (1930), Hyperion (1956), Volta Kursiv (1955), Rundgotisch (1938), Hoyer Fraktur (1935), Gotika (1934), Jubilaeums-Initialen, Künstler Grotesk, Lichte Futura (1931), Weiß Fraktur (1924), Reklameschrift Herkules, Herkules-Gotisch (1898), Enge Gotisch (ca. 1880: digital version by Gerhard Helzel), Ehmcke Antiqua (1921), Batarde (1916), Wieynck-Kursiv (1912), Zweifarbige Grotesk Kursiv, Cursive Renaissance (1912), Manuskript Gotisch (1899; after Wolfgang Hopyl, 1514), Graziosa (1914 or earlier, script face), Kleukens Antiqua (1910), Barlösius Schrift (1906-1907, H. Barlösius), Trianon (1906), Hohenzollern (1902, + Initialen), Telefunken (1959), Sinfonia (script), Amerikanische Alt-Gotisch (1903, influenced by Henry William Bradley's and Joseph Warren Phinney's 1895 art nouveau face, Bradley). In house samples: AntiquaBrotschriften-IX-Garnitur, Einfache Kanzlei (ca. 1830), Enge halbfette Zeitungsfraktur, Fette Gotisch, Moderne halbfette Fraktur, Gotisch. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Catharsis
[Christian "Cinga" Thalmann]

Catharsis is located in Leiden, The Netherlands. Before that, Christian Thalmann's page Cinga.ch was run out of Switzerland, when he was a student at ETH Zürich. It had free typefaces such as the great Arabic simulation typeface Catharsis Bedouin (2004) (available here), CatharsisCircular, CatharsisRequiem (a unicase pair), CatharsisRequiemBold, CatharsisCargo, Cirnaja Bookhand and Cirnaja Calligraphy (made for his artificial language, Obrenje), Catharsis Macchiato (2005), CatharsisEspresso (2005).

As Catharsis, the commercial foundry, he published Octant in 2013: Octant is an original steampunk display typeface drawing inspiration from Victorian-age steel and brass engineering, as well as from blackletter typography. Gryffensee (2013, in styles called Eins, Zwei and Drei) is designed to be the Futura of blackletter, combining the time-honored gravity and relentlessness of the Gothic script with the clean, contemporary freshness of the geometric sans. It also covers Cyrillic.

Backstein (2013), baked brick, took its inspiration from the broken antiqua lettering in Berlin's old subway stations.

Volantene Script (2013) is a (free) uncial display typeface inspired by the penmanship of Lady Talisa Maegyr-Stark as seen on HBO's Game of Thrones. Numina (2013, Glamour and Glory substyles) is an extensive condensed fashion-oriented typeface family related to Skyline and Corvinus.

Maestrale (2013) adds calligraphic and flamboyant extenders to a decorative text typeface for a dramatic effect. Choose between Maestrale Manual (swashy) and Manuale Text.

Blumenkind (2013) is inspired by an instance of metal-strip lettering found on the Bürgermeister Kornmesser Siedlung residential building complex in Berlin from the 1960s.

Brillinace (2013) is a glamorous contemporary display blackletter combining the rich tapestry of Textura with a hint of the airy lightness of Spencerian script. Let's say that it is a light-hearted Textura.

1001 fonts link. Yet another URL. Fontspace link. Behance link. Klingspor link. Dafont link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Christian "Cinga" Thalmann
[Catharsis]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Colin Kahn

Type designer from Buffalo, NY. His typefaces were mostly developed at P22. Klingspor link. A partial list of his fonts:

  • In 2008, he revived and extended Cigno, a 1950s script typeface by Aldo Novarese, and called it P22 Cigno.
  • LTC Circled Caps.
  • P22 Civilité is a joint effort of Colin Kahn, Richard Kegler and Milo Kowalski.
  • P22 Curwen. P22 Curwen Poster is a digitized version of a rare wood type used by the Curwen Press in England in the early 20th Century for poster work. P22 Curwen Maxima is a new hyper-stylized re-interpretation of Curwen Poster.
  • The great display/comic book font Ebin (and Ebin Outline).
  • In 2006, he created the P22 Gauguin font family (Regular, Alternate, Brush and Extras), a script font set based on the writings and sketches of post-impressionist artist Paul Gauguin.
  • Glamour (2006, P22/Lanston; also called LTC Glamour Grotesque) is based on the 1948 design by the same name done at Lanston Monotype, which in turn is based on Imre Reiner's Corvinus.
  • Goudy Sans (2006, P22/Lanston, 6 styles): Goudy Sans Bold was originally designed by Frederic Goudy in 1922 as a less formal gothic and finished in 1929. The Light was designed in 1930 and the Light Italic in 1931. Colin Kahn digitized them in 2006 to make a 6-style Goudy Sans family, which includes a Goudy Sans Hairline.
  • In 2008, he revisited Richard Kegler's P22 Platten, which was based on lettering found in German fountain pen practice books from the 1920s, and created the extended typeface P22 Platten Neu.
  • Internship (2003), or St G Schrift. P22 swrites: St. G Schrift (2005, P22) is a font based on the type designs of German poet Stefan George. This sans-serif typeface features a few variations found in books published by George in Berlin. Includes P22 St. G Schrift One, P22 St. G Schrift Two and P22 St. G Italic (an art nouveau version of the roman, newly designed). The original font was cast in 1907 by a small foundry in Germany and was used primarily for the works of George as well as other books including a monumental edition of Dante's Divine Comedy. This may or may not contradict the fact that Marcus Behmer designed Stefan George-Schrift in 1904.
  • P22 Tuscan Expanded is a digitization of the mid-19th century wood type font Antique Tuscan Expanded - Wells&Webb 1854.
  • P22 Vale (2007, in Roman and Kings Fount styles) are based on types by Charles Ricketts that were used by the Vale Press (which in turn were based on Jenson). The Kings Fount is originally dated 1903.
  • In 2007 still, he revived Zebra (P22), a font originally designed in 1963-1965 by Karlgeorg Hoefer.

View Colin Kahn's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Corvinus

Corvinus is a didone family developed between 1932 and 1935 by Imre Reiner, consisting of Corvinus, Corvinus italic, Corvinus semibold, Corvinus semibold, Corvinus bold, and Corvinus Skyline. It was published by Ludwig&Mayer and separately by Bauersche Giesserei. Lanston's 1948 font Glamour was based on it. Many digital versions exist:

  • Group Type (Mark Solsburg, Ann Pomeroy): Corvinus Skyline (1991).
  • Font Bureau (Jane Patterson): Skyline was commissioned from Font Bureau by Condé Nast specifically for Traveler magazine. In 1992, Patterson designed the headline typeface Skyline Bold Condensed.
  • P22/Lanston: LTC Glamour (2006, Colin Kahn), based in first instance on Lanston's 1948 font Glamour.
  • The Font Company: Corvinus Skyline (1993).
  • Dennis Ortiz-Lopez: OL Corvinus Bold Condensed (1993), OL Corvinus Versailles.
  • FontHaus: APCorvinus Skyline (Ann Pomeroy). It is this version that later became Group Type's through Ann's association with that foundry.
  • Opticast/Castcraft: OPTICorvinus-Skyline.
  • Image Graphics: Corvinus Skyline.
  • Softmaker (Martin Kotulla): C794 Roman.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

David Berlow

David Berlow (b. Boston, 1955) entered the type industry in 1978 as a letter designer for the Mergenthaler, Linotype, Stempel, and Haas typefoundries. He joined the newly formed digital type supplier, Bitstream, Inc. in 1982. After Berlow left Bitstream in 1989, he founded The Font Bureau, Inc. with Roger Black. Font Bureau has developed more than 300 new and revised type designs for The Chicago Tribune, The Wall Street Journal, Entertainment Weekly, Newsweek, Esquire, Rolling Stone, Hewlett Packard and others, with OEM work for Apple Computer Inc. and Microsoft Corporation. The Font Bureau Retail Library consists mostly of original designs and now includes over 1,000 typefaces. In a video made for Mike Parker's TDC medal in 2011, Mike Parker says that David Berlow is the most talented type designer he ever met. David lives in Martha's Vineyard.

At ATypI 2004 in Prague, David spoke about Daily types. At ATypI 2009 in Mexico City, he spoke on The heart of my letter, (and the online version). Since that time he has been very active and vocal on the issue of high quality web fonts. Speaker at ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik and at ATypI 2014 in Barcelona.

David Berlow Type Specimens (free pdf). Another type specimen booklet. Interview by A List Apart in 2009. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. FontShop link. www.typovideo.de/david-berlow. David Berlow on web fonts. Interview by The Boston Globe. His typefaces:

  • AgencyFB.
  • Belizio (1987-1988), after the 1958 original slab serif by Aldo Novarese called Egizio. Claudio Piccinini would have liked Font Bureau to acknowledge Aldo Novarese's Egizio as the source of this family.
  • Belucian (1990, by David Berlow and Kelly Ehrgott Milligan. Several weights exist, including Demi and Ultra.
  • Berlin Sans (1997).
  • Bureau Grotesque (1989). This 27-style family is now called Bureau Grot. Font Bureau's blurb: The current family was first developed by David Berlow in 1989 from original specimens of the grotesques released by Stephenson Blake in Sheffield. These met with immediate success at the Tribune Companies and Newsweek, who had commissioned custom versions at the behest of Roger Black. Further weights were designed by Berlow for the launches of Entertainment Weekly and the Madrid daily El Sol, bringing the total to twelve styles by 1993. Jill Pichotta, Christian Schwartz, and Richard Lipton expanded the styles further, at which point the family name was shortened to Bureau Grot.. Note: there is a custom version called M&C Saatchi Grotesque with truetype data created by dtpTypes in 1998.
  • CalifornianFB.
  • CheltenhamFB.
  • Custer RE (2014), a typeface for small on screen use. The Font Bureau blurb: In 2009, a book from 1897 in the library of the University of Wisconsin caught David Berlow’s attention. It was set in a clear text face---a predecessor of Bookman---cast by the Western Type Foundry who called it Custer. Upon noting how well the typeface worked in point sizes of 6 and 7 points, Berlow developed it into a member of the Reading Edge series specifically designed for small text onscreen. Custer RE is a broad and approachable typeface drawn large on the body with a tall x-height to maximize its apparent size when set very small. The minimal stroke contrast and the hefty serifs let it stay exceptionally clear down to a font-size of 9px. Font Bureau.
  • Desdemona (1992). An art nouveau face.
  • Eagle (1889-1994). This art deco typeface Font Bureau Eagle was started in 1989 for Publish. David Berlow designed a lowercase, finished the character set, and in 1990 added Eagle Book for setting text. In 1994, Jonathan Corum added Eagle Light and Eagle Black to form a full series.
  • Eldorado.
  • Empire.
  • Esperanto (1995).
  • ITC Franklin Gothic (1991). In 2008, David Berlow added Condensed, Compressed and Extra Compressed widths to Vic Caruso's 1979 ITC Franklin interpretation (which had Light, Medium, Bold and Black), and Font Bureau sells a complete ITC Franklin now. In 2010, Berlow completed his definitive revision of ITC Franklin, a single new series of six weights in four widths for a total of 48 styles. Typeface review at Typographica.
  • Giza (an Egyptian family.
  • Hitech (1995).
  • Juliana Text (2009), a rebirth of Sem Hartz's Juliana (1958, Linotype), a popular narrow legible paperback text face.
  • Kis FB (2007): a revival of old style types by Nicholas Kis from ca. 1700.
  • Meyer Two (1994). Based on a 1926 type by L.B. Meyer.
  • Millenium BT Bold Extended (1989, Bitstream). Also known by insiders as Starfleet Bold Extended, this font was used on federation starship hull markings until episode ten. MyFonts link.
  • Moderno FB (1995): an exhibitionist didone in 32 styles, for Esquire Gentleman. In 1996 Berlow cut new styles with Richard Lipton for El Norte. In 1997, Roger Black ordered new weights for Tages Anzeiger. It grew further when the Baltimore Sun, with FB Ionic as text, was redesigned. The whole series was then revised for Louise Vincent, Montreal Gazette, with further styles added in 2005 for La Stampa. [It is my favorite type family at Font Bureau.]
  • Nature (1995).
  • Numskill (1990).
  • Old Modern.
  • Online Gothic (1995).
  • Ornaments.
  • Phaistos (1990-1991). A flared angular design done with Just van Rossum, and inspired by Rudolf Koch's Locarno.
  • Poynter Agate.
  • Reforma: Based on Giza.
  • Rhode.
  • Romeo.
  • Scotch Roman (1993).
  • Skia (1993, Apple). A Greek simulation sans, in the style of Twombly's Lithos, co-designed with Matthew Carter for Apple's QuickDraw GX project.
  • Skyline.
  • Titling Gothic FB (2005): Berlow spent 10 years developing FB Titling Gothic (2005) in seven weights of seven widths each for use as display and headline romans. It was inspired by the popular ATF Railroad Gothic and grew out of Berlow's own Rhode.
  • Throhand: a classic family based on metal type found at the Plantin Moretus Museum in Antwerp.
  • Truth FB (1995).
  • Village.
  • Vonness (2007): a newspaper sans family. Font Bureau: Vonness was designed by David Berlow working closely with Neville Brody on corporate redesign for Jim Von Ehre at Macromedia. Core weights are loosely based on Bauersche Giesserei's Venus, 1907-1910. Berlow expanded the ideas behind the series to 56 fonts.
  • Yurnacular (1992, part of FUSE 4).
  • Zenobia (1995).

