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Caslon



[Headline set in Caslon 540 (Bitstream). This version is in turn based on an ATF typeface from 1902, and the ancient original is traced back to William Caslon I in the early part of the 18th century]








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100 Beste Schriften aller Zeiten

German FontShop-sponsored site listing the hundred best fonts of all times, compiled by a jury in 2007. There is a lot of good information about each of the fonts mentioned. PDF file compiled by the jury: Stephen Coles, Jan Middendorp, Veronika Elsner, Roger Black, Ralf Herrmann, Claudia Guminski (FontShop) and Bernard Schmidt-Friderichs. Visualization of the list. The list:
  • (1) Helvetica
  • Garamond
  • Frutiger
  • Bodoni
  • Futura
  • Times
  • Akzidenz Grotesk
  • Officina
  • Gill Sans
  • Univers
  • (11) Optima
  • Franklin Gothic
  • Bembo
  • Interstate (1993, Tobias Frere-Jones)
  • Thesis
  • Rockwell
  • Walbaum
  • Meta
  • Trinité
  • DIN
  • (21) Matrix
  • OCR A und B
  • Avant Garde
  • Lucida
  • Sabon
  • Zapfino
  • Letter Gothic
  • Stone
  • Arnhem
  • Minion
  • (61) Blur
  • Base
  • Bell Centennial
  • News Gothic
  • Avenir
  • Bernhard Modern
  • Amplitude
  • Trixie
  • Quadraat
  • Neutraface
  • (71) Nobel
  • Industria, Insignia, Arcadia
  • Bickham Script
  • Bank Gothic
  • Corporate ASE
  • Fago
  • Trajan
  • Kabel
  • House Gothic 23
  • Kosmik
  • (81) Caecilia
  • Mrs Eaves
  • Corpid
  • Miller
  • Souvenir
  • Instant Types
  • Clarendon
  • Triplex
  • Benguiat
  • Zapf Renaissance
  • (91) Filosofia
  • Chalet
  • Quay Sans
  • Cézanne
  • Reporter
  • Legacy
  • Agenda
  • Bello
  • Dalliance
  • Mistral
Follow-up in English.

Credit for some images below: Danielle West. [Google] [More]  ⦿

100types
[Ben Archer]

Educational and reference site run by Ben Archer, a designer, educator and type enthusiast located in England (who was in Auckland, New Zealand, before that). Glossary. Timeline. Type categories. Paul Shaw's list of the 100 most significant typefaces of all times were recategorized by Archer:

  • Religious/Devotional: Gutenbergs B-42 type, Gebetbuch type, Wolfgang Hoppyl's Textura, Breitkopf Fraktur, Ehrhard Ratdolt's Rotunda, Hammer Uncial, Zapf Chancery, Peter Jessenschrift, Cancellaresca Bastarda, Poetica.
  • Book Publishing&General Purpose Text Setting: Nicolas Jenson's roman, Francesco Griffo's italic, Claude Garamond's roman, Firmin Didot's roman, Cheltenham family, Aldus Manutius' roman, William Caslon's roman, Pierre-Simon Fournier's italic, Ludovico Arrighi da Vicenza's italic, Johann Michael Fleischmann's roman, ATF Garamond, Giambattista Bodoni's roman, Nicolas Kis' roman, Minion multiple master, Unger Fraktur, John Baskerville's roman, Lucida, Optima, Bauer Bodoni, Adobe Garamond, Scotch Roman, Romanée, ITC Stone family, Trinité, ITC Garamond, Sabon, ITC Novarese, Charter, Joanna, Marconi, PMN Caecilia, Souvenir, Apollo, Melior, ITC Flora, Digi-Grotesk Series S.
  • Business/Corporate: Akzidenz Grotesk, Helvetica, Univers, Syntax, Courier, Meta, Rotis, Thesis, Antique Olive.
  • Newspaper Publishing: Times Roman, Bell, Clarendon, Century Old Style, Ionic, Imprint.
  • Advertising and Display: Futura, Robert Thorne's fat typeface roman, Vincent Figgins' antique roman (Egyptian), Memphis, Fette Fraktur, Avant-Garde Gothic, Deutschschrift, Peignot, Erbar, Stadia/Insignia, Penumbra, Compacta, Bodoni 26, WTC Our Bodoni.
  • Prestige and Private Press: Romain du Roi, Golden Type, Johnston's Railway Sans, Doves Type, Walker.
  • Signage: William Caslon IV's sans serif, Trajan.
  • Historical Script: Snell Roundhand, Robert Granjon's civilité, Excelsior Script.
  • Experimental/expressive: Mistral, Beowolf, Dead History, Behrensschrift, Eckmannschrift, Neuland, Element, Remedy, Template Gothic.
  • Onscreen/multimedia: Chicago, Oakland, OCR-A, Base Nine and Base Twelve, Evans and Epps Alphabet.
  • Telephone Directory publishing: Bell Gothic.

Link to Archer Design Work. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adobe Systems Inc

The company that changed typesetting by the introduction of PostScript and type 1 fonts. Adobe Systems, based in San Jose, California, was started by John Warnock and Chuck Geschke in 1982. In 1999 it became a billion dollar company. The success of the PostScript graphics programming language, a printing industry standard since the mid-1980s, explains its early success. The company grew thanks to other popular products such as Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, and thanks to the introduction of the PDF format for document. Sumner Stone was the Director of Typography from 1984 to 1991. He initiated Adobe's design program, where classic fonts (including Garamond and Caslon) were revived by type designers such as Robert Slimbach, Carol Twombly, and others. New type designs such as Minion and Myriad saw the light. The Adobe type design group was later headed by David Lemon, with the help of Thomas Phinney. Other gems in the Adobe arsenal include the PostScript Type 3 format, which permit designers to use programming tools (loops and calculations) to show typefaces. This font format was dropped after a decade (although one can still use it in PostScript programs) because ATM, Adobe's Type Manager for screens, cannot ghandle them. The Multiple Master format, which allows an infinite number of fonts to be interpolated between a set of master designs was also promising. It too was dropped in 1999 after about a decade.

Catalog of Adobe fonts in order of popularity. Catalog of fonts in alphabetical order [large web page warning]. See also here. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alan Carr

Partial list of Alan Carr's fonts, made principally between 1992 and 2004: AdLib, AdLibEx, AdLibTh, AdLibWd, Algeria, Animals, Anwik, Arcitectura, BeeBopp, BeeBoppWide, Blast, BlueCard, BusinessIndustrial, BusinessIndustrialDingbats, Busorama, Carolus, CarrAnimalDingbats, CarrArrowsfilled, CarrArrowsoutline, CarrAstroDings, CarrBalloons, CarrDingbats1, CarrDingbats2, CarrDings, CarrElecDingbats, CarrElectronicDingbats, CarrGovernment, CarrKeys, CarrSpace, CarrXmasDingbats, Carrick-Regular, CarrickCaps-Caps:001.001, CaslonAntique, CaslonAntiqueItalic, CaslonAntiqueLefty, CharlemagneBold, Choc, ChocWd, Coco, ComicBook2, Croissant, CroissantEx, CroissantLefty, CroissantWd, Desoto, Electrik-Italic, Electrik, ElectrikCn, ElectrikEx, ElectrikWd, Empire, Enviro, EnviroCapsLefty, ErasContour-Italic, ErasContour, ErasContourEx, ErasContourLeftyWide, ErasContourTh, ErasContourWd, Fletcher-Gothic (art nouveau face, made famous by the TV show Murder She Wrote), Fountainpen, Fragola, Frankfurt, FrankfurtCn, FrankfurtExtended, FrankfurtLefty, GlypicItalic, Graphik, GraphikShadow, Halt, Hobo, HoboLeftified, KabelBook, KabelLeftieBook, Keypunch, KeypunchLeftie, Leigh, Lithos, MathSymbol, MtypeCursive, NewYorker, NewYorkerEngraved, Omnibus, Paintbrush-Italic, Paintbrush, PaintbrushCn, PaintbrushLeftified, PaintbrushWd, PaperClip-Bold, PaperClip-Italic, PaperClip, PaperClipCn-Italic, PaperClipEx-Italic, PaperClipWd, PaperClipsBentToTheLeft, Quadrille, QuickSilver, Revere, Roller, Squire, States, Stop, Tatum, TestFrogRemix, UnitedStates, Uptight-Italic, Uptight, UptightCn, UptightEx, UptightLefti, UptightTh, XmasDings, YankeeEngravedNormal.

Dafont link. Fontsy link. Fontspace link. Abstract Fonts link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alan Prescott

Philadelphia-based designer and PostScript font hacker who runs Prescott Design. He created three substantial sans typefaces families with many weights starting from hairline, almost in the fashion mag style: Clemente (2011), Ultima (2011), Passion Sans (2011, a Peignotian family). All free at Dafont.

Additional typefaces: the Bizarre series (decorative caps), Advertisers Gothic PD (2010: a large family based on Robert Wiebking's ugly original from 1917), APT Antique, Crayon PDS (2013, a decorative Victorian family), APT Caslon 76 (1997, based on a Compugraphics original), APT Feinen Inline (1997, after Henry Mikiewicz, 1983), APT Millais (1995, unknown origin), APT New Abel Cursive (1996, a revival of Bernie Abel's Abel Cursive (Compugraphic, 1974)), APT New Artcraft (1996), APT New LSC Book (1996, after a 1970 original by Lubalin Smith Carnese), APT New Classic Rubber Stamp (1996: based on DeVinne by G.F. Schroeder, 1890; F.W. Goudy 1898), APT New Hearst (1995, based on an original from Inland Type Foundry, 1901, which was famously ripped off from Goudy; the Italic was by Carl Schraubstadter, 1904), APT New Ticonderoga (1995-1996), APT New Woolly West (1995), APT Horizon Initials (1995), APT New Gill Floriated (1995), Old Gothic Initials Plain (1995: Lombardic caps), Pfister Bible Gothic APT Cameo (1997, blackletter caps), APT Saint Nick (1995: snow-themed caps).

His 19th century series, all made in 1995 or 1996: APT New Abramesque, APT New Alferata (psychedelic), APT New Armenian, APT New Belmont (Victorian), APT New Brenda, APT New Cabinet, APT New Caprice, APT New Dawson, APT New Euclid, APT New Linden, APT New Madison, APT New Moorish, APT New Mystic, APT New Rollo (Victorian), APT New Slapstick (wooden plank font), APT New Spiral, APT New Stephen Ornate, APT New Teahouse, APT New Viola, APT Novelty Script.

The wood type collection of Alan Prescott:

  • APT Antique Wood Double Outline Shaded 1995, APT Antique Wood Extended 1996
  • APT Caslon Wood w: Alts 1996
  • APT Clarendon Wood Extended 1996
  • APT Columbian Wood w: Alts 1996
  • APT Courier Wood 1997
  • APT Doric Wood 1995
  • APT Gothic Wood (+Alts) 1997
  • APT Grecian FullFaced Wood 1996
  • APT Jenson Old Style Wood 1996
  • APT Kurilian Wood w: Decorated Alts 1997
  • APT Modified Gothic Wood Cond 1997
  • APT New Venetian Wood 1996
  • APT New Woodcut Shaded Initials 1995 (Houtsneeletter)
  • APT Roman Wood 1994-1995
  • APT Tuscan Antique Wood (+Alts) 1995-1996
  • APT Tuscan Concave Wood 1996-1997
  • APT Tuscan Contour Wood 1996
  • APT Tuscan Gothic 1 Wood 1996, APT Tuscan Gothic 2 Wood Cond w: Alts 1996, APT Tuscan Gothic 3 Wood Cond w: Alts 1997, APT Tuscan Gothic Pointed Wood w: Alts 1997 (Ironwood)
  • APT Tuscan Italian Wood 1997
  • APT Unique Wood 1995
  • APT Wood 1995-1997
  • APT Wood No. 501 1996 (orig Wm.H. Page 1887), APT Wood No. 508 1997, APT Wood No. 51 1997, APT Wood No. 510 1997, APT Wood No. 515 1996
  • Stencil typefaces: APT Crystal Ship (1995), APT New Acapulco Light (1995; after the phototype Acapulco Light VGC), APT New Alpha Midnight (1996; after a typeface from 1969 sold by John Schaedler), APT New Beans w/ Alts (1996, after Beans by Dieter Zembsch, 1973), APT New Checkmate (1995---not a stencil type, really, but rather a modular typeface; after the film type Checkmate), APT New Zephyr (1996).
  • Ornamental typefaces: APT New Courtier Italic (1996, Vanity Fair), APT New Harlequin (1996), APT New June (1996, after Fournier le Jeune).
  • Computer fonts: APT Bugsy (1995), APT New Quote (1996: bilined).
  • Art nouveau typefaces: APT New Abbott (1995; after Joseph W. Phinneys' abbott Old Style, 1901), APT New Ambrosia (1995, after Peter Schnorr's 1898 Jugendstil typeface), APT New Baldur (1996; after Baldur by Schelter (1895) and Julius Klinkhardt (1903)), APT New Jagged w/ Alts (1996), APT New Jason (1996), APT New Livonia (1996), APT New Margit w/ Alts (1996), APT New Nightclub (1995), APT New Quaint (1995), APT New Quaint Open (1995).
  • Various display typefaces: APT Black Dog (1995), APT Blacksmith Heavy (1995), APT New Airedale (1995, after an original tattoo / poster from the 1930s), APT New Blade Display w/ Alts (1996), APT New Cugat (1995; a wedge serif letterpress emulation typeface), APT New Fieldstone (1995), APT New Static (1995), APT New Trump Gravur (1995; after Georg Trump, 1954), APT New Yagi Bold (1996).
  • Avant Garde typefaces: APT Avant Garde Alts and Display (1997), APT Lubalin Graph Alts (1997; to be used with BT Lubalin Graph, Ed Benguiat, 1974). [Google] [More]  ⦿

  • Alan Wood
    [Large Unicode fonts]

    [More]  ⦿

    Albert Nolan

    Type designer for PhotoLettering Inc in the photo type era. His type designs include Akimbo 2, Akimbo 3, Brush Bold, Brush Animated Condensed, Brush Expanded 7, Brush Upright 9, Brush Upright Condensed 8, Brush Upright X Condensed 8, Brush Upright X Condensed 10, Caslon Schoolbook, Caslon Schoolbook 7, Caslon Schoolbook Italic 4, Cartoon Medium, Classic Script, Flamingo 2, Flamingo 5, Flight, Frolic Bodoni, Frolic Medium, Knockout, Marionette, Nolan Roman, Rodeo, Rodeo Script, Rumba 7. Vagabond Condensed. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Alexander Kay

    Type designer and punchcutter, b. Edinburgh, Scotland, 1827, d. Philadelphia, 1905. Born Alexander Thompson MacKaye, he apprenticed with a bookbinding tools manufacturer, and went to London in 1850, where he worked for punch-cutting expert John Skirving. He cut typefaces for English typefounders such as Henry Caslon, Vincent Figgins, and the Stephenson Blake company. After that, he joined L. Johnson&Co. in Philadelphia in 1854, where he changed his surname from MacKaye to Kay. He stayed with L. Johnson&Co (later Binny&Ronaldson, then MacKellar, Smith&Jordan) for 40 years, until he lost much of his sight to cataract. His most famous are Binny Old Style and Ronaldson Old Style (1884, MacKellar, Smith&Jordan). The latter family was digitized by Canada Type as Ronaldson Regular (2008) and by Lars Törnqvist as Fitzronald (2013). The former was digitized by Monotype as Binny Old Style MT. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Alexander Phemister

    Punchcutter. From MyFonts: Scottish punchcutter (b. Edinburgh, 1829, d. 1894) active in the revival of oldstyle designs at Miller&Richard in the 1850s. He went to America in 1861, working at the Bruce typefoundry for two years, and then for the Dickinson foundry. In 1872 this foundry was ravaged by fire; Phemister was made a partner by its founder Samuel Nelson Dickinson and worked there until retirement in 1891. MyFonts missed the boat on this one! Phemister was the first man to design the famous Bookman. His typefaces include these:

    • Bookman. McGrew states: Bookman Old Style has become a lastingly popular "workhorse" design for plain, easy-to-read text, and to some extent for display as well. It is derived from an oldstyle antique typeface designed by A. C. Phemister about 1860 for the Scottish foundry of Miller&Richard, by thickening the strokes of an oldstyle series. From there on, his design was copied and refined over and over again, starting with the Bruce Type Foundry (Antique No. 310), MacKellar (Oldstyle Antique), Keystone (Oldstyle Antique), Hansen (Stratford Old Style). His design of Bookman was refined at Kinsley/ATF in 1934-1936 by Chauncey H. Griffith. The Bookman story does not end there, but at least, Phemister started it! Numerous implementations of Bookman exist, such as the free URW Bookman L family, and the free extension of the latter family in the TeX-Gyre project, called Bonum (2007).
    • Franklin Old Style. McGrew writes: Franklin Old Style was intended to be a modernization of Caslon, cut in 1863 by Alexander Phemister, once of Edinburgh, later of Boston, for Phelps, Dalton&Company. Being more regularized, it has lost the individuality and most of the charm of Caslon, but is a clear, legible typeface that has had considerable popularity. It was one of the early typefaces cut by Linotype for book work; the italic has an extreme slant for a slug-machine face, but composes remarkably well. Compare Binny, Clearcut Oldstyle.

    Some images below by Alex Delgado. FontShop link. Klingspor link.

    View and compare Bookman-style commercial typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Alfredo Marco Pradil
    [Hanken Studio]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Allison Mowry

    American type, web, and brand designer in Baltimore, MD. She combined Adobe Caslon and Gill Sans to make a blended experimental typeface in 2010. View her typographic study of Gill Sans. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Alphabet Innovations International -- TypeSpectra (Was: MM2000)
    [Phil Martin]

    Born in Dallas in 1923, and retired in Florida, Phil Martin had an exciting life, which started as a bombardier in WWII, and went on as a piano bar singer, publisher, cartoonist, comedian and typographer. He died in October 2005.

    Phil established Alphabet Innovations International in 1969 and TypeSpectra in 1974, and designed most of his 400 typefaces (read: film fonts for use in the VGC Photo Typositor) there: Agenda (1976), Americana (1972), Arthur (1970, by Roc Mitchell), Aurora Snug (1969), Avalon (1972), Baskerville (1969), Beacon (1987), Bluejack (1974), Borealis (1970, by Roc Mitchell), Britannic (1973), Bulletin (1971), Celebration (1969, by Roc Mitchell), Century S (1975), Cheltenham (1971), Clearface (1973), Cloister (1975), Corporate (1971, by Roc Mitchell), Corporate Image (1971, by Roc Mitchell), Courier B EF (2004, originally done at Scangraphic), Didoni (1969, a knock-off of Pistilli Roman with swashes added), Dimensia and Dimensia Light (1971, by Roc Mitchell), Dominance (1971), Egyptian (1970), Eightball (1971, some report this incorrectly as a VGC face, which has a different typeface also called Eightball: it was digitized by FontBank as Egbert. Alphabet Innovations' Eightball had other versions called Cueball and Highball, and all three were designed by George Thomas who licensed them to AI), Fat Chance (Rolling Stone) (1971), Fotura Biform (1969), Franklin (1981), Garamond (1975), Globe (1975), Goudy (1969), Harem (1969, aka Margit; digitized and revived in 2006 by Patrick Griffin and Rebecca Alaccari as Johnny), Helserif (1976---I thought this was created by Ed Kelton; anyway, this typeface is just Helvetica with slabs), Helvetica (1969), Introspect (1971), Jolly Roger (1970, digitized in 2003 by Steve Jackaman at Red Rooster; Martin says that Jolly Roger and Introspect are his two most original designs), Journal (1987), Kabell (1971), Kabello (1970), King Arthur [+Light, Outline] with Guinevere Alternates (1971, by Roc Mitchell), Legothic (1973), Martinique (1970), Mountie (1970), News (1975), Palateno (1969), Pandora (1969), Pazazzma (1980), Perpetua (1969), Plantin (1973), Polonaise (1977; digital version by Claude Pelletier in 2010, called Chopin Script), Primus Malleable (1972), Quaff (1977), Quixotic (1970), Report (1971), Romana (1972), Scenario (1974), Sledge Hammer (1971), Son of Windsor (1970), Stanza (1971, by Roc Mitchell; this angular typeface was later published by URW), Stark (1970), Supercooper (1970), Swath (1979), Threadgil (1972), Thrust (1971), Timbre (1970), Times (1970), Times Text (1973), Trump (1973), Tuck Roman (1981), Viant (1977), Vixen (1970), Weiss (1973), Wordsworth (1973).

    In 1974, he set up TypeSpectra, and created these type families: Adroit (1981), Albert (1974), Analog (1976), Bagatelle (1979), Cartel (1975), Caslon (1979), Criterion (1982), DeVille (1974), Embargo (1975), Heldustry (1978, designed for the video news at the fledgling ABC-Westinghouse 24-hour cable news network in 1978; incorrectly attributed by many to Martin's ex-employee Ed Kelton: download here), Innsbruck (1975), Limelight (1977), Oliver (1981), Opulent [Light and Bold] (1975, by George Brian, an amployee at Alphabet Innovations), Quint (1984), Sequel (1979), Spectral (1974), Welby (1982).

    His fonts can be bought at MyFonts.com and at Precisiontype. He warns visitors not to mess with his intellectual property rights, but I wonder how he can have escaped the ire of Linotype by using the name Helvetica. In any case, the fonts were originally made for use on photo display devices and phototypesetters. Some are now available in digital format.

    Near the end of his life, Phil's web presence was called MM2000 (dead link).

    Check his comments on his own typefaces. URW sells these typefaces: URW Adroit, URW Agenda, URW Avernus (after Martin's design from 1972), URW Baskerville AI, URW Beacon, URW Bluejack, URW Cartel, URW Cloister, URW Corporate, URW Criterion, URW Didoni, URW Fat Face, URW Globe, URW Goudy AI, URW Heldustry, URW Helserif, URW Introspect, URW Legothic, URW Martin Gothic, URW Martinique, URW Pandora, URW Polonaise, URW Quint, URW Scenario, URW Souvenir Gothic, Souvenir Gothic Antique (the Souvenit Gothic family was designed by George Brian, an employee of Alphabet Innovations at the time: it was AI's first text family), URW Stanza, URW Stark, URW Timbre, URW Viant, URW Wordsworth.

    Interview. Bye Bye Blackbird performed by Phil Martin in Largo, Florida.

    The final message on his last web page, posted posthumously read: MARTIN, PHIL, 82, of Largo, died Tuesday (Oct. 4, 2005) at Largo Medical Center. He was born in Dallas and came here after retiring as a writer, singer-songwriter, commercial artist, and comedian. As a high school student, he worked as an assistant artist on the nationally syndicated Ella Cinders, and at 18 wrote and drew Swing Sisson, the Battling Band Leader, for Feature Comics. He was an Army Air Forces veteran of World War II, where he served as a bombardier in Lintz, Austria. On his 28th mission shelling the yards in Lintz, his B-24 was hit and he was listed as missing in action until the war in Europe ended. He was a comedian on The Early Birds Show on WFAA in Dallas. As a commercial artist, he founded two multinational corporations to market typeface designs and is credited for designing 4 percent of all typefaces now used. He also wrote columns and articles for typographic publications. Locally, he sang original lyrics to old pop standards in area piano bars, and in 1999 produced 59 issues of the Web book Millennium Memorandum, changing the title to MM2000 when he issued the first edition of the new Millennium on Jan. 3, 2000. Survivors include his wife, Ann Jones Martin; and a cousin, Lorrie Hankins, Casper, Wyo. National Cremation Society, Largo.

    Phil Martin's digital typefaces.

    FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Alter Littera
    [José Alberto Mauricio]

    Spanish foundry, est. ca. 2009, and on the web since 2012. It is located in Madrid. Alter Littera's fonts and web site are designed and managed by José Alberto Mauricio, who holds a doctorate degree in Economics and Business Administration, and is Associate Professor of Econometrics at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid.

    Alter Littera produces and markets opentype fonts reviving some of the most beautiful bookhands from medieval Western manuscripts, as well as some of the finest European and North-American typefaces from the mid-fifteenth through the early-twentieth centuries. The "Bookhand", "Oldtype" and "Initials" font collections cover gothic and/or blackletter letter forms.

    The typefaces:

    • Gutenberg (B42-type) A (Johann Gutenberg, Mainz, ca. 1455). Includes the full set of special characters, alternates and ligatures from The 42-line Bible. Under development.
    • Gutenberg (B42-type) B (Johann Gutenberg, Mainz, ca. 1455). Includes the full set of special characters, alternates and ligatures from The 42-line Bible. Published as Gutenberg B in 2012, this is a clean, smooth rendition of the B42-type used by Johann Gutenberg in his famous 42-line Bible. The font includes a comprehensive set of special characters, alternates and ligatures, plus Opentype features, that can be used for typesetting (almost) exactly as in Gutenberg's Bible and later incunabula. He says: The main historical sources used during the font design process were high-resolution scans from several printings of Gutenberg's Bible. Other sources were as follows: Kapr, A. (1996), Johann Gutenberg - The Man and his Invention, Aldershot: Scolar Press (ch. 7); De Hamel, C. (2001), The Book - A History of The Bible, London: Phaidon Press (ch. 8); Füssel, S. (2005), Gutenberg and the impact of printing, Burlington: Ashgate (ch. 1); and Man, J. (2009), The Gutenberg Revolution, London: Bantam (ch. 7).
    • Gutenberg (B42-type) C (Johann Gutenberg, Mainz, ca. 1455). Includes the full set of special characters, alternates and ligatures from The 42-line Bible. Published in 2012 as Gutenberg C, this is a slightly roughened version of the Oldtype "Gutenberg B" Font, simulating irregularities and ink spreads associated with old metal types, papers and parchments.
    • Psalterium (Psalter-type) (Peter Schoeffer, Mainz, 1457). Includes the full set of special characters, alternates and ligatures from The Mainz Psalter (Psalterium Moguntinum). He writes: A clean, smooth adaptation of the magnificent gothic types used by Johann Fust and Peter Schöffer in their famous Mainz Psalter (Psalterium Moguntinum) of 1457, also used in their Canon of the Mass (Canon Missae) of 1458, and in their Benedictine Psalter (Psalterium Benedictinum) of 1459. [Although these works were published after Gutenberg's break with Fust, it is generally agreed that Gutenberg was working along with Fust and Schöffer on the Mainz Psalter while the 42-line Bible was still being printed.] In addition to the usual standard characters for typesetting modern texts, the font includes a comprehensive set of special characters, uncial initials (adapted from both the Mainz Psalter and early sixteenth-century Dutch types by Henric Pieterszoon), alternates and ligatures, plus Opentype features, that can be used for typesetting (almost) exactly as in the Mainz Psalter and later incunabula.
    • Oude Hollandse (Henric Pieterszoon "Lettersnijder", Antwerp, 1492). Under development.
    • French Textura (Joos Lambrecht, Ghent, 1541). Under development.
    • Flamand A (Hendrik van den Keere, Antwerp, 1571). Under development.
    • Flamand B (Hendrik van den Keere, Antwerp, 1571). Under development.
    • Nederduits (Johann M. Fleischmann, Haarlem, 1733). Under development.
    • Psalter Gotisch (Benjamin Krebs Nachfolger, Frankfurt am Main, 1890). Under development.
    • Manuskript Gotisch (Bauersche Giesserei, Frankfurt am Main, 1899). Under development.
    • Munthe Schrift (Gerhard Munthe, Offenbach am Main, 1904), Under development.
    • Deutsche Schrift (Rudolf Koch, Offenbach am Main, 1910). Includes both normal and large, ornamental capitals (two sets), plus several finial characters and ornaments from Koch's original designs. He writes:A comprehensive and faithful rendition of Rudolf Koch's first release, usually referred to as "Fette Deutsche Schrift" or "Koch-Schrift". In addition to the regular character set, the font includes a large number of alternates and ligatures, plus two sets of ornamental initials (Initialen mit Zierstrichen und Punkten zur Koch-Schrift, and Initialen zur halbfetten deutschen Schrift). The main sources used during the font design process were a sample page from Hendlmeier, W. (1994), Kunstwerke der Schrift, Hannover: Bund für Deutsche Schrift und Sprache (p. 164), and several specimen sheets from the Gebrüder Klingspor Type Foundry for Koch's Deutsche Schrift type family.
    • Maximilian (Rudolf Koch, Offenbach am Main, 1914). Includes normal, small (Klein), and roman (Antiqua) capitals, plus ornamental capitals and alternates (Zierbuchstaben). Under development.
    • Wilhelm Klingspor Schrift (Rudolf Koch, Offenbach am Main, 1925). Includes both normal (wide) and narrow capitals, plus the full set of alternates, ligatures and finial characters from Koch's original designs.
    • Caslon Gotisch (D. Stempel A.G., Frankfurt am Main, 1926). Produced in 2012 as Caslon Gotisch, it is a faithful adaptation of the "Caslon-Gotisch" type acquired (among several other types) by D. Stempel A.G. in 1919 from the Leipzig printer Wilhelm E. Drugulin, and further developed by Stempel in later years. Details: In addition to the usual standard characters for typesetting in modern Western languages, the font includes a comprehensive set of special characters, alternates and ligatures, plus Opentype features, that can be used for typesetting as in antique writings and printings. The main sources used during the font design process were as follows: A sample page from Typographische Mitteilungen - XXIII Jahrgang - Heft 2 (1926), and a sample page from Hendlmeier, W. (1994), Kunstwerke der Schrift, Hannover: Bund für Deutsche Schrift und Sprache (p. 37).
    • Gótico Cervantes (Fundición Tipográfica Richard Gans, Madrid, 1928). Under development.
    • Wallau (a rotunda by Rudolf Koch, Offenbach am Main, 1930). Includes German, Uncial, and Ornamental capitals. Under development.
    • Alter Gothic (Alter Littera, Madrid, 2012), or Alter Gothisch. This is Alter Littera's first original design. They write: Two specific sources must be acknowledeged: (1) the "Black" type from William Caslon's A Specimen of Printing Types (1785), and (2) the "Caslon Gotisch" type by D. Stempel A.G. (1926).
    • Gothic A. After late Carolingian and early Gothic manuscripts (12th century). Under development.
    • Gothic B. After Erhard Ratdolt's Lombardic Capitals (1491). Under development.
    • Gothic C. After Henric Pieterszoon's Uncials (1508). A comprehensive set of initials (usually referred to as Uncials, Lombardic Initials, or Lombards) of the Germanic variety, designed after Henric Pieterszoon's Gothise Monnikke Letteren as appearing in Enschedé, J. (1768), Proef van Letteren, Haarlem (p. 120); also mentioned as Great Primer Uncials and 2-line Brevier Uncials in Vervliet, H.D.L. (1968), Sixteenth-Century Printing Types of the Low Countries, Amsterdam: Hertzberger (pp. 54-55, and 212-213).
    • ATF Cincinnati, ATF Caxton, ATF Missal. From American Type Founders Company's American Specimen Book of Type Styles (1912). Under development.
    • Initials Bergling (2012, Alter Littera) is a comprehensive set of initials (usually referred to as Uncials, Lombardic Initials, or Lombards) of the French variety, adapted from Bergling's book Art Alphabets and Lettering (Second Edition) (1918, Chicago: Blakely-Oswald Printing Company).
    • Bergling B. From J.M. Bergling's Art Alphabets and Lettering (1918). Under development.
    • Morris. From William Morris's The Kelmscott Chaucer (1896). Under development.
    • Initials ATF Cloister (2012). After F.W. Goudy's Cloister Initials (1917).
    • Roman Square Capital. From 1st century B.C. onwards. Under development.
    • Roman Rustic. 1st to 6th centuries. Under development.
    • Uncial. 3rd to 6th centuries. Under development.
    • Artificial Uncial. 6th to 10th centuries. Under development.
    • Roman Half-Uncial. 3rd to 9th centuries. Under development.
    • Insular Majuscule. 6th to 9th centuries. Under development.
    • Insular Minuscule. From 6th century onwards. Under development.
    • Luxeuil Minuscule. 7th and 8th centuries. Under development.
    • Beneventan Minuscule. 8th to 13th centuries. Under development.
    • Carolingian Minuscule. 8th to mid-12th centuries. Under development.
    • Early Gothic. 11th and 12th centuries. Under development.
    • Gothic Textura Quadrata. 13th to 15th centuries. Under development.
    • Gothic Textura Prescisus. 13th to 15th centuries. Under development.
    • Gothic Rotunda. 12th to 16th centuries. Under development.
    • Gothic Littera Bastarda. From 13th century onwards. Under development.
    • Fraktur. From 15th century onwards. Under development.
    • Humanistic Book Script. From 15th century onwards. Under development.
    • Humanistic Cursive. From 15th century onwards. Under development.
    • ATF Missal Caxton (2012): A comprehensive set of initials, frames and borders, adapted from American Type Founders (ATF) Company's American Specimen Book of Type Styles, Jersey City, 1912 (pp. 944-5). The font contains over one hundred glyphs, including clean renditions of both Missal Initials and Caxton Initials, plus adaptations of Department Store Initials and French Cast Squares. Caxton Initials were first designed by F. Goudy in 1905. Missal Initials is originally due to Will Bradley in 1904.
    • Alter Headletter (2012). An original from Alter Littera in the style of Century Bold Condensed.
    • The Oldtype Gutenberg A Font (2012, free) is a free abridged edition of the full-featured Gutenberg B and Gutenberg C fonts.
    [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Anabella Mazzuca

    Graduate from FADU, University of Buenos Aires, who created the typeface Patova (2010), a fat headline typeface based on Caslon. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Andrew Hoyem