View David Berlow's typefaces. Another catalog of David Berlow's fonts. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

David Quay

British type and graphic designer (b. 1948, London) who graduated from Ravensbourne College of Art&Design in 1968, and after working as a graphic designer in London, founded Quay&Gray Lettering with Paul Gray in 1983. David Quay Design started in 1987, and finally, in 1990, he co-founded The Foundry with Freda Sack and Mike Daines in London. The Foundry also develops custom typefaces, marks and logotypes for companies inernationally these include a special typeface to be readable at very small sizes for Yellow pages, corporate fonts for BGplc (British Gas) NatWest Bank, and signage typefaces for both RailTrack in the UK and the Lisbon Metro system in Portugal. He taught typography and design at the Academie St. Joost, Hogeschool Brabant from 2001-2003. He now teaches one month a year at IDEP in Barcelona. He lives and works in Amsterdam. Linotype link. In 2009, he started selling his fonts at MyFonts. Pic. His fonts, in chronological order:

  • Custom lettering and type for the Penthouse calendar.
  • 1983: Santa Fe (monoline script), Agincourt (1983, ITC, blackletter), Blackmoor (1983, ITC, English-style blackletter).
  • 1984: Titus, Vegas.
  • 1985: Quay, Milano.
  • 1986: Bronx (brush script).
  • 1987: Bordeaux (a skyline font family), Bordeaux Script.
  • 1988: Latino Elongated, Mekanik.
  • 1989: Aquinas, Robotik, Helicon (1989, Berthold).
  • 1990: Quay Sans (a humanist sans based on Syntax), Digitek, Teknik.
  • 1991: Letraset Arta.
  • 1992: Coptek, La Bamba, Lambada (1992, Victorian; Letraset), Scriptek (angular design, ITC).
  • 1993: Marguerita (curly vampire script).
  • 2010: Kade (Re-Type---it is a display/semi display sans family of fonts based on vernacular lettering photographed around the harbours of Amsterdam and Rotterdam).
  • 2011: Bath (2010-2011), a typeface developed with Ramiro Espinoza for the the signage and orientation of the city of Bath. It comes in Bath Serif and Bath Sans versions.

View David Quay's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Dennis Ortiz-Lopez

Prolific NY-based designer (born in East Los Angeles) who specializes in faithful revivals of old masters and logotype, in Latin and Hebrew. He made over 500 fonts including. He is also a translator and illuminator of Biblical period Hebrew and Aramaic. His clients include The Vatican (Pope John Paul II's Holocaust commemerative CD) and Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America. His specialties are translations worded in the language and style of the period in which the Biblical text was composed. His translation and enumeration of kabbalistic writings, otherwise known as Hebrew Mysticism and numerology, demonstrate the mathematical base of Biblical miracles.

His typefaces: OL Siynnamin Gothic, OL Radiant Slender, OL Raleigh Gothic (A, B) Display (2013), OL Titling Deco Semi Hilight (2013), OL Gotham Gothic (2013), OL Forum Titling (2013, Trajan column lettering), OL Signpainter Titling Face (2013, copperplate-influenced titling face), OL America The Beautiful (2013, a fashionable didone without ball terminals), OL Braggadocio (Braggadocio is a 1930 design by William A. Woolley), OL Candida Medium Condensed / Extra Condensed, OL Caslon Light / Bold, OL Chamfer Woodtype, OL Contact Bold Condensed, OL Contact Deco Caps, OL Corvinus Bold Condensed, OL Corvinus Versailles, OL Edenesque, OL Egiziano (+Comstock, 2005), OL Egmont (2005, +Medium, Medium Italic, Condensed: after Sjoerd Hendrik de Roos, 1933), OL Engraver's Roman, OL Engraver's Classic Roman (2009), OL Franklin Wide, OL Franklin Extra Bold / Extra Bold Italic, OL Franklin Triple Condensed, OL Garamond (2003), OL Gotham Gothic, OL Grecian Classic Bold Condensed / Bold Extra Condensed, OL Grecian Display, OL Grecian Modern (the Grecian series imitates wood type), OL Gothic Wide and Bold, OL Hairline Gothic (2009), OL Headline Gothic Triple Condensed, OL Heavy Metal Grecian, OL Jenson Bold Condensed / Extra Bold Condensed, OL Latin Classic Condensed, OL Lightline Gothic, OL Marksman Shot, OL Marla Bold, OL Miehle Classic (2009, +Condensed), OL Newsbytes Gothic, OL Purrrbank Gothic, OL Qumran Torah Hebraic Set, OL Racer Roman, OL Raleigh Gothic, OL Roman Compressed (2004), OL Roman Wide Deco Caps, OL Smokler (2006), OL Sharon Gothic Stoned, OL Sinead Stoned and Pointy, OL Smokler, OL Smokler Deco Caps, OL Thorne with Shadow, OL Twenty-five Deco Semicondensed, OL Windowpane Gothic, OL Woody Blocked, OL Avril Roman (2003, a flared face, after Emil Rudolf Weiss), OL Brierwood Grecian, OL Butterfly, OL Egyptian, OL Franklin, OL Garamond, OL London Black, OL Machina Black (2003, octagonal, mechanical), OL Manhattan, OL Marquee, OIL Newsbytes (2003, bold and black newsprint faces), OL Radiant, OL Round Gothic, OL Siynnamin Gothic, OL Skeleton Gothic, and HispanicHeritage (1999).

His fonts are sold through Phil's Fonts, Dsgnhaus, International Typefounders, and MyFonts. His 2001 fonts are signed Siynn bar-Diyonn, which is his Hebrew name. His Hebrew fonts published in 2007 include OL Hebrew Formal Script, OL Hebrew Neo Black, OL Hebrew Block, OL Hebrew Calligraphica, OL Hebrew Chisel, OL Hebrew Cursive, OL Hebrew Deco, OL Hebrew Handwriting, OL Hebrew Handwriting Deco, OL Hebrew Headline, OL Hebrew Prismatic, OL Hebrew With Tagin, and OL Qumran Torah.

Buy his fonts at MyFonts. Interview at the end of 2002, in which he recalls the start of his career at Rolling Stone magazine in 1979.

Showcase of Dennis Ortiz-Lopez's typefaces at MyFonts.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Design Lab SRL, Milan
[Jane Patterson]

Jane Patterson founded Design Lab SRL in Milan, Italy. She is a partner in Design Lab with Sebastiano Castiglioni. Jane Patterson designed or co-designed

  • FB Californian (1994). Based on Goudy's California Oldstyle from 1938. Lanston issued Californian in 1958. The Font Bureau story: Carol Twombly digitized the roman for California in 1988. David Berlow revised it for Font Bureau with italic and small caps. Jane Patterson designed the bold. In 1999, assisted by Richard Lipton and Jill Pichotta, David Berlow designed the black and the text and display series.
  • FB Cheltenham (1992). Ingalls Kimball sketched the basic weight while architect Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue completed drawings in 1901. Morris Fuller Benton finished the ATF version in 1902, beating Mergenthaler by two years. In 1906 he drew Bold Extra Condensed, which David Berlow adapted for the SF Examiner, later a Font Bureau release.
  • Eldorado (1993-1994). W. A. Dwiggins's Eldorado was released by Mergenthaler in 1953. He followed an early roman lowercase, cut in the 16th century by Jacques de Sanlecque the elder (Granjon). Berlow, Frere-Jones, and Rickner revived and expanded the series in 1993-1994 for Premiere magazine, with versions not only for text and display, but a Micro for six point and smaller.
  • Skyline (1992). Skyline was commissioned from Font Bureau by Condé Nast as headletter for Traveler magazine. This typeface dating from 1929-1934 by Imre Reiner was known in Europe as Corvinus.
  • John Downer's Simona.
[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

FLOP Design
[Kato Masashi]

Japanese site with original fonts by Kato Masashi (b. 1973), who lives in Takasaki (Gunma prefecture, Japan): Parismatch (2004), SAKUalp (2000, handwriting), Steeltype, Broadband, Hivision, Cinematime, Ultracomic, Ice Cream, Be Happy, Summer Beauty, Flyermix, Cheerscript, Breakstyle, Breakfont, Round, H-Five, Natsucomi, Long Vacation, Lovers, Breakfont (2003, graffiti style), Pokkaman, BeHappy, Natsucomi, Momolcan, Seasons Dings, Electron, Round, Lovers, FlyerMix (fifties style), CheerScript (comic book style), Hi-Five (pixel font), Summer Beauty, SummerDrive, White Day, Long Vacation, Amayadori (high contrast kana font), Fuyucomi, Icecream, Pickett, 321, Pingpong, Frontline, Ginza, Yago (nice free dings), Polaris, 321eng, 321kana, APPLE, CLIQUE, Clover (kitchen tile font, 1998), DIGI, Eneneng, Enenhira, FDalp, FDwhie, Hnoodle, Hanko (free black on white stamp font, 1998, see also here), MKCuer, MOOGIRLALP, MOOMILKKANA, Noodle, Origami, Pers, SA0kmh, SA100kmh, SA50kmh, SK0kmh, SK100kmh, SK50kmh, Template6, Tenten, Ami Font, Speedfont, Supercar, Sakura, Regoty, Shopping Famiry, Ticket, Yohic, Recording, Akachan, Wafont, Frontbit7, MusicNetwork, Yakitori (free handwriting font), Ticket, Folkdance (pixelized people), Human Building (dings of famous buildings), Bunny (free), Frontline0, Side5 (pixel font), Side6, Side7. Some pixel fonts, many techno fonts, some kana fonts, and the Japanese kids dingbat font, Folkdance. Some fonts, such as his Latin/Japano font ShoppingFamily (1998), are sold by Font Pavilion. Major Japanese free font links.

In 1999, he published the AMI screen pixel font series in Digitalogue's DPI72 package. Other commercial fonts: Pine Apple, the WM family, Cutie Girl, Astratic, PictPlasma, Minivan, Frontbit 7, Ginza, Zoological.

Free fonts as of 2007: Aiko, a 4-weight rounded sans with support for Latin and kana (see also here). Fonts made in 2007-2008: MobileDisco, AbbeyRoad-Alternative, HighwayStar, Kompakt, AbbeyRoad, Prefuse, Readymade (didone inspired by Corvinus and Giorgio).

Additions in 2009: Kanna W4, Sweet Doughnuts (rounded sans).

Fonts made between 1998 and 2008: 321, AirExpress, AirTickt, AMAYADORI, AMIFONT, APPLE, ASTRA, AYANO, BeHappy, bitneon, BORDER7, BREAKFONT, BroadBand, BUNNY, CALENDER, CheerScript, CinemaTime, CLIQUE, CLOVER, CutieGirl, Departure, DIGIT, ELECTRON, FlyerMix, FolkDance, FOLKDANCE2, FrontBit, FRONTLINE, FRONTLINE01, FUYUCOMI, GINZA, HANKO, HappyEnd, hiFive, HumanBuild, IceCream, ICHIGO, JAPON2, KAKIZOME, KEYMODE, LabLife, LongVacation, LoversMINIMONO, MKCUTTER, MOMOKAN, MooFont, MusicNet, NATSUCOMI, Nenga, Noodele, OnePiece, oneBox, Origami, ParisMatch, Pers, Pickett, PICTdings, PictPlasma, PineApple, PingPong, pokkaman, Polaris, PopStar, Puzzle, Recoya, REGO, ROUND, SAKURA, SAMACAN, Seazons, Shopping, SIDE5, SIDE51byte, SIDE6, SIDE61byte, SIDE7, SPEED, STAMPER, SteelType, SummerBeauty, SummerDrive, SuperCar, Template5, TenTen, Ticket2, UltraComic, WHITEday, Yabako, Yago, Yakitori (handwriting of Mayumi Kakegawa), Yothic, Zoological, Nippondings, Caredings, TraficSignsWLD, TraficSigns, JPN, Kamondings, Kamondings2, Kurashidings, Okonomi, FunnyFace, Hotsuma, Toyokuni, Constellation, SunnyDay, BOXdings, Machinedings, CLICKdings, Berrys, Container Box, Twinkleline, Minivan, Akachan.

Dingbats: Kurashidings, IchigoC, TraficsignsWLD, TraficsignJPN, Nenga, Kamondings2, Kamondings, Breakstyle, Pictdings, Zoological, Caredings, Clickdings, Funnyface, seasons, Pictplasma, Humanbuilding, Nippondings, Yago, Boxdings, Toyokuni, Constellation (astrological symbols), Machinedings, Hotsuma, Folkdance, Calender.

Japanaese handwriting fonts: Aiko, Haruka, Syuntaro, YUKI, Ryunosuke.

Futuristic/ geometric fonts: MobileDisco, AbbeyRoad-Alternative, HighwayStar, Kompakt, AbbeyRoad, Prefuse.

"Funny" fonts: IchigoR, Ultracomic, Amayadori, Parismatch, hanko, LongVacation, Cinamatime, Natsucomi, Okonomi, IceCream, Yakitori, Cutiegirl, Monokan Wa, Shopping, Lovers, Fuyucomi, Berrys, Akachan, Bunny, Clover, Pokkaman, Pickett, Electron.