    Californian designer with Linnea Lundquist of a great roman transitional family Aitken commissioned in 2002 for Arion Press. Arion Press writes: Hoyem has taken advantage of twenty-first century technologies in order to revive what is believed to be the first type family cut and cast in America. In 1796 two Scotsmen named Binney and Ronaldson started a type foundry in Philadelphia, the first in the country to endure. By 1800 they had produced a remarkably beautiful and utilitarian type, identified simply as Roman No. 1. It is a Transitional face, between Old Style (as in Caslon) and Modern (as in Bodoni). The type was used by Jane Aitken, daughter of Robert Aitken, the famous printer of the American Revolution, and an accomplished printer herself, for the printing of the first American translation of the Bible, by Charles Thomson, in 1808. It was reintroduced by American Type Founders Company in 1892 under the name Oxford and was used by a succession of fine printers, such as Daniel Berkeley Updike, Bruce Rogers, and the Grabhorn Press. Arion Press has 1,200 pounds of the original type that once belonged to the Grabhorn Press. Oxford was cast for hand composition only and was not adapted for Linotype or Monotype composition. The matrices are now in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution and unavailable for further casting. In 2002, Hoyem worked with type designer Linnea Lundquist, assisted by Andrew Crewdson, to create a digital version of this historic face, which he renamed Aitken. The Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin is its first use for book printing. The Aitken design has been optimized for letterpress printing, allowing for the spread of ink biting into paper just like with the original metal type design cut by Binney&Ronaldson. For this book, the type has been printed from photopolymer plates. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Andy Crewdson

    Graduate from the University of California at Berkeley. Andy Crewdson ran the very interesting and entertaining "Lines And Splines" pages until May 12, 2002. He digitized Monica Lewinsky's handwriting (from notes she wrote for Bill Clinton---Stephen Coles later made the Mac version of Monica). On August 1, 2002, he resurfaced with New Series (dead link), in the tradition of Lines and Splines. But this too ended a short time later. There is a lot of speculation and commentary on the web regarding Crewdson's site and its disappearance---read, e.g., Joe Clark's blog. Andy is responsible for the roman transitional family Aitken commissioned in 2002 for Arion Press. Arion Press writes: Hoyem has taken advantage of twenty-first century technologies in order to revive what is believed to be the first type family cut and cast in America. In 1796 two Scotsmen named Binney and Ronaldson started a type foundry in Philadelphia, the first in the country to endure. By 1800 they had produced a remarkably beautiful and utilitarian type, identified simply as Roman No. 1. It is a Transitional face, between Old Style (as in Caslon) and Modern (as in Bodoni). The type was used by Jane Aitken, daughter of Robert Aitken, the famous printer of the American Revolution, and an accomplished printer herself, for the printing of the first American translation of the Bible, by Charles Thomson, in 1808. It was reintroduced by American Type Founders Company in 1892 under the name Oxford and was used by a succession of fine printers, such as Daniel Berkeley Updike, Bruce Rogers, and the Grabhorn Press. Arion Press has 1,200 pounds of the original type that once belonged to the Grabhorn Press. Oxford was cast for hand composition only and was not adapted for Linotype or Monotype composition. The matrices are now in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution and unavailable for further casting. In 2002, Hoyem worked with type designer Linnea Lundquist, assisted by Andrew Crewdson, to create a digital version of this historic face, which he renamed Aitken. The Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin is its first use for book printing. The Aitken design has been optimized for letterpress printing, allowing for the spread of ink biting into paper just like with the original metal type design cut by Binney&Ronaldson. For this book, the type has been printed from photopolymer plates. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Antonin Kavalec

    Czech Fraktur page. It has a lot of information and samples, includes a table (reproduced below), and has a small archive: Gothenburg (WSI), MA-Gotic (Will Software), Magdeburg (Scriptorium), SchwabenAlt-Bold, Diamond-Gothic (Jim Fordyce, 1993), Engrossing (Scriptorium, 1994), Fiorne (WSI), GF-Gesetz (Lorenz Goldnagl, 1999), JGJDrerGothic (Jeffrey Glen Jackson, 1997, based on Albrecht Dürer), OffenbachChancery, Ruritania, Schwabach, WornManuscript (Phillip Andrade, 1999), Suetterlin, MA-Bastarda1 (Will Software), FFraktur1, DSNormalFrakturBold (BfdS, 1997), Old-London, WilhelmKlingsporGotisch-Dfr.
    Alte Schwabacher 1470
    Andreas-Schrift 1942-1948 Hans Kühne (1910-1961)
    Breitkopf-Fraktur 1750 Johann Gottlob Imanuel Breitkopf (1719-1794)
    Caslon-Gotisch 1760 William Caslon (1692-1766)
    Claudius 1931-1937 Rudolf Koch (1876-1934)
    Deutsche Kursiv 1909 Richard Ludwig
    Deutsche Werkschrift 1934 Rudolf Koch (1876-1934)
    Deutsche Zierschrift 1919-1921 Rudolf Koch (1876-1934)
    Eckmann-Schrift 1900-1902 Otto Eckmann
    Ehmcke-Schwabacher 1920 Fritz Helmut Ehmcke (1878-1965)
    Eisenacher Fraktur 1994 Christian Spremberg (1956)
    Fette Gotisch 1893 Hausschnitt
    Fichte-Fraktur 1934-1939 Walter Tiemann (1876-1951)
    Frühling 1913-1914 Rudolf Koch (1876-1934)
    Gilgengart 1938 Hermann Zapf (1918)
    Kleist-Fraktur 1928 Walter Tiemann (1876-1951)
    Koch-Fraktur 1910-1921 Rudolf Koch (1876-1934)
    Lincoln-Gotisch 1907 Morris Fuller Benton
    Maximilian 1926 Rudolf Koch (1876-1934)
    Normal-Fraktur 1913-1914 Rudolf Koch (1876-1934)
    Offenbacher Schwabacher 1926 Rudolf Koch (1876-1934)
    Peter-Jessen-Schrift 1899-1900 Rudolf Koch
    Post-Fraktur 1935-1940 Herbert Post (1903-1978)
    Rhapsodie 1951 Ilse Schüle (1903-1997)
    Straßburg 1926 Hausschnitt der H. Berthold AG
    Tannenberg 1933-1935 Emil Mayer (1898-1983)
    Thannhaeuser-Fraktur 1937 Herbert Thannhaeuser (1898-1963)
    Unger-Fraktur 1794 Johann Friedrich Unger (1750-1804)
    Walbaum-Fraktur 1800 J. G. Justus Erich Walbaum (1768-1837)
    Wallau 1924-1936 Rudolf Koch (1876-1934)
    Wartburg-Fraktur 1998 Christian Spremberg
    Weißgotisch 1936-1937 Emil Rudolf Weiß (1875-1942)
    Wilhelm-Klingspor-Schrift 1920-1926 Rudolf Koch (1876-1934)
    Zentenar-Fraktur 1937-1938 Friedrich Hermann Ernst Schneidler (1882-1956)
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Apostrof
    [Konstantin Golovchenko]

    Ukrainian typefoundry founded in 2012 by Viktor Kharyk and Konstantin Golovchenko in Odessa. In 2014, they published the Latin / Cyrillic typefaces Arsena (original from 2013 by Vikto Kharyk), Caslon 1821 (Italian typeface by Viktor Kharyk and Konstantin Golovchenko), 2 Quadro (octagonal) and Surf Serif Pro (sharp-edged and modular; original from 2013 by Viktor Kharyk).

    Caslon 1821 revives a typeface of Caslon & Livermore, 1821. It covers Latin, Cyrillic and Hebrew.

    Kyiv (2010, Viktor Kharyk) combines elements of antiqua, Cyrillic, and carving into widely usable Latin and Cyrillic text family. Kyiv was awarded the 2nd prize in the text font category in the first Ukrainian typeface competition Ruthenia in 2010.

    In 2016, Henadij Zarechnjuk and Viktor Kharyk designed Dnipro for Apostrof. The Cyrillic version of this font follows Ukrainian decorative traditions, initiaited by Georgy Narbut and Mark Kirnarsky in the 1920s and continued until the 1980s. The Latin part has an uncial character. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Apply Interactive

    German stencil typeface and typographic service outfit located in Hamburg. MyFonts site. Besides Caslon Fina Stencil and Serpentine Stencil (Dick Jensen), the following typefaces or families were made in 1999 by Sigrid Claessens and Günther Flake: Advera Stencil, Stencil Antiqua (1999, by Sigrid Claessens and Günther Flake), Arston Stencil, Chico Stencil, Ferro Stencil, La Pina Stencil, Lasertac Stencil, Reedon Stencil, Rounded Stencil, Walton Stencil, Western Stencil, Glaser Stencil (after a typeface by Milton Glaser), Bank Stencil (1930s typeface of Morris Fuller Benton), Geometric Stencil (originally by Paul Renner), Tea Chest Stencil (after a typeface by Robert Harling, 1939).

    MyFonts offers these fonts: Arston Stencil, Caslon Fina Stencil, Reedon Stencil, Western Stencil, Stencil Antiqua, Advera Stencil, Glaser Stencil, Rounded Stencil, Bank Stencil, Tea Chest Stencil, Lasertac Stencil, Geometric Stencil, Walton Stencil, Ferro Stencil, Serpentine Stencil, Chico Stencil, La Pina Stencil, OCR-A AI (Apply Interactive). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Arkandis Digital Foundry
    [Hirwen Harendal]

    French foundry, est. 2007, which published many extensive free sans and sans serif families by Hirwen Harendal, who supports Open Source projects. The purpose of ADF is to provide a large number of high quality fonts (174 fonts as of the end of August 2007). Harendal has help from Clea F. Rees, most notably on the TeX part and the extensive Venturis family.

    His typefaces:

    • Accanthis (2009: an alternative for Galliard or Horley Oldstyle).
    • AlbertisADF (from URW-A028), Albertis Titling.
    • Ameris ADF (from URW n33012t).
    • ArrosADF (from URW n021003L).
    • AurelisADF (2009, almost art nouveau).
    • Baskervald ADF (7 years of work according to Harendal: an alternative for New Baskerville).
    • BerenisADF (2008, a didone family), BerenisNo2 (2008).
    • BirkenADF (from URW-n033014t).
    • ColonnadeADF (from URW-n033014t).
    • EditorialisADF (from URW-n033014t).
    • Electrum (like Eurostyle and URW City).
    • FenelrisADF (sans).
    • FrontonADF Titling (from URW-n033014t).
    • GaramondeADF (from URW-g043004t), GaramondNo8ADF (from URW g043024t).
    • Gillius ADF and Gillius ADFN (from Vera Sans, an alternative for Gill Sans MT).
    • HelvetisADF (from URW U001).
    • Ikarius (2008, semi-serif; inspired by Hypatia Sans), IkariusNo2 (2008), Ikarius-Serie (2009).
    • Irianis (2008; IrianisADFMath (2009) was made for the TeX math community).
    • Keypad (2010). a dingbat face.
    • LibrisADF (sans, patterned after Lydian).
    • MekanusADF (2009, typewriter style).
    • Mint Spirit (2012) and Mint Spirit No. 2 (2012). An original minimalist sans design. The truetype version is Mintysis (2012).
    • NeoGothisADF (2009).
    • OldaniaADF (2009, art nouveau).
    • OrnementsADF (2009).
    • PalladioADFStyle (a Palatino derived from URW g043023t).
    • RomandeADF (with hints of Caslon, Times and Tiffany; CTAN download).
    • Solothurn (2011). A family developed for Scribus, a free text preparation package that competes with Adobe's InDesign.
    • SwitzeraADF (derived from Vera).
    • SymbolADF (2008, bullets and arrows).
    • Teknis: under development.
    • TribunADF (2009, like Times New Roman).
    • Universalis ADF (2008-2009, a take on Futura). Open Font Library link.
    • VenturisADF, VenturisOldADF, VenturisTitlingADF and VenturisSansADF (2007: alternatives for Utopia).
    • Verana Sans and Serif (from Bitstream Vera Sans and Serif).

    Kernest link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    ATF 1923 Catalog: Caslon typefaces

    The Caslon typefaces in the ATF catalog from 2013 include the following:

    • American Caslon (Morris Fuller Benton), and American Caslon Italic.
    • Caslon Adbold. Mac McGrew: Caslon Adbold, originating with Keystone in 1913, is characterized by heavier strokes throughout; Extended and Extra Condensed versions followed in 1915 to 1917; all were patented and presumably designed by R. F. Burfeind.
    • Caslon Bold. Mac McGrew: The most popular Caslon Bold was introduced by Keystone Type Foundry in 1905, followed by Italic in 1906 and Condensed and Extended versions about 1911; this is the version made by ATF and in regular widths by Monotype. Monotype keyboard sizes (including large composition to 18-point) are modified considerably to fit standard arrangements, but the only apparent difference in display sizes is the redrawn T and g shown separately in the specimen alphabet and the addition of ligatures and diphthongs on Linotype and Intertype.
    • Caslon Lightface (Keystone, 1910-1912).
    • Caslon No. 540. Mac McGrew: Inland Type Foundry, St. Louis, advertised its own version of Caslon Old Style in 1901, with the claim. "We have obtained the sole right from the originating house to manufacture this series in the United States. Inland is the only type foundry which casts this typeface on standard line. ..." This meant that they had considerably shortened the descending letters; they had also redesigned the italic extensively. ATF countered with Caslon No. 540, with similarly shortened descenders but essentially the original roman and italic designs otherwise. Several other foundries, including BB&S, Hansen, and Keystone, produced similar Caslons. One of the most noticeable features of Caslon is its lack of uniformity from one size to another. This is due to the fact that all the original characters were cut by hand, before the invention of precise mechanical systems for enlarging and reducing drawings. In Caslon 540, each size is the equivalent of the next larger size of 471, including some obsolete odd sizes. Thus 14-point 540 is equivalent to 18-point 471,18 to 22, 20 to 24, etc. The difference is primarily in the descenders, very unattractively shortened in some sizes of 540; lining figures replace the hanging style, and a few other slight changes have been made. The additional large sizes are an attractive generalized design.
    • Caslon Italic No. 540.
    • Caslon Oldstyle No. 471. Mac McGrew: In 1858, Laurence Johnson, a prominent Philadelphia typefounder, visited London and arranged with the successors to William Caslon to duplicate the Caslon types. There are several accounts of how this was done; some say Johnson had fonts specially cast, from which he made electrotype matrices. Another account says he had strikes--unfinished matrices--made from the original punches, while a third account says he obtained the original matrices. The latter account is most unlikely, but the other two possibilities are interestingly credible. Many of the mats still available at ATF, successors to Johnson, are electrotypes-but then, mats wear out anyway, and are commonly replaced by electrotyping existing virgin cast type when patterns or punches are not available. If strikes were finished in this country-the usual process of accurately fitting them for width and position on the type body--this would allow for the fact that some sizes, especially in the 14- to 24-point range, are more loosely fitted here than in England. Otherwise there is virtually no difference between the American and English versions, except for later additions such as dollar mark and various swash letters--the latter are discussed later. Johnson simply called the typeface Old Style, as family names were a later development. When Johnson's foundry merged with MacKellar Smiths&Jordan foundry, the typeface was designated Original Old Style, to distinguish it from other typefaces in the same category. MS&J was part of the great merger that formed ATF in 1892, and the typeface became Old Style No. 71. When ATF's first specimen book was being prepared in 1897, the advertising manager. Henry Lewis Bullen, renamed the series Caslon Old Style. Later "No. 471" was added, the "4" designating typefaces obtained from MS&J.
    • Caslon Oldstyle. Mac McGrew: Inland Type Foundry, St. Louis, advertised its own version of Caslon Old Style in 1901, with the claim. "We have obtained the sole right from the originating house to manufacture this series in the United States. Inland is the only type foundry which casts this typeface on standard line. ..." This meant that they had considerably shortened the descending letters; they had also redesigned the italic extensively. ATF countered with Caslon No. 540, with similarly shortened descenders but essentially the original roman and italic designs otherwise.
    • Caslon Openface. Mac McGrew: Caslon Openface was originated by BB&S in 1915, where it was first called College Oldstyle. It started out as a reproduction of a delicate 18th-century French typeface known as Le Moreau le Jeune, by the foundry of G. Peignot&Son, but in the American version some strokes are heavier. In a later ad, BB&S said, "Placing it in the Caslon group of types is taking a liberty, but it assuredly 'belongs.' " Actually it has somewhat more affinity for the Cochin types.
    • Condensed Caslon. Mac McGrew: Condensed Caslon is a modification of New Caslon, by Inland in 1907; it was inherited by ATF and copied by Monotype, both of which gave it the same series number (the only such incidence); printers often but incorrectly call it Caslon Bold Condensed. Caslon Extra Condensed is also derived from New Caslon, sometime between 1912 and 1917.
    • Heavy Caslon. Mac McGrew: Heavy Caslon was issued by Inland in 1906 or earlier; Ludlow copied it as Caslon Old Face Heavy in 1925 and Intertype in 1937. Ludlow has a companion italic, while Intertype's italic is a sloped roman design. See Caslon Shaded..
    • New Caslon. Mac McGrew: New Caslon, introduced in 1905 by Inland, was the most successful of these attempts. In addition to eliminating irregularities, the aim of this typeface was to strengthen the design so that under modern printing conditions it would more closely resemble the effect of the original Caslon when printed heavily on dampened rough paper, as was commonly done in the eighteenth century. The italic followed in 1906. In 1919 ATF (successor to Inland) reversed the descender-shortening trend with the design by Morris Benton of long descenders, oldstyle figures, and italic swash characters as American Caslon; otherwise this typeface and New Caslon are identical. New Caslon was adapted to Linotype and Intertype as Caslon No.3, which some users call Caslon Bold, although it was not intended to be a bold face. However, in 18-point and larger, Caslon No.3 and Italic are copies of Caslon Bold rather than New Caslon.

    Mac McGrew describes the situation of Caslon in the era of metal type. All text below is quoted. Caslon is "the oldest living typeface," having survived in almost exactly its original form since every character was hand-cut by William Caslon more than 250 years ago. Virtually the same design is still available, along with a myriad of imitations, derivatives, and attempts at improvement. Altogether. they form a number of families, for there is little or no compatibility between many typefaces which now bear the name Caslon. In fact, Caslon is perhaps the hardest set of types to group into reasonable categories; therefore some of the following classifications are arbitrary.

    • The original Caslon. Prior to 1722 English typefounding was at a low ebb. and most printers in that country used Dutch types. But in that year William Caslon completed the first sizes of his new style, which quickly gained dominance over the Dutch types. This new English style was also extensively exported to other countries, including the American Colonies, where it was popular before the Revolution. In fact, the Declaration of Independence of the new United States was first printed in Caslon's types. Benjamin Franklin met Caslon in London, admired and recommended his types, and used them extensively in his printshop. Caslon's types have gone through several periods of decline and revival. In America they died out by about 1800, and had little or no further use for nearly sixty years. In 1858, Laurence Johnson, a prominent Philadelphia typefounder, visited London and arranged with the successors to William Caslon to duplicate the Caslon types. There are several accounts of how this was done; some say Johnson had fonts specially cast, from which he made electrotype matrices. Another account says he had strikes--unfinished matrices--made from the original punches, while a third account says he obtained the original matrices. The latter account is most unlikely, but the other two possibilities are interestingly credible. Many of the mats still available at ATF, successors to Johnson, are electrotypes-but then, mats wear out anyway, and are commonly replaced by electrotyping existing virgin cast type when patterns or punches are not available. If strikes were finished in this country-the usual process of accurately fitting them for width and position on the type body--this would allow for the fact that some sizes, especially in the 14- to 24-point range, are more loosely fitted here than in England. Otherwise there is virtually no difference between the American and English versions, except for later additions such as dollar mark and various swash letters--the latter are discussed later. Johnson simply called the typeface Old Style, as family names were a later development. When Johnson's foundry merged with MacKellar Smiths&Jordan foundry, the typeface was designated Original Old Style, to distinguish it from other typefaces in the same category. MS&J was part of the great merger that formed ATF in 1892, and the typeface became Old Style No. 71. When ATF's first specimen book was being prepared in 1897, the advertising manager. Henry Lewis Bullen, renamed the series Caslon Old Style. Later "No. 471" was added, the "4" designating typefaces obtained from MS&J. Meanwhile, a prominent New York printer, Walter Gilliss, had promoted the adoption of Caslon for setting Vogue magazine, a fashion and art journal which was started in 1892, and the typeface quickly returned to popularity. A. D. Farmer&Son copied the typeface under the name Knickerbocker Old Style. But this was the time when standard alignment was being heavily pro- moted, necessitating the shortening of descenders. Inland Type Foundry, St. Louis, advertised its own version of Caslon Old Style in 1901, with the claim. "We have obtained the sole right from the originating house to manufacture this series in the United States. Inland is the only type foundry which casts this typeface on standard line. ..." This meant that they had considerably shortened the descending letters; they had also redesigned the italic extensively. ATF countered with Caslon No. 540, with similarly shortened descenders but essentially the original roman and italic designs otherwise. Several other foundries, including BB&S, Hansen, and Keystone, produced similar Caslons. One of the most noticeable features of Caslon is its lack of uniformity from one size to another. This is due to the fact that all the original characters were cut by hand, before the invention of precise mechanical systems for enlarging and reducing drawings. In Caslon 540, each size is the equivalent of the next larger size of 471, including some obsolete odd sizes. Thus 14-point 540 is equivalent to 18-point 471,18 to 22, 20 to 24, etc. The difference is primarily in the descenders, very unattractively shortened in some sizes of 540; lining figures replace the hanging style, and a few other slight changes have been made. The additional large sizes are an attractive generalized design. To overcome objections to the wide fitting of some sizes of Caslon Oldstyle No. 471, ATF brought out Caslon Oldstyle No. 472 in 1932; the design is identical but it is fitted more closely. It is made only in 18-, 22- and 24-point sizes. In the specimens shown here, notice the small caps shown with Caslon OldstyleNo. 471, for which they are made up to 36-point-one of the very few typefaces to include such letters above 14- or 18-point. Most of these appear to be cut separately, rather than being regular caps of a smaller size. Long-s characters and combinations have also been made for Caslon Oldstyle roman and italic by ATF and Monotype, and for Caslon No. 540 roman by ATF; they are called Quaint Characters.
    • Swash versions of the Caslon Oldstyle Italic capitals J, Q, T, and Y, also lowercase h with the final stroke turned inward, were the only forms shown in Caslon's original specimen sheet, although other similar swash letters were made for Dutch types at least a century earlier. Later, plain versions of these letters were added, and both forms are included in some fonts. About 1920, Thomas M. Cleland designed a dozen swash letters to be used with Caslon Oldstyle Italic No. 471, and a dozen more were designed in 1923 for Curtis Publishing Company, perhaps by another designer. These were cast in regular molds, with some letters having long, delicate kerns. By 1927 most of these letters, plus a few others, were being made for Caslon Italic No. 540. These were cast with mortises where necessary, greatly reducing the problem of breakage. Thereafter the larger sizes of Caslon No. 471 Italic were also adapted to mortise molds. Lowercase swash letters e, k, v, w, andz are part of the swash font for both 471 and 540 italics. Vowels are also cast on smaller bodies to fit within the mortises. Compare Scotch Open Shaded Italic. About 1927 an ATF specimen said, "The five largest sizes of CaslonItalic No. 540 are the equivalent of 60-, 72-, 84-, 96-, and 120-point Caslon Oldstyle Italic No. 471. Some of the Swash Capitals are cast on these bodies and long descenders cast on these larger bodies will be ready shortly, which will give the full effect of the popular No.4 71 Italic." No evidence has been found that this was ever completed. In the specimen of Caslon Oldstyle Italic No. 471 Swash shown here, these characters are shown on the first line; these are made in all sizes of the face. Caslon Italic No. 540 includes-only in sizes from 36-point up-many of these letters plus the I and U shown separately; fullface letters in this series are cast on the next larger body and thus are identical to 471. Incidentally, the swash J in these fonts is identical when inverted to the pound sterling mark furnished with English fonts. Ludlow True-Cut Caslon Italic also includes many of the 471 swash letters. Monotype Caslon Old Style Italic No. 3371 includes some of the same, plus the W shown separately. Monotype Caslon Old Style Italic No. 4371, which was copied from Stephenson Blake's Caslon Old Face in the 42- to 72-point sizes, has a different set of swash letters as shown on the latter part of the second line. Linotype Caslon Old Face Italic has a similar set of swash letters, only some of which are shown in the specimen. Linotype Caslon Italic (not Old Face) has no swash letters but the otherwise identical Intertype typeface does, as shown, including the peculiarly reversed T, which was later corrected. Also note the swash letters shown with some following Caslon italics. Caslon Italic Specials are swash letters of a completely different sort, designed by Carl S. Junge in 1924 for BB&S, for use with that foundry's Caslon Italic and various similar typefaces.
    • Monotype produced an adaptation of Caslon to its mechanical restrictions as early as 1903, when Sol Hess drew English Caslon Old Style No. 37 at the request of the Gilliss Press in Boston. (Two years later Monotype adopted a new set of matrix and other mechanical improvements which required redesigning nearly all its typefaces.) Display sizes of this typeface were also drawn by Hess, presumably adapted from the original English face, as the italic has several swash letters similar to the English version. Otherwise display sizes of this roman and italic are very similar to Inland Type Foundry's short-descender adaptation of the original Caslon. On Linotype and Intertype. Caslon No.4 is essentially the same. Monotype also has Inland Caslon Old Style No. 137, presumably adapted from the Inland typeface mentioned above, but the italic seems identical to that of No. 37. Linotype has a copy of Caslon No. 137 under that name. About 1915 Monotype cut yet another version of Caslon Old Style-No. 337, designated "MacKellar Caslon" in some early literature because it is closer to the original typeface associated with that foundry. Display sizes are virtually an exact copy of No. 471. Composition sizes are well adapted, though necessarily modified to fit the standard arrangement; they are made with short descenders on standard alignment, but were the first Monotype typeface with alternate long descenders. Oddly, all three Monotype Caslons---37, 137, and 337---are the same set width---letter for letter---in all keyboard sizes made, which means that any given character is precisely the same width from one typeface to another in any composition size. In addition, 12-point No. 337, which with long descenders must be cast on 13- or 14-point body, is essentiallythe same size and width as 14-point of the same face. Sizes of this typeface above 36-point were later copied from Stephenson Blake's Caslon Old Face and called Caslon Old Style No. 437, as previously noted. Linotype and Intertype have Caslon and Italic, similar to Caslon No. 540 and cut about 1903; long descenders are available in place of the regular short descenders, making a fair approximation of Caslon Oldstyle No. 471; this Caslon Italic in 18- to 30-point sizes is more regularized as shown, similar to Caslon Light Italic. Linotype also has Caslon No.2, a copy of Monotype Caslon No. 37, also with alternate long descenders; and the previously mentioned Caslon No. 137, cut in 1936. For greatest authenticity, Linotype went back to the English original in 1923 for its Caslon Old Face; the roman is almost indistinguishable, but the italic is necessarily modified considerably. Most smaller sizes have both long and short alternate descenders avail- able. Intertype offers the same face, roman only, in 18- to 30-point. Ludlow's True-Cut Caslon and Italic, cut in 1922 and 1928 respectively, are close copies of Caslon Oldstyle No. 471 and Italic.
    • Several attempts have been made to regularize Caslon and improve its so-called faults, but these have generally lost much of the character of the face. and have seldom achieved widespread use. They include
      • Recut Caslon (Inland 1907).
      • Caslon Lightface (Keystone 1910-12).
      • Clearface Caslon (Robert Wiebking for Western 1913), etc., all with italics and some with condensed versions; Caslon Lightface Italic is non-kerning.
      • New Caslon, introduced in 1905 by Inland, was the most successful of these attempts. In addition to eliminating irregularities, the aim of this typeface was to strengthen the design so that under modern printing conditions it would more closely resemble the effect of the original Caslon when printed heavily on dampened rough paper, as was commonly done in the eighteenth century. The italic followed in 1906. In 1919 ATF (successor to Inland) reversed the descender-shortening trend with the design by Morris Benton of long descenders, oldstyle figures, and italic swash characters as American Caslon; otherwise this typeface and New Caslon are identical. New Caslon was adapted to Linotype and Intertype as Caslon No.3, which some users call Caslon Bold, although it was not intended to be a bold face. However, in 18-point and larger, Caslon No.3 and Italic are copies of Caslon Bold rather than New Caslon.
      • Condensed Caslon is a modification of New Caslon, by Inland in 1907; it was inherited by ATF and copied by Monotype, both of which gave it the same series number (the only such incidence); printers often but incorrectly call it Caslon Bold Condensed.
      • Caslon Extra Condensed is also derived from New Caslon, sometime between 1912 and 1917.
      • Caslon Catalog, with heavied hairlines, was designed by Robert Wiebking for his Advance Type Foundry in 1913 under the name of Caslon Antique (not to be confused with a later use of this name); it was also shown by Laclede, and was renamed when BB&S acquired it.
      • Caslon Medium and Italic, as the name implies, are somewhat heavier versions, offered by BB&S as Modern Caslon and Italic about 1924---the roman at least was shown by Western Type Foundry in the mid-teens. However, the italic appears to be identical to Ludlow's Caslon Light Italic, also credited to Wiebking but advertised as early as 1922; it was the first typeface cut for Ludlow's development of italic matrices which permitted kerning designs without the fragility of the kerns on single types. Strangely, though, Ludlow Caslon Light (roman) matches Caslon Clearface.
      • The newest Caslon was designed in 1965, when ATF commissioned a "beefed up" version of Caslon No. 540, by Frank Bartuska. The result was Caslon No. 641, an arbitrary number. It is a handsome face, reflecting the best of 540, but without the latter's variations from one size to another. It also includes all the ancillary characters of ATF's later creations as shown, in- cluding percent and pound marks, a variety of quotation marks, and center dot, hyphen, and dash in two positions to center on caps or lowercase. An italic was started but never completed. This typeface has considerable similarity to Caslon Medium, for which ATF still had mats when the new typeface was commissioned.
    • Boldface Caslons have been made by several sources.
      • The most popular Caslon Bold was introduced by Keystone Type Foundry in 1905, followed by Italic in 1906 and Condensed and Extended versions about 1911; this is the version made by ATF and in regular widths by Monotype. Monotype keyboard sizes (including large composition to 18-point) are modified considerably to fit standard arrangements, but the only apparent difference in display sizes is the redrawn T and g shown separately in the specimen alphabet and the addition of ligatures and diphthongs on Linotype and Intertype.
      • Caslon No.3 matches ATF Caslon Bold from 18-point up, although smaller sizes match New Caslon.
      • Hansen's Caslon Fullface and Caslon Fullface Condensed were close copies of Caslon Bold and Caslon Bold Condensed, differing most apparently in the characters shown (A Gas, condensed AG), but Hansen's Caslon Fullface Italic matches New Caslon Italic.
      • A somewhat different Caslon Bold series is made by Ludlow.
      • A Caslon Black series by BB&S, from Western Type Foundry in the mid-teens.
      • Caslon Adbold, originating with Keystone in 1913, is characterized by heavier strokes throughout; Extended and Extra Condensed versions followed in 1915 to 1917; all were patented and presumably designed by R. F. Burfeind.
      • Heavy Caslon was issued by Inland in 1906 or earlier; Ludlow copied it as Caslon Old Face Heavy in 1925 and Intertype in 1937. Ludlow has a companion italic, while Intertype's italic is a sloped roman design. See Caslon Shaded.
    • Caslon Openface was originated by BB&S in 1915, where it was first called College Oldstyle. It started out as a reproduction of a delicate 18th-century French typeface known as Le Moreau le Jeune, by the foundry of G. Peignot&Son, but in the American version some strokes are heavier. In a later ad, BB&S said, "Placing it in the Caslon group of types is taking a liberty, but it assuredly 'belongs.' " Actually it has somewhat more affinity for the Cochin types.
    • Caslon Shaded was adapted by ATF from Heavy Caslon in 1917, by W. F. Capitaine. Caslon Shadow Title was adapted from Caslon Bold by Monotype about 1928. Compare Cameo, Cochin Open, Gravure, Narciss.
    • Caslons in name only.
      • Caslon Antique and Italic were designed by Berne Nadall and brought out by BB&S in 1896-98 as Fifteenth Century (XV Century in one early announcement) and Italic. Although they aren't really representative of types of that time, being a poor copy of a crude early typeface cut about 1475 in Venice, they have become popular for the simulation of supposedly quaint American types of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Disregarding the usual practice of increasing the proportionate width of a typeface as the size decreases, Caslon Antique maintains uniform proportions in all sizes, and thus appears narrow and cramped in small sizes. Caslon Antique is also the original (1913) name of Advance Type Foundry's Caslon Catalog, mentioned earlier, while in the early 1920s Laclede Type Foundry applied that name to "a brand-new, entirely machine-cut typeface of Old Style Antique," a duplicate of the Advance face.
      • Caslon Old Roman is discussed later under its original name, Old Roman.
      • Caslon Text originated with William Caslon in 1734. Inland Type brought out a reproduction of it in 1899 as part of their agreement with the Caslon Type Foundry in England. It later became the property of ATF, and was copied by Linotype. Being handcut originally, it shows the expected varia- tions from one size to another, but some characters show decidedly different forms in some sizes. See Cloister Black and Engravers Old English, which are derived from this face.
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    ATF typefaces

    PDF file by David Tribby that lists all ATF typefaces. Text file listing those 1600 typefaces. The Cary Collection at RIT has many matrices, listed here (PDF) and here (HTML). A google docs spreadsheet with the ATF typefaces, all compiled by David Tribby. The same in HTML.