Cool fonts: Sunnyday, HiVision AirTicket, Lablife, Flyermix, Popstar, AirExpress, Broadband, Recording, Breakfont, Frontline, Ami, Minivan, Side5, Side6, Summerdrive, Digit, Supercar, Frontline00, BeHappy, Steeltype, Onepiece, Puzzle, Astlatic, Stamper.

Download page of their free silhouette dingbat images. In 2014, they created the free art deco typeface Jazzkissa.

Dafont link. Abstract Fonts link. Fontspace link. Direct access. Alternate URL for free stuff. And another URL. Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gerald Giampa
[Lanston Type Co]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Grosse Pointe Group LLC
[Mark Solsburg]

The Grosse Pointe Group LLC is located in Westport, CT, and is run by Mark Solsburg, who also owns Group Type, ansd who was involved in or ran FontHaus and TypoBrand. Under the Grosse Pointe label, we find a digital font called Stradivarius (1992), named after Imre Reiner's 1938 formal script font Symphonie (Bauer; renamed Stradivarius in 1945). At Group Type or the other outfits of Solsburg, we find these fonts: Carpenter (a 1995 revival of an old connected ATF script by James West), Aquiline (an absolutely wonderful 16th century script), Bank Gothic (1994, a revival of Morris Fuller Benton's original---see also Bank Gothic BT), Aries (a 1995 revival of a lapidary by Eric Gill), Schneidler Initials (a 1995 revival of Friedrich Hermann Ernst Schneidler's Trajan-style typeface), Raleigh Gothic (a 1995 typeface based on Morris Fuller Benton's design. See also Raleigh Gothic RR for a different revival), Ovidius Script (a medieval simulation script, dated 2006, designed by Thaddeus Szumilas; in Light, Demi and Bold weights), Metro Sans (2006, a great Bauhaus style sans family based on William Addison Dwiggins' Metro #2), Corvinus Skyline (1991; a revival of a condensed modern family by Imre Reiner by the same name, 1934), Cloister Initials (2006, a revival of an illuminated caps typeface by Goudy), Regular Joe (2006, an out-of-place childish handwriting font), and Caslon Antique (1993; based on an original by Bernd Nadall). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Group Type
[Mark Solsburg]

Mark Solsburg's outfit located in Westport, CT. Before GroupType, Solsburg worked at ITC, which he left in 1989 to start FontHaus. Later he started TypoBrand and Grosse Pointe Group LLC. Solsburg headed the Type Directors Club for a few years. He is presently located in Ann Arbor, MI. He is President / CEO of DsgnHaus (1989-present), and partner in TypoBrand LLC (2004-present), a specialized typographic consulting firm founded by type designer, Mark van Bronkhorst; former type designer for Adobe, Linnea Lundquist, and Mark Solsburg. It seems that the FontHaus collection is now being marketed under the Group Type label at MyFonts. Group Type does technology consultation in the field of providing software and type typeface fonts for designers, publishers and typographers, related to the selection, purchase and use of design software and type typeface fonts for use in graphic, industrial, interactive and communications design. They specialize in revivals. Their fonts include

View the Group Type typeface libary. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Haiku Monkey
[Alec Julien]

Commercial foundry, est. 2007 in Burlington, VT, by Alec Julien (b. 1965). Fonts sold through MyFonts include Doctor Cyclops (2009), Grundlagen (2009, retro display sans), I Am A Bird (2009), Yacht (2009, a 1930s movie poster style family), Predicate (+Rounded) (2008, sans), Steel Sedan (2008, a condensed slab serif family), Monumint (2008, comic book style), Aerohop (2008, a sans family), Chittenden (2008, an artsy blackboard math style face), Rany (2008, hand-printed), Ashbery (2008, Asian jungle look stick font), Banyan (2007, brush typeface with a jungle look), Loge (2007, a high-contrast sans), Joules (2007, hand-printed family, whose development is described here), Tara (2007, a jungle-look face), Sinn (2007), Set Theory (2007), Bad Marker (2007), Counterfact (2007), Sharp Nine (2007), Good Robot (2007), Groovin Up Slowly (2007), Fractal Caps (2007), Classy Diner (2007), Anthem (2007), Zooey (2007), Imagination Theory (2007), 89 (2007), Skrawl (2007), Zerega (2007), AJ Hand (2007), Scandal (2008), Zone 52 (2008, techno), Gno (2008, techno), Gno Serif (2008), Abbott (2008, a cool hand-printed script). Most of these fonts resulted from drawing or doodling experiments.

Free fonts: Lavoisier (2009, sans), Skritch (2008, handwriting), Geekium (2008, a math symbols font based on Gentium), 36 Dots (dot matrix face), Teacher Sez (2007, blackboard script). Devian Tart carries these free fonts/demos: Skritch, Rany, Teacher Sez, Steel Jalopy (2008, based on Steel Sedan), Insolent (2009), I Am A Bird (2009, slab serif family), Myrna (2009). Lavoisier (2009) is a free monoline font, later cyrillicized by Sergey Tkachenko. Working on Modus (2009).

Additions in 2010: Lockwood (a strong all-caps sans display face), m7 (a slab serif typewriter face), Blues Vity (condensed display face), m13 (fat slab serif), Mineola, Hunk (fat all-caps display face).

Creations from 2011: Zurdo (hand-printed).

Typefaces from 2012: Shockproof (a tall display face).

Typefaces from 2013: Arcation (techno).

IN 2014, Alec Julien published the skyline typeface family Lexave.

Fontsquirrel link. Klingspor link. Kernest link.

View Alec Julien's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

High Contrast Serifs: Stephen Coles's List

Stephen Coles points out the jewels in the FontShop store.

[Google] [More]  ⦿

Ian Lynam
[Wordshape]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Imre Reiner

Typographer, architect, designer and type designer, b. Versec, Hungary, 1900, d. Lugano, Switzerland, 1987. He emigrated from Hungary, and studied at the Staatliche Bildhauerschule Zalatua, the Kunstgewerbeschule Frankfurt, and the Kunstgewerbeschule in Stuttgart, where Prof. F. H. Ernst Schneidler was his teacher. After a brief stint (1923-1925) as a graphic designer in London, Paris, New York and Chicago, he returned to study with Schneidler, and from 1931 onwards, he worked in Ruvigliana near Lugano as painter, graphic designer and illustrator. His list of fonts includes:

  • Bazaar or Bazar (1956, D. Stempel; this brush typeface was revived in 2005 by Patrick Griffin, Canada Type, as Boondock).
  • The brush script Contact (Deberny&Peignot, 1952; Ludwig&Mayer, 1968 (according to Jaspert), and 1963 according to others).
  • Corvinus (Bauersche Giesserei, 1934; Swisstypedesign mentions 1932-1935). See also here. Corvinus Skyline (1934). Digital typefaces derived from this include Corvinus Skyline (1991, Group Type), Skyline (1992, Jane Patterson, Font Bureau).
  • Figaro (1940).
  • Florides Initiales (Deberny&Peignot, 1939, 3d horizontally shaded caps).
  • The Gotika fraktur font (Bauersche Giesserei, 1933), revived as Gotika by Petra Heidorn (2005, no downloads) and as Leather by Canada Type (2005). Manfred Klein created Gotika Buttons (2005) based on Petra Heidorn's Gotika. Gotika discussion on Typophile. Eric West intends to do a digitization as well, and Neufville is not cooperating.
  • London Script (1957). This was digitized twice at Canada Type, once by Phil Rutter in 2004 as Almanac, and once in 2007 by Rebecca Alaccari as Reiner Hand.
  • Matura MT (1938, Monotype), Matura Swash (1938).
  • Mercurius MT (1957).
  • Meridian (1930, Klingspor: a fat display face). Swisstypedesign says 1929.
  • Mustang (1956, D. Stempel, a brush script revived in 2005 by Canada Type as Hunter).
  • Pepita MT (1959).
  • Reiner Black (1955, Berthold, a brush script).
  • Reiner Script (1951, Amsterdam). Digitizations of this brush script under the same name include those of Dieter Steffmann and Tobias Frere-Jones (Font Bureau, 1993).
  • Sassa (1939).
  • Stradivarius (1945, identical to his Symphonie; Bauersche Giesserei, 1938), a formal script font with a compressed straightened lower case alphabet. [Note: Neufville copied it in its Sinfonia later, and in 2005, Petra Heidorn made a digitized version called Symphonie.] Martin Z. Schröder discusses its origins here. Also called Neue Symphony (1938). Digitizations include one by Group Type in 1993 also called Stradivarius.
  • Amsterdam Primula Ornaments. A digital version by Ari Rafaeli is called Ornaments 5 (2010).

In 1992, Manfred Klein made Tokay-MK after one of Reiner's ideas. In 2004, he added VariationsForImre, a playful typeface based on Reiner's lettering, and this was followed in 2005 by Magyarish.

Reiner wrote several books, including Modern and Historical Typography An Illustrated Guide (1946, Paul A. Struck, New York, and 1948, Zollikofer and Comp., St. Gallen).

Linotype page on him. FontShop link. Klingspor link.

View Imre Reiner's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Jane Patterson
[Design Lab SRL, Milan]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Jane Patterson

An American type designer and President of Design Lab SRL (in partnership with Sebastiano Castiglioni), a digital font foundry in Milan, Italy. Jane Patterson holds degrees in fine and computer arts from Colorado College and the School of Visual Arts in New York. After an apprenticeship with Benguiat, she joined Font Bureau in 1991.

Author of the essay entitled Copyright&Fonts In The Age of Cyber Space.

Jane Patterson designed or co-designed

  • FB Californian (1987-1994, with Carol Twombly and David Berlow). In 1938, Goudy designed California Oldstyle for the University of California Press. In 1958, Lanston issued it as Californian. Carol Twombly digitized the roman in 1988 at Adobe. David Berlow revised it for Font Bureau with italic and small caps. Jane Patterson designed the bold. In 1999, assisted by Richard Lipton and Jill Pichotta, Berlow designed the black and the text and display series.
  • FB Cheltenham (1992).
  • Eldorado (Font Bureau). W. A. Dwiggins created the gorgeous oldstyle font Eldorado during WWII. It was released by Mergenthaler in 1953. Goudy followed an early roman lowercase, cut in the 16th century by Jacques de Sanlecque the elder, aka Granjon. David Berlow, Tobias Frere-Jones, and Thomas Rickner revived and expanded the series in 1993-1994 for Premiere magazine, with versions not only for text and display, but a Micro for six point and smaller.
  • Skyline (1992). Skyline was commissioned from Font Bureau by Condé Nast as headletter for Traveler magazine. Based on Imre Reiner's Corvinus (1929-1934)], and John Downer's Simona.

    In 1995, Maurizio Osti reconstructed and redesigned Ben Shahn's Folk Alphabet, which was originally created as lettering in 1940, with the consent and approval of Mrs. Bernarda Shahn, Shahn's second wife, and the Estate of Ben Shahn, under license from VAGA (New York). FF Folk (2003, Marizio Osti and Jane Patterson) is the only authorized and officially endorsed digital version of Shahn's well-known protest poster lettering.

FontShop link.

View Jane Patterson's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Kato Masashi
[FLOP Design]

[More]  ⦿

Kelly Ehrgott-Milligan

American designer of Belucian (Font Bureau, 1990, with David Berlow, after a 1928 design by Lucian Bernhard; +Ultra weight) and FB Empire (Font Bureau, 1989, with David Berlow). FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Lanston Type Co
[Gerald Giampa]

The Lanston Type Co was based in PEI, Canada, moved in 2002 to Vancouver, and moved later that year to Espoo, Finland. In 2004, Lanston was sold to P22. It has classic and wonderful offerings such as Albertan, Bodoni, Caslon, Deepdene (Frederic Goudy, 1929-1934; see D690 Roman on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, or URW Deepdene, or Barry Schwartz's Linden Hill (a free font)), Goudy Oldstyle, Jacobean Initials, Kennerly, Kaatskill, Water Garden and Jefferson Gothic. Owned by Gerald Giampa (b. 1950, d. Vancouver, 2009), who wrote me this: Frederic Goudy worked for us for 29 years. We manufactured Monotype casters and keyboards. The English sister company sold casters to England and the Commonwealth and we sold to the Americas and wherever else practical. Tolbert Lanston, our founder, was the inventor of Monotype. We still sell matrices and were punching them until several years ago. Soon we expect to have the equipment moved and operational once again. We are placing it into America's largest printing museum which is in Andover close to Boston. However there is a possibility that it will end up in Hull Québec. Our previous type director was Jim Rimmer of Vancouver, noted type designer. He designs, cuts and cast type in lead. Our typeface Albertan was designed by Jim and is very successful. John Hudson and Ross Mills of Tiro were directly inspired by our facilities in Vancouver. I encouraged them towards type design. The beautiful Bodoni 26 (unicase) can be bought at FontShop. Atlantic 35 (1909-1935) is a modern family first used by the Atlantic Monthly in 1909.

The fonts: Albertan No. 977, Albertan Bold No. 978, Albertan Title No. 980,&Inline No. 979, Bodoni No. 175, Bodoni Bold No. 2175, Bodoni 26 (a Lanston unicase based on an interpretation by Sol Hess), No. 175, Caslon Old Style No. 337, Caslon Bold No's 637,&537, Deepdene No. 315, Figures Square No. 132, Flash No. 373, Fleurons C, Fleurons Granjon Folio, Fleurons Folio One, Forum No. 274, Francis No. 982, Garamont No. 248, Globe Gothic No's 240,&239,&230, Goudy Initials No. 296, Goudy Old Style No. 394, Goudy Thirty No. 392, Goudy Village (#2) No. 410, Hadriano Stone-Cut No. 409, Hadriano Title No. 309, Jacobean Initials, Jefferson Gothic No. 227, Jenson Old Style No. 508, Kaatskill No. 976, Kaufmann (Lanston Swing Bold) No. 217, Kennerley Old Style No. 268, Metropolitan No. 369, Obelisk No. 2577, Pabst Old Style No. 45, Pabst Old Style Open, Spire No. 377, 20th Century No. 605, Vine Leaves C, Vine Leaves Folio One, Vine Leaves Folio Two, Water Garden Ornaments. P22 writes this about Lanston: In the late 1800s, Tolbert Lanston licensed his technology to an English sister company and became a major international force. Lanston grew rapidly with America's pre-eminent type designer, Frederic Goudy, holding the position of art director from 1920-1947. The Philadelphia-based Lanston Monotype eventually parted ways with its English counterpart. English Monotype became simply known as Monotype from that time forth. Lanston was acquired by American Type Founders in 1969. After a series of other owners, the company found its way to master printer Gerald Giampa, who moved it to Prince Edward Island in 1988. During its time of transition, Lanston continued supplying the American market for monotype casters until January 21, 2000, when the hot-metal component of Lanston was tragically destroyed by a tidal wave. Giampa was one of the earliest developers of PostScript fonts. After the loss, he focused on digitization to an even greater extent. Under his stewardship, Lanston's classic faces were digitized in a style that was true to the sources, which are the brass and lead patterns from which the metal type was made. The past few years have seen Giampa and Lanston travel from Canada to Finland, and back again. Now, Lanston has completed another journey back to the United States to come under the care of a new steward: P22. Giampa is answering the call of the sea. He has traded his type founder's hat for that of a ship's captain to sail the northern Pacific coast. During his shore leaves, Giampa will act as typographic consultant to Lanston-P22. The P22 Lanston collection (2005-2006) includes this:

  • LTC Archive Ornaments (2014, Richard Kegler and Miranda Roth).
  • Artscript (2 style+OT).
  • Bodoni 26 (1 style).
  • Bodoni Bold (4 styles).
  • LTC Bodoni 175 (by Sol Hess; with help in 2006 by Paul Hunt. This is supposed to be a Bodoni revival true to the original.).
  • LTC Broadway (by Sol Hess).
  • Californian (8 styles + OT).
  • Caslon (12 styles+OT).
  • Christmas (5 styles).
  • Cloister in 11 styles, including LTC Cloister Light Swash, LTC Cloister Bold, LTC Cloister Light, LTC Cloister Oldstyle, and LTC Cloister Swash.
  • Deepdene (9 styles).
  • LTC Creepy Ornaments (2006).
  • Deepdene Bold (2 styles).
  • Figures (1 style).
  • Flash (1 style).
  • Fleurons Granjon (1 style).
  • Fleurons Garamont (1 style).
  • Fleurons Rogers (1 styles).
  • Forum Titling (1 style).
  • LTC Fournier le Jeune, a decorative all caps combines the font designed by Simon Fournier for the Peignot Foundry in 1768 with a more elaborate "Vogue Initials" caps offered by ATF in the 1920s.
  • Garamont (12 styles).
  • Globe Gothic (3 styles).
  • LTC Glamour was originally released by Lanston Monotype in 1948. It is based on Corvinus, designed by Imre Reiner. P22 designer Colin Kahn has added some unusual variants.
  • LTC Goudy Extras (50 ornaments).
  • Goudy Handtooled (2 styles).
  • Goudy Heavyface (2 styles + OT).
  • Goudy Initials (1 style).
  • Goudy Oldstyle Family (7 styles + OT).
  • Goudy Sans: Goudy Sans Bold was originally designed by Fredric Goudy in 1922 as a less formal "gothic" and finished in 1929. The light was designed in 1930 and the Light Italic in 1931. Colin Kahn digitized them in 2006 to make a 6-style Goudy Sans family at P22/Lanston, which includes a Goudy Sans Hairline.
  • Goudy Text (2 styles+OT).
  • Goudy Thirty (2 styles).
  • Hadriano (1 style).
  • Halloween Ornaments (1 style).
  • Hess Monoblack (1 style).
  • LTC Italian Old Style (2007, by Paul Hunt, after Goudy Italian Oldstyle, 1924). Remastered in 2011 by Paul Grieshaber as LTC Italian Old Style Pro: LTC Italian Old Style is not to be confused with the English Monotype font also called "Italian Old Style", which is an earlier design from 1911 based on William Morris's Golden Type that is based on Nicholas Jenson's Roman face. Goudy went back to Jenson's original Roman and other Renaissance Roman faces for his inspiration and the result is what many consider to be the best Renaissance typeface adapted for modern use. Bruce Rogers was one of the biggest admirers of Italian Old Style and designed the original specimen book for Italian Old Style in 1924 using his trademark ornament arrangement. These ornaments are now contained in the pro versions of the Roman styles- Regular Pro and Light Pro.
  • Jacobean Initials (8 styles).
  • Jefferson Gothic (1 style).
  • LTC Jenson Oldstyle was designed by J. W. Phinney of the Dickinson Type Foundry in 1893 and is based on Morris's Golden Typeface. This remastered set features a true italic based on the 1893 ATF italic version as well as a newly digitized Jenson Regular (P22) and Jenson Heavyface (P22) based on Phinney's design of 1899.
  • Kaatskill (the Italic was completed by Jim Rimmer).
  • Kennerley (9 styles+OT).
  • Metropolitan (4 styles+OT).
  • LTC Law Italic.
  • Nicolas Cochin (2 styles+OT).
  • LTC Obelysk Grotesk, a reconsrtruction of Sol Hess's Spire (1937) (digital versions first by Gerald Giampa and then bu Colin Kahn).
  • Octic Gothic (2 styles).
  • Ornaments 1 (1 style).
  • Ornaments 2 (1 style+OT).
  • Ornaments 3 (1 style).
  • Ornaments Animalia (1 style).
  • LTC Ornamental Initials. These are floriated caps.
  • Pabst (1 style), Pabst Italic.
  • Powell (2 styles).
  • Remington Typewriter (2 styles+OT).
  • Spire (1 style).
  • LTC Squareface (Sol Hess).
  • Swing Bold (1 style).
  • Twentieth Century (2 styles+OT).
  • LTC Tourist Gothic (Sol Hess).
  • Village #2 (4 styles + OT).
  • Vine Leaves (1 style).
  • Water Garden Ornaments (11 styles).

Fonts can be purchased from MyFonts where all fonts have the prefix LTC. Obituary of Giampa and links to obituaries.

Catalog of the Lanston typeface library. View the typefaces designed by Lanston. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ludwig&Mayer

Big German foundry active in the first half of the 20th century. It was absorbed by Neufville in 1984, which will make its faces available in digital form. Type designers and faces:

  • House faces: Allemannia Fraktur (1908), Allright (1936), Altenburger Gotisch (1928), Bastard Mediaeval, Beatrice (1931), Chic, Cochin (1922), Commerciale, Diplomat (1964, see the digital version Diploma by Hans van Maanen, 2009), Excelsior (1914, script face), Firmin Didot (1929), Hallo (1956), Kombinette (1932), Kupferplatte (1950), Largo (1939), Magnet (1951), Nelson (1902, art nouveau), Wren, Samson Script, Luminous, Behrens. Kudos Kaps NF (2006, Nick Curtis) is a set of five nice ornamental caps and associated alphabet and border sets, including a Lombardic set, and an engraved set--they are based on faces from the Ludwig&Mayer library.
  • Albert Christoph Auspurg: Rasse (1924), Mona Lisa (1930), Brigitte (1935), Krimhilde (1934)
  • Hans Bohn: Allegro (1936-1937)
  • Jakob Erbar: Erbar-Grotesk (1922-1930), Lucina, Lumina, Lux, Phosphor, Koloss (1923), Candida (1936, a mediocre didone family), Feder Grotesk (1910), Fette Feder Grotesk, Erbar
  • Hace Frey: Charleston (1967, Alphonse Mucha-style display face)
  • G. Germroth: Germroth-Deutsch (1935, blackletter)
  • Erhard Grundeis: Achtung (1932)
  • Karlgeorg Hoefer: Stereo (1968), Permanent (1962), Headline (1964), Elegance (1968), Big Band (1974)
  • Walter Höhnisch: Tempo (1930), Werbeschrift Deutsch (1933), National (Fraktur, 1933-1934), Schräge National (1937), Skizze (1935, a script face), Stop (1939), Antiqua die Schlanke (1938-1939), Express (1952), Candida Italic (1937), Slender (1939)
  • Heinrich Jost: Aeterna (or Jost Mediaeval, 1927)
  • Walter Ferdinand Kemper: Colonia (1938-1939, a humanist sans)
  • Wilhelm Krause: Professor-Krause-Fraktur (1930, blackletter)
  • Paul Eduard Lautenbach: Prägefest (1926)
  • Richard Ludwig: Augenheil (1908)
  • Helmut Matheis: Charme (1957-1958, calligraphic), Slogan (1959, connected script), Primadonna (1956, a formal script), Matheis Mobil (1960), Compliment (1965, an angular vertical script)
  • Joshua Reichert: Reichert-Gotisch (1930s).
  • Imre Reiner: Contact (Deberny&Peignot, 1952; Ludwig&Mayer, 1968 (according to Jaspert), and 1963 according to others), Corvinus (ca. 1932), Stradivarius (1945)
  • Lorenz Reinhard Spitzenpfeil: Welt-Fraktur (1910), Werk-Fraktur (1918)
  • Alfred Riedel: Domino (1954)
  • Georg Schiller: Lyrisch (1907)
  • Arthur Schulze: Werbekraft (1926)
  • Ilse Schüle: Rhapsodie (1949-1951, bastarda)
  • Johannes Schweitzer: Dominante (1959)
  • Francesco Simoncini: Aster (or Aster Simoncini, 1958), Life (1965), Armstrong (1970), Simoncini Garamond (1961)
  • K. Sommer: Dynamo (1930)
  • Hans Wagner: Altenburger Gotisch (1928, Fraktur font), Welt (1931, slab serif), Wolfram (1930, a heavy upright italic).
  • Eugen Weiss: Hölderlin (1938, blackletter)
[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Mark Solsburg
[Group Type]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Mark Solsburg
[Grosse Pointe Group LLC]

[More]  ⦿

Match&Kerosene
[Alex Sheldon]

Match&Kerosene is Alex Sheldon's Detroit-based graphic design and typographic illustration company, est. 2008.

Klingspor link. Behance link.

Typefaces designed by Sheldon (b. Michigan, 1984) include Slab Sheriff (2009), Western, Kerosene Boxley (2009, a multiline art deco revival of a Solotype font; some say that it is based on a pair of 1972 alphabets by Marcia Loeb called Zig Zag and Rainbow), Kerosene Woodtype (2009), Kerosene Retroface, Kerosene Stereo (2009, revival of an Italian typeface from 1869), Kerosene Killowatt, White Wolf (2009, condensed horror movie face).