    Scans of some typefaces: ArtGothic (1897 catalog), Baskerville (1941), Caslon Oldstyle Roman No. 471, Caslon Oldstyle Italic No. 471, Chaucer, Chessmen (1897 catalog), Childs, Columbian (1897 catalog), Columbus, Culdee, DeVinne Initialen, Elandkay (1897 catalog), Erratic Outline, Ferdinand, Jenson Italic, Koster (1897 catalog), Laclede, Ronaldson Title Slope (1897 catalog), Santa Claus Initials, Skjald, Virile Open (1897 catalog), 20th Century, Bodoni Ultra, Clearface, Dietz Text, European Grotesque No. 2, Goudy Kennerley, Impact, News Gothic Condensed, Onyx, Palance Script, Palatino, Stymie, Typo Upright, Atlanta Series, Childs Series, Columbus Outline Initials, Contour No. 7, DeVinne Shaded, Erratck Outline, Johnson Series, Koster Series, Longefellow Series, McCullagh Series, Mural Series, Quaint Roman No. 2, Quaint Series, Rubens Series, Samoa Series, Victoria Series. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Autofont
    [Eddie Kohler]

    A free UNIX/TeX tool by Eddie Kohler. He writes: This package provides some Perl scripts that simplify font handling for TeX. The basic idea behind Autofont is that TeX-required font information, including TFM and VF font metrics, PK bitmap fonts, and DVIPS 'psfonts.map' references, should be generated on the fly when required, based on the TeX font name. With Autofont, referring to a PostScript font is sufficient to install that font for TeX's purposes. The user writes an .fd file and that's it. This differs from fontinst, where fonts must be explicitly installed. Autofont can automatically transform fonts based on "instructions" embedded in the font name. For example, "Times-Roman--sl167" refers to an artificially slanted version of Times Roman, and "ACaslon-Regular--f" refers to a version of Adobe Caslon Regular that includes the ff, ffi, and ffl ligatures found in Adobe Caslon Expert. Again, there is no need to install anything explicitly; simply refer to the fonts by name and Autofont will take care of the required virtual font manipulations. Autofont requires a Unix TeX installation based on Web2c. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Autofont

    Free utility by Eddie Kohler who writes: This package provides some Perl scripts that simplify font handling for TeX. The basic idea behind Autofont is that TeX-required font information, including TFM and VF font metrics, PK bitmap fonts, and DVIPS 'psfonts.map' references, should be generated on the fly when required, based on the TeX font name. With Autofont, referring to a PostScript font is sufficient to install that font for TeX's purposes. The user writes an .fd file and that's it. This differs from fontinst, where fonts must be explicitly installed. Autofont can automatically transform fonts based on "instructions" embedded in the font name. For example, "Times-Roman--sl167" refers to an artificially slanted version of Times Roman, and "ACaslon-Regular--f" refers to a version of Adobe Caslon Regular that includes the ff, ffi, and ffl ligatures found in Adobe Caslon Expert. Again, there is no need to install anything explicitly; simply refer to the fonts by name and Autofont will take care of the required virtual font manipulations. Autofont requires a Unix TeX installation based on Web2c. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    A.V. Haight
    [Inland Type Foundry]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    BA Graphics
    [Robert Alonso]

    Bob Alonso (b. Bronx, NY, 1946, d.2007), the founder of BA Graphics in 1994, was a prolific American type designer. With 33 years of experience at NewYork's Photo Lettering, he specializs to some extent in calligraphic script typefaces, but not exclusively so. BA Graphics was located in Chester, NY, and later in Toms River, NJ, and now sells its fonts through MyFonts. Many of its fonts published after Alonso's death in 2007 were completed by John Bomparte.

    John Bomparte wrote this obituary: Throughout his career at the legendary Photo-Lettering, Inc. (one that spanned four decades), Bob created original typefaces and tailored type by modifying, revising and filling out families, fashioning pieces of type for hand-lettered jobs, as well as being involved with the updating of a number of well-known logotypes. Bob was blessed with natural teaching abilities; and those in social and professional circles who had the good fortune to know him considered him not just a type designer but a mentor and a friend. As one such person close to him put it, he was a "graphic technician... back when computers were not even in site for graphic arts, he would take on any intricate&complex graphic project that others would shy away from and come up with a solution that achieved a masterpiece. I'll always remember someone saying 'this can't be done' and Bob saying let me see it and a short time later, there it was --done&perfect. I would like to think that attitude rubbed off on me. Along with this gift for teaching and explaining the complex, Bob exhibited a level of professionalism that was unsurpassed. A number of years ago when the need came to make the transition from the traditional to digital way of creating fonts, he rose to the challenge admirably. Towards the last few years of Photo-Lettering, Bob played a vital role in the conversion to digital, of many of the typefaces within the collection, notably those fonts that carry the prefix PL. More recently, Bob Alonso released several fonts through ITC, Adobe and his independent foundry, BA Graphics. Bob was on the cutting edge of his best work, and in the circumstance of his untimely passing, left a measure of unfinished designs. However, the spirit of his typographic talents and his fine sense of humor lives on through the many much-loved, and popular fonts he has left us: fonts such as Cookie Dough, Equate, Elephant Bells and Pink Mouse, to name a few.

    Alonso created these typefaces:

    FontShop link. Klingspor link.

    View Bob Alonso's typefaces. View the BA Graphics typeface collection. An alphabetic listing of Alonso's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Babylon Schrift Kontor
    [Klaus Bartels]

    Commercial German foundry, est. 2000 by Klaus Bartels (1948-2005). BSK also has on board Wolfgang Talke, Bernd Pillich, and the type experts René Kerfante and Frank Sax. It specializes in major text families, mostly based on fonts from the Berthold collection. Bartels was previously responsible for the digitization of that collection at Berthold, so this is a natural progression. Some amount of renaming of the typefaces seems to have been necessary. Partial list: Adlon Sans BSK, Adlon Serif BSK, Admira BSK, Albion Script BSK, Albion Script 2 BSK, Alte Schwabacher BSK, Ancora BSK, Atlantica BSK, Avenue BSK, Babylon Schreibschrift BSK, Baskerville BSK, Baskerville Text BSK, Bodoni BSK, Bodoni Expert BSK, Bodoni Condensed BSK, Bodoni Text BSK, Bodoni Text Expert BSK, Carissa BSK, Caslon Text BSK, Centra BSK, Champion BSK, Cogita BSK, Elega BSK, Fabiana BSK, Fonica BSK, Francesa BSK, Garamond BSK, Garamond Expert BSK, Herold Reklameschrift BSK, KG privata BSK, KG privata II BSK, KG vera BSK, KG vera II BSK, Lettura BSK, Mirage BSK, Mirage Expert BSK, Mirage New BSK, Pintura BSK, Signal BSK, Standard-Grotesk BSK, Standard-Grotesk Condensed BSK, Standard-Grotesk Extended BSK, Standard-Grotesk Classic BSK, Standard-Grotesk Next BSK, SG Next Condensed BSK, SG Next Extended BSK, SG Next Rounded BSK, SG Next Stencil BSK, SG School BSK, SG School 2 BSK, Story BSK, Supersonic BSK, T & T Form BSK, T & T Form Condensed BSK, T & T Form Ey BSK, Tomos-Antiqua BSK, Tomos-Mediaeval BSK, Trump Tower BSK, Unger Fraktur BSK, Walbaum BSK, Walbaum Expert BSK, Walbaum Fraktur BSK, Walbaum Text BSK. I have no idea what happened after Bartels' death--the page disappeared! [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Barnhart Brothers&Spindler (or: BB&S)

    Chicago-based foundry, which grew out of The Great Western Type Foundry in 1868 when the Barnhart brothers (newspaper publishers in Iowa who came to Chicago as advertising agents) bought out the Toepfer family in 1868. They retained Herman Spindler as the foreman, since he was the only typefounder in the group. Aggressive in business, BB&S became the largest foundry in Chicago. Book of type specimens. Comprising a large variety of superior copper-mixed types, rules, borders, galleys, printing presses, electric-welded chases, paper and card cutters, wood goods, book binding machinery etc., together with valuable information to the craft. Specimen book no.9 (1907) is a 1048-page monster catalog (see also here and here and here). Some pictures from Type Barnhart Type Foundry Co. New York City: Superior Copper-Mixed Type (1908). BB&S was purchased by ATF about 1911 and it operated independently until about 1930. Typophile page on them. Text file with a list of the typefaces in their Catalog 25 (1925). Discussion of some of their typefaces and digitizations:

    • Engravers Upright Script, a ronde style alphabet, was revived in 2006 by Nick Curtis as Bon Mot NF.
    • Hazel Script, a primary school didactic connected script, digitized in 2006 by Paul Hunt as P22 Allyson (discussed here).
    • They made the (sloppy) old-look garalde typeface Fifteenth Century in 1897, which turned into Caslon Antique (American Type Founders). A digital version can be had at MyFonts, but who made it? MyFonts also offers Caslon Open Face (originally, 1915).
    • One of their best known designers was Oswald B. Cooper who made Cooper Black (1921) and Cooper Old Style (1919-1924), with characteristically blurred rounded serifs. He also made Cooper Hilite (shaded), Cooper 570 (fat), Cooper 579 (outline), Cooper Tooled Italic (shaded) and Cooper Black Italic 571.
    • Delysian NF (2004, Nick Curtis) revives their Greeting Card typeface from the BBS catalog of 1923.
    • Lining Gothic No. 71 (1907) is a grotesque typeface with panache. It was digitized by Nick Curtis as Cerulean NF (2007).
    • Mazurka NF (2004, Nick Curtis) is a combination of two typefaces from the same catalog, Swagger Capitals, designed by Carl S. Junge, for the uppercase and Gothic Novelty Title for the lowercase.
    • Racine (1903) was revived by Nick Curtis as Kenosha Antique (2004).
    • Archer (1905) was revived by Nick Curtis as Grand Rapids (2005).
    • Umbra (1907) was revived by Nick Curtis as Shady Lady NF (2005). Monotype's Umbra is based on a later metal version by Ludlow though.
    • One of their blackletter typefaces is Waldorf Text (1914).
    • Steelplate, a monocase engraved US dollar bill-style face, ca. 1900 at BBS, was revived by Nick Curtis as Smackeroo NF (2005).
    • Ernst Lauschke designed the oriental look typeface Dormer in 1888 at the Great Western Foundry. BB&S renamed it Pekin. HiH digitized it in 2005. Pekin also is the name of Dan Solo's revival.
    • Freak (1889, The Great Western Type Foundry) was renamed Bamboo by BB&S. A digital version by Tom Wallace is also called Freak (2005).
    • Parsons (1918, Will Ransom) was digitized by Jess Latham.
    • Clearcut Shaded Capitals (1920s, Will Ransom). Extended to a full font by Nick Curtis in 2005 as Ransom Clearcut NF).
    • Dotted Roman (1897, a Victorian typeface) was revived as Miss Dottie NF by Nick Curtis in 2014.
    • The decorative wood type typeface French Antique, featured in the 1905 catalog, and originally due to William H. Page. Digital versions by Woodentype (Jordan Davies) and Nick Curtis (whose version of French Antique Extended is called Fran Tique NF (2008)).
    • The wedge-serifed typeface Vulcan (1884) was revived by Nick Curtis in 2014 as Vulkan NF.
    Wiki page. List of all BB&S typefaces compiled by the American Amateur Press Association in 2009. This includes a PDF file and an Excel spreadsheet.

    Digital typefaces that descend from Barnhart / BBS. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Barry Eshkol Adelman
    [The Schoenfieldian script Page]

    [More]  ⦿

    Bastien Conus

    Student at ECAL in Lausanne who made Ciao (2008), a revival of Italian typefaces done by Caslon in 1821. He is working on a connected script typeface called Afterwork (2010). Scan of his poster called Foam. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Before & After

    Great recommendations on how to choose a typeface for text at Before&After magazine: Character widths should be similar. For example, Futura or Avant Garde are bad. Medium height-to-width ratio, so no compressed types. Medium x-height. Small variations in stroke weight: out with the didones. No mirrors. Pick typefaces in which letters are sufficiently different. Avoid large counters. Avoid quirkiness. Their favorite text typefaces: Adobe Caslon (11/12.75pt), Adobe Garamond (11.5/12.75pt), ITC Stone Serif (9.5/12.75pt), Janson Text 55 Roman (10.5/12.75pt, Linotype). PDF file. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ben Archer
    [100types]

    [More]  ⦿

    Benjamin Franklin

    Benjamin Franklin, Typefounder (1925, Douglas C. McMurtie, New York) describes Benjamin Franklin as typefounder. McGrew writes about Franklin: Prior to 1722 English typefounding was at a low ebb, and most printers in that country used Dutch types. But in that year William Caslon completed the first sizes of his new style, which quickly gained dominance over the Dutch types. This new English style was also extensively exported to other countries, including the American Colonies, where it was popular before the Revolution. In fact, the Declaration of Independence of the new United States was first printed in Caslon's types. Benjamin Franklin met Caslon in London, admired and recommended his types, and used them extensively in his printshop. F. Kerdijk penned the Dutch book Benjamin Franklin. Drukker - Postmeester - Uitvinder en Gezant, 1706-1790 (1956, Drukkerij Trio, 's-Gravenhage), a 16-page booklet that further explains Franklin's multidimensional persona. Further books on Franklin's sideline include Typophiles Chapbook: B. Franklin, 1706-1790 . Franklin's interests in typography and as a printer have caused a number of typefaces to be named after him, such as the famous Franklin Gothic, but also Ben Franklin, Ben Franklin Condensed and Ben Franklin Open (metal types at Keystone Type Foundry. 1919), Franklin's Caslon (2006, P22), Poor Richard RR (named after Benjamin Franklin's "Poor Richard Almanack"), Poor Richard (1994, Projective Solutions: a free font), and Benjamin Franklin Antique (free font by Dieter Steffmann). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Bernd Nadall

    Or Berne Nadall. This designer (b. 1869, Louisville, KY) studied at the Louisville School of Design, worked briefly for some newspapers in Lousville, and then left for Chicago, where he worked for Barnhart Brothers & Spindler (The Great Western Type Foundry). For BBS he designed borders, ornaments, and some typefaces such as Faust Text (1896), Fifteenth Century (1898), Tell Text (1898) and a typeface now known as Nadall (1895-1896, BBS). The last typeface was digitized by Dan X. Solo as Nadall Regular in 2001.

    Creator at BBS of Mazarin (1895), Mazarin Italic (1895). The historians do not mince words about Mazarin. McGrew writes: Mazarin was introduced by BB&S in 1895, redesigned from the Golden Type of William Morris. Mazarin Italic was introduced a year later, but neither typeface lasted long. See Jenson Oldstyle. Mazarin HTF by Hoefler Type Foundry is a digital version.

    Nadall also created Caslon Antique (and Italic) in 1895 (Caslon EF Antique in the Elsner&Flake collection, and Caslon Antique in the Linotype collection), a version unlike any original Caslon. Some say it was developed from 1896-1898. For another digital version of this, see Caslon Antique (1993, Group Type).

    Klingspor link. William E. Loy writes about Nadall in The Inland Printer. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    BERTLib (Fontstuff)

    Fontstuff, est. 2005, sells BERTLib, the "Berlin Electronically Remastered Type Library". It has offices in London. Berthold, which folded in 1993, had a 2000+ type collection, which came in the hands of Freydank, Körbis, Pillich, Talke GbR in 1996 who lent it out to Berthold PrePress GmbH in 1997 under the name The Berthold Type Collection. Babylon Schrift Kontor GmbH, the company of Klaus Bartels, offered type 1 fonts from this collection for sale since 2000, but it disappeared some time later when Bartels died. BERTLib acquired the original Ikarus data of the Berthold Type Collection (over 2000 fonts) and set out to make high quality OpenType fonts with full support of all European languages, and fully Unicode-compliant. Slowly, these fonts are now being released by BERTLib. Not to be confused with Berthold Types Ltd from Chicago, who produced its library from Berthold type 1 data, not Ikarus data, of the same collection. Because of typename protection by Berthold Types, BERTLib had to change some font names. Some fonts also cover Cyrillic and Greek, but Maltese and Turkish are standard in all typefaces. More research needs to be done about the Berthold bankruptcy in 1993. They had a lot of debts. How can two different companies "acquire" or "get" the rights and sources of their collection? Who took care of the debts? Were there some underhanded deals? BERTLib twice refused to send me a list of types to which their own names can be matched. No names of digitizers or font BERTLib font designers or BERTLib owners are given. And finally, one has to pay 2.50 Euros just to see a sample of a font. All that makes me think that this company is one of businessmen rather than passionate type designers. Typefaces from these type designers/foundries have been or are being converted right now: Aldo Novarese, American Typefounders, Bernd Möllenstädt, Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue, Bruce Rogers, Claude Garamond, David Quay, Eric Gill, Erik Spiekermann, Facsimilie Fonts, Frederic Warde, Friedrich Berthold, Georg Trump, Giambattista Bodoni, Gustav Jaeger, Günter Gerhard Lange, Hermann Hoffmann, Herbert Post, Inland Typefoundry of St. Louis, John Baskerville, Justus Erich Walbaum, Karl Gerstner, Louis Oppenheim, Morris Fuller Benton, Nicolas Cochin, Otl Aicher, Schriftenatelier Taufkirchen, Thomas Maitland Cleland, William Caslon. I created this page with remarks on their fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Bertrand Morel
    [Stencil fonts: Graphic Obsession]

    [More]  ⦿

    Biblio@BoyBeaver

    List of well-known typographers, with biographies of people such as Nicolas Jenson, Aldus Manutius, William Caslon, John Day, Johann Froben, William Caxton, and Christophe Plantin. Plus a list of typography books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Bill Troop
    [ITC Garamond opinion]

    [More]  ⦿

    Bitstream font analogue

    Bitstream font name equivalences. The original file, dated 2007, was at Fontinfo.net, but dispappeared some time ago. Here is that list in text format:

  • Aachen == Charlemagne; Ruhr; Vanadium; Westlake
  • Ad Lib == Alibi
  • Adsans == Ad Gothic; Angro; Humanist 970; News Ad
  • Akzidenz Grotesk == Ad Grotesk; Gothic 725; Grigat; Standard; Wayland
  • Albertus == Adelon; Alburt; Flareserif 821
  • Aldus == Breklum; Luce; Mannucci Roman
  • Alternate Gothic No.2 == Alpin Gothic; Gothic
  • Amazone == Amazonia; Fredrika
  • Amelia == Computer 651; Orbit; Orea
  • American Text == Blackletter 851; National Text
  • Americana == AM; American Classic; Aston; Colonial; Concord; Flairserif 721; Freedom; Independence
  • Antique No. 3 == Egyptian 710
  • Antique Olive == Alphavanti; AO; Berry Roman; Gibson Antique; Incised 901; Oliva; Olivanti; Olive; Olive Antique; Oliver; Olivette; Olivette Antique; Olivia; Provence
  • Antique Roman Open == Roman Stylus
  • Antique Roman Shaded == Roman Shaded
  • Arnold Bocklin; Auckland == Bock; Expo; Medusa; Nouveau; Youth; Freeform 715
  • Asta == Albany; AS; Astro; Aztec; Corolla; Dutch 823
  • Auriol == Freeform 721; Robur; Skylark
  • Aurora Bold Condensed == Anzeigen Grotesk; Aura; Aurora; Grotesque Condensed
  • Aurora == Empira; News 706; News No.12; News No.2; Polaris; Regal
  • Baker Signet == Keene; Signature; Signatur Vario; Signete
  • Balloon == BL; Freehand 041; Lasso
  • Bank Gothic == Bond Gothic; Commerce Gothic; Deluxe Gothic; Magnum Gothic; Square 021; Stationer's Gothic
  • Baskerville == Baskenland; Baskerline; Basque; Beaumont; BK; Transitional 401
  • Baskerville No.2 == Euro Baskerville; Transitional 404
  • Bauer Bodoni == Bodoni B; Euro Bodoni; Headline Bodoni; Modern 405
  • Bell Centennial == Gothic 762
  • Bell Gothic == Directory Gothic; Furlong; Gothic 761; Paddock
  • Belwe == Belter; Welby
  • Bembo == Aldine 401; Aldine Roman; Ambo; BE; Bem; Bernstein vario; Bingo; Griffo; Latinesque
  • Berling == Carmichel; Revival 565
  • Bernhard Modern == Beacon; Bernie; BN; Duchess; Engravers Oldstyle
  • Bernhard Tango == Aigrette; Carmine Tango
  • Bingham Script == Freehand 591
  • Bison == Bison; Blizzard; Brush 738
  • Bitstream Alisal == Calligraphic 456
  • Bitstream Amerigo == Flareserif 831
  • Bitstream Arrus == Lapidary 721
  • Bitstream Carmina == Calligraphic 811
  • Bitstream Charter == Transitional 801
  • Bitstream Cooper == Freeform 741
  • Bitstream Fournier == Transitional 601
  • Bitstream Iowan Old Style == Venetian 801
  • Bitstream Oz Handicraft == Freehand 701
  • Bitstream Ventana == Humanist 800
  • Blippo == Geometric 755
  • Block == Black; Block; Gothic 821; Hobble
  • Bloc == Geometric 885
  • Bodoni == BO; Bodoni No. 2; Brunswick; Empiriana; Gorvind; Modern 421
  • Bodoni Campanile == Modern 735; Palisade
  • Bookman == Bookface; Bookman Antique; Bookprint; Revival 710
  • Bremen == Exotic 011
  • Britannic == Gallery; Grenoble
  • Broadway == Big City; BW; Deco; Hudson; Moderne; Modernistic; Ritz; Showtime
  • Brody == Brophy Script
  • Bruce Old Style == Bruce; No. 31; Old Style No.3; Old Style No.7; Revival 704
  • Brush Script == Bombay; BR; Brush; Brilliant Bold Script; Brush 451; Punch
  • Cable == Geometric 231; Kabel; Kabello; Kobel
  • Caledonia == Calderon; Caledo; California; Cornelia; Edinburgh; Gael; Gemini; Highland; Laurel; Transitional 511
  • Candida == Candide
  • Cascade == Freehand 471; Kascade Script
  • Caslon 540 == Caslon 74; CL; Caslon 2; Caslon 484; Caslon 485
  • Caslon Bold == Caslon No. 3; New Caslon; Caslon 74 Bold
  • Caslon Old Face == Caslon Old Style; Caslon; Caslon 128; Caslon 471; Caslon 76
  • Cataneo == Chancery 731
  • Centaur == Arrighi; Centaurus; Venetian 301
  • Century Expanded == Century Light/II; Century X; Cambridge Expanded; CE; Century; Century Bold
  • Century Oldstyle == Cambridge Oldstyle
  • Century Schoolbook == Century Text; Century Textbook; CS; Schoolbook; Cambridge Schoolbook; Century Medium; Century Modern
  • Chapel Script == Mahogany Script; Monterey
  • Cheltenham Old Style == Cheltonian; Chesterfield; Gloucester; Kenilworth; Nordhoff; Sorbonne; Winchester
  • Choc == Staccato 555
  • City == Square Slabserif 711; Town
  • Clarendon == Clarique; Clarion; Cerebral
  • Cloister Black == Abbey; Cloister Black
  • Codex == Calligraphic 421
  • Concorde == Dutch 809; Chinchilla; Concert
  • Cooper Black == Bitstream Cooper; Burlesque; Coop; CP; Ludlow Black; Pabst; Plymouth; Rugged Black
  • Copperplate Gothic == Atalante; Copperplate; Formal Gothic; Gothic No.29; Gothic No.30; Gothic No.31; Gothic No.32; Gothic No.33; Lining Plate Gothic; Mimosa; Spartan
  • Corona == Aquarius; Cardinal; CR; Crown; Elmora; Ideal; Koronna; News 705; News No.3; News No.5; News No.6; Nimbus; Quincy; Royal; Scotsman Royal; StarNews; Vela
  • Coronet == Pageant; Ribbon 131
  • Courier == Messenger
  • Davida == DaVinci
  • De Vinne == Congressional; Industrial 731
  • Della Robbia == Cantoria; Canterbury; Dahila; Firenze; Westminster Old Style
  • Diotima == Calligraphic 810; Diotima
  • Dom Casual == Ad Bold; Brush 431; Brush Roman; Dom Casual; Polka
  • Eckmann == Freeform 710
  • Egyptian 505 == Egyptios; Egypt 55
  • Egyptienne == Humanist Slabserif 712; Egyptien
  • Electra == Avanta; Elante; Illumna; Selectra; Transitional 521
  • Embassy == Boston Script; Florentine Script; Hellana Script; Script No.1; Script No.2
  • Englische Schreibschrift == English 157; English Script
  • Engravers' Old English == Old English; Old English Text
  • Engravers' Roman == Lining Litho
  • Engravers Roundhand == Roundhand No. 1; Signet Roundhand; Snell; Snell Roundhand
  • Eurostile == Aldostyle; Astron; ES; Eurogothic; Europa; Gamma; Micro; Microstyle; Square 721; Waltham
  • Excelsior == Angeles; Berlin; Camelot; Commerce No.1; Commerce No.2; Digi-Antique; Esquire; EX; Excel; Excella; League Text; News 702; News No.10; News No.14; Opticon; Paragon; Primus; Victoria
  • Fairefax; Fairfield == Fairmont; Savant; Transitional 551
  • Financial == Letter Gothic
  • Folio == Haverhill
  • Fraktur == German Gothic
  • Franklin Gothic == Gothic No.16; Pittsburgh
  • Frutiger == CG Frontiera; Concorde; Freeborn; Humanist 777; Provencale; Roissy; Siegfried
  • Fry's Baskerville == Baskerville Display; Baskerville F; Baskerville Old Face; Transitional 409
  • Futura == Alphatura; Atlantis; FU; Future; Photura; Sirius; Utica
  • Gando == Gando Ronde
  • Garamond == Aldine 511; American Garamond; Canberra; Carrera; Garamond No.2; Garamond No.3; Garamond No.49; Garamont; GD; Grenada
  • Gill Sans == Eric; Gillies; Glib; Graphic Gothic; Hammersmith; Humanist 521; Sans Serif 2
  • Gothic No.13 == Gothic No.4
  • Goudy Old Style == Grecian; Number 11; Goudy; Goudy Bold; Goudy Extra Bold
  • Granjon == Elegant Garamond; Garamont Premier; Grandeur
  • Grotesque 126 == Gothic 720
  • Hanseatic == Swiss 924; Geneva 2 Hanoverian;
  • Helvetica Compressed == Helvetica Pressed; Spectra Compressed; Swiss 911; Claro Compressed; Geneva 2 Compressed; Helios Compressed
  • Helvetica Inserat == Swiss 921; Geneva 2 Sera; Geneva Inserat; Helios Inserat
  • Helvetica Monospaced == Monospace 821
  • Helvetica == Aristocrat; CG Triumvirate; Claro; Corvus; Europa Grotesk; Geneva/2; Hamilton; HE; Helios/II; Helv; Helvette; Holsatia; Megaron/II; Newton; Spectra; Swiss 721; Vega; Video Spectra
  • Hobo == Hobnob; Tramp
  • Imperial == Bedford; Emperor; Gazette; New Bedford; News No.4; Taurus
  • Imprint == Period Old Style; Dutch 766
  • Impuls == Impuls; Brush 439
  • Ionic No. 5 == Ionic-326; Ionic/2; News 701; News Text Medium; Rex; Windsor; Zar; Corinth; Doric; Ionic 342; Dow News; Ideal; Regal
  • Italian Script == Lorraine Script; Lucia
  • ITC American Typewriter == Amertype; AT; Newriter; Typewriter 911
  • ITC Avant Garde Gothic == AG; Avanti; Cadence; Geometric 711; Suave; Vanguard
  • ITC Bauhaus == BH Geometric 752
  • ITC Benguiat Gothic == BT; Informal 851
  • ITC Benguiat == Beget; BG; Revival 832
  • ITC Berkeley Oldstyle == Venetian 519
  • ITC Bolt Bold == Square 821
  • ITC Bookman == Revival 711; Bookman; BM
  • ITC Busorama == Geometric 075; Omnibus; Panorama;
  • ITC Century == Centrum
  • ITC Galliard == Seville
  • ITC Garamond == Garamet
  • ITC Kabel == Kabot
  • ITC Korinna == Kordova
  • ITC New Baskerville == Transitional 402
  • ITC Serif Gothic == Line Gothic
  • ITC Souvenir == Sovran; SV
  • ITC Tiffany == Jewel
  • ITC Zapf Chancery == Chancelor
  • Janson == Jason; Journal; Kis; Kis-Janson; Nikis; Dayton; Jan/Dutch
  • Jefferson == Freehand 575
  • Kaufmann == Swing Bold; Tropez
  • Liberty == Bernhard Cursive; Bernhard Schonschrift; Lotus; Viant
  • Libra == Libretto; Libby Uncial
  • Life == Fredonia
  • Linotype Modern == Modern 880; Telegraph Modern
  • London Text == Belvedere; Blackletter 686
  • Lydian Cursive == Granite Cursive; Lisbon Cursive
  • Lydian == Granite; Lisbon
  • Madison == Century 725
  • Mandate == Command; Freehand 521
  • Matt Antique == Garth Graphic
  • Melior == Ballardvale/2; CG Melliza; Hanover/II; Lyra; Mallard; Matrix; ME; Medallion; Metrion; Uranus; Ventura; Vermilion; Zapf Elliptical
  • Memphis == Alexandria; Cairo; Geometric Slabserif 703; Nashville; Pyramid
  • Meridien == Zenith; Equator; Latin 725; Latine; Maximal
  • Metro == Chelsea; Geometric 415; Gothic No.2; Gothic No.3; Megamedium; Meteor
  • Mirarae == Calligraphic 808
  • Mister Earl == Freehand 651
  • Mistral == Aeolus; Missive; Staccato 222; Zephyr Script
  • Neuland == Othello; Informal 011
  • Neuzeit Grotesk == Genneken; Geometric 706; Grotesk S
  • News Gothic == Alpha Gothic; CG Trade; Classified News; Gothic Bold-131; Gothic No.17; Gothic No.18; Gothic No.19; Gothic No.20; Gothic-130; Lightline Gothic; Record Gothic; Toledo; Trade Gothic
  • Nuptial Script == Bridal Script; Floridian
  • Olympian == Olympus; Dutch 811
  • Ondine == Formal Script 421; Mermaid
  • Onyx == Arsis; Onyx; Poster Bodoni Compressed
  • Optima == Athena; CG Omega; Chelmsford/II; Musica; October; OP; Optimis; Optimist; Oracle/II; Orleans; Roma; Ursa; Zapf Humanist; Zenith
  • Oscar == Formal 436
  • Palatino == Andover/II; CG Palacio; Compano; Elegante; Malibu/2; Paladium; Palatine; Palermo; Parlament; Patina; Pontiac; Zapf Calligraphic
  • Palette == Brush 445; Palette
  • Park Avenue == Parkway; PA
  • Peignot == Exotic 350; Monterey; Penyoe
  • Perpetua == Felicity; Lapidary 333; Percepta; Perpetual
  • Piranesi Italic == Minuet
  • Plantin == Aldine 721; Atlantic; PL; Planet; Plantin
  • Poster Bodoni == Bodoni Extrabold/No. 2; Modern 721
  • Prestige == Prestige Elite
  • Primer == Rector; Scholasta; Century 751; Premier; Bancroft
  • Profil == Decorated 035
  • Raleigh == Cartier
  • Rockwell == Slate; Geometric Slabserif 712; Rockland
  • Romana == Romanisch; De Vinne; De Vinne Ornamental; French Old Style; Lorimer; Romaans
  • Sabon == Berner; Classical Garamond; September; Sybil/2; Symposia
  • Serifa == Seriverse; Sierra; Monty; Seraphim
  • Shelley == Operinia
  • Simoncini Garamond == Garamond Simoncini; Garamondus; Italian Garamond;
  • Spartan == Technica; Techno; Times Gothic; Twentieth Century; Geometric 212; Sans; Sparta
  • Star Trek == Square 051
  • Stempel Garamond == Euro Garamond; Garamond; Garamond Antiqua; Garamond Royale; Original Garamond
  • Stempel Schneidler == Amalthea; Bauen Schrift; Bauer Text; Brewer Text; Kohinoor; Schneidler; Schneidler Old Style
  • Stuyvesant == Wintergreen
  • Stymie == ST
  • Syntax == Synthesis; Cintal; Humanist 531; Symphony; Synchron
  • Textype == Century 731
  • Times Roman == TmsRmn; TR; Varitimes; Claritas; Dutch 801; English; English 49; English Times; Euro Times; London Roman; Pegasus; Press Roman; Sonoran Serif; Tempora; Tiempo; Timeless; Times New Roman
  • Torino == Contessa; Galileo; Industrial 736; Loren
  • Trump Mediaeval == Activa; Ascot; Continental; Knight; Kuenstler 480; Mediaeval; Olympus; Renaissance; Saul
  • Typo Upright == French Script; Interscript; Kaylin Script; Linoscript; Parisian Ronde
  • Umbra == Durante; Meandme; Plastica
  • Univers == Alphavers; Aries; Boston; Eterna; Galaxy; Kosmos; Swiss 742; UN; Versatile; Zurich
  • University Roman == Ace; Celtic; Collegette; Forum Flair; Opera; Orna; Stunt Roman
  • Wedding Text == Linotext; Marriage
  • Windsor == Winslow [Google] [More]  ⦿

  • Blackletter, Fraktur, Rotunda
    [Manfred Klein]

    Manfred's fascination with blackletter and its German roots is apparent from the tens of typefaces he designed that are either revivals of historic typefaces or playful and not so playful extensions. Here we go:

    • ArtNouveauDecadente (2007)
    • ArthritishSpringtime
    • BarlosRandom, BarlosRandomRings
    • BarlosiusEdged (2007)
    • Bastarda, Bastarda-K, BastardaButtonsBeta, BastardaMajuskel1300 (2005), BastardusSans
    • BauernFraktur (2004, after the 1911 original by Bauersche)
    • BayreuthFraktur, Bayreuther-BlaXXL (2005, a variation of Schneidler's Bayreuth)
    • BigBroken, BigBrokenTwo
    • BigElla
    • Brahms-Gotisch (2005, with Petra Heidorn: a revival of Heinz Beck's 1937 typeface at Genzsch&Heyse)
    • BrokenAlphabetTradition, BrokenBrainsFrax, BrokenCapsJumperB, BrokenHand, BrokenHand-Bold, BrokenHandLight, BrokenRoman-Bold, BrokenSansCaps, BrokenSansCaps (2007), BrokenSansCapsJumper, BrokentTraditionRound
    • BruchschriftMK
    • Burtine (2003: handwritten freestyle version of Burte Fraktur, 1928), Burte-Fraktur, Burtinomatic, Burtinomatic-DemiBold
    • CancellerescA
    • CantaraGotica
    • Cantzley Inverse Caps (2007), CantzleyAD1600 (2005)
    • CaslonishFraxx
    • ClaudiusImperator
    • Clausewitz-Fraktur (2005)
    • Cuxhaven Initials Round (2006), CuxhavenFraktur (2006), CuxhavenInitials (2006), CuxhavenTimes
    • DecadentaFrax (2007)
    • DirtyThinkwitz
    • DizzyBrokenWritten
    • DolbyFraxCaps (2005)
    • DornspitzGrotesk
    • DoubleBrokenTextura
    • DrunkenSailor (2006)
    • ElectrUnciale (2005)
    • ElephantaBlack (2006)
    • FatFreeFrax
    • FlyingHollander (2005)
    • FracturiaSketched, FracturiaSketchedCaps
    • FraktKonstruct, FraktSketch, FraktSketchFS, FraktalConPablos, FrakturInRings (2007), FrakturInitials07 (2007), FrakturNitials (2006), FrakturaFonteria, FrakturaFonteriaSlim (2006)
    • FraxBricKs, FraxBrix, FraxHandwritten, FraxHandwrittenCaps (2007), FraxHandwrittenXtrem-Medium, FraxInCage, FraxInCageLeftOblique, FraxInCageRightOblique, FraxInitials, FraxxSketchQuill
    • FrungturaFS
    • GGothiqueMK
    • GermanFatman (2006)
    • GingkoFraktur (2006)
    • GoldenSwing, GothicMajuscles
    • GotenborgFraktur (2007)
    • GotikaButtons (2005, after Imre Reiner's Gotika from 1933)
    • GothicLetters (2007)
    • Gotic Caps (2006), GoticaBastard, GotischeMajuskel
    • GutJoeBlack
    • GutenbergsGhostypes, GutenbergsTraces
    • HamletOrNot, HamletTobeornot
    • HansFraktur
    • HansSachsCaps (2007)
    • HansSchoenspergerRandomish
    • HappyFrax (2006)
    • Haunted-Normal, HauntedBricks
    • Holland-Gotisch (with Petra Heidorn; a revival of Nederduits by Johann Michael Fleischmann, ca. 1750)
    • ImresFraktur, ImresFraxCaps (2007)
    • Incunitials
    • IronFraktur
    • JessicaPlus
    • JoeCaxton
    • JohannesBricks, JohannesButtons-02, JohannesGDiamonds, JohannesGLastTraces (2007), JohannesTraces
    • Jugendstil (2006)
    • KaiserRotbartCaps (2007)
    • Kl1RheumaticFraktur
    • KlausBFraktur
    • KleinSchwabach (2005)
    • KleinsBrokenGotik (2006)
    • KlungerCaps (2006)
    • Leibniz-Regular
    • LombardPlattfuss
    • Lombardic
    • LookBrokenTypes
    • LuFraktorsoBroad
    • LudwigHohlwein (2006)
    • LufrakturBricks (2006)
    • LutherDuemille, LutherMousedrawn, LutherMousedrawn-Bold
    • MK Broken Types (2006)
    • MKFraxConstr (2007)
    • MKalligFrax, MKalligFrax-MediumItalic
    • MKancellerescaCaps (2005)
    • MKantzley (2005), MKanzleiCaps-One (2006)
    • MKaslonTextura
    • MoKsford, MoKsfordBold, MoKsfordDemiBold, MoKsfordExtraLight, MoKsfordLight
    • MonAmourCaps (2006), MonAmourFraktur-Broken (2006), MonAmourFrakturRegular
    • MonksWriting
    • MorbusParcinsonFraxx
    • MountFirtree
    • MousefraKtur, MousefraKtur-Bold
    • Münchner-Fraktur (2005; a revival of Renaissance Fraktur by Heinz König, 1885, Genzsch&Heyse)
    • MyElectronicSchwabach
    • NeuGothic-Bold
    • Neudoerffer, NeudoerfferScribbleQuality. Both codex style typefaces are from 2003. Manfred writes that Neudoerffer is an unaltered version of the original Neudoerffer Initialen from 1660.
    • OKsfordBadFat, OKsfordItalic
    • OldTypographicSymphony-Regular, OldTypographicSymphony-Round
    • PopFraxFrankfurt (2007), PopFraxFrankfurtCondensed (2007)
    • Potsdam (2005, a revival of a 1934 typeface by Robert Golpon)
    • PrinzEugen
    • Prothesis-Black, Prothesis-Caribiqu, Prothesis-Caripix
    • RandomFrax
    • ReadableGothic
    • RememberReinerFS
    • RotundaEspagna
    • Schaftstiefel Kaputt (2003)
    • SchmaleGotischMK, SchmalfetteGotisch
    • SchneidlerSchwabacher, SchneidlerSolitaires, SchneidlerSolitairesRound, SchneidlerSolitairesRound
    • Schwabach, SchwabachDuemille, SchwabachScribbels, SchwabachScribbelsSecond
    • ScribbledFrakturX-Heavy (2006)
    • SketchedCassiusBroken
    • SmallEdgedFrax (2006)
    • Snoutlike (2003)
    • SpaceWinningFrax (2007)
    • TizonaDance
    • TshirtsForFrax
    • TypoasisBoldGothic (2003)
    • VanDoesburgBrokenFS
    • VeryBrokenFrax
    • WeimarInline
    • WeissGotischRandom
    • Weissgotnitials (2005, based on Weiss's Lichte Initialen, 1935)
    • WittewittMajuscles-Flourish, WittewittMajuscles-FlourishBricks
    • WrittenFrax (2007)

    [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Brett T. Johnson
    [Simeon out West Foundry]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    British Standards for Type Classification

    Typeface classification according to "British Standards 2961:1967" (or BS 2961), British Standards Institution, London, 1967.

    • Humanist: Centaur, Jenson, Verona, Kennerley.
    • Garalde: Stempel Garamond, Garamond, Caslon Old Face, Granjon, Sabon, Bembo.
    • Transitional: New Baskerville, Baskerville, Caslon, Fournier, Perpetua.
    • Didone: Bodoni, Bauer Bodoni, Torino, Walbaum.
    • Mechanistic: Clarendon, Memphis, Rockwell, Lubalin.
    • Lineal
      • Lineal Grotesque: Franklin Gothic Demi-Bold, Franklin Gothic, News Gothic, Alternate Gothic.
      • Lineal Neo-Grotesque: Helvetica Light, Akzidenz Grotesk, Folio, Helvetica, Univers.
      • Lineal Geometric: Avant Garde Medium, Avant Garde, Futura, Eurostile, Erbar.
      • Lineal Humanist: Gill Sans, Goudy Sans, Optima.
    • Incised: Albertus, Latin, Friz Quadrata.
    • Script: Brush Script, Mistral, Park Avenue, Zapf Chancery.
    • Manual: Neuland, Broadway, OCR-A, Pritchard.
    • Black Letter: Fette Fraktur, Old English, Goudy Text, Wilhelm Klingspor-Schrift.
    • Non-Latin.
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Brode Vosloo
    [Sacred Nipple Type Foundry]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Bruno Maag
    [Dalton Maag]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    bukva:raz!

    bukva:raz! was an international competition of type design, sponsored by the Association Typographique Internationale (ATypI). It covered Latin, Greek, Cyrillic, Arabic, Hebrew, and other scripts. The judging of bukva:raz! took place in Moscow, Russia, on 1 and 2 December 2001, and was chaired by Maxim Zhukov. The jury consisted of Matthew Carter, Yuri Gherchuk, Akira Kobayashi, Lyubov Kuznetsova, Gerry Leonidas, Fiona Ross, Vladimir Yefimov. From the 600 entries, 99 winners were selected. John Berry's report. An alphabetic list:

    • Absolut type: Lars Bergquist (Sweden)
    • Alinea: Thierry Puifoulhoux (USA)
    • Alphatier: Mark Jamra (USA)
    • Ambroise, Ambroise François: Jean-François Porchez (France)
    • Anisette, Anisette Petite: Jean-François Porchez (France)
    • Arcana: Gabriel Martinez Meave (Mexico)
    • Asmik: Manvel Shmavonyan (Armenia)
    • Atzmaut (Independence): Yanek Iontef (Israel)
    • Bartholeme open: Dennis Pasternak (USA)
    • Basalt: Sumner Stone (USA)
    • Biot: Julien Janiszewski (France)
    • Caflisch Script Pro: Robert Slimbach (USA)
    • Calbee: Karen Lau (USA)
    • Calligraphic: Yuri Gulitov (Russia)
    • Charente: Jean-François Porchez (France)
    • Cholla: Sibylle Hagmann (USA)
    • Cursiv Bogdesko: Ilya Trofimovich Bogdesko (Russia)
    • Dolly: Lars de Beer, Akiem Helmling, Bas Jacobs, Sami Kortemäki (The Netherlands)
    • DTL Dorian: Elmo van Slingerland (The Netherlands)
    • DTL Haarlemmer Sans: Frank E. Blokland (The Netherlands)
    • DTL Paradox: Gerard Unger (The Netherlands)
    • DTL Unico: Michael Harvey (The Netherlands)
    • Economy: Vasily Shishkin (Russia)
    • Enigma: Jeremy Tankard (United Kingdom)
    • Ergo Sketch: Gary Munch (Germany)
    • FF Kievit: Michael Abbink (USA)
    • Fontana ND: Ruben Fontana (Argentina)
    • Founder's Caslon: Justin Howes (United Kingdom)
    • Frothy: Julien Janiszewski (France) (this font was later disqualified by the jury because it was derived from ITC Stone Sans).
    • Geisha: Yelena Liqutina (Ukraine)
    • Giacometti Pi: Sine Bergmann (Germany)
    • Gotham: Tobias Frere-Jones, Jesse M. Ragan (USA)
    • Guggenheim: Jonathan Hoefler (USA)
    • Den Haag (Latin, Cyrillic): Alexandr Tarbeev (Russia)
    • Handmade: Andrey Belonogov (Russia)
    • Harmony Greek: Jeremy Tankard (United Kingdom)
    • Hothouse: Jörgen Huber (Germany)
    • Humanist 531 Cyrillic: Isay Slutsker, Manvel Shmavonyan (Russia)
    • ITC Biblon: Frantisek Storm (USA)
    • Kinesis: Mark Jamra (USA)
    • Knockout: Jonathan Hoefler (USA)
    • Lagarto: Gabriel Martinez Meave (Mexico)
    • Latina : Inigo Jerez Quintana (Spain)
    • Le Monde Courrier: Jean-François Porchez (France)
    • Le Monde Journal: Jean-François Porchez (France)
    • Lechaufferie: Damien Gautier (France)
    • Letopis: Innokenty Keleinikov (Russia)
    • Linotype Finnegan : Jürgen Weltin (Germany)
    • Linotype Frutiger Next: Adrian Frutiger (Germany)
    • Linotype Syntax: Hans-Eduard Meier (Germany)
    • LTR Federal: Erik van Blokland (The Netherlands)
    • made in China: Yelena Zotikova (Ukraine)
    • Maqsaf: Habib Khoury (Israel)
    • Maya: Oded Ezer (Israel)
    • Mercury: Jonathan Hoefler & Tobias Frere-Jones (USA)
    • Minion Pro: Robert Slimbach (USA)
    • Myriad Pro: Robert Slimbach (USA)
    • Nathan: Sylvie Chokroun (France)
    • Newspaper: Luc[as] de Groot (Germany)
    • Next Exit: Yanek Iontef (Israel)
    • Nichiyou Daiku: Joachim Müller-Lancé (USA)
    • No name: Tim Holloway (United Kingdom)
    • Nyx: Rick Cusick (USA)
    • Onserif & Onsans: Inigo Jerez Quintana (Spain)
    • P22 Daddy-O Beatsville: Richard Kegler & Peter Reiling (USA)
    • P22 Gothic Gothic: James Grieshaber (USA)
    • Papaya: Zvika Rosenberg (Israel)
    • Parmenides: Dan Carr (USA)
    • Pesaro: Joachim Müller-Lancé (USA)
    • Pigiarniq: Ross Mills (Canada)
    • Policy: Julian Bittiner (USA)
    • Pradell: Andreu Balius (Spain)
    • Prensa: Cyrus Highsmith (USA)
    • Quadrat Grotesk: Vladimir Pavlikov (Russia)
    • Raghu: R.K. Joshi (India)
    • Rayuela: Alejandro Lo Celso / Pampa Type (Argentina)
    • Really: Gary Munch (USA)
    • Reguiem: Jonathan Hoefler (USA)
    • Reguiem Ornaments: Jonathan Hoefler (USA)
    • Relay: Cyrus Highsmith (USA)
    • Retina Agate: Tobias Frere-Jones (USA)
    • Rouble: Andrey Belonogov (Russia)
    • Seria & Seria Sans: Martin Majoor (The Netherlands)
    • Serp'n'Molot: Tagir Safayev (Russia)
    • Shaker: Jeremy Tankard (United Kingdom)
    • Shirokuro: Joachim Müller-Lancé (USA)
    • Shuriken: Joachim Müller-Lancé (USA)
    • Sketchley: Ronna Penner (USA)
    • Stancia: Jean-Renaud Cuaz (USA)
    • Sun: Luc[as] de Groot (Germany)
    • Tanya: Olga Overchun (Ukraine)
    • The AntiquaB: Luc[as] de Groot (Germany)
    • The Shire Types: Jeremy Tankard (United Kingdom)
    • Vesta: Gerard Unger (The Netherlands)
    • Waters Titling Pro: Julian Waters (USA)
    • Yellow: Jürgen Weltin (Germany)
    • Yisana: Olivier Umecker (France)
    • Zentra: Vladimir Pavlikov (Russia)
    • Zigzag: Yurij Lila (Ukraine)
    • Zubizarreta: Joan Barjau (Spain)
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    ByType (was: Foco Design; will be Fabio Haag Type)
    [Fabio Luiz Haag]

    ByType is the type subdivision of Foco Design, the Brazilian design company of graphic and type designer Fabio Luiz Haag (b. 1981, Taquara, Rio Grande do Sul), located in Sapiranga, Rio Grande do Sul. Fabio Haag designed FH After (2006, futuristic display typeface to which After Text and After Headline were added in 2007), FH Foco (2003) (a large x-height sans), this futuristic typeface (2003), and Minas Headline, a custom family made for the government of Minas Gerais. He was working on this display font (2005).

    In 2006, Foco became a Dalton Maag Ltd font family, and Fabio Haag became the new Creative Director of the Brazilian wing of Dalton Maag in 2008. MyFonts sells Foco and Foco Corp (2007).

    Designer (with Jonas Schudel) of a grotesque sans at Dalton Maag, 2007-2009, called Effra, which was inspired by a 1816 design from the Caslon font foundry. Discussion at Typophile. Followed in 2013 by Effra Corp (Dalton Maag) which also supports Greek and Cyrillic.

    In 2007, he created the organic sans typeface IronThree.

    Cordale (2008) is a workhorse serif typeface jointly done with Lukas Paltram at Dalton Maag. Cordale Corp, the corporate edition, includes Latin Extended A, Greek and Cyrillic characters sets. Cordale Arabic was published in 2013.

    In 2009, Foco Italics was published.

    At ATypI 2009 in Mexico City, he spoke about Dalton Maag and about the elements necessary to make it in the type business today.

    In 2012, the Dalton Maag Brazil team designed the font for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games The 5448-character connected script font Rio2016 was developed by Dalton Maag Brazil, and involved a team that includes Fabio Haag, Fernando Caro and Gustavo Soares. Beth Lula is the Branding Director of the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games Organising Committee. Passages of the press release: Each letter expresses a characteristic of Rio 2016 Games, its people and city. The letters are written with a single continuous linework, with a fast and fluid movement, suggesting the movements of the athletes in action. The variety of curves in the letters has a unique informality, inspired by the joyfulness of the Brazilian people. Fabio Haag: As a Brazilian typophile, designing the Rio 2016 font was a dream job. This is a milestone for the design scene in Brazil---it's a great example of how type designers can collaborate with graphic designers, sharing their expertise to strengthen an identity.

    In 2013, Fabio designed Almaq, a pair of sans display typefaces in cuts called Refined and Rough.

    Codesigner with Bruno Mello, Fernando Caro, Rafael Saraiva and Ron Carpenter of Soleto (2014, Dalton Maag), a sans typeface that won an award at Tipos Latinos 2014.

    Setimo (2015) was co-designed by Fernando Caro, Ken Gitschier, Fabio Haag and Lukas Paltram at Dalton Maag, and won an award at Tipos Latinos 2016.

    In 2016, Fabio Haag published Lembra at his new typefoundry, Fabio Haag Type. It is yet unclear if this means that he left Dalton Maag after eight years.

    Klingspor link.

    View Fabio Haag's typefaces. Fabio Haag Type. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Cade Type Foundry
    [Philip Cade]

    Cade Type Foundry is the private foundry of Philip Cade. He cut his first (metal) typeface in 1972. Cade published a Specimen book Type Borders Ornaments and Bras Rule in 1976 (Juniper Press, 24 GinnRoad, Winchester, MA).

    Typefaces include Jenson Old Style No. 58, Goudy Lanston No. 279, and Caslon Old Style Italic 3371. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Cameron Roll
    [Typefaces no one gets fired for using]

    [More]  ⦿

    Candace Uhlmeyer
    [DH Type Visionaries]

    [More]  ⦿

    Carl Ernst Pöschel

    German printer and typographer (b. Leipzig, 1874, d. Scheidegg, 1944). In 1900, he joins his father's printing shop, Poeschel&Trepte, in Leipzig. In 1907, he starts up Janus-Presse with Walter Tiemann, the first private press in Germany. In 1918, Janus-Presse is taken over by Insel Publishing House. His fonts include Janus-Presse-Schrift (1907, with Walter Tiemann) and Winckelmann-Antiqua (1920). He published "Antiqua als deutsche Normalschrift" (with F.L. Habbel, Berlin, 1942). He is said to have brought the blackletter typeface Caslon-Gotisch in 1904 from England to Leipzig---the latter typeface showed up in the VEB Typoart catalog. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Carl Stephen Junge

    Illustrator and poster designer in Chicago in the 1920s and 1930s, who lived from 1880 (b. Stockton, CA)-1972 (d. Des Plaines, IA). Many of the ornamental typefaces in the Barnhart Brothers&Spindler catalog of 1931, Typefaces : border designs, typecast ornaments, brass rule: selective specimens of preferred matter, are due to Junge. His typefaces:

    • Caslon Italic Specials (1924).
    • Swagger Capitals, which already appeared in the 1922 catalog of BBS. Swagger Capitals was reworked by Nick Curtis in 2004 as Mazurka NF [the lower case of Mazurka NF is based on Gothic Novelty Title, perhaps not a Junge type]. Swagger Capitals also inspired Pencraft (2010, Intellecta Design).

      Mac McGrew: Swagger Capitals or Swagger Initials were designed by Carl S. Junge for BB&S in 1925. They are virtually monotone, with an elongated flourish on each of the letters, most of which are cursive in character. There are only twenty-four letters, without X or Z. The foundry promoted them as being usable as initials with various typefaces.

    • Many ornaments were collected and digitized by Nick Curtis in Junge Holiday Cuts NF (2004).
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Carol Twombly

    Born in 1959 in Concord, Carol Twombly studied at the Rhode Island School of Design and under Charles Bigelow at Stanford, and joined the Bigelow&Holmes studio for four years. In 1988, she joined Adobe and started designing typefaces. She was featured in 5 American Type Designers by Spurius Press. In 1994, she won the Prix Charles Peignot. In 1999, she retired from type design.

    Linotype link. FontShop link. Klingspor Museum PDF. Typophile link.

    Her typefaces:

    View the typefaces made by Carol Twombly. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Caslon 540

    The staff of ATF created Caslon 540 at ATF in 1902. This design can be traced back to William Caslon I in 1725.

    Digital versions of Caslon 540 exist at Bitstream, Linotype, Paratype, Adobe (both as Caslon 540 and Caslon Three), Elsner & Flake, and Letraset (Caslon 540 Italic with Swashes, by Freeda Sack). See also OPTI Caslon Five (Castcraft), Caslon Elegant (Softmaker), Dutch 771 (Bitstream).

    For the Cyrillic extension, highly recommended, see Caslon 540 (2002) by I.M. Slutsker and M. Shmavonyan at Paratype.

    View and compare some digital versions of Caslon 540. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Caslon Antique

    An essay on Caslon Antique, the font used to typeset both The Declaration of Independence and The Constitution of the United States of America. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Caslon: Choice

    Various implementations and/or variations of Caslon in metal, photo or digital formats include [according to the Wikipedia]:

    • Ludlow Typograph Company, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Ludlow had a wide variety of Caslon-types. The type-number is added between brackets behind the name. Ludlow True-Cut Caslon (1-TC) 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72 punt, Ludlow True-Cut Caslon Italic (1-TCI) 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72 punt, Ludlow Caslon-Light (1-L) 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72 punt, Ludlow Caslon-Light Italic (1-) 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72 punt, Ludlow Calson Bold (1-B) 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72 punt, Ludlow Caslon Bold Italic (1-BI) 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72 punt, 6, 8 en 10 punt op matrijzen voor romein Ludlow Caslon Bold Condensed (1-BC) 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72 punt, Ludlow Caslon Bold Extra Condensed (1-BEC) 12, 14, 18, 22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72 punt, Ludlow Caslon Old Face Heavy (1-OFH) 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72 punt, Ludlow Caslon Heavy Italic (1-HE) 14, 18, 22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72 punt.
    • The Monotype Corporation Limited at Salfords, UK. Monotype produced three Caslon revivals: 1903, Series 20 Old Face (special) after 1967 out of production; 1906, Series 45 Old Face Standard, after 1967 out of production; 1915, Series 128&209, Caslon&Caslon Titling.
    • Adobe Caslon (1990). Adobe Caslon is a variant designed by Carol Twombly and based on the Caslon's own specimen pages printed between 1734 and 1770. Small caps, old style figures, swash letters, ligatures, alternate letters, fractions, subscripts and superscripts, and ornaments were included with the Adobe Caslon Expert family. Adobe Caslon Pro incorporates the previous expert letters, adds ordinals, arbitrary fractions, and extends the language coverage to include central European languages. Adobe Caslon is the typeface used for body text in The New Yorker. Poster by Rachel McKay.
    • Caslon Old Face. Caslon Old Face nowadays is a generic term used to describe a typeface that appears to be true to those designed by William Caslon himself. Originally it referred to the Caslon matrices and type which were property of the H.W. Caslon&Sons foundry. In 1937 the H.W. Caslon&Sons foundry was acquired by Stephenson Blake&Co who thereafter added 'the Caslon Letter Foundry' to their name. George Ostrochulski adapted the designs from Stephenson Blake&Co for photocomposition at Mergenthaler Linotype with skill and understanding during the 1950s. A variety of typefaces called Caslon Old Face are available commercially. Visual differences exist between typefaces from different companies and the authenticity of some of these typefaces is debatable.
    • Caslon 471. Caslon 471 was designed by the staff of American Type Founders as their first revival of Caslon. It is based on the Old Style No. 1 typeface used in an 1865 specimen book from the L.J. Johnson foundry in Philadelphia.
    • Caslon 540. Caslon 540 was designed by the staff of American Type Founders and released in 1902. The typeface was originally intended for use in advertising and is based on Caslon 471 with shortened descenders. It does not include a bold weight.
    • Caslon 3. A slighter bolder version of Caslon 540, released by American Type Founders in 1905. Bitstream sells Caslon 3 under the name of Caslon Bold.
    • Caslon 641. A heavy version of Caslon 540, released by American Type Founders in 1966.
    • Caslon 224. Caslon 224 was designed by Ed Benguiat of ITC, and released in 1983. The result of his efforts is a highly-readable typeface, featuring a large x-height, smooth weight transitions, and careful structuring of hairline strokes, offered in four weights (book, medium, bold, and black) each with a matching italic. In lectures, Benguiat has frequently said he chose the number 224 because it was the address of the building where he did most of his work.
    • Big Caslon. Big Caslon is a revival based on the three largest sizes of type from the H.W. Caslon&Sons foundry by Matthew Carter of Carter&Cone in 1994. The typeface is intended for use at eighteen point and above. It is bundled with Apple's OS X operating system.
    • Caslon Openface. A decorative openface serif typeface with very high ascenders, designed by Barnhart Brothers and Spindler in 1915, that is only loosely based on the typefaces designed by William Caslon himself.
    • ITC Founder's Caslon (1998). ITC Founder's Caslon was digitized by Justin Howes. He used the resources of the St. Bride Printing Library in London to thoroughly research William Caslon and his types. Unlike previous digital revivals, this family closely follows the tradition of building separate typefaces intended for different sizes, despite the use of scalable typefaces in the digital counterpart. This family was released by ITC in December 1998. It includes separate fonts for 12 point, 30 point, 42 point, and Poster sizes, and a typeface for ornaments. Also following the original Caslon types, it does not include bold typefaces, but uses old style figures for all numbers. Another feature in the Windows TrueType version of the typeface is the allocation of extra ligatures and alternate forms to Basic Latin and ISO Latin-1 blocks, replacing |, <, >, =. The OpenType Std version of the typeface adds small caps to the family and updates the character set to support the Adobe Western 2 character set.
    • H. W. Caslon's version. Following the release of ITC Founder's Caslon, Justin Howes revived the H.W. Caslon&Company name, and released an expanded version of the ITC typefaces under the Founders Caslon name. Caslon Old Face is a typeface with multiple optical sizes, including 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72, 96 points. Each font has small capitals, long esses and swash characters. The 96 point font came in roman only and without small capitals. Caslon Old Face was released in July 2001. Caslon Ornaments is a typeface containing ornament glyphs. These typefaces are packaged in the following formats: Founders Caslon 1776: Caslon Old Face (14), Caslon Ornaments. Founders Caslon Text: Caslon Old Face (8, 10, 12, 14, 18), Caslon Ornaments. Founders Caslon Display: Caslon Old Face (22, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60, 72), Caslon Ornaments. However, following the death of Justin Howes, the revived H.W. Caslon&Company went out of business, and the expanded Founders Caslon is no longer offered in the retail market.
    • LTC Caslon (2005). LTC Caslon is a remastering of the Lanston Type Company's 14 point size of their revival of Lanston Monotype's Caslon 337 of 1915 (itself a revival of the original Caslon types). This family include fonts in 2 weights, complementary italics, and long descender typefaces The character sets are expanded to include fractions, ligatures, swashes (italics only), and Central European characters.
    • LTC Caslon Remix. The LTC Caslon Remix typeface is a variant of LTC Caslon Pro found in the P22 Records music CD William Caslon Experience, an album by The William Caslon Experience (Nate Butler, Mart Schaefer) remixed by Odiorne. The CD is included with the purchase of the LTC Caslon family.
    • Wyld. A modern day recreation of Caslon by David Manthey which is intended to exactly match the typeface found in The Practical Surveyor, by Samuel Wyld, published in London in 1725. The typeface contains glyphs for several ligatures commonly used in printing during the early 18th century. It does not include a bold weight.
    • Williams Caslon Text. A modern attempt to capture the spirit of Caslon by William Berkson currently used in Boston magazine. Although not aimed at being fully authentic in every respect, the typeface closely follows Caslon's original specimen sheet in many respects, including varied slopes for the italic letters. The weight is heavier, to compensate for changes in printing processes.
    • Franklin Caslon. This 2006 creation by P22 is based on the pages produced by Benjamin Franklin circa 1750. It has a distressed appearance.
    • Caslon Antique. This decorative serif typeface was originally called Fifteenth Century, but later renamed Caslon Antique. It is not generally considered to be a member of the Caslon family of typefaces, because its design appears unrelated, and the Caslon name was only applied retroactively.
    • Caslon Roman. Caslon Roman is a Unicode-based typeface for computer display, developed by George Williams from 1992 until 2001.
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Caslon: Mac McGrew's take

    Mac McGrew describes the situation of Caslon in the era of metal type. All text below is quoted. Caslon is "the oldest living typeface," having survived in almost exactly its original form since every character was hand-cut by William Caslon more than 250 years ago. Virtually the same design is still available, along with a myriad of imitations, derivatives, and attempts at improvement. Altogether. they form a number of families, for there is little or no compatibility between many typefaces which now bear the name Caslon. In fact, Caslon is perhaps the hardest set of types to group into reasonable categories; therefore some of the following classifications are arbitrary.