Typefaces designed in 2011: Quimby (Copperplate Gothic style titling face), Black Bear (2011, straight-edged display family), Swifty (2011), Grizzly Bear (a set of 12 constructivist titling faces), Detroit (a modular family for superpositions), Prismatic (another superimposable multi-purpose family), Duotone (2011, Duotone is a layered font system that allows one to title two-tone headlines), Volcano Gothic (+Inline), Volcano Island (jungle look family), Lightyears. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Michel Troy
[Urban Pixel (or: UP Font Studio)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Morris Fuller Benton

Prolific American type designer (b. 1872, Milwaukee, d. 1948, Morristown, NJ), who published over 200 alphabets at ATF. He managed the ATF type design program from 1892 until 1937. Son of Linn Boyd Benton. MyFonts page on him. Nicholas Fabian's page. Linotype's page. Klingspor page. Unos tipos duros page. His fonts include:

  • 1897: Cloister Old Style (ATF). [Stephenson Blake purchased this from ATF and called it Kensington Old Style, 1919] [Cloister (2005, P22/Lanston) is based on Jim Rimmer's digitization of Benton's Cloister.]
  • 1898: Roycroft. Mac McGrew on Roycroft: Roycroft was one of the most popular of a number of rugged faces used around the turn of the century, when printing with an antique appearance was in vogue. It was inspired by lettering used by the Saturday Evening Post. then a popular weekly magazine, and has been credited to Lewis Buddy, a former Post artist and letterer, but ATF says it was designed "partly" by Morris Benton, about 1898. Gerry Powell, director of typographic design for ATF in the 1940s, says, "Roycroft was first known as Buddy, changed when it was adopted by Elbert Hubbard for the Roycroft Press." Henry L. Bullen, ATF librarian and historian, says, "The first font of type to be made from matrices directly engraved on the Benton machine was 24-point Roycroft. October 4, 1900." While the machine was originally designed in 1884 to cut punches rather than matrices, it is doubtful that no fonts of mats were cut before 1900. Roycroft is also said to be the first typeface for which the large size of 120-point was engraved in type metal, with matrices made by electrotyping. Many faces of the day had a number of alternate characters. For this face. ATF gave specific instructions for their intended use: "M with the short vertex, in words the letters of which are open; R with the long tail, as a final letter in all-cap words; the wide h, m, and n, as a final letter only; t with the swash tail, as a final letter but not too frequently; u with the descending stroke, in words having no descending letters; ct ligature, wherever possible; the long s and its combinations, in antique work." Roycroft Open was cut in 1902, probably from the same patterns as the parent face. Roycroft Tinted is a very unusual face, in which the typeface is engraved with the equivalent of a halftone screen of about 25 percent tone value, with a black shadow on the right side; this typeface was cut by the Dickinson Type Foundry branch of ATF in Boston, and includes the same special characters as Roycroft. Compare Post Oldstyle.
  • 1900: Century Expanded (1900: poster by Heather Leonhardt). This was a complete redraw of Century Roman which was designed in 1894 by his father, Linn Boyd Benton, for Theodore Low DeVinne, the publisher of Century Magazine. Digitizations by Elsner&Flake, Bitstream and URW.
  • 1901: Linotext (aka WedddingText).
  • 1901-1910: Engravers.
  • 1901: Wedding Text (some put this in 1907), Old English Text, Engravers' Old English (a blackletter font remade by Bitstream). Wedding Text has been copied so often it is sickening: Wedding Regular and Headline (HiH, 2007), Dan X. Solo's version, Comtesse, Elite Kanzlei (1905, Stempel), Meta, Lipsia, QHS Nadejda (QHS Soft), Blackletter 681, Marriage (Softmaker), Wedding Text TL (by Tomas Liubinas).
  • 1902: Typoscript.
  • 1902-1912: Franklin Gothic. Digital versions exist by Bitstream, Elsner&Flake (in a version called ATF Franklin Gothic), Red Rooster (called Franklin Gothic Pro, 2011), Linotype, and ITC (ITC Franklin Gothic). Discussion by Harvey Spears. Mac McGrew: Franklin Gothic might well be called the patriarch of modern American gothics. Designed in 1902 by Morris Fuller Benton, it was one of the first important modernizations of traditional nineteenth-century faces by that designer, after he was assigned the task of unifying and improving the varied assortment of designs inherited by ATF from its twenty-three predecessor companies. Franklin Gothic (named for Benjamin Franklin) not only became a family in its own right, but also lent its characteristics to Lightline Gothic. Monotone Gothic, and News Gothic (q.v.). All of these faces bear more resem- blance to each other than do the faces within some other single families. Franklin Gothic is characterized by a slight degree of thick-and-thin contrast; by the double-loop g which has become a typically American design in gothic faces; by the diagonal ends of curved strokes (except in Extra Condensed); and by the oddity of the upper end of C and c being heavier than the lower end. The principal specimen here is Monotype, but the basic font is virtually an exact copy of the ATF typeface in display sizes, except that Monotype has added f- ligatures and diphthongs. Franklin Gothic Condensed and Extra Condensed were also designed by Benton, in 1906; Italic by the same designer in 1910; and Condensed Shaded in 1912 as part of the "gray typography" series. Although Benton started a wide version along with the others, it was abandoned; the present Franklin Gothic Wide was drawn by Bud (John L.) Renshaw about 1952. Franklin Gothic Condensed Italic was added by Whedon Davis in 1967. Monotype composition sizes of Franklin Gothic have been greatly modi- fied to fit a standard arrangement; 12-point is shown in the specimen-notice the narrow figures and certain other poorly reproportioned characters. The 4- and 5-point sizes have a single-loop g. Gothic No. 16 on Linotype and Inter- type is essentially the same as Franklin Gothic up to 14-point; in larger sizes it is modified and more nearly like Franklin Gothic Condensed. However. some fonts of this typeface on Lino have Gagtu redrawn similar to Spartan Black. with the usual characters available as alternates; 14-point is shown. Western Type Foundry and later BB&S used the name Gothic No.1 for their copy of Franklin Gothic, while Laclede had another similar Gothic No. 1 (q.v.). On Ludlow, this design was originally known as Square Gothic Heavy with a distinctive R and t as shown separately after the Monotype diphthongs; when the name was changed to Franklin Gothic in 1928, it was redrawn, closer to Franklin Gothic but still a bit top-heavy; the unique R was retained in standard fonts but an alternate version like that of ATF was made available separately; also a U with equal arms, a single-loop g, and a figure 1 without foot serifs. Ludlow Franklin Gothic Italic, partially shown on the third line of the specimen, is slanted much more than other versions, to fit the standard 17 -degree italic matrices of that machine. Modern Gothic Condensed and Italic (q.v.) are often though not properly called Franklin Gothic Condensed and Italic, especially by Monotype users. Also see Streamline Block.
  • 1903: Alternate Gothic (ATF). See Alternate Gothic EF (Elsner&Flake), Alternate Gothic No2 (Bitstream), and Alternate Gothic No1, No2 and No3 (see the URW version). Mac McGrew: Alternate Gothic was designed in 1903 by Morris F. Benton for ATF with the thought of providing several alternate widths of one design to fit various layout problems. Otherwise it is a plain, basic American gothic with no unusual features, but represents a more careful drawing of its nineteenth-century predecessors. The Monotype copies in display sizes are essentially the same as the foundry originals, with the addition of f-ligatures. The thirteen alternate round capitals shown in the first line of Alternate Gothic No.1 were designed by Sol Hess in 1927 for Monotype, hence the "Modernized" name; with these letters the design is sometimes referred to as Excelsior Gothic. Monotype keyboard sizes, as adapted by Hess about 1911, are considera- bly modified to fit a standard arrangement; caps are not as condensed as in the original foundry design. In 6-point, series 51 and 77 are both the same width, character for character, but some letters differ a bit in design. Note that these two narrower widths are simply called Alternate Gothic on Monotype, while the wider version is Alternate Gothic Condensed! Alternate Gothic Italic, drawn about 1946 by Sol Hess for Monotype matches No.2, but may be used with other widths as well. Condensed Gothic on Ludlow, is essentially a match for Alternate Gothic No.1, but has a somewhat different set of variant characters, as shown in the third line. There is also Condensed Gothic Outline on Ludlow, introduced about 1953, essentially an outline version of Alternate Gothic No.2. On Linotype and Intertype there is Gothic Condensed No.2 which is very similar to Alternate Gothic No. 1 in the largest sizes only, but with even narrower lowercase and figures. Also compare Trade Gothic Bold and Trade Gothic Bold Condensed. For a free version of Alternate Gothic No. 1, see League Gothic (2009-2011, The League of Movable Type).
  • 1904: Bold Antique, Whitin Black [see OPTI Bold Antique for a modern digitization], Cheltenham (digitizations by Bitstream and Font Bureau, 1992), Cloister Black (blackletter font, see the Bitstream version: it is possible that the typeface as designed by Joseph W. Phinney).
  • 1905: Linoscript (1905). Originally at ATF it was named "Typo Upright". Clearface, about which McGrew writes: Clearface was designed by Morris Benton with his father, Linn B. Benton, as advisor. The bold was designed first, in 1905, and cut the following year. The other weights and italics were produced through 1911. As the name implies, the series was intended to show unusual legibility, which it certainly achieved. The precision of cutting and casting for which ATF is noted produced a very neat and handsome series, which had considerable popularity. Clearface Heavy Italic has less inclination than the lighter weights, and is non-kerning, a detail which helped make it popular for newspaper use; the specimen shown here is from a very worn font. Some of the faces have been copied by the matrix makers. But the typeface Monotype calls Clearface and Italic is the weight called Bold by other sources. Monotype also includes Clearface Italic No. 289, a copy of the lighter weight. Revival and expansion by Victor Caruso for ITC called ITC Clearface, 1978. Also, American Extra Condensed, an octagonal mechanical typeface revived in 2011 by Nick Curtis as Uncle Sam Slim NF.
  • 1906: Commercial Script (versions exist at Linotype, URW, Bitstream (called English 144), and Elsner&Flake), Miele Gothic, Norwood Roman.
  • 1907: Lincoln Gotisch, named after Abraham Lincoln. This found found its way from ATF to Schriftguss, Trennert und Sohn, and Ludwig Wagner. Digital revivals include Delbanco's DS Lincoln-Gotisch. Compare with Comtesses, Lipsia, Elite Kanzlei, Lithographia and Wedding Text.
  • 1908: News Gothic, Century Oldstyle (digital versions by Bitstream, Elsner&Flake, and URW), Clearface Gothic (1907-1910: digital revivals include Clear Gothic Serial (ca. 1994, SoftMaker) and Cleargothic Pro (2012, SoftMaker). McGrew: Clearface Gothic was designed by Morris Benton for ATF in 1908, and cut in 1910. It is a neat, clean gothic, somewhat thick and thin, which incorporates some of the mannerisms of the Clearface (roman) series. However, it can hardly be considered a part of that family. There is only one weight, and fonts contain only the minimum number of characters.
  • 1909-1911: Rugged Roman. McGrew: Rugged Roman was designed for ATF by Morris F. Benton in 1909-11. It was patented in 1915, but the earliest showing seems to have appeared in 1917. It is a rugged face, as the name says, of the sort that was popular early in the century, but appears to have no relation to other faces having the name "Rugged." It somewhat resembles Roycroft, but is lighter. But to add to the uncertainty, fonts contained a number of ligatures of the kind which were more common in the early 1900s, in addition to the usual f-ligatures.
  • 1910: Cloister Open Face, Hobo (1910, strongly influenced by the Art Nouveau movement), ATF Bodoni (Bitstream's version is just called Bodoni, and Adobe's version is called Bodoni Book or Bodoni Poster or Bodoni Bold Condensed, while Elsner&Flake call theirs Bodoni No Two EF Ultra; Font Bureau's version has just two weights called BodoniFB-Bold Condensed and Compressed). McGrew writes about Hobo: Hobo is unusual in two respects---it is drawn with virtually no straight lines, and it has no descenders and thus is very large for the point size. It was designed by Morris F. Benton and issued by ATF in 1910. One story says that it was drawn in the early 1900s and sent to the foundry without a name, which was not unusual, but that further work on it was continually pushed aside, until it became known as "that old hobo" because it hung around so long without results. More time elapsed before it was patented in 1915. The working name was Adface. Hobo was also cut by Intertype in three sizes. Light Hobo was also drawn by Benton, and released by ATF in 1915. It is included in one list of Monotype faces, but its series number is shown elsewhere for another Monotype face, and no other evidence has been found that Monotype actually issued it.
  • 1911-1913: Venetian, Cromwell. Mac McGrew: Cromwell is a rather playful typeface, designed by Morris Benton in 1913 but not released by ATF until three years later. It uses the same capitals as Cloister (q.v.) and has the same small x-height with long ascenders and descenders, but otherwise is quite different, with much less formality. Notice the alternate characters and the double letters including overhanging f's.. Cromwell was digitized by Nick Curtis in 2010 as Cromwell NF. Mac McGrew on Venetian: Venetian and Italic were designed by Morris F. Benton for ATF about 1911, with Venetian Bold following about two years later. They are rather reserved transitional faces, almost modern, instead of classic designs of Venetian origin as the name implies. The result is closer to Bodoni than to Cloister. The working title was Cheltenham No.2, but the relationship to that family is not apparent. It is carefully and neatly done, but never achieved widespread use. Compare Benton, a later typeface by the same designer, which has similar characteristics but more grace and charm.
  • 1914: Adscript, Souvenir, Garamond (with T.M. Cleveland).
  • 1916: Announcement, Light Old Style, Goudy Bold. Mac McGrew writes: Announcement Roman and Announcement Italic were designed by Morris F. Benton in 1916, adapted from steel or copperplate engravings, but not completed and released until 1918. These delicate faces have had some popularity for announcements, social stationery, and a limited amount of advertising work, but are a little too fancy for extensive use. Oddly, some of the plain caps shown in the specimens, both roman and italic, do not seem to appear in any ATF specimens. Foundry records show that a 48-point size of the roman was cut in 1927, but no other listing or showing of it has been found. In fact, sizes over 24-point were discontinued after a few years, and all sizes were discontinued in 1954.. Digitizations: Announcement Roman was done by Nick Curtis in 2009 and called Society Page NF.
  • 1916-1917: Invitation. For a digital revival, see Sil Vous Plait (2009, Nick Curtis).
  • 1917: Freehand.
  • 1917-1919: Sterling. Digitizations include Howard (2006, Paul D. Hunt), Argentina NF (2009, Nick Curtis), and Argentina Cursive NF.
  • 1918: Century Schoolbook (1918-1921). (See ITC Century (Tony Stan, 1975-1979), or the Century FB-Bold Condensed weight by Greg Thompson at Font Bureau, 1992. For Century Schoolbook specifically, there are versions by Elsner&Flake, Bitstream and URW. Bitstream has a monospaced version.) URW Century Schoolbook L is free, and its major extension, TeXGyre Schola (2007) is also free.
  • 1920: Canterbury. Mac McGrew: Canterbury is a novelty typeface designed by Morris F. Benton for ATF in 1920, when trials were cut, but not completed for production until 1926. It features a very small x-height, with long ascenders and descenders; monotone weight with minute serifs; and a number of swash capitals. It is primarily suitable for personal stationery and announcements. Compare Camelot Oldstyle. Digital versions were done by Nick Curtis in his Londonderry Air NF (2002-2004), and Red Rooster in the series Canterbury, Canterbury OldStyle, and Canterbury Sans.
  • 1922: Civilité. Mac McGrew on the ATF Civilité: Civilite in its modern adaptation was designed by Morris Benton in 1922 and cut by ATF in 1923-24. The original version was cut by Robert Granjon in 1557 to imitate the semi-formal writing then in vogue, and is believed to be the first cursive design cut in type. It became popular for the printing of poetry and for books of instruction for children, where the type itself could serve as a perfect model of handwriting. The first of these books was titled La Civilite puerile, printed at Antwerp in 1559. The books were so popular that the design came to be known as "civility" type. Other interpretations of the letter have been made, including Cursive Script, cut in the nineteenth century in 18-point only from French sources by ATF predecessors and by Hansen, but Benton's seems more attractive and legible to modern eyes. The French pronunciation of ci-vil'i-tay is indicated by the accented e, which was used only in ATF's earliest showings. The many alternate characters were included in fonts as originally sold; later they were sold separately and finally discontinued, although the basic font was still listed in recent ATF literature. Also see ZapfCivilite. Compare Freehand, Motto, Verona.
  • 1924: Schoolbook Oldstyle.
  • 1926-1927: Typo Roman.
  • 1927: Chic (American Typefounders; doubly shaded capitals and figures), Gravure, Greeting Monotone, Goudy Extra Bold. The art deco typeface Chic was revived by Nick Curtis as Odalisque NF (2008) and Odalisque Stencil NF (2010).
  • 1928: Parisian, Bulmer (revival of William Martin's typeface from 1792 for the printer William Bulmer; digital forms by Monotype, Adobe, Linotype, and Bitstream), Broadway (1928-1929, see two styles offered by Elsner&Flake, Linotype, Bitstream, and 11 weights by URW), Goudy Catalogue, Modernique, Novel Gothic (ATF, designed with Charles H. Becker), Dynamic. Novel Gothic has seen many digital revivals, most notably Telenovela NF (2011, Nick Curtis), Naked Power (Chikako Larabie) and Novel Gothic SG (Jim Spiece). Images of Bulmer: i, ii, iii, iv, v, vi, vii, viii, ix, x, xi, xii.
  • 1929: Louvaine. McGrew: Louvaine series was designed by Morris F. Benton for ATF in 1928. It is an adaptation of Bodoni (the working title was Modern Bodoni), and many of the characters are identical. Only g and y are basically different; otherwise the distinction is in the more abrupt transition from thick to thin strokes in this series. In this respect, Ultra Bodoni has more affinity to Louvaine than to the other Bodoni weights. The three weights of Louvaine correspond to Bodoni Book, Regular, and Bold. This series did not last long enough to appear in the 1934 ATF specimen book, the next complete one after its introduction. Compare Tippecanoe.
  • 1930: Benton, Engravers Text, Bank Gothic (see Bitstream's version), Garamond-3 (with Thomas Maitland Cleland), Paramount (some have this as being from 1928: see Eva Paramount SG by Jim Spiece). McGrew: Paramount was designed by Morris Benton in 1930 for ATF. It is basically a heavier companion to Rivoli (q. v.), which in turn is based on Eve, an importation from Germany, but is heavier than Eve Bold. It is an informal typeface with a crisp, pen-drawn appearance. Lowercase is small, with long ascenders and short descenders. Vertical strokes taper, being wider at the top. It was popular for a time as an advertising and announcement type.
  • 1931: Thermotype, Stymie (with Sol Hess and Gerry Powell). Stymie Obelisk is a condensed Egyptian headline face---the latter was revived by Nick Curtis as Kenotaph NF (2011).
  • 1932: Raleigh Gothic Condensed (the digital version by Nick Curtis is Highpoint Gothic NF (2011)), American Text (blackletter). Mac McGrew: Raleigh Gothic Condensed was designed by Morris F. Benton for ATF in 1932. It is a prim, narrow, medium weight gothic face, with normally round characters being squared except for short arcs on the outside of corners. The alternate characters AKMNS give an even greater vertical appearance than usual. At first, this typeface was promoted with Raleigh Cursive as a stylish companion face, although there is no apparent relationship other than the name. Compare Phenix, Alternate Gothic, Agency Gothic.
  • 1933: American Backslant, Ultra Bodoni (a great Bodoni headline face; see Bodoni FB (1992, Font Bureau's Richard Lipton). About Agency Gothic, McGrath writes: Agency Gothic is a squarish, narrow, monotone gothic without lower- case, designed by Morris F. Benton in 1932. It has an alternate A and M which further emphasize the vertical lines. Sizes under 36-point were added in 1935. Agency Gothic Open was drawn by Benton in 1932 and introduced in 1934; it follows the same style in outline with shadow, and probably has been more popular than its solid companion. Triangle Type Foundry, a Chicago concern that manufactured matrices, copied this typeface as Slim Open, adding some smaller sizes. ATF's working titles for these faces, before release, were Tempo, later Utility Gothic and Utility Open. Compare Raleigh Gothic Condensed, Poster Gothic, Bank Gothic. Digital versions include Warp Three NF (2008, Nick Curtis), which borrows its lowercase from Square Gothic (1888, James Conner's Sons), FB Agency (1995, David Berlow at FontBureau)
  • 1934: Shadow, Tower (heavy geometric slab serif), Whitehall. Font Bureau's Elizabeth Cory Holzman made the Constructa family in 1994 based on Tower. Digital versions include Warp Three NF (2008, Nick Curtis), which borrows its lowercase from Square Gothic (1888, James Conner's Sons), FB Agency Gothic (1995, David Berlow at FontBureau) and Agency Gothic by Castle Type. Eagle Bold followed in 1934. McGrew: Eagle Bold is a by-product of the depression of the 1930s. The National Recovery Administration of 1933 had as its emblem a blue eagle with the prominent initials NRA, lettered in a distinctive gothic style. Morris Benton took these letters as the basis for a font of type, released later that year by ATF, to tie in with the emblem, which businesses throughout the country displayed prominently in advertising, stationery, and signs; naturally it was named for the eagle. Compare Novel Gothic. USA Resolute NF (2009, Nick Curtis) is based on Eagle Bold.
  • 1935: Phenix. This condensed artsy sans was revived in 2011 at Red Rooster by Steve Jackaman and Ashley Muir as Phoenix Pro.
  • 1936: Headline Gothic.
  • 1937: Empire (Bitstream version). This ultra-condensed typeface was digitally remade and modernized by Santiago Orozco as Dorsa (2011).
Linotype link. FontShop link. Picture.

Typefaces alphabetic order:

  • Adscript
  • Agency Gothic (+Open
  • Alternate Gothic No.1 (+No.2, +No.3)
  • American Backslant
  • American Caslon&Italic
  • American Text
  • Announcement Roman&Italic (1916). For digital revivals or influences, see Friendly (2012, Neil Summerour) and Society Page NF (2009, Nick Curtis).
  • Antique Shaded
  • Bank Gothic Light (+Medium, +Bold, +Light Condensed, +Medium Condensed, +Bold Condensed). For digital versions, see Bank Gothic AS Regular and Condensed (2008, Michael Doret).
  • Baskerville Italic
  • Benton (Whitehall)&Italic
  • Bodoni&Italic (+Book&Italic, +Bold&Italic, +Bold Shaded, +Bold Open)
  • Bold Antique (+Condensed)
  • Broadway (+Condensed). The prototyical art deco typeface.
  • Bulfinch Oldstyle (1903).
  • Bulmer&Italic
  • Canterbury
  • Card Bodoni (+Bold). 1912-1916.
  • Card Litho (+Light Litho)
  • Card Mercantile
  • Card Roman
  • Century Expanded&Italic
  • Century Bold&Italic (+Bold Condensed, +Bold Extended)
  • Century Oldstyle&Italic (+Bold&Italic, +Bold Condensed)
  • Century Catalogue&Italic
  • Century Schoolbook&Italic (+Bold)
  • Cheltenham Oldstyle&Italic (+Condensed, +Wide)
  • Cheltenham Medium&Italic (+Medium Condensed, +Medium Expanded, +Bold&Italic, +Bold Condensed&Italic, +Bold Extra Condensed&Title, +Bold Extended, +Extrabold, +Bold Outline, +Bold Shaded&Italic, +Extrabold Shaded, +Inline, +Inline Extra Condensed, +Inline Extended)
  • Chic
  • Civilite
  • Clearface&Italic (1907, +Bold&Italic, +Heavy&Italic)
  • Clearface Gothic: a flared version of Clearface.
  • Cloister Black
  • Cloister Oldstyle&Italic (+Lightface&Italic, +Bold&Italic, +Bold Condensed, +Cursive, +Cursive Handtooled, +Title&Bold Title)
  • Commercial Script
  • Copperplate Gothic Shaded
  • Cromwell.
  • Cushing Antique (1902).
  • Della Robbia Light
  • Dynamic Medium
  • Eagle Bold
  • Empire
  • Engravers Bodoni
  • Engravers Old English (+Bold)
  • Engravers Bold
  • Engravers Shaded
  • Engravers Text
  • Franklin Gothic&Italic (+Condensed, +Extra Condensed, +Condensed Shaded)
  • Freehand (1917). Mac McGrew: Freehand, a typeface based on pen-lettering, was designed for ATF by Morris Benton in 1917. The working title before release was Quill. Derived from Old English, it is an interesting novelty, and has had quite a bit of use. Compare Civilite, Motto, Verona.
  • Garamond&Italic (+Bold&Italic, +Open)
  • Globe Gothic (+Condensed, +Extra Condensed, +Extended, +Bold&Italic)
  • Goudy Bold&Italic (+Catalogue&Italic, +Extrabold&Italic, +Handtooled&Italic, +Title)
  • Gravure
  • Greeting Monotone
  • Headline Gothic
  • Hobo&Light Hobo (1910). For digital versions, see Informal 707 (Bitstream), Hobbit (SF), Homeward Bound (Corel), and Hobo (Bitstream).
  • Invitation (+Shaded)
  • Light Oldstyle
  • Lightline Gothic&Title (1908). For a revival, see Benton Gothic Thin NF (2014, Nick Curtis).
  • Lithograph Shaded (1914, with W.F. Capitain).
  • Louvaine Light&Italic (+Medium&Italic, +Bold&Italic)
  • Miehle Extra Condensed&Title
  • Modernique
  • Monotone Gothic&Title
  • Motto (1915). Mac McGrew: Motto is a calligraphic typeface designed by Morris F. Benton for ATF in 1915. It is similar to the same designer's Freehand, drawn a couple of years later, but has plainer capitals, heavier thin strokes, and shorter descenders. But letters combine into legible words with a pleasant, hand-lettered appearance. Also compare Humanistic, Verona.
  • News Gothic (+Condensed, +Extra Condensed&Title)
  • Norwood Roman
  • Novel Gothic
  • Othello
  • Packard (+Bold)
  • Paramount
  • Parisian
  • Pen Print Open
  • Phenix
  • Piranesi Italic (+Italic Plain Caps, +Bold&Italic, +Bold Italic Plain Caps)
  • Poster Gothic
  • Raleigh Gothic Condensed (1934).
  • Rockwell Antique
  • Roycroft
  • Rugged Roman
  • Schoolbook Oldstyle
  • Shadow
  • Souvenir (1914). Revived in 1977 by Ed Benguiat as ITC Souvenir, but a total failure as a type design. Simon Garfield: Souvenir was the Comic Sans of its era, which was the 1970s before punk. It was the typeface of friendly advertising, and it did indeed appear on Bee Gees albums, not to mention the pages of Farrah Fawcett-era Playboy. Mark Batty from International Typeface Corporation (ITC) on one of his best-selling fonts: A terrible typeface. A sort of Saturday Night Fever typeface wearing tight white flared pants. Garfield also retrieved this quote by type scholar Frank Romano in the early 1990s: Real men don't set Souvenir. Digital revivals also include Sunset Serial by Softmaker, and ITC Souvenir Mono by Ned Bunnel.
  • Sterling&Cursive
  • Stymie Light&Italic (+Medium&Italic, +Bold&Italic, +Black&Italic)
  • Thermotypes
  • Tower Condensed (1934). Revived by Photo-Lettering Inc as PL Tower.
  • Typo Roman&Shaded
  • Typo Script and Typo Script&Extended (1902)
  • Typo Shaded
  • Typo Slope
  • Typo Upright&Bold
  • Ultra Bodoni&Italic (+Condensed, +Extra Condensed)
  • Venetian&Italic (+Bold)
  • Wedding Text&Shaded

View Morris Fuller Benton's typefaces. A longer list. A listing of various digital versions of News Gothic. More News Gothic-like typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Paul H. Neville

Boston-based designer. His typefaces:

  • The display skyline sans serif FF Kath Condensed (1992, FontFont). It is accompanied by a gorgeous Inline. Four styles in all.
  • FF Extra Condensed (1995, FontFont), one of the first blocky ultra-fat faces. FF Extra Black (1995, FontFont) is as black as you can get.

FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Santiago Orozco
[Typemade]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Skyline Fonts

Skyline fonts are fonts that are ultra narrow or condensed in a style often seen in American magazines in the 1930s and 1940s. This group contains fonts such as Swifty (2011, Alex Sheldon, Match & Kerosene), Empire (1989-1994, David Berlow and Kelley Ehrgott-Milligan, Font Bureau), Spire (Ann Pomeroy, Group Type), LTC Spire (2005, Lanston), Corvinus Skyline (1991, Ann Pomeroy, Group Type), Niagara (1994, Tobias Frere-Jones, Font Bureau), and Manygo Serif (2012, Michel Troy).

Font Bureau's Empire is a 7-style extension of the Empire type designed in 1937 by Morris Fuller Benton for Vogue, where it was used as a headline style. A year later, in 1938, Sol Hess created an ultra-narrow didone caps only family called Spire, which similar magazine titling applications. It was that typeface that was extended in digital form by Ann Pomeroy of Group Type and by Lanston in 2005. The typeface family Niagara by Tobias Frere-Jones revisits both styles. A separate duckling with its ultra large x-height is Corvinus Skyline, designed in 1934 by Imre Reiner. It was digitized in 1991 by Group Type. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Sol Hess

American typographer and type designer, b. 1886, Philadelphia, d. -1953. He was a man with class and style, who influenced many through his work. He managed the Lanston library from early in the 20th century (he joined Lanston in 1902) until the second World War. He created many of its typefaces himself, and commissioned many from Frederic W. Goudy. His typefaces (LTC stands for Lanston Type Company):

  • Alternate Gothic Modernized.
  • LTC Artscript (Lanston Monotype, 1940; digital version in 2005 at P22/Lanston).
  • In 1928, he created the now famous Broadway Engraved. P22 writes: LTC Broadway was originally designed by Morris Benton. Sol Hess added a lower case in 1929 and also drew Broadway Engraved for Lanston Monotype. That font is now available in digital format from LTC/P22.
  • Bodoni 26: a unicase interpretation of Bodoni by Hess at Lanston, designed by Giampa; digital version at P22/Lanston in 2005.
  • Bodoni No. 175 (remastered in 2006 by Paul Hunt).
  • LTC Bodoni Bold.
  • Bruce Old Style No. 31: a transitional font at Lanston Monotype in 1909. Now a Bitstream face. Based on Bruce Old Style No. 20 from Bruce Foundry (1869).
  • Linotype states that Soll is responsible for a version of Cochin Bold (1921): Georges Peignot designed Cochin based on copper engravings of the 18th century and Charles Malin cut the typeface in 1912 for the Paris foundry Deberny&Peignot. The font is named after the French engraver Charles Nicolas Cochin (1715-1790) although its style had little to do with that of the copper artist's. The font displays a curious mix of style elements and could be placed as a part of the typographical Neorenaissance movement. Cochin is especially large and wide and was very popular at the beginning of the 20th century. Note: Cochin is now sold by Linotype, Adobe, Monotype, URW++ and Bistream (as Engravers' Oldstyle 205).
  • English Caslon no 37.
  • Flash, Goudy Bible.
  • Goudy Bold Swash.
  • LTC Goudy Heavyface (1925, with Frederic Goudy at Kingsley/ATF, now available at Bitstream). It was done as Monotype's reply to the popular Cooper Black, similar to other Cooper Black reactions such as Ludlow Black and Pabst Extra Bold.
  • Hadriano Stone-Cut.
  • Hess, Hess Bold (1910, garalde at Lanston), Hess Monoblack (a great display poster typeface that looks like a hand-drawn version of Nicolas Cochin---see P22/Lanston for a digital version called LTC Hess Monoblack done by Paul Hunt in 2005), Hess Old Style (1920-1923, a garalde at Lanston; revived by Steve Jackaman in 1993 as Hess Old Style RR), Hess Neobold (1933, display at Lanston).
  • Italian Old Style Wide.
  • Janson.
  • LTC Jefferson Gothic: an adaptation of News Gothic Extra Condensed drawn by Sol Hess in 1916; digital version at P22/Lanston in 2005.
  • Kennerley Open Caps.
  • Laurentian.
  • New Bookman.
  • Onyx Italic.
  • Pendrawn.
  • Postblack Italic.
  • Post-Stout Italic.
  • Poster.
  • Slimline.
  • Spire (1937): a condensed didone, see the digital LTC Spire in the Lanston collection. Spire has been digitized/revived by Ann Pomeroy under the same name for FontHaus and then Group Type. LTC Obelysk Grotesk was designed by the Lanston Drawing Office in the late 1980s. This typeface is a reconstruction of Spire. The skeleton of Spire Roman stands with the serifs removed. Like Spire, this font has no lower case, but does offer alternate cap styles in some of the lower case positions.
  • Squareface (now available digitally as LTC Squareface from LTC/P22).
  • Stationers Gothic.
  • Stylescript.
  • Stymie.
  • Tourist Gothic (Lanston, 1909; now available digitally as LTC Tourist Gothic from LTC/P22).
  • Twentieth Century was designed by Hess between 1936 and 1947 as a monoline version of Paul Renner's Futura. The main version is sold by Monotype as Twentieth Century MT. The digital typefoundry Lanston, or LTC, sells LTC Twentieth Century. Hess Gothic Round NF (2008, Nick Curtis) is based on Twentieth Century. The design was reinterpreted by Herb Lubalin as Avant Garde in the 1970s. Curtis' version softens the harsh geometry of the original designs with rounded line endings. Revivals and derivations of Twentieth Century Poster include Renard Moderne NF (2010, Nick Curtis).
  • Ward.

Klingspor link. FontShop link. Linotype link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

The Font Company

Dan Barthell's Phoenix, AZ-based foundry, was founded in 1988. It produced about 400 fonts that some call revivals and others call rip-offs. It was merged into Precision Type Foundry in 1993. Its fonts can now be bought via URW or Ascender, two unscrupulous companies that have no problem asking money for font collections with a doubtful "past".

Stuart Sandler (The Font Diner) explains: Dan Barthel was the owner of The Font Company out of Phoenix, AZ and now lives in Ft Myers, FL . . . I have his phone number if you wanted to REALLY get all the inside scoop . . . Generally speaking, he was among the first groups along with a handful of young employees he trained to scan and digitize fonts from filmstrips and did a number of conversions for Harry Brodjian of Alphatype faces in the late 1980s. Among those included were Parade and Contemporary Brush Bold which were eventually licensed by Robert Norton for Microsoft . . . I'm certain they used the Ikarus system to make their digitizations . . . The Font Company eventually went on to digitize a good amount of faces and nearly all of them were distributed by the Precision Type Company until it closed its doors in the mid-2000s . . . Get your hands on one of those catalogs to see the entire library they released . . . At some point in the 1990s Dan decided to close up shop and tossed all the assets digital or otherwise and start over in another business but walked away from the font business all together regardless . . .

The fonts: Abbey, Accolade, Adelon (patterned after Albertus MT), Adroit, Advertisers, Aggie, Amanda, Amber, American, Annual, Apache, April, Art Gothie, Artcraft, Ashley, Atrax, Avalon, Avon, Baker Signet, Ballantines, Balloon, Balzac, Baucher Gothic (a headline, tall and geometric typeface designed by URW Studio in 1995 according to some sources---unclear where it originated), Bauer Topic, Beacon, Beale, Bee, Benjamin, Bernhard, Bible, Bluejack, Boa Script, Brittany, Bulmer, California Grotesk, Cartel, Cartoon, Casablanca, FC Caslon, Century Expand, Charter Oak, Chevalier, Chinat, Cloister, Contemporary Brush, Continental, Cooper Old Style, Corporate, Corvinus Skyline, Craw Modern, Criterion, Danmark, FC Deepdene, Diamante, Didoni, Digital, Din 16, Disco, Egizio, Elaine, Erbar, Expressa, Fanfare, Firmin Didot, Florentine, Frency, Gatsby, Geshexport, Glamour, Glasgow, Globe, Gorden, Harem, FC Heldustry, Helenic, Helium, Helserif, FC Highway Gothic, Hildago, Hobo, Holly Script, Howland, Hudson, Huxley Vertical, Impact, Introspect, Inverserif, Japanette, Jay Gothic, Kelles, Kennerley, Kenneth, Koloss, Largo, Leasterix, Legothic, Lightline Gothic, Lucida Type, Marcato, Martin Gothic, Martinique, Mr Big, Napoli, Nashville, Newport Land, Novel Gothic, Neuland, Ondine, Organ Grinder, Ornitons Heavy, Paladin, Pandora Black, Parade, Pasadena, Pekin, Permanent Headline, Philly Sport, Pinnochio, Plakat, Polonaise, Precis, Pretoria, Promoter, Publicity, Quratz, Quint, Racer, Radiant, Regency, Reiner, Rochester, Roger, Rolling Stone, Roman Shaded, Roman Stylus, Roman Solid, Ronda, Roundest, San Serif, Scenario, Sevilla, Shotgun, Siegfried, Souvenir Gothic, Spire, Stanza, Stark, Thor, Ticonderoga, Timbre, Toledo, Torino, Umbra, Veracruz, Viant, Viking Gothic, Village, Vixon, Woodcut, Wordsworth, Yorkshire, Zanzibar and Zola. Other fonts: AGBuch, AGrotesk, Accent-Normal, Aggie-Normal, AlternateGothic, AmericanGothic, AntiqueOlive, Apache, BAVGarde, BOSGoudy, BakerSignet, Bauer Topic (1999-2002), BernhardModern, BrodyNormal, CaslonC224, CaslonC37, CaslonC637, Centaur, CenturyExpanded, Cochin, DisneyPrint, ECBGill, Exquisit, Flash, Folio, GaramondM, Grotesk, IceAge, ImpactCondensed, Imprint, Jenson, Latin, Laudatio, Lynton, MagicSymbols, MBrighton, Michelangelo (a roman caps typeface based on Hermann Zapf's Michelangelo from 1950), NewportLand, NovelGothic, Nueland, Panache, QuaySans, RealtyExecutives, Roman, SpiritCraw, Univers, Venus. In 2009, the elegant transitional---almost modern--- high-legged faces Roman Solid and Roman Stylus (outlines) are shown as part of the URW++ collection.

Ascender sells these fonts: Accent, Amber, Amber Italic, Amelia, American Text, American Uncial Regular, April, Artcraft Pro, Avon, Balloon Bold, Balzac, Baucher Gothic, Bernhard Gothic Light, BoaScript, Cartoon, Chinat, Contemporary Brush, Cowgirl, Devinne, Digital, N 16, Erbar, Expressa, Fanfare, Florentine, Geshexport, Glasgow ExtraBold, Handel Gothic, Hastings, Hobo, Hobo Bold, Holly Script, Hudson, Koloss, LeAsterix, Nashville, Novel Gothic, Nueland, Nueland Inline, Opportunity, Pasadena Family, Philly Sport, Pretoria, Quartz, Reiner, Resonance, Souvenir Gothic, Stanza, Thor, Ticonderoga, Umbra, Viant, Woodcut, Zanzibar, Zola. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Tobias Frere-Jones

Celebrated type designer, born in 1970 in New York City. Frere-Jones received a BFA in Graphic Design from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1992. He moved to Boston, where he worked at the Font Bureau Until 1999. He joined the faculty of the Yale University School of Art in 1996 and has lectured throughout the United States, Europe and Australia. His work is in the permanent collections of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In 2006, The Royal Academy of Visual Arts in The Hague (KABK) awarded him the Gerrit Noordzij Prijs, for his contributions to typographic design, writing and education. In 2013 he received the AIGA Medal, in recognition of exceptional achievements in the field of design.

His Font Bureau typefaces:

  • FB Agency.
  • Armada (1987-1994). A rigid ellipti cal sans in many styles. This is a surprisingly beautiful family despite its self-imposed design restrictions. The Compressed Black is a piano key typeface in the style of Wim Crouwel.
  • Asphalt (1995).
  • Benton Sans (1995-2003). Done with Cyrus Highsmith, it is a revival of Benton's 1903 family, News Gothic, and one of Font Bureau's bestsellers. It is a very complete family, ranging from regular widths to Condensed, Compressed and ExtraCompressed subfamilies. The Small Caps set is complete as well.
  • Benton Gothic (2000).
  • Cafeteria (1993).
  • Citadel (1995).
  • CochinOldstyle (1992), CochinBlack (1991).
  • Eldorado (1993-1994).
  • Epitaph (1993). An art nouveau typeface based on an ATF typeface.
  • Garage Gothic (1992). In three weights, it is based on parking garage ticket lettering but very reminiscent of license plate characters.
  • Grand Central (1998). Grand Central was designed for 212 Associates from late-twenties capitals hand-painted on the walls of Grand Central Station. Font Bureau writes: The design is a distinguished Beaux Arts descendant of the great French Oldstyle originated by Louis Perrin in Lyons in 1846, known across Europe as Elzevir and in the U.S. as De Vinne.
  • Griffith Gothic (1997-2000). A revival of Chauncey Griffith's telephone book directory typeface, Bell Gothic (1937-1938).
  • Hightower (1994-1996). A Venetian typeface originally done for the Journal of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.
  • Interstate (1993). Done for the United States Federal Highway Administration, but later released as a type family by Font Bureau. Interstate Mono (done with Christian Schwartz) followed in 2000.
  • Miller. A Scotch Roman finished in 1997 together with Matthew Carter and Cyrus Highsmith at Font Bureau.
  • Niagara (1995). Almost a skyline typeface.
  • Nobel (1993). An exquisite geometric sans family based on old ideas of De Roos. FB Nobel showcased. The Extra Lights were added by Cyrus Highsmith and Dyana Weissman.
  • Pilsner (1995). A beer bottle typeface.
  • Poynter Old Style (1997, Font Bureau).
  • FB Reactor (1996: this was first a FUSE7 font).
  • Reiner Script (1993). Based on a 1951 brush script by Imre Reiner.
  • Stereo (1993). After a typeface by Karlgeorg Hoefer, 1963.