    • The original Caslon. Prior to 1722 English typefounding was at a low ebb. and most printers in that country used Dutch types. But in that year William Caslon completed the first sizes of his new style, which quickly gained dominance over the Dutch types. This new English style was also extensively exported to other countries, including the American Colonies, where it was popular before the Revolution. In fact, the Declaration of Independence of the new United States was first printed in Caslon's types. Benjamin Franklin met Caslon in London, admired and recommended his types, and used them extensively in his printshop. Caslon's types have gone through several periods of decline and revival. In America they died out by about 1800, and had little or no further use for nearly sixty years. In 1858, Laurence Johnson, a prominent Philadelphia typefounder, visited London and arranged with the successors to William Caslon to duplicate the Caslon types. There are several accounts of how this was done; some say Johnson had fonts specially cast, from which he made electrotype matrices. Another account says he had strikes--unfinished matrices--made from the original punches, while a third account says he obtained the original matrices. The latter account is most unlikely, but the other two possibilities are interestingly credible. Many of the mats still available at ATF, successors to Johnson, are electrotypes-but then, mats wear out anyway, and are commonly replaced by electrotyping existing virgin cast type when patterns or punches are not available. If strikes were finished in this country-the usual process of accurately fitting them for width and position on the type body--this would allow for the fact that some sizes, especially in the 14- to 24-point range, are more loosely fitted here than in England. Otherwise there is virtually no difference between the American and English versions, except for later additions such as dollar mark and various swash letters--the latter are discussed later. Johnson simply called the typeface Old Style, as family names were a later development. When Johnson's foundry merged with MacKellar Smiths&Jordan foundry, the typeface was designated Original Old Style, to distinguish it from other typefaces in the same category. MS&J was part of the great merger that formed ATF in 1892, and the typeface became Old Style No. 71. When ATF's first specimen book was being prepared in 1897, the advertising manager. Henry Lewis Bullen, renamed the series Caslon Old Style. Later "No. 471" was added, the "4" designating typefaces obtained from MS&J. Meanwhile, a prominent New York printer, Walter Gilliss, had promoted the adoption of Caslon for setting Vogue magazine, a fashion and art journal which was started in 1892, and the typeface quickly returned to popularity. A. D. Farmer&Son copied the typeface under the name Knickerbocker Old Style. But this was the time when standard alignment was being heavily pro- moted, necessitating the shortening of descenders. Inland Type Foundry, St. Louis, advertised its own version of Caslon Old Style in 1901, with the claim. "We have obtained the sole right from the originating house to manufacture this series in the United States. Inland is the only type foundry which casts this typeface on standard line. ..." This meant that they had considerably shortened the descending letters; they had also redesigned the italic extensively. ATF countered with CaslonNo. 540, with similarly shortened descenders but essentially the original roman and italic designs otherwise. Several other foundries, including BB&S, Hansen, and Keystone, produced similar Caslons. One of the most noticeable features of Caslon is its lack of uniformity from one size to another. This is due to the fact that all the original characters were cut by hand, before the invention of precise mechanical systems for enlarging and reducing drawings. In Caslon 540, each size is the equivalent of the next larger size of 471, including some obsolete odd sizes. Thus 14-point 540 is equivalent to 18-point 471,18 to 22, 20 to 24, etc. The difference is primarily in the descenders, very unattractively shortened in some sizes of 540; lining figures replace the hanging style, and a few other slight changes have been made. The additional large sizes are an attractive generalized design. To overcome objections to the wide fitting of some sizes of Caslon Oldstyle No. 471, ATF brought out Caslon Oldstyle No. 472 in 1932; the design is identical but it is fitted more closely. It is made only in 18-, 22- and 24-point sizes. In the specimens shown here, notice the small caps shown with Caslon OldstyleNo. 471, for which they are made up to 36-point-one of the very few typefaces to include such letters above 14- or 18-point. Most of these appear to be cut separately, rather than being regular caps of a smaller size. Long-s characters and combinations have also been made for Caslon Oldstyle roman and italic by ATF and Monotype, and for Caslon No. 540 roman by ATF; they are called Quaint Characters.
    • Swash versions of the Caslon Oldstyle Italic capitals J, Q, T, and Y, also lowercase h with the final stroke turned inward, were the only forms shown in Caslon's original specimen sheet, although other similar swash letters were made for Dutch types at least a century earlier. Later, plain versions of these letters were added, and both forms are included in some fonts. About 1920, Thomas M. Cleland designed a dozen swash letters to be used with Caslon Oldstyle Italic No. 471, and a dozen more were designed in 1923 for Curtis Publishing Company, perhaps by another designer. These were cast in regular molds, with some letters having long, delicate kerns. By 1927 most of these letters, plus a few others, were being made for Caslon Italic No. 540. These were cast with mortises where necessary, greatly reducing the problem of breakage. Thereafter the larger sizes of Caslon No. 471 Italic were also adapted to mortise molds. Lowercase swash letters e, k, v, w, andz are part of the swash font for both 471 and 540 italics. Vowels are also cast on smaller bodies to fit within the mortises. Compare Scotch Open Shaded Italic. About 1927 an ATF specimen said, "The five largest sizes of CaslonItalic No. 540 are the equivalent of 60-, 72-, 84-, 96-, and 120-point Caslon Oldstyle Italic No. 471. Some of the Swash Capitals are cast on these bodies and long descenders cast on these larger bodies will be ready shortly, which will give the full effect of the popular No.4 71 Italic." No evidence has been found that this was ever completed. In the specimen of Caslon Oldstyle Italic No. 471 Swash shown here, these characters are shown on the first line; these are made in all sizes of the face. Caslon Italic No. 540 includes-only in sizes from 36-point up-many of these letters plus the I and U shown separately; fullface letters in this series are cast on the next larger body and thus are identical to 471. Incidentally. the swash J in these fonts is identical when inverted to the pound sterling mark furnished with English fonts. Ludlow True-Cut Caslon Italic also includes many of the 471 swash letters. Monotype Caslon Old Style Italic No. 3371 includes some of the same, plus the W shown separately. Monotype Caslon Old Style Italic No. 4371, which was copied from Stephenson Blake's Caslon Old Face in the 42- to 72-point sizes, has a different set of swash letters as shown on the latter part of the second line. Linotype Caslon Old Face Italic has a similar set of swash letters, only some of which are shown in the specimen. Linotype Caslon Italic (not Old Face) has no swash letters but the otherwise identical Intertype typeface does, as shown, including the peculiarly reversed T, which was later corrected. Also note the swash letters shown with some following Caslon italics. Caslon Italic Specials are swash letters of a completely different sort, designed by Carl S. Junge in 1924 for BB&S, for use with that foundry's Caslon Italic and various similar typefaces.
    • Monotype produced an adaptation of Caslon to its mechanical restrictions as early as 1903, when Sol Hess drew English Caslon Old Style No. 37 at the request of the Gilliss Press in Boston. (Two years later Monotype adopted a new set of matrix and other mechanical improvements which required redesigning nearly all its typefaces.) Display sizes of this typeface were also drawn by Hess, presumably adapted from the original English face, as the italic has several swash letters similar to the English version. Otherwise display sizes of this roman and italic are very similar to Inland Type Foundry's short-descender adaptation of the original Caslon. On Linotype and Intertype. Caslon No.4 is essentially the same. Monotype also has Inland Caslon Old Style No. 137, presumably adapted from the Inland typeface mentioned above, but the italic seems identical to that of No. 37. Linotype has a copy of Caslon No. 137 under that name. About 1915 Monotype cut yet another version of Caslon Old Style-No. 337, designated "MacKellar Caslon" in some early literature because it is closer to the original typeface associated with that foundry. Display sizes are virtually an exact copy of No. 471. Composition sizes are well adapted, though necessarily modified to fit the standard arrangement; they are made with short descenders on standard alignment, but were the first Monotype typeface with alternate long descenders. Oddly, all three Monotype Caslons---37, 137, and 337---are the same set width---letter for letter---in all keyboard sizes made, which means that any given character is precisely the same width from one typeface to another in any composition size. In addition, 12-point No. 337, which with long descenders must be cast on 13- or 14-point body, is essentiallythe same size and width as 14-point of the same face. Sizes of this typeface above 36-point were later copied from Stephenson Blake's Caslon Old Face and called Caslon Old Style No. 437, as previously noted. Linotype and Intertype have Caslon and Italic, similar to Caslon No. 540 and cut about 1903; long descenders are available in place of the regular short descenders, making a fair approximation of Caslon Oldstyle No. 471; this Caslon Italic in 18- to 30-point sizes is more regularized as shown, similar to Caslon Light Italic. Linotype also has Caslon No.2, a copy of Monotype Caslon No. 37, also with alternate long descenders; and the previously mentioned Caslon No. 137, cut in 1936. For greatest authenticity, Linotype went back to the English original in 1923 for its Caslon Old Face; the roman is almost indistinguishable, but the italic is necessarily modified considerably. Most smaller sizes have both long and short alternate descenders avail- able. Intertype offers the same face, roman only, in 18- to 30-point. Ludlow's True-Cut Caslon and Italic, cut in 1922 and 1928 respectively, are close copies of Caslon Oldstyle No. 471 and Italic.
    • Several attempts have been made to regularize Caslon and improve its so-called faults, but these have generally lost much of the character of the face. and have seldom achieved widespread use. They include
      • Recut Caslon (Inland 1907).
      • Caslon Lightface (Keystone 1910-12).
      • Clearface Caslon (Robert Wiebking for Western 1913), etc., all with italics and some with condensed versions; Caslon Lightface Italic is non-kerning.
      • New Caslon, introduced in 1905 by Inland, was the most successful of these attempts. In addition to eliminating irregularities, the aim of this typeface was to strengthen the design so that under modern printing conditions it would more closely resemble the effect of the original Caslon when printed heavily on dampened rough paper, as was commonly done in the eighteenth century. The italic followed in 1906. In 1919 ATF (successor to Inland) reversed the descender-shortening trend with the design by Morris Benton of long descenders, oldstyle figures, and italic swash characters as American Caslon; otherwise this typeface and New Caslon are identical. New Caslon was adapted to Linotype and Intertype as Caslon No.3, which some users call Caslon Bold, although it was not intended to be a bold face. However, in 18-point and larger, Caslon No.3 and Italic are copies of Caslon Bold rather than New Caslon.
      • Condensed Caslon is a modification of New Caslon, by Inland in 1907; it was inherited by ATF and copied by Monotype, both of which gave it the same series number (the only such incidence); printers often but incorrectly call it Caslon Bold Condensed.
      • Caslon Extra Condensed is also derived from New Caslon, sometime between 1912 and 1917.
      • Caslon Catalog, with heavied hairlines, was designed by Robert Wiebking for his Advance Type Foundry in 1913 under the name of Caslon Antique (not to be confused with a later use of this name); it was also shown by Laclede, and was renamed when BB&S acquired it.
      • Caslon Medium and Italic, as the name implies, are somewhat heavier versions, offered by BB&S as Modern Caslon and Italic about 1924---the roman at least was shown by Western Type Foundry in the mid-teens. However, the italic appears to be identical to Ludlow's Caslon Light Italic, also credited to Wiebking but advertised as early as 1922; it was the first typeface cut for Ludlow's development of italic matrices which permitted kerning designs without the fragility of the kerns on single types. Strangely, though, Ludlow Caslon Light (roman) matches Caslon Clearface.
      • The newest Caslon was designed in 1965, when ATF commissioned a "beefed up" version of Caslon No. 540, by Frank Bartuska. The result was Caslon No. 641, an arbitrary number. It is a handsome face, reflecting the best of 540, but without the latter's variations from one size to another. It also includes all the ancillary characters of ATF's later creations as shown, including percent and pound marks, a variety of quotation marks, and center dot, hyphen, and dash in two positions to center on caps or lowercase. An italic was started but never completed. This typeface has considerable similarity to Caslon Medium, for which ATF still had mats when the new typeface was commissioned.
    • Boldface Caslons have been made by several sources.
      • The most popular Caslon Bold was introduced by Keystone Type Foundry in 1905, followed by Italic in 1906 and Condensed and Extended versions about 1911; this is the version made by ATF and in regular widths by Monotype. Monotype keyboard sizes (including large composition to 18-point) are modified considerably to fit standard arrangements, but the only apparent difference in display sizes is the redrawn T and g shown separately in the specimen alphabet and the addition of ligatures and diphthongs on Linotype and Intertype.
      • Caslon No.3 matches ATF Caslon Bold from 18-point up, although smaller sizes match New Caslon.
      • Hansen's Caslon Fullface and Caslon Fullface Condensed were close copies of Caslon Bold and Caslon Bold Condensed, differing most apparently in the characters shown (A Gas, condensed AG), but Hansen's Caslon Fullface Italic matches New Caslon Italic.
      • A somewhat different Caslon Bold series is made by Ludlow.
      • A Caslon Black series by BB&S, from Western Type Foundry in the mid-teens.
      • Caslon Adbold, originating with Keystone in 1913, is characterized by heavier strokes throughout; Extended and Extra Condensed versions followed in 1915 to 1917; all were patented and presumably designed by R. F. Burfeind.
      • Heavy Caslon was issued by Inland in 1906 or earlier; Ludlow copied it as Caslon Old Face Heavy in 1925 and Intertype in 1937. Ludlow has a companion italic, while Intertype's italic is a sloped roman design. See Caslon Shaded.
    • Caslon Openface was originated by BB&S in 1915, where it was first called College Oldstyle. It started out as a reproduction of a delicate 18th-century French typeface known as Le Moreau le Jeune, by the foundry of G. Peignot&Son, but in the American version some strokes are heavier. In a later ad, BB&S said, "Placing it in the Caslon group of types is taking a liberty, but it assuredly 'belongs.' " Actually it has somewhat more affinity for the Cochin types.
    • Caslon Shaded was adapted by ATF from Heavy Caslon in 1917, by W. F. Capitaine. Caslon Shadow Title was adapted from Caslon Bold by Monotype about 1928. Compare Cameo, Cochin Open, Gravure, Narciss.
    • Caslons in name only.
      • Caslon Antique and Italic were designed by Berne Nadall and brought out by BB&S in 1896-98 as Fifteenth Century (XV Century in one early announcement) and Italic. Although they aren't really representative of types of that time, being a poor copy of a crude early typeface cut about 1475 in Venice, they have become popular for the simulation of supposedly quaint American types of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Disregarding the usual practice of increasing the proportionate width of a typeface as the size decreases, Caslon Antique maintains uniform proportions in all sizes, and thus appears narrow and cramped in small sizes. Caslon Antique is also the original (1913) name of Advance Type Foundry's Caslon Catalog, mentioned earlier, while in the early 1920s Laclede Type Foundry applied that name to "a brand-new, entirely machine-cut typeface of Old Style Antique," a duplicate of the Advance face.
      • Caslon Old Roman is discussed later under its original name, Old Roman.
      • Caslon Text originated with William Caslon in 1734. Inland Type brought out a reproduction of it in 1899 as part of their agreement with the Caslon Type Foundry in England. It later became the property of ATF, and was copied by Linotype. Being handcut originally, it shows the expected varia- tions from one size to another, but some characters show decidedly different forms in some sizes. See Cloister Black and Engravers Old English, which are derived from this face.
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    Caslon wiki

    The Caslon wiki states: William Caslon's types of the early eighteenth-century were extremely popular then, and strongly revived in the late nineteenth century, producing many versions. Since the Caslon Foundry was in business for a long time, there are many Caslon typefaces. Caslon's designs were markedly different at different sizes (for instance, some of his uppercase Cs had serifs at top and bottom, some only at the top); variation in design is not therefore necessarily a sign of "inauthenticity". Caslon's type was popular in every sense. It was popular in the eighteenth century (until it was eased out by modern typefaces in the early 19th). When the fashion of "old face" revived in the 19th, many in England and America looked to Caslon's type as the model. And, at a time when lay people probably knew less about font-names than they do now, "Caslon" was a name quite a few people did know. George Bernard Shaw, for example, absolutely insisted that his work be set in Caslon. This vast popularity of Caslon's types led to a practically endless range of copies, among them Caslon 540 from American Type Founders in 1902, and Caslon 3, a slightly bolder typeface also from ATF in 1905, which was later modified for use on Intertype and Linotype technologies. Both designs have the warm, solid, straightforward style that has made Caslon popular for over 200 years; these Caslons, however, have shorter descenders, and higher contrast, features that enable them to hold up better with the faster presses and the new varieties of paper introduced at the turn-of-the-century. As with Garamond, there are not only typefaces which use the Caslon name, but typefaces which are Caslon-inspired. Of some importance historically is Imprint, which was designed by (English) Monotype in 1913 for use in the (short-lived) Imprint journal. Because the journal was interested in the "improvement" of typography, it chose to release its typeface for general use. It took the "cleaning up" of Caslon's type for modern use a stage further, deliberately increasing x-height, reducing the notoriously loose fit of some of Caslon's type, and removing some of its archaic character. Wikipedia. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Caslon: Wikipedia

    Excerpts from the wiki page on Caslon: Caslon refers to a number of serif typefaces designed by William Caslon I (1692-1766), and various revivals thereof. Caslon shares the irregularity characteristic of Dutch Baroque types. It is characterized by short ascenders and descenders, bracketed serifs, moderately-high contrast, robust texture, and moderate modulation of stroke. The A has a concave hollow at the apex, the G is without a spur. Caslon's italics have a rhythmic calligraphic stoke. Characters A, V, and W have an acute slant. The lowercase italic p, q, v, w, and z all have a suggestion of a swash. [...] Caslon's earliest design dates to 1722. Caslon is cited as the first original typeface of English origin, but type historians like Stanley Morison and Alfred F. Johnson, a scientist who worked at the British Museum, did point out the close similarity of Caslon's design to the Dutch Fell types cut by Voskens and other type cut by the Dutchman Van Dyck. [...] Nicols writes: "he (Caslon) cut the beautiful fount of English which is used in printing Selden's Works 1726. Nicols describes this character as far superior over comtemporary Dutch founts used in English books at this period. Rowe More does not give any comment on this. Dutch founts were in use by several printers in England at that time. The Oxford University Press used the "Fell-types", character cut by the Dutch typefounder Voskens. The Cambridge University Press had received in January 1698 some 52 series of alphabets from Holland, all cut by Van Dyck. But even before that in 1697 thay used the Text-sized roman and italic of Van Dyck in an edition of Gratulatio Cantabrigiences. Character of Van Dyck and Voskens is found also in: William Harison, Woodstock Park, Tonson, 1706. Although Nicols attributes this character to Caslon, the fount used in Seldens Works is actually cut by Van Dyck. The italic is identical to the Van Dycks Augustijn Cursijf fount in specimen sheets issued in 1681 by the widow Daniel Elzevir. This woman had bought the typefoundry of Van Dyck after Van Dyck died. The roman in this book, is a Garamond. This fount is used in the first volume and in the greater part of the second volume, It is found in a specimen sheet of the Amsterdam printer Johannes Kannewet, in accompagny with Van Dyck's Augustijn Cursijf. The only thing known about this Kannewet is that he was a printer, not a typefounder. This specimen-sheet is preserved in the Bagford-collection in the British Museum, and can be dated 1715 or earlier because Bagford died in 1716. There is no reason to suppose anything is added on a later date to this collection. The roman is named: Groote Mediaan Romyn. This fount is also found on a specimen sheet of the widow of Voskens. Therefore it can be assumed to be the work of Voskens. The earliest use of it at Amsterdam is 1684. The earliest use of a roman and italic cut by Caslon can be identified in books printed William Bowyer in 1725, 1726 and 1730. The founts cut by Caslon and his son, were close copies of the Dutch Old typeface cut by Van Dyck. These founts were rather fasionable at that time. The alternative founts they cut for text were a smaller, rather than a condensed letter. The Caslon types were distributed throughout the British Empire, including British North America. Much of the decayed appearance of early American printing is thought to be due to oxidation caused by long exposure to seawater during transport from England to the Americas. Caslon's types were immediately successful and used in many historic documents, including the U.S. Declaration of Independence. After William Caslon I's death, the use of his types diminished, but saw a revival between 1840-1880 as a part of the British Arts and Crafts movement. The Caslon design is still widely used today. For many years a common rule of thumb of printers and typesetters was When in doubt, use Caslon. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Castle Type
    [Jason Castle]

    Designs by Jason Castle from San Rafael, CA, who studied psychology at Dominican University of California. He does custom font design and sells commercial typefaces through MyFonts and FontShop. Blog. These include:

    • A: AfrikaBorders, Afrika Motifs, Agency Open (M. F. Benton, 1934, revival Jason Castle), Agency Gothic Inline, Ampersands, Azbuka (2005, a heavy slab serif).
    • B: Brasileiro (2007, an art deco face).
    • Carisma (2007, a clean geometric sans), Carlos (art deco inspired by Elektra), Castle Fleurons, Chinoise (2008, based on hand lettering that is reminiscent of a style of ancient Chinese square-cut ideograms), Cloister Black, Copperplate Script, Cradley (2015, a Caslon titling family with Greek and Cyrillic, named after the birthplace of William Caslon).
    • D: Deko Initials (1993, discontinued in 2007; based on NADA0 drawn in 1972 by Marcia Loeb), Dionisio (2008, didone).
    • E: Eden (Bold, Light; originally designed by Robert H. Middleton in 1934).
    • F: Fat Freddie, Futura CT and Futura CT Inline (2007, based on Futura ND, but discontinued after only a few weeks).
    • G: Goudy Lombardy (Lombardic), GoudyStout, Goudy Text, Goudy Trajan (1994-2010, free; +alternates).
    • H: Handsome (2002, nice finger dingbats, aka fists).
    • J: Jensen Arabique (left field art deco, based on work of Gustav Jensen, 1933).
    • K: Koloss (art deco).
    • L: Latin CT (2008,, 6 styles), Latin Wide, Laureat, Lise Informal (2008, hand-printed), Lombardy.
    • M: Maximilian CS (Rudolf Koch, 1917), Metropolis Bold and Shaded (based on the 1932 Stempel cut as designed by W. Schwerdtner), Minotaur (2008, an original monoline design based on an Oscan votive inscription from the second century BC; looks like simulated Greek).
    • N: Norberto (2009, an all-caps Bodoni; +Stencil).
    • O: Ogun (2008, inspired by an Egyptian-style Russian block alphabet and useful for athletic lettering; formerly named Azbuka).
    • P: Plantain (2002, a digital version of Plantin Adweight, a 1913 typeface by F. H. Pierpont), Plantain Stencil (2009), Progreso (2010, a condensed, unicase, serif gothic type design inspired by the hand-lettering on Russian posters from the 1920s).
    • R: Radiant, Radiant Extra Condensed CT (both Radiants are revivals of Roger Middleton's typeface by that name, 1940), Ransahoff (2002, ultra condensed didone), Rudolf (1992, based on Rudolf Koch's German expressionist work such as Neuland).
    • S: Samira (2008, art nouveau style), Shango (1993, based on Schneidler Initials by F.H.E. Schneidler (1936), and including a digital version of Schneidler Cyrillic (1992); extended in 2007 to Shango Gothic and in 2008 to a 3-d shadow version, Shango Chiseled, and in 2009 to Shango Sans), Sculptura (2005, an all caps typeface based on Diethelm's Sculptura from 1957), Sencia (2008, based on Spanish art deco stock certificate lettering from 1941), Sonrisa (2009, art deco family---Sonrisa Thin is free), Standard CT (a neo-grotesque family).
    • Tambor (Light, Black, Inline, Adornado) (1992) (note: Jason claims that it was remotely based on Rudolf, which in turn was based on calligraphy of Rudolf Koch), Trio (an art deco sansserif), Trooper Roman (discontinued).
    • V: Vincenzo (2008, a slabby didone), Warrior (2009, a 3d font based on Ogun; +Shaded).
    • X: Xavier (art deco family based on Ashley Crawford by Ashley Havinden, 1930, revival by Jason Castle in 1992).
    • Z: Zagora, Zamenhof (2011: an all caps poster face with constructivist ancestry, named after the inventor of Esperanto), Zuboni Stencil (2009, Latin and Cyrillic, constructivist).

    Klingspor link. Behance link.

    View Jason Castle's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    CAT Design Wolgast
    [Peter Wiegel]

    Wolgast-based type designer Peter Wiegel (b. 1955) runs CAT Design Wolgast. Designer of these free fonts:

    • In 2016: 5by7 (LED pixel font), u DIN 1451 Mittelschrift.
    • In 2015: Autobahn (blackletter), DIN Schblonierschrift (DIN-based stencil), CAT North Licht, Feronia, CAT Childs (fifties style cursive typeface), Wattauchimma (heavy hipster sans), Friedolin (blackletter), Lorem Ipsum, Symphonie (a calligraphic script, reviving Imre Reiner's Symphonie (1938), also called Stradivarius (1945)), Krugmann Brush, Omega.
    • In 2014: BernerBasisschrift1, BernerBasisschrift2 (school script), Berolina, Fette Mikado (psychedelic style oriental look), Germanica, Gloria, HentimpsCirclet (blackletter), Hofstaetten (blackletter), Kleinsemmering, KuenstlerGotisch (blackletter), LacledeCAT (psychedelic), NeptunCAT, Neue Zier Schrift (a mischievous curly script), Reclame, Rueck-Italic, Rueck, RueckLeft, RueckLicht, RundschriftCAT (hairline ronde), Standard Graf (German expressionist), Teutonic, VerzierteFavorite, VictoriaCAT, AdmiralCAT (a retro script), Dynamo (poster font), Des Malers Fraktur, Kanzleyrath (blackletter), Ober-Tuerkheim (art nouveau), PopplFrakturCAT (blackletter), Rundkursiv, Modeschrift (fifties script), Biedermeier Kursiv, Ehmcke Federfraktur (after a 1935 font by F.H. Ehmcke), Wernicke Schwabacher (after an original by Emmi Wernicke), Gotische Missalschrift, Hand Textur (after a 1935 font by F.H. Ehmcke), Renata (after a 1914 bastarda by Bauersche Giesserei), Rundgotisch Rauh (possibly after a Schelter & Giesecke design from 1903), Offenbacher Schwabacher (after Kurt Wanschura's bastarda from 1900), Incopins Clusters (multilined typeface), BadGong, Bernardo Moda (Bold, Semibold: modeled after Lucian Bernhard's Bernhard fashion), CAT-Hohenzollern (after a 1902 art nouveau font by Bauersche), CATNorth, CATNorthLicht, CATNorthShadow, CAT Zentenaer Fraktur UNZ1 (a blackletter after a 1937 original by F.H.E. Schneidler), Coggers-Tariqa, EirikRaude, Fabrik (a geometric sans), Grobe Deutschmeister (German expressionist face), Harry Piel (or Piehl--a tattoo font), Kanalisirung, Klaber-Fraktur, Peter Obscure, Rumburak (a fat retro script), Flottflott (retro script), Indira K, Regent UNZ (a Schwabacher), Postamt, TGL 0-1451 Engschrift (a DIN-like font).
    • In 2013: Spartakus (+Round), Cut Me Out (white on black sans), 5by9 (dot matrix face), Tartlers End (high-contrast ball terminal face), Alpha 54 (rounded flared script face), Chunk Five Ex (slab serif; he writes: With permission of Meredith Mandel, the original author of the ASCII-Font Chunk Five, I have extended Chunk Five Ex to a full featured unicode font with all figures used in Latin and Cyrillic writing), Simple Print (simple sans), Fette Bauersche Antiqua (a didone fat face), Manuskript Gothisch (after Manuskript Gotisch (1899, Bauersche), which was modeled after Wolfgang Hopyl's 1514 Textura), Quast (hairy font).
    • Still in 2013, he published a number of school scripts, including Neue Rudelskopf, Deutsche Normalschrift, Imrans School, Rastenburg (German school font), and Bienchen.
    • In 2012: Hardman (connected fifties script), Immermann (a quaint slab serif), Quast (grunge), Fundamental Brigade (sans family), DiffiKult (a bilined face), Men Nefer (a Memphis lookalike), Fette Unz Fraktur (like Fette Fraktur), Mutter Krause (for the reconstruction of the 1929 silent movie "Mutter Krausens Fahrt ins Glück", where it is used for intertitles, that where missing. The font is redrawn from the original intertitles), Youbilee (a font with laurels).
    • In 2010: Alfabilder (dingbats), Gondrin (athletic lettering with a 3d effect), Helvetia Verbundene (making Helvetica into a school script? The original typeface was by Carl Albert Fahrenwaldt 1901), Proletarsk (a grotesk face), Vis-à-vis (great idea--a double-storied serif face), ApolloASM (Victorian), BertholdrMainzerFraktur, Doergon-Regular (license plate font), DoergonBackshift, DoergonShift, Eureka (Victorian, ornamental face), GoeschenFraktur (1880-style Fraktur used in Sammlung Göschen books), Makushka, MakushkaKontura, MakushkaQuadriga, MakushkaSecunda, Moderne3DSchwabacher, ModerneGekippteSchwabacher, StrassburgFraktur, TGL0-16 (same as DIN 16), TGL0-17 (same as DIN 17), TGL0-17Alt, Tank (emblems of gas companies), EricaType-Bold, EricaType-BoldItalic, EricaType-Italic, EricaType-Regular (typewriter), ErikaOrmig, Fibel Vienna (2012, a high-legged sans), GreifswalderTengwar-Regular, GreifswalerDeutscheSchrift (German Schreibschrift), Midroba-Regular (a strong mechanical octagonal face), MidrobaSchatten, MMX2010 (futuristic), Präsent60, Rotunda Pommerania (blackletter), TengwarOptime, TengwarOptimeDiagon, cbe-Bold, cbe-BoldItalic, cbe-Italic, cbe.
    • In 2009: 18thCenturyInitials, 18thCenturyKurrent-Regular, 18thCenturyKurrentAlternates, German writing from the 18th century), CentreClaws, CentreClawsBeam1, CentreClawsSlant, Cöntgen Kanzley Regular (blackletter), Cöntgen Kanzley Aufrecht (2009), ElficCaslin, H1N1, Loxembourg1910Shadow (an art nouveau-influenced stencil face), Luxembourg1910, VarietScala (an art deco sans family), Varietee, VarieteeArtist, VarieteeCabaret, VarieteeCascadeur, VarieteeCasino, VarieteeCirque, VarieteeColege, VarieteeConferencier, VarieteeFolies, VarieteeIkarier, VarieteeJongleur, VarieteeMirage, VarieteeRevue, VarieteeTheatre, KochFetteDeutscheSchrift (blackletter), MoradoFelt-Regular (upright connected script), MoradoMarker (2009), MoradoNib, PreussischeVI9 (DIN-like family), PreussischeVI9Linie, PreussischeVI9Schatten-Linie, PreussischeVI9Schatten, SchatternvonPreussischeVI9, Stage (art deco), Ring Matrix (dot matrix), Nathan, Amptmann Script (2009, upright connected script), Cat Shop, Blankenburg (blackletter), Murrx (arched face), Schwaben Alt (1988, bastarda), Vrango, 14LED (Regular, Phattt-Heavy, Rised-Black), 24LED (+Bright, +Grid, +Modul), DIN1451fetteBreitschrift1936-Regular, FibelNord (basic sans family with an architectural twist), FibelSued (family), PaneuropaBankette, PaneuropaCrashbarrier-Black, PaneuropaFreeway, PaneuropaHighway, PaneuropaRoad, PaneuropaStreet, PaneuropaWrongWay, Quirkus (family), RingMatrix (dot matrix family), RingMatrix3D, RingMatrixTwo, DiscipuliBritannica (connected script), GruenewaldVA-Regular (connected school script), Rudelskopfdeutsch-Aufrecht, WiegelLatein (connected school script), WiegelLateinMedium (2009), Morado, Moebius Bicolor (art deco), Elbaris (sans), ElbarisOutline, Nomitais (multiline face), RostockKaligraph, Waschkueche, WaschkuecheGrob-Ultra, WiegelKurrent (traditional German school script), WiegelKurrentMedium, XAyax, XAyaxOutline (2009), Kaufhalle (squarish), Quimbie (art deco), CasaSans-Regular, Elb-Tunnel, MeyneTextur (blackletter), Yiggivoo, TGL 31034-1 (futuristic sans), Beroga (a simple organic sans).
    • Before 2009: Xayax, PreussischeIV44Ausgabe3 (2006, a severe sans), Utusi Star (1989, very condensed all-caps face), Avocado (2006, script face), CbeNormal (2006, script face), Leipzig Fraktur (+Bold) (2006), Berlin Email (2006, a condensed sans family, followed in 2009 by Berlin Email Serif), MaassslicerItalic (2006, a futuristic typeface made for Rudolf Maass + Partner GmbH), Powerweld (a gorgeous avant-garde typeface made for OPTI Pumpen und Technik GmbH), WolgastScript (2005), WolgastTwo (2006, connected script), WolgastTwoBold, ZeichenDreihundert-Regular, ZeichenHundert-Regular, ZeichenVierhundert-Regular, ZeichenZweihundert-Regular (2006, traffic dingbats), Djerba simplified (Arabic font, Computer and Technologie, Hamburg, 1995; it can be downloaded here), Titus FrakturBaltic (1998), TITUS FrakturEast Normal (1998), and TITUS FrakturWest Normal (1998) [which used to be downloadable here; these fonts were retired and the Titus name dropped; most of the glyphs made it to Schwaben Alt].

    Dafont link. One more URL. Fontspace link. Yet another URL. Font Squirrel link. Fontsy link.

    The list of his truetype and opentype typefaces as of 2011: 18thCenturyInitials, 18thCenturyKurrentStart, 18thCenturyKurrentText, Alfabilder, AlteDIN1451Mittelschrift, AlteDIN1451Mittelschriftgepraegt, AmptmannScript, ApolloASM, Avocado, Barnroof, BerlinEmail, BerlinEmail2, BerlinEmailBold, BerlinEmailBold, BerlinEmailHeavy, BerlinEmailHeavy, BerlinEmailOutline, BerlinEmailOutline, BerlinEmailSchaddow, BerlinEmailSchaddow, BerlinEmailSemibold-Bold, BerlinEmailSemibold-Bold, BerlinEmailSerif, BerlinEmailSerif, BerlinEmailSerifSemibold, BerlinEmailSerifSemibold, BerlinEmailSerifShadow, BerlinEmailWideSemibold, BerlinEmailWideSemibold, Beroga, Beroga, BerogaFettig-Bold, BerogaFettig-Bold, BertholdMainzerFrakturUNZ1A-Italic, BertholdMainzerFrakturUNZ1A, BertholdrMainzerFraktur, Blankenburg-Regular, BlankenburgUNZ1A-Italic, BlankenburgUNZ1A, CasaSans-Regular, CasaSans, CasaSansFettig-Bold, CatShop, CentreClaws, CentreClawsBeam1, CentreClawsSlant, ChunkFiveEx, CntgenKanzley-Regular, CntgenKanzleyAufrecht, DIN1451fetteBreitschrift1936-Regular, DiscipuliBritannica, DiscipuliBritannicaBold, Doergon-Regular, DoergonBackshift, DoergonShift, DoergonWave-Regular, Elb-Tunnel, Elb-TunnelSchatten, Elbaris, ElbarisOutline, ElficCaslin, EricaType-Bold, EricaType-BoldItalic, EricaType-Italic, EricaType-Regular, ErikaOrmig, Eureka, FibelNord-Bold, FibelNord-BoldItalic, FibelNord-Italic, FibelNord, FibelNordKontur, FibelSued-Bold, FibelSued-BoldItalic, FibelSued-Italic, FibelSued, FibelSuedKontur, GoeschenFraktur, GoeschenFrakturUNZ1A-Italic, GoeschenFrakturUNZ1A, Gondrin, GreifswalderTengwar-Regular, GreifswalerDeutscheSchrift, GruenewaldVA-Regular, GruenewaldVA1.Klasse, GruenewaldVA3.Klasse, H1N1, HelvetiaVerbundene, KochFetteDeutscheSchrift, KochFetteDeutscheSchriftUNZ1A-Italic, KochFetteDeutscheSchriftUNZ1A, LeipzigFrakturBold, LeipzigFrakturHeavy-ExtraBold, LeipzigFrakturLF-Bold, LeipzigFrakturLF-Normal, LeipzigFrakturNormal, LeipzigFrakturUNZ1A-Bold, LeipzigFrakturUNZ1A-BoldItalic, LeipzigFrakturUNZ1A-Italic, LeipzigFrakturUNZ1A, Luxembourg1910, Luxembourg1910Contur, Luxembourg1910Ombre, MMX2010-Regular, Maassslicer3D, Maassslicer3D, MaassslicerItalic, MaassslicerItalic, Makushka, MakushkaKontura, MakushkaQuadriga, MakushkaSecunda, MeyneTextur, MeyneTexturUNZ1A-Italic, MeyneTexturUNZ1A, Midroba-Regular, MidrobaSchatten, Moderne3DSchwabacher, ModerneFetteSchwabacher, ModerneFetteSchwabacherUNZ1A-Italic, ModerneFetteSchwabacherUNZ1A, ModerneGekippteSchwabacher, MoradoFelt-Regular, MoradoMarker, MoradoNib, MoradoSharp-Regular, Murrx, Nathan-CondensedRegular, Nathan-ExpandedRegular, Nathan-Semi-expandedRegular, Nathan, NathanAlternates-CondensedRegular, NathanAlternates-ExpandedRegular, NathanAlternates-Semi-expandedRegular, NathanAlternates, Nomitais, Nomitais, Numikki, Numukki-Italic, Numukki-Italic, Numukki, Powerweld, PreussischeIV44Ausgabe3, PreussischeIV44Ausgabe3, PreussischeVI9, PreussischeVI9Linie, PreussischeVI9Schatten-Linie, PreussischeVI9Schatten, Proletarsk, Prsent60, Quimbie, Quimbie3D, QuimbieShaddow, QuimbieUH, Quirkus-Bold, Quirkus-BoldItalic, Quirkus-Italic, Quirkus, QuirkusOut, QuirkusUpsideDown, RostockKaligraph, RotundaPommerania, RotundaPommeraniaUNZ1A-Italic, RotundaPommeraniaUNZ1A, Rudelskopfdeutsch-Aufrecht, SchatternvonPreussischeVI9, Schulfibel-Nord-Linie-2, SchwabenAlt-Bold, SchwabenAltUNZ1A-Italic, SchwabenAltUNZ1A, Stage, StrassburgFraktur-Regular, TGL0-16, TGL0-17, TGL0-17Alt, TGL31034-1, TGL31034-1, TGL31034-2, TGL31034-2, Tank, TengwarOptime, TengwarOptimeDiagon, TitilliumMaps29L-1wt, TitilliumMaps29L-400wt, TitilliumMaps29L-800wt, TitilliumMaps29L-999wt, TitilliumText22L-1wt, TitilliumText22L-250wt, TitilliumText22L-400wt, TitilliumText22L-600wt, TitilliumText22L-800wt, TitilliumText22L-999wt, TitilliumTitle20, UtusiStar-Bold, UtusiStar, VarietScala, Varietee, VarieteeArtist, VarieteeCabaret, VarieteeCascadeur, VarieteeCasino, VarieteeCirque, VarieteeColege, VarieteeConferencier, VarieteeFolies, VarieteeIkarier, VarieteeJongleur, VarieteeMirage, VarieteeRevue, VarieteeTheatre, Via-A-Vis, Vrng, Waschkueche, Waschkueche, WaschkuecheGrob-Ultra, WaschkuecheGrob-Ultra, WiegelKurrent, WiegelKurrent, WiegelKurrentMedium, WiegelKurrentMedium, WiegelLatein, WiegelLateinMedium, WolgastScript, WolgastScript, WolgastTwo, WolgastTwo, WolgastTwoBold, WolgastTwoBold, XAyax, XAyax, XAyaxOutline, XAyaxOutline, YiggivooUnicode-Italic, YiggivooUnicode-Italic, YiggivooUnicode, YiggivooUnicode, YiggivooUnicode3D-Italic, YiggivooUnicode3D-Italic, YiggivooUnicode3D, YiggivooUnicode3D, ZeichenDreihundert-Regular, ZeichenDreihundertAlt, ZeichenHundert-Regular, ZeichenHundertAlt, ZeichenVierhundert-Regular, ZeichenZweihundert-Regular, ZeichenZweihundertAlt, cbe-Bold, cbe-BoldItalic, cbe-Italic, cbe, kaufhalle, kaufhalle, kaufhalleblech, kaufhalleblech, moebius.