At FontFont, he designed the children's fonts FF Dolores (1991) and FF Dolores Cyrillic.

At FUSE 15, he designed Microphone (1996). At FUSE 10, he published Fibonacci, a font consisting just of lines.

His custom work includes WorthGothic (1996), WorthLogo1996 (1995), WorthText (1995), GQGothic (1995), Halifax, Commonwealth (1995), Belizio-TwentySix (Font Bureau), HermanMillerLogo (1999, Font Bureau). Cassandra, Vitriol (1993), Quandry (1992-1994) and Chainletter (1993).

Retina Agate (2001, specially made for small-print stock listings at the Wall Street Journal) netted him a Bukvaraz 2001 award and an AIGA 2003 Design Award.

From 1999 until 2014, he designed for the Hoefler Type Foundry, which he joined as an equal partner (and the new company became Hoefler & Frere-Jones (in 2004), or H&FJ). He claims that he brought with him to H&FJ a lot of typefaces including Whitney, Whitney Titling, Elzevir, Welo Script, Archipelago (Shell Sans), Type 0, Saugerties, Greasemonkey, Vive, Apiana, and Esprit Clockface. It is not expicitly stated at the H&FJ site which typefaces he had a hand in, but one can safely assume that it must have been nearly every typeface made since he entered into the partnership. In 2014, Tobias sued Jonathan for half of the company in a 20-to-80 million dollar lawsuit since he claims that Hoefler reneged on his promise to give him his half. The typefaces at H&FJ he had a hand in include:

  • HTF Retina (2002). For use in the Wall Street Journal.
  • Gotham (2002). A sans serif done with the help of Jesse M. Ragan. Read about it here. In 2007, he published a rounded version of it, called Gotham Round. Gotham was used in 2008 by Obama in his presidential campaign. Joshua Brustein (Business Week): Gotham is one hell of a typeface. Its Os are round, its capital letters sturdy and square, and it has the simplicity of a geometric sans without feeling clinical. The inspiration for Gotham is the lettering on signs at the Port Authority, manly works using "the type of letter that an engineer would make," according to Tobias Frere-Jones, who is widely credited with designing the font for GQ magazine in 2000. Critics have praised Gotham as blue collar, nostalgic yet exquisitely contemporary, and simply self evident. It's also ubiquitous. Gotham has appeared on Netflix (NFLX) envelopes, Coca-Cola (KO) cans, and in the Saturday Night Live logo. It was on display at the Museum of Modern Art from 2011 to 2012 and continues to be part of the museum's permanent collection. It also helped elect a president: In 2008, Barack Obama's team chose Gotham as the official typeface of the campaign and used it to spell out the word HOPE on its iconic posters. Gotham poster by Joakim Meihack. Gotham poster by Jen Beck (2013). Gotham poster (2013) by Ashlee Burlie.
  • Cyclone (2003).
  • In 2010, he and Jonathan Hoefler designed the sans family Forza.
  • Giant (2003).
  • Knoz (2003).
  • Topaz (2003).
  • Verlag (2006). Developed together with Jonathan Hoefler.
  • Whitney (2004). This is an amazing 58-style sans family designed for the Whitney Museum, but now generally avalaible from Hoefler, and touted as a great family for infographics. A derivative, Whitney-K, is the house font of Kodak. Whitney's sales blurb: While American gothics such as News Gothic (1908) have long been a mainstay of editorial settings, and European humanists such as Frutiger (1975) have excelled in signage applications, Whitney bridges this divide in a single design. Its compact forms and broad x-height use space efficiently, and its ample counters and open shapes make it clear under any circumstances.
  • With Hoefler, he collaborated on projects for The Wall Street Journal, Martha Stewart Living, Nike, Pentagram, GQ, Esquire, The New Times, Business 2.0, and The New York Times Magazine. In all, he has designed over five hundred typefaces for retail publication, custom clients, and experimental purposes. His clients have included The Boston Globe, The New York Times, The Cooper-Hewitt Museum, The Whitney Museum, The American Institute of Graphic Arts Journal, and Neville Brody. He has lectured at Rhode Island School of Design (from which he graduated with a BFA in 1992), Yale School of Art, Pratt Institute, Royal College of Art, and Universidad de las Americas. His work has been featured in How, ID, Page, and Print, and is included in the permanent collection of the Victoria&Albert Museum, London.

Interview. Interviewed by Dmitri Siegel. He created Estupido Espezial for fun, but it actually made it into an issue of Rollingstone. Catalog of his faces at Font Bureau. Keynote speaker at Typecon 2014.

View typefaces designed by Tobias frere-Jones. Another page with typefaces created by Tobias Frere-Jones. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Typemade
[Santiago Orozco]

Santiago Orozco (b. 1981, Monterrey) is Typemade in Monterrey, Mexico. Google Font Directory link. He is currently also working for DaniloBlack as an information architect.

He created the free geometric sans typeface Josefin Std (2010) using a small x-height. This was followed by Josefin Slab [see this poster by Cauex Pascoa], and both were extended to many weights. Free downloads from the Google Font Directory. In 2011, he published Dorsa (a modern interpretation of the ultra-condensed skyline typeface Empire (1937, Morris Fuller Benton, ATF) with some personal details thrown in), Antic, Clark Hairline, a sans serif with a calligraphic touch. Scans of Josefina: I, II, III. Behance link. He explains: The idea for create this typeface was to make it geometric, elegant and kind of vintage, special for titling. It is based on 1927 Rudolf Koch's Kabel, 1930 Rudolf Wolf's Memphis, 1927 Paul Renner's Futura.

Typefaces from 2012: Antic Slab (Google Web Fonts: designed for use in the headlines of newspapers and magazines), Antic Didone (Google Web Fonts). Italiana (Google Web Fonts) was designed for use in the headlines of newspapers and magazines. Italiana is inspired by the calligraphy of the Italian masters.

Google Plus link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Urban Pixel (or: UP Font Studio)
[Michel Troy]

Foundry in Montreal, est. 2008 by Michel Troy (b. 1969).

Behance link. Dafont link. Klingspor link. Their fonts:

  • Their pixel or dot matrix fonts, which can be had from MyFonts, include Urbix (2008, a large family), Urbix Nu (2009), Urbox (2008, a great dot matrix family), Urbox Nu (2009), Javelist Head (2008), Javelist Arm (2008), Thyme Nu (2009), Stock Board (2008), Scratch Up (2008), Melko (2010, a dot matrix family), and Kolly (2011).
  • The free pixel typeface UP Tiny LCD Four 8 (2008).
  • At FontStruct, Michael Troy (a.k.a Upixel) made the gridded monospace family Kyra (2010), Kabog (2010), the constructivist Upixel, the pointy ghouly Barko (2010), the ultra-fat Fatex (2010), the narrow display typeface Lingo (2010), the constructivist Akroy (2010, pixelish), Nuebrick (2010, white on black), Karbo 1986 (2010, honeycomb techno), Mobivus (2010, bold sans), Melko (2010), Kolly (texture face), En Sans New (2010), and the slanted Blax (2010).
  • In 2011, he created Quino (slabby, FontStruct), Gothic XS Hand, Blax Slab (textured alphabet, a slab version of Blax), MIKA (very fat), Melko Rip (2012, dot matrix), Kilix (2012), Grecian 1896 (2012, wood-style slab face).
  • Typefaces from 2012 include the ultra condensed typeface Manygo Serif (+Semi Serif). This American magazine style belongs to the category of skyline fonts.
  • Typefaces from 2013: Stiff Script (a winner in the FontStruct Connected Script Competition in the Suetterlin style of school scripts).

    Typefaces from 2014: Fraline (this inline blackletter typeface was a winner in the FontStruct Inline Font Competition in February 2014).

[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Viktor Andersson

Art director in Stockholm, who created Fohrsmark (2014, a conndensed skyline typeface) during his studies at Södertörn University. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Wordshape
[Ian Lynam]

Commercial fonts at this boutique type foundry and publisher operating in Tokyo, jointly run by Ian Lynam and Thien Huynh. Ian Lynam is a New Yorker who studied Graphic Design at Portland State University (B.S.) and California Institute of the Arts (M.F.A.). MyFonts link. Images of most of Ian Lynam's typefaces.

  • Cern (2013). A sans family based on Helvetica, Akzidenz Grotesk and Univers, with large x-heights.
  • Vaud (2013). Ian writes: Vaud is a family of 40 weights of neutral, yet formally nuanced grotesk typefaces that takes inspiration from Helvetica, Akzidenz Grotesk, Univers and the original metal types from Switzerland, yet had a slightly larger x-height for more pronounced legibility.
  • Plural (2013). A futuristic sans family.
  • Sketch Caslon Italic (2013).
  • Raffish (2013). This is an ornamental caps typeface based on Henk Krijger's Raffia typeface.
  • Entity (2012). A basic sans family with slightly rounded corners.
  • Okojo (2012), Okojo Slab (2012) are geometric sans and slab serif typefaces influenced by the type designs of Paul Renner and Herb Lubalin. They were followed by Okojo Slab Display (2012) and Okojo Display (2012).
  • Pompeian Cursive (2010). An elegant calligraphic script based on the original drawings by Oswald Cooper for BBS in 1927.
  • His Cooper series. Cooper Swash Italic Traditional & Cooper Swash Italic Custom, Cooper Italic (2010, after Cooper's original from 1924), Boul Mich (2010, after Oswald Cooper's 1927 art deco typeface), Cooper Initials (2010), Cooper Old Style (2010), Cooper Capitals (2010), Cooper Text (2010), Cooper Black Condensed (2010), Cooper Black Swash (2010), Cooper Screamers (2010, oversized exclamation points), Cooper Black Italic Pro (2013), Cooper Italic Pro (2013), Cooper Fullface Italic Pro (2013).
  • Cruller (2010). A spidery display typeface that is based on lettering from a 1910 German lettering book.
  • Hanger (2004).
  • Rubber Vloeren. A geometric display typeface adapted from an alphabet used by Piet Zwart in the Netherlands for a series of advertisements for rubber flooring.
  • Ensenada is a typeface designed based on hand-cut lettering that adorns businesses throughout the city of Ensenada in Baja California in Mexico.
  • Clobber Grotesk (2010) is a grotesk typeface designed for readability at very small sizes. It is accompanied by a nice stencil style.
  • International Blackletter (2010) is a collaborative display typeface designed for fun, together with Simon Gane and Selena Hoy.
  • Devil's Advocate is a digital version of the heavy blackletter typeface Cathedral Text found in the 1934 ATF typeface from the American Specimen Book of Type Styles (by ATF).
  • Sandberg Honorarium (2003) is inspired by the work of Dutch typographer Willem Sandberg.
  • Inversion (2010) is an uncial face.
  • Designer with Eli Carrico of the heavy stencil typeface Black-Out (2010, Wordshape) and the paperclip family Interno (2004), which was based on Walter Ballmer's logo for Olivetti in 1960.
  • Neuerland (2010) is an update of Rudolf Koch's Neuland.
  • Dorsal (2011) is a splendid versal lettering typeface that cries Absinthe Overload.
  • Off Broadway (2011) is a casual art deco face related to Oz Cooper's Boul Mich and to Nubian (ATF).
  • Cinta Adhesiva (2011, done with Mexican designer One Eye) began as a typeface designed for the masthead of a graffiti fanzine called Free Copy---the monumental letters painted by L.A.-based graffiti writers Crae and Hael greatly influenced the feel of the typeface.
  • Maat (2011) is a modular geometric stencil piano key face. It is a loose interpretation of a handlettered alphabet by the late Dutch designer Jurrian Schrofer called Sans Serious which was included in Wim Crouwel's publication Letters of Maat. It is inflected with a bit of influence from British designer Ken Garland's similar lettering form the cover of his textbook, The Graphics Handbook.
  • Effete (2011) is a tall stylish typeface similar in weight and proportion to fonts like Imre Reiner's skyline typeface Corvinus.
  • Adora (2011) is a typeface similar to Walter Tracy's AdSans.
  • Kihachiro Swash Italic (2011) has garalde forms but Caslonian curved terminals and weighty serifs. Kihachiro Geometric (2011) recalls Antique Olive and Futura.
  • Kirimomi Swash (2011) is a pair of garalde faces. Kirimomi Geometric (2011) is a humanist sans.
  • Kommisar (2012) is Lynam's version of the Trajan capitals alphabet.
  • Smythe Sans (2012) is a contemporary geometric sans serif family that is quite readable on-screen and in print.
  • Stebl Grotesk (2012) and Stebl Slab (2012) are workhorse typefaces for sturdy jobs.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