    His type 1 fonts as of 2011: Avocado, BerlinEmail, BerlinEmail2, BerlinEmailBold, BerlinEmailHeavy, BerlinEmailOutline, BerlinEmailSchaddow, BerlinEmailSemibold-Bold, BerlinEmailSerif, BerlinEmailSerifSemibold, BerlinEmailSerifShadow, BerlinEmailWideSemibold, Beroga, BerogaFettig-Bold, CasaSans, Elb-Tunnel, Elb-TunnelSchatten, Maassslicer3D, MaassslicerItalic, Numukki-Italic, Numukki, Powerweld, PreussischeIV44Ausgabe3, Quimbie, QuimbieUH, RostockKaligraph, TGL31034-1, TGL31034-2, UtusiStar-Bold, UtusiStar, Waschkueche, WaschkuecheGrob-Ultra, WolgastScript, WolgastTwo, WolgastTwoBold, YiggivooUnicode-Italic, YiggivooUnicode, YiggivooUnicode3D-Italic, YiggivooUnicode3D, cbe-Bold, cbe-BoldItalic, cbe-Italic, cbe, kaufhalle, kaufhalleblech.

    A list of typefaces in alphabetical order, with descriptive comments provided by Reynir Heidberg Stefansson from Iceland: 18th Century Kurrent (Kurrent-style handwriting, Wiegel-coded), Alfabilder (Alphabetic picture font for the German alphabet), Amptmann Script (Partly-connected, upright writing, used on Prussian Railways pattern drawings), ApolloASM (Jugendstil, vaguely resembling an ornate Bocklin), Avocado (Handwriting, broad-nib pen-style), Berlin Email (Narrow sans-serif, based on emailled signage; Wiegel-coded), Berlin Email Serif (Narrow serif, based on emailled signage; Wiegel-coded), Beroga (All-minuscule, rounded marker-style sans-serif with ca. 8° slope), Berthold Mainzer Fraktur (Fraktur in Wiegel (Regular only) and UNZ1(A) coding), Blankenburg (Semicondensed Tannenberg in Wiegel (Regular only) and UNZ1(A) coding), Casa Sans (Squarish, broad-nib pen-style block writing), CatShop (Serif, soft of an acid-washed didone), cbe Normal (Sans-serif, narrow, somewhat cuneiform), Centre Claws (Sans-serif, Art Deco display, a bit like Broadway), Cöntgen Kanzlei (Cöntgen Kanzley) (Fraktur-based calligraphy by Heinrich Hugo Cöntgen, Wiegel coding), DiffiKult (Sans-serif, display, no horizontal lines), DIN 1451 fette Breitschrift 1936 (The now-withdrawn Wide version of DIN 1451 traffic font), Discipuli Britannica (UK school handwriting), Doergon (Slab-serif, narrow-ish, all majuscule), Elabris (Elbaris) (Sans-serif, caps/smallcaps, shades of DIN1451 Engschrift), Elb-Tunnel (Sans-serif, based on signage in the old Elbe tunnel in Hamburg), Elbic Caslon (Elfic Caslon, Elfic Caslin) (a Caslon for the Queen Galadriel), Erika Type (Erica Type) (Slab-serif, typewriter, comes from Wiegel's old Erika typewriter), Eureka (Serif, caps/smallcaps, Art Deco/Jugendstil), Fibel Nord (2009, sans-serif, based on German school primer), Fibel Sued (2009, sans-serif, based on German school primer), Fibel Vienna (Sans-serif, based on Austrian school primer), Fundamental Brigade (Sans-serif, geometric, some UNZ1 ligatures), Göschen Fraktur (Goeschen Fraktur) (Fraktur with a biblical feel, Wiegel (Rg only) and UNZ1 coding), Gondrini (Gondrin) (Sans-serif, geometric, display, shaded outlines, cookie-cutter), Greifswalder Deutsche Schrift (Handwriting, based on Rudolf Koch's Offenbacher Kurrent, Wiegel coding), Greifswalder Tengwar (Tengwar handwriting in Offenbach style), Gruenewald VA (Latin-style schoolhand, Wiegel coding), H1N1 (Heavy display typeface made of parallel wavetrains), Hardman (Heavy, wide, squarish logotype with connecting letters), Helvetia Verbundene (Swiss handwriting), Immermann (Display, resembles a seriffed Radio/Rundfunk, UNZ1 coding), Kaufhalle (Display, recreation of HO Kaufhalle logotype), Koch Fette Deutsche Schrift (Very plain fraktur, Wiegel (Rg only) and UNZ1 coding), Leipzig Fraktur (Fraktur for bread text, Wiegel coding), Leipzig Fraktur UNZ1A (Fraktur for bread text), Luxembourg 1910 (Sans-serif, Jugendstil display typeface from old spice drawers), Maass Slicer (Maassslicer) (Sans-serif, oblique display face, orig. logotype), Makushka (Sort-of an Elabris with minuscules, looks overlayable), Men Nefer (Slab-serif, geometric, UNZ1 coding), Midroba (Spur-serif, display, all-majuscule, heavy, octal), MMX2010 (Sans-serif, display, caps/smallcaps, TV game machine feel), Moderne Schwabacher (Heavily reworked, Wiegel coding), Moderne Fette Schwabacher UNZ1A (Heavily reworked, Wiegel coding), Möbius (moebius) (Sans-serif, display, bicolour (u/c = non-spacing fills, l/c = spacing outlines)), Morado (Connected handwriting with nib or marker pen), Murrx (Heavy display typeface made from ellipsoids on NE-SW axis), Mutter Krause (Serif, slanting, Jugendstil-feel.), Nathan (Slab-serif, hand-drawn.), Nomatais (Nomitais) (Elabris with multiple levels of outlines), Numukki (Conlang, knotted-line, good for separators and scenebreaks), Powerweld (Sans-serif, Bauhaus style, all-minuscule), Präsent 60 (PI font with various East German logos), Preussische IV 44 (PreussischeIV44Ausgabe3) (Repro of Prussian Railways pattern type IV 44 version 3), Preussische VI 9 (Repro of Prussian Railways pattern type VI 9 version 2), Proletarsk (Sans-serif, monoline, doubled-up questionmark), Quast (Brush type, all-majuscule, very rough outline), Quimbie (Sans-serif, all-majuscule, resembles Amelia), Quirkus (Sans-serif), Ring Matrix (LED matrix with ring LEDs, solid LEDs and ring LEDs with shadow), Rostock Kaligraph (Very round calligraphy, resembles rotunda), Rotunda Pommerania (Rotunda style, Wiegel-code (Regular only) or UNZ1-coded), Rudelskopf deutsch (Sans-serif, based on Kurrent-style letterforms), Schwaben Alt (Schwabacher in Wiegel- (Rg only) or UNZ1-coding.), Stage (Sans-serif, narrow, Art Deco, fleeting taste of Broadway), Strassburg Fraktur (Handwritten fraktur, ornate majuscules, Wiegel-coding), Tank (PI font with (gas/petrol) tank station logos), TengwarOptime (Optima for Tengwar), TGL 0-16/0-17 (East German versions of DIN 16 and DIN 17 blueprint types), TGL 31034-1, TGL 31034-2 (East German versions of DIN 6776 / DIN EN ISO 3098 blueprint types), Utusi Star (Sans-serif, slight resemblance with Rundfunk), Varieté (Sans-serif, all-majuscule or caps/smallcaps), Vis-A-Vis (Serif, all-majuscule, split in middle), Volk Redis (Kurrent handwriting, anno 1930-1941), Vrångö (LED matrix type like Ring Matrix), Waschküche (Serif, resembles Antykwa Torunska), Wiegel Kurrent (Kurrent-style handwriting), Wiegel Latein (Latin-style handwriting), Wolgast Script (Sloppy-looking handwriting with a broad-nib pen), Wolgast Two (Latin/Cyrillic handwriting), XAyax (Serif, Jugendstil, narrow, all-majuscule), Yiggivoo Unicode (Sans-serif, wide, tall x, board game packaging feel), Youbilee (PI font with various jubilee laurels), Verkehrszeichen (Zeichen) (PI fonts with traffic signs (in layers)), Verkehrszeichen alt (Zeichen Alt) (PI fonts with old traffic signs (in layers)).

    Abstract Fonts link. Dafont link. Kernest link. Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Catherwood

    Caslon and Catherwood published a now famous Italian in 1821. Scans: From Nicolete Gray's book, another scan. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Century: Timeline

    A timeline on the development of Century, with bits and pieces taken from The Century family (Paul Shaw, for Fine Print magazine), which in turn was based on material from Mac McGrew. Also check these typophile opinions. I have added personal comments and items to complete the picture.

    • Theodore Low DeVinne (1829-1914), printer of The Century magazine, designed a stronger, bolder and more readable typeface for the magazine and commissioned Linn Boyd Benton (1844-1932) of ATF to cut it.
    • L.B. Benton cut it on the newly invented Benton punch-cutting machine and in 1895 was christened Century Roman. Afterwards, a companion typeface was created for ATF by L.B. Benton: Century no. 2, later called Century Broad-face. This typeface became the basis for Century Expanded, designed by L.B.'s son, Morris Fuller Benton in 1902 [Image by Heather Leonhardt]. Over the course of three more years, the italic, bold and bold italics were developed.
    • Then after a few more years, Morris Fuller Benton developed Century Oldstyle. Paul Shaw writes While the essential appearance of Century Roman and Century Expanded derived from Bodoni and Didot, that of Century Oldstyle seems to have been based on Caslon.
    • 1915: Century Book, a redevelopment of Century Oldstyle.
    • Soon after, ATF was approached by Ginn&Co., the textbook publisher, with a request for a new typeface for schoolbooks. M.F. Benton began review of research done at Clark University on the relationship between the legibility of type and the eyesight of children. Consequently, Benton increased the space between letter, the x-height of each letter, and the weight of each stroke, and balanced the color of the type by opening up the counters. The result was Century Schoolbook, completed in 1919.
    • In 1964, ATF commissioned Charles E. Hughes to design a new proportion for Century Expanded... the result, Century Nova, was more condensed.
    • Under license from ATF, Tony Stan designed the sixteen-weight ITC Century family between 1975 and 1980 for International Typeface Corporation. [ITC Century Light and Ultra were released in 1975 while the other styles appeared only in 1980]. It has the large x-height that is characteristic of many typefaces of ITC in that time period. Nick Shinn: The color of ITC Century is not good at smaller text sizes.
    • David Berlow: New Century Schoolbook was designed from 1979 until 1981 in the New York Lettering office of Merganthaler Linotype based on Century Schoolbook, long after the Bentons had passed on. It was the second face, after New Baskerville, that was digitized and expanded using Ikarus (digital technology). The Bitstream version [Century Schoolbook] is a near exact copy, only being moved from a 54 unit to a 2000 or so unit design. Matthew Carter did a lot of the work on New Century Schoolbook.
    • Grad (Phil Martin, 2004, Mark Simonson Studio) was a redesign of the classic Century Schoolbook for Martin's personal use in the early '90s.
    • See also Modern Century by SoftMaker. In addition, Centrum is an old Bitstream name for ITC Century back when they were in the cloning business.

    View various commercial digital versions of Century Schoolbook. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Chauncey H. Griffith

    Kentucky-based type designer and printer, 1879-1956. He was a Linotype salesman who directed the growth of the Linotype library from 1915 to 1948, and improved the look of the world's newspapers. He worked to establish Linotype as the composing machine of choice in America. He continued as a consultant to Linotype well into his retirement.

    Claus Eggers Sorensen writes: In 1922 Chauncey H. Griffith was promoted to Vice President of Typographic Development at Mergenthaler Linotype. He immediately started the development of new typefaces to replace the prevailing modern style typefaces. The issue troubling the moderns was their high contrast design. Especially the hairline parts of the cast lines could break of while printing, and counters could clog with ink and pulp. Faster printing meant transferring the cast lines with the stereotype process to a letterpress cylinder for high-speed rotary printing on endless rolls of paper stock. C. H. Griffith's new approach was to engineer new typefaces to the printing method. That meant drawing inspiration from the Egyptienne style as seen in the Clarendon typeface, with its very sturdy lower contrast design, and Theodore Low De Vinne and Linn Boyd Benton's Century Roman, which possessed elegance and legibility. The first product of these efforts was Ionic No. 5. It was an instant success, within eighteen months it was used by more than 3000 newspapers all over the world. C. H. Griffith and Mergenthaler Linotype continued to refine the design in subsequent iterations: Excelsior (1931), Paragon (1935), Opticon (1935), Corona (1941). These became known as the Legibility group. Ionic No. 5, Excelsior and Paragon form the Linotype Legibility Group.

    He designed or co-designed the following fonts, all at Mergenthaler:

    • Baskerville (1939, Linotype).
    • Bell Gothic (1937-1938). Now available at Bitstream. Font Bureau has its own version, Griffith Gothic (1997-2000, by Tobias Frere-Jones): Of all his work, Chauncey Griffith claimed one type, Bell Gothic, as his own design. Griffith Gothic is a revival of the 1937 Mergenthaler original, redrawn as the house sans for Fast Company. Tobias Frere-Jones drew a six weight series from light and bold, removing linecaster adjustments and retaining the pre-emptive thinning of joints as a salient feature. Mac McGrew: Bell Gothic was developed in 1937 by C. H. Griffith of Mergenthaler Linotype, primarily for use in the New York City telephone directory, but quickly became standard for telephone books nationwide. The aim was to eliminate roman types with objectionably thin serifs and hairlines. Furlong and Market Gothic were specialized adaptations of this typeface for newspaper work, the former with special figures and other characters for setting racetrack results, the latter in 1941 with other special characters for stock market details. The basic Bell Gothic was also cut by Intertype in 1939. Compare No. 11 and No. 12, shown under Numbered Faces, previously used for directory work. Imitations include OPTI Benet (Castcraft). Poster by Jaime Schweitzer. View digital versions of Bell Gothic.
    • Bookman (1936, after the 1960 original by Alexander Phemister at Kingsley ATF).
    • Corona (1941), a narrow newspaper typeface with large x-height. Corona was designed to meet the rigorous requirements of high-speed printing, and is still the chosen type of many American daily newspapers. Mac McGrew: Corona was drawn and cut by Linotype under the direction of C. H. Griffith in 1941. It is a member of the "Legibility Group" offaces designed for easy reading under newspaper conditions of stereotyping and high-speed printing with inks that could be trapped in close quarters. Royal on Intertype is a 1960 copy of Corona.
    • Elegant Garamond (Bitstream). This Granjon design was made by Chauncey H. Griffith based on models by George William Jones, and before that, Robert Granjon.
    • Excelsior (1931, Linotype). At Bitstream, this is News 702. Mac McGrew: Excelsior was cut for Linotype in 1931 under the direction of C. H. Griffith. It is a plain type, but designed for the utmost readability, with only slight variation from thick to thin, and careful fitting that makes the characters flow into easily recognizable words. Long or short descenders are available in certain sizes. Like a number of Linotype typeface intended primarily for newspaper work, Excelsior is available in closely graded sizes, including odd and some half-point multiples.
    • Granjon (1928-1930, with George William Jones at Linotype). MyFonts: Claude Garamond's late Texte (16 point) roman was the model used by George W. Jones when he designed this typeface for Linotype&Machinery in 1928. To avoid confusion with the Garamond romans based on Jannon's seventeenth century work, L&M called the typeface Granjon, after the designer of the italic used as a model, thus creating confusion with the typefaces based on Granjon's romans, Plantin and Galliard. Granjon is a little less crisp in cut than either Sabon, Stempel Gararmond or Berthold Garamond, but makes a magnificent and most readable text face, as shown in Reader's Digest since its founding. Mac McGrew: Granjon was designed for Linotype in 1928 by George W. Jones, distinguished English printer, to meet his own exacting requirements for fine book and publication work. It is derived from classic Garamond sources, but with refinements made possible by modern methods of punch cutting. In fact, one critic has called it "the purest form of Garamond." It is named for Robert Granjon, mid-sixteenth-century punch cutter noted in particular for his italics, from which the present Granjon Italic was derived. Granjon Bold, by C. H. Griffith, was added in 1931. Lanston Monotype acquired reproduction rights to the typeface from Mergenthaler.
    • Ionic No. 5 (Linotype, 1925). Mac McGrew: Ionic is a general name for a style of typeface which is closely related to the Clarendons (q.v.). Plain, sturdy designs with strong serifs and little contrast, the Ionics were popular in the latter part of the nineteenth century. Although many founders offered them, they were generally gone by early in this century. A few received a new lease on life when they were copied by Monotype, Linotype, or Intertype. Two new Ionics appeared in this century. Ionic No.5 was designed by C. H. Griffith in 1926 for Linotype, as a newspaper text face. It features a large lowercase with short ascenders and descenders, with no fine lines or serifs to break down in stereotyping, and no small openings to fill up with ink. This is one of a few typefaces made in many closely graded sizes: 5-, 51/2-, 6-, 61/2-, 63/4-, 7-, 71/2-, 8-, 9-, 10-, and 12-point. Intertype's Windsor, developed in 1959, is comparable. Ionic Condensed was designed by Griffith in 1927, also for Linotype. It is a refinement of traditional designs, intended for newspaper head- ings, and has most of the general characteristics of the text face. Ionic Extra Condensed is essentially the same, a little narrower and without lowercase, also for newspaper headlines.
    • Janson (1932). Mac McGrew: Janson is adapted from types often attributed to Anton Janson, seventeenth-century Dutch letter founder, although researchers have shown that the originals were cut by Nicolas Kis, a Hungarian punchcutter and printer. The Linotype version was done in 1932 under the direction of C. H. Griffith, based on the 14-point size of about 1660. The Monotype version was adapted by Sol Hess in 1936, in collaboration with Bruce Rogers. Both versions are sharp and clear cut, and rather compact. They bear some resemblance to the types of William Caslon, which were based on later, similar Dutch types.
    • Memphis (1929): the prototypical Egyptian of Rudolf Wolf. Mac McGrew: Memphis is the Linotype copy of the popular German square-serif typeface known as Memphis or Girder, designed by Rudolf Weiss about 1929, which did much to revive interest in this old style. Memphis Light and Bold were introduced by Linotype in 1933, Italics and Unique Caps in 1934, Medium in 1935, and other variations up to 1938. The Extra Bold versions were designed by C. H. Griffith. Alternate characters are available in some versions to more nearly approximate the appearance of Stymie or Beton (q.v.). The Lining versions are comparable to small caps in the regular versions, being propor- tionately wider and heavier than caps, and have no lowercase; there are several sizes each in 6- and 12-point, permitting various cap-and-small-cap combinations, in the manner of Copperplate Gothic. Also see Ward; compare Cairo, Karnak. Digital versions are everywhere. The Bitstream version is Geometric Slabserif 703.
    • Linotype Monticello was designed by Griffith in 1946. Its design is based on James Ronaldson's Roman No.1 and Oxford Typefaces from American Type Founders and was revised by Matthew Carter while he was working at Linotype between 1965-1981. Mac McGrew: Monticello is a Linotype recreation of America's first great typeface, Binny&Ronaldson's Roman No.1, cut about 1796 by Archibald Binny in Philadelphia. His was the first permanent American type foundry. After about 30 years, the Binny typeface fell into disuse. The matrices survived, though, and a few fonts were cast about 1892 and the typeface was renamed Oxford (q. v.). In 1943 Princeton University Press announced plans for publishing a 52-volume edition of The Papers of Thomas Jefferson. As President, Jefferson had personally written to friends in France, introducing a Binny&Ronald- son representative who was seeking a source of antimony to replenish the shortage which threatened the young typefounding industry in this country. Jefferson also referred in this letter to the importance of type to civilization and freedom. In addition, the popularity of this typeface coincided with the most prominent years of Jefferson's life. Therefore Linotype suggested that a recutting of the typeface would be most appropriate for the Jefferson books, and the publisher heartily agreed. C. H. Griffith, Linotype typographic consultant, made a detailed study of Binny's type and redrew it in 1946 for the requirements of Linotype composition and modern printing conditions. It is a vigorous transitional face, somewhat similar to Baskerville but slightly heavier and a little crisper.
    • Opticon (1935, Linotype). Mac McGrew: Opticon was designed in 1935 by C. H. Griffith for Linotype. It is a member of what that supplier calls its Legibility Group of typefaces designed primarily for newspaper use. It is essentially the same as Excelsior, but with stems and thick lines weighted slightly, for printing on hard-surfaced paper.
    • Paragon (1935, Linotype). Mac McGrew: Paragon was designed by C. H. Griffith for Linotype in 1935. It is a member of that company's Legibility Group of typefaces, planned primarily for sharp and clean printing under the difficult inking and printing conditions of newspaper production, but also useful and popular for other periodical work. This typeface is lighter and airier than most such typefaces; otherwise it is much the same style. Compare Excelsior, Ionic, Opticon, Textype.
    • Poster Bodoni (1920). Digital versions of Poster Bodoni or a textured ornamental version of it include Poster Bodoni (Bitstream), Modern 721 (Bitstream), OPTI Poster Bodoni Compressed (Castcraft), Bodoni Poster (Softmaker), Bodnoff (Corel), Poster Bodoni (Tilde), Poster Bodoni WGL4 (Bitstream), Saphir (Linotype), Bodoni Poster (Linotype), Bodoni poster (Adobe; same as the Linotype version), and Bodoni Ornamental (FontMesa).
    • Ryerson Condensed was designed by C. H. Griffith in 1940 for Linotype, as a modernization of Globe Gothic Condensed.
    • Textype (1929, Linotype). Mac McGrew: Textype was designed in 1929 by C. H. Griffith for Linotype. Although intended as a newspaper face, Textype with its smaller x-height and longer ascenders than most newspaper typefaces also became popular for magazines and other publications, as well as for a certain amount of advertising and general printing. There is an 18-point size in roman with italic, also a bold and bold italic. The 18-point size and the bold italic are both rare in newspaper typefaces. Compare Excelsior, Ionic, Rex, etc.
    • Non-Latin typefaces: Porson and Metro Greek; thirteen Arabic designs adaptable for use throughout the Moslem world; Hebrews; the Indian scripts devanagari, Gujarati, and Bengali; Sinhalese for use in Ceylon, Tamil, and Syriac.

    Klingspor link. Linotype link. FontShop link. Font Bureau link. Pic. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Choice of Caslon

    A typophile discussion on the choice of Caslon centers around these digital possibilities:

    • Caslon 540 BT (Bitstream). See also the Paratype extension by Isay Slutsker. Adobe, Linotype, URW and others have their own Caslon 540, usually only in two styles, roman and italic. XCaslon 540 was originally done by ATF in 1902. Caslon 3 is a slightly bolder ATF face, dated 1905.
    • King's Caslon (Dalton Maag).
    • William's Caslon, by William Berkson, Font Bureau, 2010.
    • ITC Founder's Caslon by Justin Howes: faithful to Caslon's metal types.
    • CaslonBookBE (Berthold).
    • Adobe Caslon: preferred by several typophiles over the Berthold version. It is lihter and has longer descenders. People say it performs optimally at around 10-12 point. Some claim that Bertold's Caslon is better at smaller point sizes (8pt).
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    Chris Costello

    Chris Costello (b. 1959, Poughkeepsie, NY) graduated from Northeastern University in Boston. Since 1989, he works as a graphic, web and font designer and illustrator from his base in watertown, MA. From 2002 onwards, he has worked as a creative director and senior graphic designer for Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage in Woburn, MA. Since 2010, hae also creates artistic designs and renderings for United States coinage and medal programs for the U.S. Department of the Treasury. He runs Costello Art, and is involved in graphic design and handlettering. His typefaces:

    • The simultaneously gorgeous and overused Papyrus (1983, Letraset). One variant is sold by Elsner&Flake as Papyrus EF Regular, and another is in the Linotype library. The Avatar 2009 movie poster features Papyrus, and many are getting tired of the ubiquity.
    • Letterpress Text. An antiqued rough outline family based on Caslon.
    • Mirage (2001).
    • Blackstone (2001). A medieval (blackletter) typeface. Winner of the Chartpak typeface design competition.
    • Virus (2001).
    • In the planning stage: Driftwood (great lettering!), Sheriden's Letters (writing by a 5-year old), Costello (text font).

    Klingspor link. Bio. MyFonts entry. Papyrus blog. FontShop link. Linotype link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Christian Schwartz

    Christian Schwartz was born in 1977 in East Washington, NH, and grew up in a small town in New Hampshire. He attended Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he graduated in 1999 with a degree in Communication Design. After graduation, he spent three months as the in-house type designer at MetaDesign Berlin, under the supervision of Erik Spiekermann. In January 2000, he joined Font Bureau. Near the end of 2000, he founded Orange Italic with Chicago-based designer Dino Sanchez, and left Font Bureau in August 2001 to concentrate full-time on developing this company. Orange Italic published the first issue of their online magazine at the end of 2001 and released their first set of typefaces in the beginning of 2002. Presently, he is an independent type designer in New York City, and has operated foundries like Christian Schwartz Design and Commercial Type (the latter since 2009). He has designed commercial fonts for Emigre, FontShop, House Industries and Font Bureau as well as proprietary designs for corporations and publications. In 2005, Orange Italic joined the type coop Village.

    His presentations. At ATypI 2004 in Prague, he spoke about "The accidental text face". At ATypI 2006 in Lisbon, he and Paul Barnes explained the development of a 200-style font family for the Guardian which includes Guardian Egyptian and Guardian Sans. FontShop's page on his work. Bio at Emigre. At ATypI 2007 in Brighton, he was awarded the Prix Charles Peignot. Jan Middendorp's interview in October 2007. Speaker at ATypI 2009 in Mexico City, where he announced his new typefoundry, simply called Commercial.

    FontShop link. Font selection at MyFonts.

    A partial list of his creations:

    • FF Bau (2001-2004): Art direction by Erik Spiekermann. Released by FontShop International. He says: Bau is based on Grotesk, a typeface released by the Schelter&Giesecke typefoundry in Leipzig, Germany at the end of the 19th century and used prominently by the designers at the Bauhaus. Each weight was drawn separately, to give the family the irregularity of the original, and the Super is new.
    • Neutraface (2002, House Industries) and Neutraface Condensed (2004). Art directed by Ken Barber and Andy Cruz. Schwartz states: Neutraface was an ambitious project to design the most typographically complete geometric sans serif family ever. We didn't have many actual samples of the lettering that the Neutras used on their buildings, so it ended up taking a lot of interpretation. There was no reference for the lowercase, so it's drawn from scratch, looking at Futura, Nobel, and Tempo for reference. Stephen Coles reports: Reminiscent of the recent FB Relay and HTF Gotham, Neutraface is an exaggerated Nobel with nods to Bauhaus and architectural lettering. Yes, and maybe Futura? Maggie Winters, Ioana Dumitrescu, Nico Köckritz, Nico Kockritz and Michelle Regna made great Neutraface posters.
    • Neutraface No. 2 (2007), discussed by Stephen Coles: By simply raising Neutrafaces low waist, most of that quaintness is removed in No. 2, moving the whole family (which is completely mixable) toward more versatile, workhorse territory. This release is surely Houses response to seeing so many examples of Neutraface standardized by its users. Also new is an inline version. Who doesn't love inline type? It so vividly recalls WPA posters and other pre-war hand lettering. There are other heavy, inlined sans serifs like Phosphate, but one with a full family of weights and text cuts to back it up is very appealing. A typophile states: Designed by Christian Schwartz for House Industries, Neutraface captures the 1950s stylings of architect Richard Neutra in a beautiful typeface meant for application on the screen, in print, and in metalwork. If you are ever in need of a classy retro face, they don't get any more polished than this.
    • Farnham (2004, Font Bureau) and Farnham Headline (2006, Schwartzco). Commissioned by Esterson Associates and de Luxe Associates. Winner of an award at TDC2 2004. Based on work by Johannes Fleischman, a German punchcutter who worked for the Enschedé Foundry in Haarlem in the mid-to-late 1700s. Schwartz: Truly part of the transistion from oldstyle (i.e. Garamond) to modern (i.e. Bodoni) Fleischman's romans are remarkable for their energy and "sparkle" on the page, as he took advantage of better tools and harder steel to push the limits of how thin strokes could get. In the 1800s, Fleischman's work fell into obscurity as tastes changed, but interest was renewed in the 1990s as digital revivals were designed by Matthew Carter, the Hoefler Type Foundry, and the Dutch Type Library, each focusing on a different aspect of the source material. I think the DTL version is the most faithful to the source, leaving the bumps and quirks inherent to metal type untouched. I've taken the opposite approach, using the source material as a starting point and trying to design a very contemporary text typeface that uses the basic structure and character of Fleischman without duplicating features that I found outdated, distracting, or unttatractive (i.e., the extra "spikes" on the capital E and F, or the form of the y).
    • FF Unit (2003-2004, Fontshop, designed with Erik Spiekermann). A clean and blocky evolution of FF Meta intended as a corporate typeface for the Deutsche Bahn (but subsequently not used).
    • Amplitude (2001-2003, Font Bureau), Amplitude Classified and Amplitude Headline. A newspaper-style ink-trapped sans family, unfortunately given the same name as a 2001 font by Aenigma. Winner of an award at TDC2 2004. The typeface selected by the St Louis Post Dispatch in 2005. One of many agates (type for small text) successfully developed by him. This page explains that they've dumped Dutch 811 and Bodoni and Helvetica and Franklin Gothic and News Gothic (whew!) for various weights of Amplitude, Poynter Old Style Display and Poynter Old Style Text. AmplitudeAubi was designed in 2002-2003 by Schwartz and Font Bureau for the German mag AutoBild.
    • Simian (2001, House Industries): SimianDisplay-Chimpanzee, SimianDisplay-Gorilla, SimianDisplay-Orangutan, SimianText-Chimpanzee, SimianText-Gorilla, SimianText-Orangutan. Designed at Font Bureau. Art Direction by Ken Barber and Andy Cruz. Schwartz: "Although Simian's roots are in Ed Benguiat's logos for the Planet of the Apes movies, Simian wound up veering off in its own direction. The display styles look very techno, and we really went nuts with the ligatures, since this was one of House's first Opentype releases."
    • Publico (2007): A predecessor of Guradian Egyptian. Schwartz writes: During the two year process of designing the typeface that would eventually become Guardian Egyptian, Paul Barnes and I ended up discarding many ideas along the way. Some of them were decent, just not right for the Guardian, including a serif family first called Stockholm, then renamed Hacienda after the legendary club in the Guardian's original home city of Manchester. Everyone involved liked the family well enough, but it didn't fit the paper as the design evolved, and several rounds of reworking left us more and more unsure of what it was supposed to look like. In the summer of 2006, Mark Porter and Esterson Associates were hired to redesign Publico, a major Portuguese daily newspaper, for an early 2007 launch. He asked us to take another look at Hacienda, to see if we might be able to untangle our many rounds of changes, figure out what it was supposed to look like in the first place, and finish it in a very short amount of time. Spending some time away from the typeface did our eyes a world of good. When we looked at it again, it was obvious that it really needed its "sparkle" played up, so we increased the sharpness of the serifs, to play against softer ball terminals, and kept the contrast high as the weight increased, ending up with an elegant and serious family with some humor at its extreme weights. As a Spanish name is not suitable for a typeface for a Portuguese newspaper, Hacienda was renamed once more, finally ending up as Publico. Production and design assistance by Kai Bernau. Commissioned by Mark Porter and Esterson Associates for Publico
    • Austin (2003): Designed by Paul Barnes at Schwartzco. Commissioned by Sheila Jack at Harper's&Queen.
    • Giorgio (2007): Commissioned by Chris Martinez at T, the New York Times Sunday style magazine. Small size versions produced with Kris Sowersby. Not available for relicensing. A high contrast condensed "modern" display typeface related to Imre Reiner's Corvinus. Ben Kiel raves: Giorgio, like the fashion models that it shares space with in T, the New York Times fashion magazine, is brutal in its demands. It is a shockingly beautiful typeface, one so arresting that I stopped turning the page when I first saw it a Sunday morning about a year ago. [...] Giorgio exudes pure sex and competes with the photographs beside it. The designers at T were clearly unafraid of what it demands from the typographer and, over the past year, kept on finding ways to push Giorgio to its limit. Extremely well drawn in its details, full of tension between contrast and grace, it is a typeface that demands to be given space, to be used with wit and courage, and for the typographer to be unafraid in making it the page.
    • Empire State Building (2007): An art deco titling typeface designed with Paul Barnes for Laura Varacchi at Two Twelve Associates. Icons designed by Kevin Dresser at Dresser Johnson. Exclusive to the Empire State Building.
    • Guardian (2004-2005): Commissioned by Mark Porter at The Guardian. Designed with Paul Barnes. Not available for relicensing until 2008. Based on an Egyptian, this 200-style family consists of Guardian Egyptian (the main text face), Guardian Sans, Guardian Text Egyptian, Guardian Text Sans and Guardian Agate.
    • Houston (2003): Commissioned by Roger Black at Danilo Black, Inc., for the Houston Chronicle. Schwartz: As far as I know, this typeface is the first Venetian Oldstyle ever drawn for newspaper text, and only Roger Black could come up with such a brilliant and bizarre idea. The basic structures are based on British Monotype's Italian Old Style, which was based on William Morris's Golden Type. The italic (particularly the alternate italic used in feature sections) also borrows from Nebiolo Jenson Oldstyle, and there is a hint of ATF Jenson Oldstyle in places as well.
    • Popular (2004): Commissioned by Robb Rice at Danilo Black, Inc., for Popular Mechanics. An Egyptian on testosterone.
    • Stag (2005): Commissioned by David Curcurito and Darhil Crooks at Esquire. Yet another very masculine slab serif family. Schwartz writes I showed them a range of slab serifs produced by French and German foundries around 1900-1940, and synthesized elements from several of them (notably Beton, Peignot's Egyptienne Noir, Georg Trump's Schadow, and Scarab) into a new typeface with a very large x-height, extremely short ascenders and descenders, and tight spacing. Also, we find Stag Sans (2007, Village) and Stag Dot (2008, Village).
    • Fritz (1997, Font Bureau). Schwartz: "Fritz is based on various pieces of handlettering done in the early 20th century by Ozwald Cooper, a type designer and lettering artist best known for the ubiquitous Cooper Black. Galapagos Typefoundry's Maiandra and Robusto are based on the same pieces of lettering."
    • Latino-Rumba, Latino-Samba (2000, House Industries). Art Direction by Andy Cruz. Designed with Ken Barber. Jazzy letters based on an earlier design of Schwartz, called Atlas (1993).
    • Pennsylvania (2000, FontBureau). A monospaed family inspired by Pennsylvanian license plates. Schwartz: "Thai type designer Anuthin Wongsunkakon's Keystone State (1999, T26) is based on the exact same source."
    • Luxury (2002, Orange Italic, codesigned with Dino Sanchez). Gold, Platinum and Diamond are the names of the 1930s headline typefaces made (jokingly) for use with luxury items. The six-weight Luxury family at House Industries in 2006, contains three serif text weights called Luxury Text, as well as three display typefaces, called Platinum (art deco), Gold, and Diamond (all caps with triangular serifs).
    • Los Feliz (2002, Emigre). Based on handlettered signs found in LA.
    • Unfinished typefaces: Masthead, Reform, Bitmaps, Bilbao, Boyband, Addison, Elektro, Sandbox, Vendôme, Bailey.
    • Fonts drawn in high school: Flywheel (1992, FontHaus), Atlas (1993, FontHaus, a "a fairly faithful revival of Potomac Latin, designed in the late 1950s for PhotoLettering, Inc"), Elroy (1993, FontHaus), ElroyExtrasOrnaments, Hairspray (1993, "a revival of Steinweiss Scrawl, designed in the mid-1950s by Alex Steinweiss, best known for his handlettered record covers": HairsprayBlonde, HairsprayBrunette, HairsprayPix, HairsprayRedhead), Twist (1994, Precision Type and Agfa), Zombie (1995, Precision Type and Agfa), Morticia (1995, Agfa/Monotype), Gladys (1996, an unreleased revival of ATF's turn-of-the-century Master Script).
    • Ant&Bee&Art Fonts (1994-1995): three dingbat fonts, Baby Boom, C'est la vie, and Raining Cats&Dogs, based on drawings by Christian's aunt, Jill Weber. Released by FontHaus.
    • Digitizations done between 1993-1995: Dolmen (Letraset), Latino Elongated (Letraset), Regatta Condensed (Letraset), Fashion Compressed (Letraset), Jack Regular (Jack Tom), Tempto Openface (Tintin Timen).
    • Hand-tuned bitmap fonts: Syssy, Zimmer's Egyptian, Elizzzabeth, Newt Gothic, Trags X, Tibia, Fibula, Tino, Digest Cyrillic (based on Tal Leming's Digest). Free downloads of the pixel typefaces Newt Gothic, Tibula and Fibia here.
    • At Village and Orange Italic, one can get Local Gothic (2005), now in OpenType, a crazy mix of Helvetica Bold, Futura Extra Bold, Franklin Gothic Condensed and Alternate Gothic No. 2. It is a collection of alternates one can cycle through---thus a for of randomization.
    • FF Oxide (2005), a Bank Gothic style stencil family. FF Oxide Light is free!
    • Graphik (2008), a sans between geometric and grotesk made for thew Wallpaper mag. Kris sSwersby writes: In a sweltering typographic climate that favours organic look-at-me typefaces bursting with a thousand OpenType tricks, Graphik is a refreshing splash of cool rationality. Its serious, pared-back forms reference classic sans serifs but remain thoroughly modern and never get frigid. Any designer worth their salt needs to turn away from the screen&pick up the latest copy of Wallpaper* magazine. There you will find one of the most beautiful, restrained sans serifs designed in a very long time.
    • In 2011, he created a 22-style revival of Helvetica called Neue Haas Grotesk (Linotype), which offers alternates such as a straigt-legged R and a differently-seriffed a. It is based on the original drawings of Miedinger in 1957.
    Schwartz also made numerous custom fonts:
    • Houston (2003). Winner of an award at TDC2 2004, a type family done with Roger Black for the Houston Chronicle. Schwartz: This typeface is the first Venetian Oldstyle ever drawn for newspaper text, and only Roger Black could come up with such a brilliant and bizarre idea. The basic structures are based on British Monotype's Italian Old Style, which was based on William Morris's Golden Type.).
    • Popular (2004). A thick-slabbed typeface drawn for Popular Mechanics, commissioned by Robb Rice at Danilo Black, Inc.
    • FF Meta 3 (2003, hairline versions of type drawn by Richard Lipton and Erik Spiekermann).
    • Eero (2003). Based on an unnamed typeface drawn by Eero Saarinen for the Dulles International Airport. Art Directed by Ken Barber and Andy Cruz. Commissioned by House Industries for the Dulles International Airport.
    • ITC Officina Display (2003). The Regular, Bold and Black weights of this typeface were originally developed by Ole Schäfer for Erik Spiekermann's redesign of The Economist in 2000 or 2001. The ITC conglomerate decided to release it in 2003. I revised parts of Ole's fonts, and worked with Richard Lipton to adapt the Light from a version of Officina Light that Cyrus Highsmith had drawn several years earlier for a custom client. I also added more arrows and bullets than anyone could possibly need, but they were fun to draw. Released by Agfa.
    • Symantec (2003). Designed with Conor Mangat based on News Gothic by Morris Fuller Benton (Sans) and Boehringer Serif by Ole Schäfer, based on Concorde Nova by Günter Gerhard Lange (Serif). Advised by Erik Spiekermann. Commissioned by MetaDesign for Symantec Corporation.
    • Harrison (2002). Based on the hand of George Harrison, was commissioned in 2002 by radical.media.
    • Chalet Cyrillic (2002, House Industries).
    • Benton Modern (2001). Based on Globe Century by Tobias Frere-Jones and Richard Lipton. Commissioned by Font Bureau for the Readability Series. Designed at Font Bureau. Microsite.
    • Caslon's Egyptian (2001). Commissioned by Red Herring. Designed at Font Bureau. Around 1816, William Caslon IV printed the first know specimen of a sans serif typeface: W CASLON JUNR LETTERFOUNDER. A complete set of matrices for captials exists in the archives of Stephenson Blake, and Miko McGinty revived these as a project in Tobias Frere-Jones's type design class at Yale. In 1998, Cyrus Highsmith refined Miko's version, giving it a more complete character set for Red Herring magazine. In 2001, they came back for a lowercase and 3 additional weights. I looked at Clarendon and British vernacular lettering (mainly from signs) for inspiration, and came up with a lowercase that does not even pretend to be an accurate or failthful revival.
    • David Yurman (2001). Based on a custom typeface by Fabien Baron. Commissioned by Lipman Advertising for David Yurman. Designed at Font Bureau.
    • Coop Black lowercase (2001). Based on Coop Black by Ken Barber and Coop. Commissioned by House Industries for Toys R Us. Designed at Font Bureau.
    • Interstate Monospaced (2000-2001). Based on Interstate by Tobias Frere-Jones. Commissioned by Citigroup. Designed at Font Bureau.
    • Vectora Thin (2000). Based on Vectora by Adrian Frutiger. Commissioned by O Magazine. Not available for licensing. Designed at Font Bureau.
    • LaDeeDa (2000). Informal lettering, art directed by Mia Hurley. Commissioned by gURL.com. Designed at Font Bureau.
    • Poynter Agate Display (2000). Based on Poynter Agate by David Berlow. Commissioned by the San Jose Mercury News classified section. Designed at Font Bureau.
    • FF DIN Condensed (2000). Based on FF DIN by Albert-Jan Pool. Commissioned by Michael Grossman for Harper's Bazaar. Designed at Font Bureau.
    • VW Headline Light&VW Heckschrift (1999). Based on Futura by Paul Renner and VW Headline by Lucas de Groot. Art directed by Erik Spiekermann and Stephanie Kurz. Commissioned by MetaDesign Berlin for Volkswagen AG.
    • 5608 (1999). Stencil typeface for Double A Clothing.
    • Bureau Grotesque (1996-2002). Designed with FB Staff including David Berlow, Tobias Frere-Jones, Jill Pichotta, Richard Lipton, and others. Mostly unreleased. Some styles commissioned by Entertainment Weekly. Designed at Font Bureau.
    • Guardian Egyptian (2005). A 200-font family by Schwartz and Paul Barnes for The Guardian.
    • In 2007, Schwartz and Spiekermann received a gold medal from the German Design Council for a type system developed fo the Deutsche Bahn (German Railway).
    • Zizou or Clouseau (2011). A reworking (from memory) of Antique Olive (1960, Roger Excoffon). This was published at the end of 2013 as Duplicate (2013, with Miguel Reyes). In three styles, Slab, Sans and Ionic. Commercial Type writes: Christian Schwartz wanted to see what the result would be if he tried to draw Antique Olive from memory. He was curious whether this could be a route to something that felt contemporary and original, or if the result would be a pale imitation of the original. Most of all, he wanted to see what he would remember correctly and what he would get wrong, and what relationship this would create between the inspiration and the result. Though it shares some structural similarities with Antique Olive and a handful of details, like the shape of the lowercase a, Duplicate Sans is not a revival, but rather a thoroughly contemporary homage to Excoffon. Duplicate Sans was finally finished at the request of Florian Bachleda for his 2011 redesign of Fast Company. Bachleda wanted a slab companion for the sans, so Schwartz decided to take the most direct route: he simply added slabs to the sans in a straightforward manner, doing as little as he could to alter the proportions, contrast, and stylistic details in the process. The bracketed serifs and ball terminals that define the Clarendon genre (also known as Ionic) first emerged in Britain in the middle of the 19th century. While combining these structures with a contemporary interpretation of a mid-20th century French sans serif seems counterintutive, the final result feels suprisingly natural. The romans are a collaboration between Christian Schwartz and Miguel Reyes, but the italic is fully Reyes's creation, departing from the sloped romans seen in Duplicate Sans and Slab with a true cursive. Mark Porter and Simon Esterson were the first to use the family, in their 2013 redesign of the Neue Züricher Zeitung am Sonntag. Because the Ionic genre has ll ong been a common choice for text in newspapers, Duplicate Ionic is a natural choice for long texts. Duplicate Ionic won an award at TDC 2014.
    • In 2014, Christian Schwartz and Dino Sanchez codesigned the roman inscriptional typeface Gravitas. The name was already in use by Riccardo de Franceschi (since 2011), Laura Eames (since 2013) and Keith Tricker (since earlier in 2014), so there may be some emails flowing between these type designers. They write: The primary inspiration for Gravitas was Augustea Nova, Aldo Novarese's quirky and spiky Latin interpretation of the Roman inscriptional caps for the Nebiolo Type Foundry, released in a single weight in the 1950s. It's fairly common to see Augustea Open these days, but his lowercase apparently didn't survive the transition to phototype. Many designers have tackled the problem of matching a lowercase to the classical Roman capitals, with decidedly mixed results. The Bold Italic was drawn by Jesse Vega.
    • Early in 2014, Christian Schwartz, Paul Barnes and Miguel Reyes joined forces to create the manly didone typeface family Caponi, which is based on the early work of Bodoni, who was at that time greatly influenced by the roccoco style of Pierre Simon Fournier. It is named after Amid Capeci, who commissioned it in 2010 for his twentieth anniversary revamp of Entertainment Weekly. Caponi comes in Display, Slab and Text subfamilies.

      Also in 2014, Christian designed the custom typeface Poets Electra for the American Academy of Poets. It extends and modifies W.A. Dwiggins's Electra (1940).

    • Tanja (2016). A dot matrix typeface designed by Christian Schwartz and Paul Barnes and based on the monolinear Marian 1554, Tanja began life as the proposed logo for a German publisher.
    • Le Jeune (2016, Greg Gazdowicz, Christian Schwartz and Paul Barnes): a crisp high-contrast fashion mag didone typeface family in Poster, Deck, Text and Hairline sub-styles, with stencils drawn by Gazdowicz. This large typeface family comes in four optical sizes, and was originally developed for Chris Dixon's refresh of Vanity Fair.
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    Christoffel van Dijck

    Dutch type cutter, 1601-1669, who had a type foundry in Amsterdam. DTL Elzevir is based upon his work. Rudi Geeraerts explains a bit about present day types based on Van Dijck's work. I cite him, interspersed with my own comments:

    • Monotype Van Dijck is based on a typeface used in 1671 in Herscheppinge (Joost van den Vondel) printed by Daniel Bakkamude. Jan van Krimpen was consultant to Monotype on that project. Most graphic designers were a bit disappointed because it looks skinny when used in normal text sizes. The digital version is due to Robin Nicholas.
    • DTL Elzevir is based on a study of several cuttings from Christoffel Van Dijck. DTL states that it is mainly based on the Augustijn Romeyn a cut found on a 1682 type specimen issued by Daniel Elseviers widow (hence the name DTL Elzevir) showing some typefaces from Van Dijck and others. So the DTL Elzevir is not a remake of the Monotype Van Dijck.
    • Gerard Unger's Hollander (1983) is based on a study of the typography used in 17th century books using typefaces cut by van Dijck and possible Dirck Voskens. The Hollander is also the base of the well-known Swift. So Unger's Hollander is not a remake of the Monotype Van Dijck.
    • OurType's Custodia, designed by Fred Smeijers, is a single-weight roman, with italic and matching small caps, with a seventeenth-century flavour. It was made in 2002 for use in the publications of the Custodia Foundation. Custodia 17 is the first typeface to join the OurType Classics collection. By seventeenth century flavoured we mean the flavour shared by a range of 17th century punch cutters, like Christoffel van Dijck, Dirck Voskens, Johan Michael Smit and Jean Baptiste van Wolschaten. References to and specimens of their typefaces can be found in several archives. One of them is the Plantin-Moretus Museum in Antwerp. The OT Custodia is neither a Van Dijck revival nor a Monotype Van Dijck remake.
    • Dutch Textura (1681), in versions called Augusteyn Duyts and Mediaen Duyts.
    Typefaces offered at MyFonts that are rooted in Van Dijck's work include:

    FontShop link. Klingspor link. Christoffel Van Dijck's digital legacy. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Cindy Zeiwen Chang

    Graphic designer with a BFA in Desigm from UT Austin, 2006. Creator of the blackletter typeface Butterfly Sushi (2007), a hybrid of Wilhelm Klingspor Gotisch and Caslon 540. No downloads. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Claude Pelletier

    Quebec-based typographer and type designer (aka Diogene) who specializes mainly in revivals of obscure or old typefaces.

    Dafont link. Yet another URL. Abfonts carries many of his fonts. Fontspace link.

    His typefaces:

    • Salamandre (2012). A tall 19-th century style slab typeface based on Iguana, a design of Sally-Ann Grover.
    • Aerolite C Pone (2013). A calligraphic connected copperplate script.
    • Angelica CP (2011)
    • Banner Star (2012). An American flag-themed display typeface.
    • Barrio CP (2011). An inline face.
    • BeansCP (2010, after a font found on page 10 of Art Deco Display Alphabets: 100 Complete Fonts by Dan X. Solo).
    • Bienetresocial (2003), BienetresocialBold (2003).
    • Bizarre and Bizarrerie (2010; based on Edwards and Inland, both designed in 1895 by Nicholas J. Werner at the Inland Type Foundry; renamed in 1925 by BBS)
    • Bloque Demo (2011). Experimental.
    • Bold (2008)
    • Bolina (2015). A copperplate calligraphic script after Dan X. Solo's alphabet shown on page 12 of Dan X Solo. Script and Cursive Alphabets (1987, Dover).
    • Bonte Divine (2017).
    • Carre (2009, athletic numerals).
    • Caslon CP (2012, based on Caslon 223 Bold).
    • Champignon (1999-2009, a formal calligraphic script)
    • Chartrand (2010, Victorian)
    • Chomage (2009)
    • Chopin Script (1999-2010, calligraphic; after Polonaise by Phil Martin)
    • Constanze Initials (2010). After Constanze Initials by Joachim Romann (1956).
    • Crayonnette (2000)
    • DeClaude (2010, patterned and named after DeVinne)
    • Derniere (1999)
    • Dojo CP (2011)
    • Dynamic CP (2010, based on page 48 of The Solotype Catalog of 4,147 Display Typefaces as Dynamic Deco)
    • Ebony (2011). Based on a Marder&Luse design from 1890. Ebony is on page 38 of 100 Ornamental Alphabets by Dan X. Solo and also on page 43 of The Solotype Catalog of 4,147 Display Typefaces.
    • Embrionic 85 (2012, +Swash Caps) and Embrionic 55 Swash (2012): an ink trap sans display family modeled after Robert Trogman's Embrionic in the FotoStar collection.
    • Essai (2003)
    • Euclid CP (2011): based on an 1880 typeface at Central Type Foundry.
    • Fancy Text (2004, blackletter)
    • Fantaisie1 (1999)
    • Gourmandise (2013), an exquisite Normandian-style didone display typeface.
    • Grandee CP (2014). Claude says that it is based on T.H. Grandee, but that is too cryptic for me...
    • Haricot (2010, a fat modular typeface based on Beans in the Dan Solo catalog)
    • Humeur (2001-2002, funny smilies)
    • IEC5000 (2011). A symbol font with electrical and other icons.
    • Initiales Medium (2011).
    • Jeux Cache (2016). A boxed letter font.
    • JohnHancockCP-Medium (2010, bold didone)
    • Landi Echo (2011). A remake of Landi Echo by Alessandro Butti (1939-1943).
    • La Tribune (2011). A newspaper type.
    • Le Golf or Le Trou (2010, art nouveau typeface by Antoine Szczebanski, digitized by Claude Pelletier; also on page 71 of the Solotype catalog)
    • Les Etoiles (2013): an inline typeface
    • Lionel CP (2010, a multiline typeface inspired by Letraset's 1973 typeface Stripes)
    • Louisa CP (2015). A free calligraphic copperplate script. Free download.
    • Malvern (1999)
    • Manquis CP (2012). A roman typeface.
    • Maratre (2013). A delicious connected copperplate calligraphic script.
    • Monterey Wide (2011). A Tuscan ornamental face, based on a showing on page 22 of The Solotype Catalog of 4,147 Display Typefaces.
    • Motscroises (1997)
    • Niaisage (2012). A lachrymal caps only typeface.
    • Oxford CP (2010, a multiline face, based on the 1960s typeface by Christine Lord)
    • Pasdecourbe (2003)
    • Pasdenom (2001, no punctuation)
    • Pepinot (2012), an art nouveau typeface based on Coral Inline on page 190 of The Solotype Catalog of 4,147 Display Typefaces.
    • Pistilli Roman (2011, after the original by Pistilli)
    • Postface (2012). A bold signage script face.
    • Rita Smith (2012). After Primavera by Rita Major.
    • Rogers, Rogers2 (1997). He says that it is not his font---that he just rearranged the glyphs. According to Claude, can be found in the book Treasury of Authentic Art Nouveau Alphabets, ed. Petzendorfer, Plate 23. It was made in 1902 by A.V. Haight for Inland Typefoundry.
    • Simplement (2011) is Cut-in Medium on page 163 of The Solotype Catalog of 4,147 Display Typefaces.
    • Stylie Stymus (2012).
    • Threshold (2014).
    • TriangleETcircleShadow, TriangleETcircleShadowed (2010, 3d iron work style face)
    • UptightC (2010, multiline face).
    • YagiUHFNo2 (2012).
    • Zenith CP (2016). A free connected calligraphic (wedding) script typeface.
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Continental Typefounders Association
    [Melbert Cary]

    Continental Type Founders Association was founded by Melbert Brinckerhoff Cary Jr. (1892-1941) in 1925 to distribute foundry type imported from European foundries. Beginning in 1927 Continental also distributed typefaces cast by Frederic Goudy, and two typefaces for Doug McMurtrie. Doug McMurtie and Frederic Goudy were the vice-presidents in 1925 and 1927, respectively. At first Goudy's type was cast at his own Village Letter Foundry, but after 1929 these were cast by the New England Foundry. Despite imports being virtually cut-off during the war years, Continental was still issuing Goudy's types as late as 1944 and may have continued functioning even later. Located at 216 E. 45th street, New York around 1930. They published Specimen Book of Continental Types in 1929. Cary collected 2300 books about printing. After his death, the Cary Collection was presented to the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1969 by the Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust as a memorial to Melbert Cary. Its collection of 20,000 volumes is described as one of America's premier libraries on the history and practice of printing.

    Their typeface Nova Bold was revived by Nick Curtis as Maple Leaf Rag NF (2005).

    The European foundries represented by them:

    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Cowan

    Designer of Engravers' Old English (1901, ATF) with Morris Fuller Benton, who designed the similar typeface Wedding Text (1901). McGrew writes: Engravers Old English is a plain, sturdy rendition of the Blackletter style, commonly known as Old English. It was designed in 1901 by Morris Benton and another person identified by ATF only as Cowan, but has also been ascribed to Joseph W. Phinney. It is a modernization of Caslon Text, and has been widely used. Engravers Old English Open was produced by ATF in 1902. Sidney Gaunt designed Engravers Old Black, very similar to Engravers Old English, for BB&S in 1910, but BB&S later produced Engravers English, a copy of Engravers Old English. It has also been copied by Intertype, and by Ludlow as Old English. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dadaism
    [Manfred Klein]

    Dadaisistic typefaces, if we can call them that: CaslonDadaesque, CaslonDadaesqueLeft, CookinDada-Italic, DadaDa, DadaDaSerif, DadaGridB, DadaGridD, DadaMeetsStoneage, DadaSchwitters, DadasAngie-Bold, DadasAngie-Oblique, DadasDreams, DadasTraces-Bold, DadasTraces, DadasTracesFreeshapes-BoldItalic, DadasTracesFreeshapes-Italic, GridDadaA, GridDadaC, ReadItOrDada, DadaSays (2005). All by Manfred Klein. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Dalton Maag
    [Bruno Maag]

    Swiss designer Bruno Maag (b. Zürich) founded Dalton Maag in 1991, and set up shop in Brixton, South London. He serves the corporate market with innovative type designs, but also has a retail font line. Ex-Monotype designer Ron Carpenter designs type for the foundry. In the past, type designers Veronika Burian worked for Dalton Maag. A graduate of the Basel School of Design, who worked at Stempel and was invitedd by Rene Kerfante to Join Monotype to start up a custom type department. After that, he set up Dalton Maag with his wife Liz Dalton. He has built the company into a 40-employee enterprise with offices in London, Boston, Brazil (where the main type designer is Fabio Luiz Haag), Vienna and Hong Kong.

    The Dalton Maag team designed these commercial fonts:

    • Aktiv Grotesk (2010). Published as an alternative to Helvetica, a typeface Bruno hates with a passion. It also covers Chinese, Japanese and Korean.
    • Aller Typo.
    • Almaq.
    • Blenny (2014). A fat face didone by Spike Spondike.
    • Bligh (2015). A three-weight sans family.
    • Co (2007): a rounded monoline minimalist sans codesigned by Bruno Maag and Ron Carpenter.
    • Cordale: a text family.
    • Dedica (2007): a didone face.
    • Effra and Effra Italic (2007-2009): sans family by Jonas Schudel and Fabio Luiz Haag. Followed in 2013 by Effra Corp.
    • Elevon (2012). By Bruno Maag and Marconi Lima.
    • Fargo (2004): a humanist sans in 6 weights.
    • Foco. A sans family.
    • Grueber (2008): a slab serif.
    • InterFace (2007): an extensive sans family; one weight is free (2001). See also InterFace Corporate (2007).
    • Kings Caslon (2007). By Marc Weymann and Ron Carpenter.
    • Lexia (1999, Ron Carpenter and Dalton Maag): a slab serif family.
    • Magpie (2008). A serifed family by Vincent Connare for Dalton Maag.
    • Objektiv.
    • Oscine (2014, by Bruno Maag, Ron Carpenter, Fernando Caro and Rafael Saraiva). A rounded organic sans typeface.
    • Pan (1996). A text family at 1500 US dollars per style.
    • Plume (2004): a display typeface inspired by calligraphy, co-designed with Ron Carpenter.
    • Prometo. An organic stressed sans.
    • Royalty (1999, +Royalty Obese, 2007): a stunning art deco display family.
    • Scope One (2015). A free Google Font. It has a single light weight, whose slab serifs make it useful for headlines.
    • Setimo (2015). By Fernando Caro. A distinguished sans.
    • Soleto (2014, a simple sans by Bruno Mello, Fabio Haag, Fernando Caro, Rafael Saraiva and Ron Carpenter). Soleto won an award at Tipos Latinos 2014.
    • Southampton.
    • Stroudley (2007): a sturdy large counter condensed sans by Bruno Maag, Ron Carpenter and Veronika Burian.
    • Tephra (2008): a collaboration with Hamish Muir. This is an experimental multi-layered LED-inspired family.
    • Tondo (2007, at Dalton Maag): a rounded information design sans family designed by Veronika Burian for Dalton Maag.
    • Tornac (2013). A casual script.
    • Ubuntu (2010): this is a team effort---a set of four styles of a free font called Ubuntu. This font supports the Indian rupee symbol. Some work for the Ubuntu Font Family was done by Rodrigo Rivas Costa in 2010. Download via Fontspace.
    • Verveine (2009). A casual script by Luce Averous.
    • Viato. A simple sans family co-designed by Bruno Maag and Ron Carpenter in 2007. This tapered terminal sans family includes Viato Corp (2007) and Viato Hebrew (2013).

    Fonts sold at Fontworks, and through the Bitstream Type Odyssey CD (2001). At the ATypI in 2001 in Copenhagen, he stunned the audience by announcing that he would never again make fonts for the general public. From now on, he would just do custom fonts out of his office in London. And then he delighted us with the world premiere of two custom font families, one for BMW (BMWType, 2000, a softer version of Helvetica, with a more virile "a"; some fonts are called BMWHelvetica), and one for the BMW Mini in 2001 (called MINIType: this family comprises MINITypeRegular-Bold, MINITypeHeadline-Regular, MINITypeHeadline-Bold, MINITypeRegular-Regular).

    Other custom typefaces: Tottenham Hotspur (2006), Teletext Signature (by Basten Greenhill Andrews and Dalton Maag), Skoda (Skoda Sans CE by Dalton Maag is based on Skoda Formata by Bernd Möllenstädt and MetaDesign London), UPC Digital, BT (for British Telecommunications), Coop Switzerland (for Coop Schweiz), eircom, Lambeth Council, Tesco (2002), PPP Healthcare, ThyssenKrup (Dalton Maag sold his soul to these notorious arms dealers; TK Type is the name of the house font), Co Headline (2006), Co Text (2006, now a commercial font), Telewest Broadband, Toyota Text and Display (2008), TUIType, HPSans (for Hewlett-Packard, 1997). His custom Vodafone family (sans) (2005) is based on InterFace. In 2011, Dalton Maag created Nokia Pure for Nokia's identity and cellphones, to replace Erik Spiekermann's Nokia Sans (2002). The Nokia Pure typeface has rounder letters, and is simultaneously more legible and more rhythmic.

    In 2010, the Dalton Maag team consisted of Bruno Maag and David Marshall as managing and operations directors, and Vincent Connare as production manager. The type designers are Amélie Bonet, Ron Carpenter, Fabio Haag, Lukas Paltram and Malcolm Wooden.

    In 2015, Kindle picked Bookerly by Dalton Maag for their typeface.

    Interview in 2012 in which he stresses that typefaces should above all be functional.

    View the Dalton Maag typeface library. Speaker at ATypI 2016 in Warsaw and at ATypi 2015 in Sao Paulo, where he gave an electrifying talk on type design for dyslexics (with Alessia Nicotra). Speaker at ATypI 2016 in Warsaw. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Darren McPherson

    Designer from Chicago, IL, who is now in New York City. Home page. Creator of the Western typeface in the Italian style, called Umidità 1832 (2009), about which Darren writes: This re-interpretation of an 1832 wood cut by Caslon was created for the Spring 2009 edition of the literary-arts journal Ninth Letter.

    With Will Miller, he created the structural experimental typeface Skky (2011).

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Berlow

    David Berlow (b. Boston, 1955) entered the type industry in 1978 as a letter designer for the Mergenthaler, Linotype, Stempel, and Haas typefoundries. He joined the newly formed digital type supplier, Bitstream, Inc. in 1982. After Berlow left Bitstream in 1989, he founded The Font Bureau, Inc. with Roger Black. Font Bureau has developed more than 300 new and revised type designs for The Chicago Tribune, The Wall Street Journal, Entertainment Weekly, Newsweek, Esquire, Rolling Stone, Hewlett Packard and others, with OEM work for Apple Computer Inc. and Microsoft Corporation. The Font Bureau Retail Library consists mostly of original designs and now includes over 1,000 typefaces. In a video made for Mike Parker's TDC medal in 2011, Mike Parker says that David Berlow is the most talented type designer he ever met. David lives in Martha's Vineyard.

    At ATypI 2004 in Prague, David spoke about Daily types. At ATypI 2009 in Mexico City, he spoke on The heart of my letter, (and the online version). Since that time he has been very active and vocal on the issue of high quality web fonts. Speaker at ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik and at ATypI 2014 in Barcelona.

    David Berlow Type Specimens (free pdf). Another type specimen booklet. Interview by A List Apart in 2009. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. FontShop link. www.typovideo.de/david-berlow. David Berlow on web fonts. Interview by The Boston Globe. His typefaces:

    • AgencyFB.
    • Amstelvar (2017). a variable (or parametric) font at Font Bureau. Contributors include David Berlow, Santiago Orozco, Alexandre Saumier Demers, and David Jonathan Ross. Open Font Library link, where one can download the font. Github link.
    • Apres (2008, a sans with 40 styles). David Berlow and staff drew Apres as part of a series designed originally for the Palm Pre smart phone, for use both on the device and in print marketing. Simple, open letterforms and generous proportions provide a clear, comfortable, and inviting experience for navigation and readability.
    • Belizio (1987-1988), a beautiful slab serif modeled after the 1958 original slab serif by Aldo Novarese called Egizio Corsiva Nero. Claudio Piccinini would have liked Font Bureau to acknowledge Aldo Novarese's Egizio as the source of this family.
    • Belucian (1990, by David Berlow and Kelly Ehrgott Milligan. Several weights exist, including Demi and Ultra.
    • Berlin Sans (1997).
    • Bureau Grotesque (1989). This 27-style family is now called Bureau Grot. Font Bureau's blurb: The current family was first developed by David Berlow in 1989 from original specimens of the grotesques released by Stephenson Blake in Sheffield. These met with immediate success at the Tribune Companies and Newsweek, who had commissioned custom versions at the behest of Roger Black. Further weights were designed by Berlow for the launches of Entertainment Weekly and the Madrid daily El Sol, bringing the total to twelve styles by 1993. Jill Pichotta, Christian Schwartz, and Richard Lipton expanded the styles further, at which point the family name was shortened to Bureau Grot.. Note: there is a custom version called M&C Saatchi Grotesque with truetype data created by dtpTypes in 1998.
    • CalifornianFB.
    • CheltenhamFB.
    • Custer RE (2014), a typeface for small on screen use. The Font Bureau blurb: In 2009, a book from 1897 in the library of the University of Wisconsin caught David Berlow’s attention. It was set in a clear text face---a predecessor of Bookman---cast by the Western Type Foundry who called it Custer. Upon noting how well the typeface worked in point sizes of 6 and 7 points, Berlow developed it into a member of the Reading Edge series specifically designed for small text onscreen. Custer RE is a broad and approachable typeface drawn large on the body with a tall x-height to maximize its apparent size when set very small. The minimal stroke contrast and the hefty serifs let it stay exceptionally clear down to a font-size of 9px. Font Bureau.
    • Decovar (2017). A variable font. Github link, where one can freely download the font family. See also Open Font Library.
    • Desdemona (1992). An art nouveau face.
    • Eagle (1889-1994). This art deco typeface Font Bureau Eagle was started in 1989 for Publish. David Berlow designed a lowercase, finished the character set, and in 1990 added Eagle Book for setting text. In 1994, Jonathan Corum added Eagle Light and Eagle Black to form a full series.
    • Eldorado.
    • Empire.
    • Esperanto (1995).
    • ITC Franklin Gothic (1991). In 2008, David Berlow added Condensed, Compressed and Extra Compressed widths to Vic Caruso's 1979 ITC Franklin interpretation (which had Light, Medium, Bold and Black), and Font Bureau sells a complete ITC Franklin now. In 2010, Berlow completed his definitive revision of ITC Franklin, a single new series of six weights in four widths for a total of 48 styles. Typeface review at Typographica.
    • Giza (an Egyptian family.
    • Hitech (1995).
    • Juliana Text (2009), a rebirth of Sem Hartz's Juliana (1958, Linotype), a popular narrow legible paperback text face.
    • Kis FB (2007): a revival of old style types by Nicholas Kis from ca. 1700.
    • Letras Oldtsyle (1998). Letras Oldstyle was commissioned by Letras Libres, the reigning literary magazine published by Enrique Krauze in Mexico City. This garalde series was inspired by the earliest typefaces cut in the Americas in the early 1600s by printer Henrico Martinez. Proofs survive in the Biblioteca Nacional. Letras Oldstyle stands as the first typeface ever cut in the Americas, the root of American type design.
    • Meyer Two (1994). Based on a 1926 type by L.B. Meyer.
    • Millenium BT Bold Extended (1989, Bitstream). Also known by insiders as Starfleet Bold Extended, this font was used on federation starship hull markings until episode ten. MyFonts link.
    • Moderno FB (1995): an exhibitionist didone in 32 styles, for Esquire Gentleman. In 1996 Berlow cut new styles with Richard Lipton for El Norte. In 1997, Roger Black ordered new weights for Tages Anzeiger. It grew further when the Baltimore Sun, with FB Ionic as text, was redesigned. The whole series was then revised for Louise Vincent, Montreal Gazette, with further styles added in 2005 for La Stampa. [It is my favorite type family at Font Bureau.]
    • Nature (1995).
    • Numskill (1990).
    • Old Modern.
    • Online Gothic (1995).
    • Ornaments.
    • Phaistos (1990-1991). A flared angular design done with Just van Rossum, and inspired by Rudolf Koch's Locarno.
    • Poynter Agate.
    • Reforma: Based on Giza.
    • Rhode (1997).
    • Romeo.
    • Scotch Roman (1993).
    • Skia (1993, Apple). A Greek simulation sans, in the style of Twombly's Lithos, co-designed with Matthew Carter for Apple's QuickDraw GX project.
    • Skyline.
    • Titling Gothic FB (2005): Berlow spent 10 years developing FB Titling Gothic in seven weights of seven widths each for use as display and headline romans. It was inspired by the popular ATF Railroad Gothic and grew out of Berlow's own Rhode.
    • Throhand: a classic family based on metal type found at the Plantin Moretus Museum in Antwerp.
    • Truth FB (1995).
    • Village.
    • Vonness (2007): a newspaper sans family. Font Bureau: Vonness was designed by David Berlow working closely with Neville Brody on corporate redesign for Jim Von Ehre at Macromedia. Core weights are loosely based on Bauersche Giesserei's Venus, 1907-1910. Berlow expanded the ideas behind the series to 56 fonts.
    • Yurnacular (1992, part of FUSE 4).
    • Zenobia (1995).

    View David Berlow's typefaces. Another catalog of David Berlow's fonts. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Farey

    Type designer who was born in London in 1943. Dave Farey runs Housestyle Graphics with Richard Dawson in London. He was well-known for running the successful auctions at many ATypI meetings. His typefaces for various foundries:

    • Panache Typography: the artsy typeface Cupid, Azbuka (sans family).
    • ITC: ITC Beesknees (1991), the sans-serif family ITC Highlander (1993), ITC Ozwald (1992, a beautiful fat face), ITC Johnston, and ITC Golden Cockerel family (1996, with Richard Dawson, an Eric Gill revival). The former three are part of the Linotype library. ITC Beesknees has been remade and extended by Nick Curtis as Arbuckle Remix (2008).
    • Agfa: Zemestro (2003, a 4-weight sans tapped as a typeface for television). His Creative Alliance typefaces: Abacus (art nouveau), Blackfriar, Bodoni Unique, Breadline Normal, Cachet, Cavalier, Classic, Cupid, Font Outline, Gabardine, ITC Golden Cockerel, Greyhound Script, ITC Johnston, Little Louis, Longfellow, Maigret (art nouveau), Revolution Normal, Stanley, Stellar, Virgin Roman Normal (art nouveau), Warlock.
    • Galapagos: Ersatz (2002, with Richard Dawson, at Galapagos, originally done at Panache).
    • HouseStyle Graphics: ClassicFranklin family (2000-2001).
    • FontHaus: Aries (1995), a font designed by Eric Gill (1932).
    • Monotype: Azbuka (2008-2009): a 20-style sans family by Richard Dawson and David Farey.
    • Elsner&Flake: Caslon EF Black.
    • OEM work: TimesClassic (2000-2001) for The London Times.
    View David Farey's typefaces.

    FontShop link. Klingspor link. Biography at Agfa. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Fleming Nalle
    [Scriptorium (Ragnarok Press, Fontcraft)]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Manthey

    For The Practical Surveyor, a reprint of the classical 1725 text by Samuel Wyld, David Manthey created a font, Wyld (2001, +Italic), that was developed to explicitly match the original text, which was set in Caslon. The free typeface contains glyphs for several ligatures commonly used in printing during the early 18th century. It does not include a bold weight. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daylight Fonts
    [Shin Oka]

    Japanese foundry with excellent web pages on early 20-th century type design. They created various revival fonts in 2009, all connected in some way to Tom Carnase, including

    • Bentley (201)=0). This is the same as Avant Garde Gothic.
    • Bernhard Neo DF (2010).
    • Caslon223 DF (after ITC/LSC Caslon 223 by Tom Carnase). Other Caslons include Caslon Headlione DF (2010) and Caslon Swash DF (2010).
    • Didot DF (2008).
    • Garamond DF (2010).
    • Grouch DF (after ITC Grouch by Tom Carnase and Ronne Bonder)
    • Lubalin Graph DF (after ITC Luabalin graph by Herb Lubalin, Ed Benguiat, Joe Sundwall, and Tony DiSpigna)
    • Busorama DF (after ITC Busorama by Herb Lubalin and Tom Carnase)
    • L&C Hairline DF (after L&C Hairline by Herb Lubalin and Tom Carnase)
    Additionally, they identified the fonts on many covers and albums from the 1960s and 1970s. Further revivals of photolettering era fonts:
    • Baby Teeth (2009): after the art deco typeface of Milton Glaser, 1968, PhotoLettering.
    • CBS Didot (2009): after the original by Freeman Craw, 1970s.
    • Indigo (2009): after a font by Albert Hollenstein, 1970s.
    • Pacella Collegiate (2009): after Vincent Pacella's typeface at PhotoLettering.
    • Penny Bee (2009): a Peignot lookalike.
    • Tiffany Heavy With Swash (2011). A swashy Didot display face. This type was used by Quentin Tarantino's movie Jackie Brown in 1997. Tiffany Heavy (Ed Benguiat, Photolettering) is basically identical to Benguiat Caslon Swash (1960s) and to Foxy Brown (1974). Similar typefaces include LSC Book with Swash by Herb Lubalin and Tom Carnase (ca. 1970).
    • Wexford (2009): after the typeface of Richard A. Schlatter, VGC, 1972.
    They are working on Permanent Massiv (after a 1962 Ludwig&Mayer font by Karlgeorg Hoefer---comparable to Impact or Compacta in its massiveness and masculinity), Michel, Didoni, Tiffany, Ginger Snap, Patriot, Motter Ombra, Pistilli Roman, Benguiat Caslon, and Via Face Don. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dean Allen
    [Textism]

    [More]  ⦿

    Deke Martin
    [Ridgemont StudiosT]

    [More]  ⦿

    Delbanco-Frakturschriften
    [Gerda Delbanco]

    Gerda Delbanco's German foundry in Ahlhorn, specializing in blackletter fonts. Great web presentation, and gorgeous glyphs. The company is owned by Gerda Delbanco, but it is not clear if she designed some or all of the typefaces. Some fonts were designed by Gerhard Helzel, and others by Christian Spremberg. This is one of the best sources of blackletter fonts in the world. Names of the fonts, which are nearly all historical revivals of the great blackletter fonts: Alte Schwabacher, Andreas Schrift, Breitkopf Fraktur, Caslon Gotisch, Claudius (1998, after Rudolf Koch, 1934-1937), Deutsche Kursive, Deutsche Werkschrift (+halbfett), Deutsche Zierschrift, Eckmann Schrift, Eisenacher Fraktur (1994, by Christian Spremberg), Ehmcke Schwabacher, Fette Gotisch, Fichte Fraktur, Frühling (after Rudolf Koch's original from 1917) [sample 1, sample 2, sample 3], DS-Garalang, DS-Garamond, DS Gotenbrg, Hermersdorf, Humboldt Fraktur (after a typeface by H. Rhode), Kleist Fraktur (1996, after the Walter Tiemann original from 1927-1928), Wilhelm Klingspor Schrift, Koch Fraktur, Rudolf Koch Kurrent (after the original school alphabet by Koch, done in 1935), Kurrent (a connected writing font based on examples from J.B. Henning, ca. 1817), Lincoln Gotisch, DS Maximilian Gotisch, DS Maximilian Zierbuchstaben, Normal Fraktur (this is a nameless typeface in the group of Biedermeier-Fraktur typefaces which also includes Schelter's Schulfraktur; also known elsewhere as Armin-Fraktur, Bürenstein-Fraktur, Mars-Fraktur and Pressa-Fraktur), Offenbacher Schwabacher (1996, after the 1899 font by Gustav Ruprecht at Rudhardsche), Old English, Peter Jessen Schrift (1997, after the original from 1924-1929 by Rudolf Koch), Post Fraktur, DS Ratdolt Rotunda, DS Salzmann Fraktur, DS Schmuck, Strassburg, DS Suetterlin, Tannenberg (after a 1933 Stempel typeface by Emil Meyer), DS Thannhaeuser Fraktur, DS Unger Fraktur (1999), DS Walbaum Fraktur, DS Wallau (1996, after Rudolf Koch, 1924-1936), Wartburg Fraktur, DS Weiss Gotisch, DS Wilhelm Klingspor Schrift, Wohe Kursive and Zentenar Fraktur (1997 (after F.H.E. Schneidler's original from 1937).

    Some of the copyright notices refer to the Bund für deutsche Sprache und Schrift, and others to PrimaFont, and this may explain some of the foundry's history. 1994 catalog. Part of the 1999 catalog. Part of the 2002 catalog. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Denia Vanikova

    During her studies in Prague, Denisa Vanikova created the text typeface DeCaslon (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dennis Ortiz-Lopez

    Prolific NY-based designer (born in East Los Angeles) who specializes in faithful revivals of old masters and logotype, in Latin and Hebrew. He made over 500 fonts including. He is also a translator and illuminator of Biblical period Hebrew and Aramaic. His clients include The Vatican (Pope John Paul II's Holocaust commemerative CD) and Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America. His specialties are translations worded in the language and style of the period in which the Biblical text was composed. His translation and enumeration of kabbalistic writings, otherwise known as Hebrew Mysticism and numerology, demonstrate the mathematical base of Biblical miracles.

    MyFonts wrote this analysis of his work: Dennis Ortiz-Lopez is a hugely talented New York type designer. lettering artist&typographer, with around 600 typefaces to his credit. Typographic quality in the magazine market doesn't get much better than Rolling Stone magazine---well, guess who was their typographer (as well as InStyle, Sports Illustrated, People, etc.). Dennis made a successful transition to the digital era around 1989, keeping up his prodigious output. Dennis is also known by his Hebrew name, Siynn bar-Diyonn. Dennis follows the footsteps of great American type designers such as Morris Fuller Benton and Herb Lubalin. And he likes contrasts, too: his typefaces are very narrow or very wide, very thin or very fat. If you love Franklin Gothic but always felt like it's not fat and wide enough. try "OLFranklin". If you like Futura or Gill but have the same feeling. try "OLLondon Black". If you need a headline font but are fed up with Helvetica Inserat, try "OLNewsbytes". If you need something elegant and female but think Avant Garde or Optima are just boring, try "OLRound Gothic" and "OLRadiant". And if your text just won't fit, try "OLBrierwood Grecian" or "OLSkeleton Gothic".

    His typefaces: OL Siynnamin Gothic, OL Radiant Slender, OL Raleigh Gothic (A, B) Display (2013), OL Titling Deco Semi Hilight (2013), OL Gotham Gothic (2013), OL Forum Titling (2013, Trajan column lettering), OL Signpainter Titling Face (2013, copperplate-influenced titling face), OL America The Beautiful (2013, a fashionable didone without ball terminals), OL Braggadocio (Braggadocio is a 1930 design by William A. Woolley), OL Candida Medium Condensed / Extra Condensed, OL Caslon Light / Bold, OL Chamfer Woodtype, OL Contact Bold Condensed, OL Contact Deco Caps, OL Corvinus Bold Condensed, OL Corvinus Versailles, OL Edenesque, OL Egiziano (+Comstock, 2005), OL Egmont (2005, +Medium, Medium Italic, Condensed: after Sjoerd Hendrik de Roos, 1933), OL Engraver's Roman, OL Engraver's Classic Roman (2009), OL Franklin Wide, OL Franklin Extra Bold / Extra Bold Italic, OL Franklin Triple Condensed, OL Garamond (2003), OL Gotham Gothic, OL Grecian Classic Bold Condensed / Bold Extra Condensed, OL Grecian Display, OL Grecian Modern (the Grecian series imitates wood type), OL Gothic Wide and Bold, OL Hairline Gothic (2009), OL Headline Gothic Triple Condensed, OL Heavy Metal Grecian, OL Jenson Bold Condensed / Extra Bold Condensed, OL Latin Classic Condensed, OL Lightline Gothic, OL Marksman Shot, OL Marla Bold, OL Miehle Classic (2009, +Condensed), OL Newsbytes Gothic, OL Purrrbank Gothic, OL Qumran Torah Hebraic Set, OL Racer Roman, OL Raleigh Gothic, OL Roman Compressed (2004), OL Roman Wide Deco Caps, OL Smokler (2006), OL Sharon Gothic Stoned, OL Sinead Stoned and Pointy, OL Smokler, OL Smokler Deco Caps, OL Thorne with Shadow, OL Twenty-five Deco Semicondensed, OL Windowpane Gothic, OL Woody Blocked, OL Avril Roman (2003, a flared face, after Emil Rudolf Weiss), OL Brierwood Grecian, OL Butterfly, OL Egyptian, OL Franklin, OL Garamond, OL London, OL Machina Black (2003, octagonal, mechanical), OL Manhattan, OL Marquee, OIL Newsbytes (2003, bold and black newsprint typefaces), OL Radiant, OL Round Gothic, OL Siynnamin Gothic, OL Skeleton Gothic, and HispanicHeritage (1999).

    His fonts are sold through Phil's Fonts, Dsgnhaus, International Typefounders, and MyFonts. His 2001 fonts are signed Siynn bar-Diyonn, which is his Hebrew name. His Hebrew fonts published in 2007 include OL Hebrew Formal Script, OL Hebrew Neo Black, OL Hebrew Block, OL Hebrew Calligraphica, OL Hebrew Chisel, OL Hebrew Cursive, OL Hebrew Deco, OL Hebrew Handwriting, OL Hebrew Handwriting Deco, OL Hebrew Headline, OL Hebrew Prismatic, OL Hebrew With Tagin, and OL Qumran Torah.

    Buy his fonts at MyFonts. Interview at the end of 2002, in which he recalls the start of his career at Rolling Stone magazine in 1979.

    Showcase of Dennis Ortiz-Lopez's typefaces at MyFonts.

    Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    DH Type Visionaries
    [Candace Uhlmeyer]

    Candace Uhlmeyer provided a bit of type history through the work of Johannes Gutenberg (1398-1468), William Caxton (1422-1491), Aldus Manutius (1450-1515), William Caslon (1692-1766), John Baskerville (1706-1775), Giambattista Bodoni (1740-1813), William Morris (1834-1896), Frederic W. Goudy (1865-1947), Eric Gill (1882-1940), and Jan Tschichold (1902-1974). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dieter Hofrichter
    [Hoftype]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Dieter Steffmann
    [Dieter Steffmann's Homepage]

    [More]  ⦿

    Dieter Steffmann's Homepage
    [Dieter Steffmann]

    FontShop was the name of Dieter Steffmann's foundry in Kreuztal, Germany (not to be confused with the FontShop foundry and font vendor). He made about 600 self-proclaimed "old-fashioned" fonts, and among these many Fraktur fonts. His site became too expensive to run, and is now hosted by Typoasis. Alternate URL. Current list of fonts. See also here. New stuff. Fontspace link. A nice essay about Fraktur fonts accompanies the fonts. News. As Dieter puts it: I am not a designer but I add missing letters to public domain fonts in order to get a complete character set and I hint the fonts and create new weigths (shadow, inline etc.) His Christbaumkugeln font, and how it was made. The font families:

    A set of TeX service files for many of the decorative caps fonts was published by Maurizio Loreti from the University of Padova.

    The collection is now also available in OpenType. Fontsquirrel link. Dafont link. Fontspace link. Abstract Fonts link. Home page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dixie's Delights
    [Michelle Dixon]

    This used to be a wonderful page, but Michelle Dixon seems to have retired from the font making business. There used to be five shareware dingbats fonts: African Ornaments One, Cave Painting Dingbats One, Mayan Dingbats, Pre-Columbian Ornaments One, and Printers' Ornaments One (Mac PS), plus about 45 other original fonts (not shareware). In her wonderful collection, the following of Michelle Dixon's creations stand out: Arrighi Copybook, ItalianMosaicOrnaments, Beautiful, LondonHouse, Love Letter Typewriter, Gaudy Medium, Rusty Nail-Medium (the last four are all old typewriter fonts), and the display fonts Isla Bella (art nouveau), La Negrita, Arty Nouveau, Victorian, Art Nouveau Fonts, Bad Dog-Black, Berlin, Caslon Frenzy, Dixon's Vixens Caps, AntiqueMonoTW, DangerousTypoWriter, Elegant Nouveau Initial Caps, Fruitbasket, Matador, Manhattan, Modern Scribe, Ovid, Spillage, Tacos, Tolstoy, Typewriter, Love Letter, Basketcase, ChiliPepperDingbats, Postage Stamps, Garish Monde, Taco Modern, and Beautiful Ink. All fonts are between 5 and 30 dollars a piece, but often there are four fonts per face. In August 98, the absolutely gorgeous calligraphic font Beautiful Ink became available as a 10USD shareware font in Windows TrueType. Many designs are by Blake Haber, who is Michelle Dixon's husband. Located in Santa Barbara, CA.

    Dafont link. Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Douglas Crawford McMurtrie

    Author (1888-1944) of over 400 books on printing and typography. His life story is told by Scott Bruntjen and Melissa L. Young in Douglas C. McMurtrie, bibliographer and historian of printing (Metuchen, N.J. : Scarecrow Press, 1979). A partial list of his books, limited to the history of typography:

    His typefaces include McMurtrie Title, Ultra-Modern&Italic (1928, an art deco typeface published at Ludlow), and Vanity Fair Capitals. Jim Spiece's UltraModernClassicSG is based on Ultra-Modern. And so is Steve Jackaman's Ultra Modern RR (Red Rooster).

    FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Eddie Kohler
    [Autofont]

    [More]  ⦿

    Edmund Fry

    British typefounder, d. 1835. Son of Joseph Fry, the founder of the Fry Letter Foundry in Bristol. Quoted from MyFonts: In 1784 he introduced a raised roman letter for the blind, and was awarded a prize by the Edinburgh Society of Arts. Louis Braille's system of lines and dots ultimately proved better. In 1787, he and his brother Henry took over the Fry Letter Foundry from their father. Credited with many great typefaces, including Fry's Baskerville (1768) and Fry Moxon (or Graisberry), a Gaelic typeface, Fry A Gothic Capitals (ca. 1819), an angular transitional Gaelic face, and Fry B Gaelic Capitals, a transitional Gaelic typeface (Everson mentions the date 1836, but that would be one year after his death...) and Priory Text.

    Mac McGrew writes: Priory Text was the blackletter of the Fry Foundry in England, with some sizes dating back to about 1600, and most sizes shown in 1785. It was revived by Talbot Baines Reed for his History of the Old English Letterfoundries in 1887, and DeVinne used it for his edition of Philobiblon in 1889. The Dickinson foundry, a forerunner of ATF, issued it as Priory Text about that time. It is very similar to Caslon Text (q.v.). BB&S made a near-duplicate type, originally called Reed Text, but later shown as Priory Black Text. Although the latter was shown as late as 1925, these typefaces had generally been replaced earlier by Cloister Black (q. v.) and other Old English typefaces with more refined draftsmanship.

    About the Gaelic types, Brendan Leen writes: In 1819, Edmund Fry cut a type once again commissioned by the British and Foreign Bible Society. The design of the Fry type signifies a departure from the angular minuscule toward the more rounded form of the half-uncial, a characteristic of Irish typography in the nineteenth century. Sample of Fry Irish type from The Two First Books of the Pentateuch.

    Author of Pantographia (1799, Cooper&Wilson, London), a work that shows the scripts of many languages [a careful digitization of some can be found in the font family Pantographia (2010) by Intellecta Design]. The full title is Pantographia; Containing Accurate Copies of All the Known Alphabets in the World; Together with an English Explanation of the Peculiar Force or Power of Each Letter: To Which Are Added, Specimens of All Well-Authenticated Oral Languages; Forming a Comprehensive Digest of Phonology. Examples from that book: Bastard, Bengallee and Berryan, Bulgarian and Bullantic, Chaldean.

    FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Edward Benguiat

    Born in New York in 1927, Ed grew up in Brooklyn. He was once a very prominent jazz percussionist playing in several big bands with Stan Kenton and Woody Herman, among others. He has created a large number of typefaces between 1970 and 1995. About his career, he once said: I'm really a musician, a jazz percussionist. One day I went to the musician's union to pay dues and I saw all these old people who were playing bar mitzvahs and Greek weddings. It occurred to me that one day that's going to be me, so I decided to become an illustrator. He designed more than 400 typefaces for PhotoLettering. He played a critical role in establishing The International Typeface Corporation (or ITC) in the late '60s and early '70s. Founded in 1971 by designers Herb Lubalin, Aaron Burns, and Ed Ronthaler, ITC was formed to market type to the industry. Lubalin and Burns contacted Benguiat, whose first ITC project was working on Souvenir. Ed became a partner with Lubalin in the development of U&lc, ITC's famous magazine, and the creation of new typefaces such as Tiffany, Benguiat, Benguiat Gothic, Korinna, Panache, Modern No. 216, Bookman, Caslon No. 225, Barcelona, Avant Garde Condensed, and many more. With Herb Lubalin, Ed eventually became vice-president of ITC until its sale to Esselte Ltd.

    Ed is a popular keynote speaker at major type meetings, including, e.g., at TypeCon 2011, where he entertained the crowd with quotes such as I do not think of type as something that should be readable. It should be beautiful. Screw readable. His typefaces---those from PhotoLettering excepted:

    • ITC Avant Garde Gothic (1971-1977, with Andre Gurtler, Tom Carnase, Christian Mengelt, and Erich Gschwind).
    • ITC Modern No. 216 (1982: a didone text family). The Softmaker versions are called M791 Modern and Montpellier. Ed writes: It's a revival of the classic British Modern design. I tried to capture the dignity and grace of the original designs, but not make it look stuffy. Moderns were often numbered to distinguish different versions. 216 East 45th street was where I worked when I drew the ITC Modern No. 216 font.
    • Modern No. 20, after the Stephenson Blake original from 1905. [Image by Kristen Cleghorn]
    • ITC Barcelona (1981). Ed writes: I was one of the design consultants for the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. What could be more appropriate then to design a typeface for the event? The design of the ITC Barcelona font family, with its soft triangular serifs set the mood for the soft-spoken Catalan people.
    • ITC Bauhaus (1974-1975). ITC Bauhaus was codesigned with Victor Caruso. The Softmaker versions are called R790 Sans and Dessau. The Infinitype version is Dessau. The Bitstream version is Geometric 752.
    • ITC Benguiat (1977) and ITC Benguiat Gothic (1977-1979). Comic book style typefaces called Benjamin and Benjamin Gothic on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD (2002). Softmaker also has fonts called B693 Roman and B691 Sans that are identical.
    • Benguiat Roman (1960s).
    • PL Bernhardt (Photo-Lettering, 1970), modeled after a 1930-1931 design by Lucian Bernhard.
    • ITC Bookman (1975). See B791 Roman on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD (2002).
    • Calendar (1960s).
    • ITC Caslon 224 (1983). In 1960, he added Benguiat Caslon Swash, and in 1970, Caslon 223 followed. See C790 Roman on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD (2002), and Caslon CP (2012, Claude Pelletier).
    • ITC Century Handtooled (1993).
    • ITC Cheltenham Handtooled (1993).
    • ITC Edwardian Script (1994).
    • ITC Garamond Handtooled.
    • ITC Korinna (1974): after a 1904 typeface called Korinna by Berthold. Michael Brady thinks it is very close to the Berthold original.
    • Laurent (1960s).
    • Lubalin Graph (1974, ITC). By Herb Lubalin, Ed Benguiat, Joe Sundwall, and Tony DiSpigna.
    • ITC Panache (1987-1988). Ed writes: I put my heart, soul, sweat and tears into the design of the ITC Panache font family. I was striving to create an easy to read, legible typeface. I know in my heart that I accomplished what I set out to do. Not only is it easy to read, it's also sophisticated.
    • Scorpio (1960s).
    • ITC Souvenir (1977). Kent Lew: Benguiat revived Benton's Souvenir for ITC in the '70s and that was well-received for a while. On the other hand, look what happened after that. Souvenir in the ATF 1923 catalog looks really nice, IMO. Souvenir in the '70s seems cliché now. Souvenir these days would be downright dorky. Souvenir was done by Benguiat in 1967 at PhotoLettering. Morris Fuller Benton's original model was from 1914. It was described by Simon Loxley as follows: Souvenir is a typeface that is intractably rooted in style to a particular era, although one a half-century after its creation. It is a quintessential late 1960s and 1970s typeface, informal, with full rounded character shapes and rounded serifs, a laid-back Cheltenham. The Bitstream version of ITC Souvenir was called Sovran.
    • ITC Tiffany (1974), a fashion mag typeface family. Adobe says that it is a blend of Ronaldson, released in 1884 by the MacKellar Smiths&Jordan foundry, and Caxton, released in 1904 by American Type Founders.
    • PL Torino (1960, Photo-Lettering), a blackboard bold didone-inspired typeface.
    • In 2004, House Industries released five typefaces based on the lettering of Ed Benguiat: Ed Interlock (1400 ligatures---based on Ed's Interlock, Photolettering, 1960s), Ed Roman (animated bounce), Ed Script, Ed Gothic and Bengbats.
    • He did logotypes for many companies, including Esquire, New York Times, Playboy, Reader's Digesn, Sports Illustrated, Look, Estée Lauder, AT&T, A&E, Planet of the Apes, Super Fly.
    • Lesser known Photolettering typefaces include Benguiat Bounce, Benguiat Boutique, Benguiat Bravado, Benguiat Brush, Benguiat Buffalo (+Ornaments), Benguiat Century, Benguiat Cinema, Benguiat Congressional, Benguiat Cooper Black, Benguiat Cracle, Benguiat Crisp, Benguiat Debbie, Benguiat Montage, Benguiat Roman. Scorpio, Laurent and Charisma, all done in the 1960s, are psychedlic types.

    Links: Linotype, CV by Elisa Halperin. Daylight Fonts link (in Japanese). Catalog by Daylight, part I, part II.

    Pics harvested from the web: Portrait With Ilene Strivzer at ATypI 1999. One more with Strivzer. With Jill Bell at ATypI 1999. In action. At TypeCon 2011 with Matthew Carter and Alejandro Paul. At the same meeting with Carole Wahler and with Roger Black.

    FontShop link. Klingspor link.

    View Ed Benguiat's typefaces. Ed Benguiat's fonts. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Emigre
    [Zuzana Licko]

    Sacramento, CA-based foundry established in 1984 by Zuzana Licko and Rudy Vanderlans. They were "in" during the grungy early 1990s, but ran out of steam and out of fashion around the turn of the century. They had their own magazine, and were in the limelight in the 1990s. Lea Chapon's thesis at Estienne in 2006 was entitled Emigre : typographie et critique de la typographie---strangely, it was removed from the school's web site---Emigregate? The typophiles are not gentle with their critique. In the collection, we find these fonts: Arbitrary (1992), Awkward (1991), Berkeley (1990), Citizen (1990), Elektrix (1990), EmigreEight (1990), EmigreFifTeen (1990), EmigreFourTeen (1990), EmigreTen (1990), EmperorEight (1990), EmperorFifTeen (1990), EmperorNineTeen (1990), EmperorTen (1990), IndustrySans, KubotaFont (1991), Lunatix (1990), Marvelous (1991), Matrix (1988-1991), NeoTheo, Oblong (1990), STICadillac (1990), Sample (1990), Senator (1990), Simplex, TemplateGothic (1991), TotallyGlyphic (1990), TotallyGothic (1990), Transportation (1990), UniversalEight (1990), UniversalNineTeen (1990), VariexBold (1990), VariexLight (1990), VariexRegular (1990), Zenith (1990). Also, by designer:

    • Nancy Mazzei and Brian Kelly: Backspacer (1993).
    • Zuzana Licko: BaseMono (1997, a monospaced family), BaseNine (1995), BaseTwelve (1995), Dogma (1994), Filosofia (1996, Emigre's (unicase) version of Bodoni), Hypnopaedia (1997), Journal (1993), the Lo-Res family (pixel fonts at sizes 9, 12, 15, 21, 22, 28, made in 2001), Modula (1990-1995), MrsEaves (1996, Emigre's version of Baskerville), Narly (1993), Program OT (2013, a rounded sans family), Quartet (1993), SodaScript (1995), Solex (2000), Tarzana (1998), Triplex (1990), Whirligig (1994).
    • Bob Aufuldish and Eric Donelan: BigCheese (dings, 1993), ZeitGuys (1994, funny dingbats).
    • John Hersey: Blockhead (1995, Alphabet and Illustrations), Thingbat (1995).
    • Conor Mangat: BoksHeavy (1994), BoksThin (1994), Platelet (1994, inspired by California license plate systems---organic and quite dysfunctional).
    • John Downer: Brothers (1999), Council (1999), Triplex Italic (1990), Vendetta (1999).
    • Sibylle Hagmann: Cholla (1999).
    • Frank Heine: DallianceFlourishes (2001), DallianceRoman (2001), DallianceScript (2001), Motion (1993), OaklandEight (1990), OaklandFifTeen (1990), OaklandSix (1990), OaklandTen (1990), Remedy (1992).
    • P. Scott Makela: DeadHistory (1994).
    • Miles Newlyn: Democratica (1992-1993), Missionary (1992), SabbathBlack (1994).
    • Rodrigo Cavazos: EideticNeo (2000).
    • Jonathan Barnbrook: Exocet (1992), Manson (1993), Mason (1993).
    • Edward Fella: FellaParts (1993), Outwest (1993).
    • Jeffery Keedy: KeedySans (1991).
    • Mark Andresen: NotCaslonOne (1995).
    • Claudio Piccinini: Ottomat (1996).
    • Rudy VanderLans: Suburban (1994).
    Alternate URL.

    View Zuzana Licko's typefaces. Alphabetical listing of Zuzana Licko's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Emiliano Agnetti

    Graduate from FADU, University of Buenos Aires, who created the typeface Read Praz Std (2010), a typeface that evolved from Adobe Caslon Pro. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Erhard Kaiser

    German type designer (born in Quedlinburg, near Leipzig, 1957), who made the extensive DTL Fleischmann family (1992) at the Dutch Type Library. The font is named after Johann Michael Fleischmann (1707-1768), a German punchcutter who lived and died in Amsterdam. From 1983 until 1991 Erhard Kaiser worked at TypeDesign for Typoart, Dresden and since 1993 has been with DutchTypeLibrary/URW++. Still at DTL, he made the sans serif DTLProkyon family in 2002 around a curvy "4". This family gets raves from many typographers. Among possible imitations, we cite Dalton Maag's Ubuntu. For Typoart he designed Caslon Gotisch, Kleopatra, Quadro, Weiß-Antiqua and Bembo Antiqua. Since 1998 he teaches at the Muthesius Hochschule in Kiel. In 2005, he created DTL Antares, a strangely proportioned serif to accompany DTL Prokyon. Some weights published in 2008 are called Evonik Antares and some Evonik Prokyon.

    Klingspor link. Bio at ATypI. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Expert Alphabets
    [George Abrams]

    George Abrams (b. 1919 or 1920, Brooklyn, d. 2001, Manhasset, NY) is the designer of the gorgeous font families Augereau, Abrams Caslon and Venetian, at Expert Alphabets in Great Neck, NY. Abrams taught lettering and typeface design at the Parsons School of Design, the New School for Social Research and at the Columbia University Teachers College. He had over 50 years of Madison Avenue experience designing ads, logos, typography and lettering for Fortune 500 companies and more. His early typefaces were photo types published by Headliners in New York City. He died on June 7, 2001 at age 81.

    About Augereau: This is the only digitized typeface by George Abrams [in fact, the digitization is due to Charles Nix, for George Abrams]. Its 28 weights include over 2,000 sorts including expert, OsF,&alts. Augereau is named for Antoine Augereau, who was a typographer who had a few claims to fame - one was that he was Claude Garamonds teacher, and two was that he was sentenced to death for heresy in 1544. Heresy for a typographer in 1544 meant that he printed something that the king or the Pope didn't like and died for it.

    I would like to thank Poul Steen Larsen for clarifying the history of Abrams' Venetian: The Abrams Venetian was donated to Mr. Poul Kristensen of Herning (in Jutland), then Printer to the Royal Court (which he has ceased to be in 1995). You are right about the font being today locked to Poul Kristensen' old Linotron, from which not even Linotype experts brought in to unlock it, could get it out for conversion into an up-to-date digital font. So the font will disappear from the type arena when Kristensens Linotron one day breaks down. You can trust me, for I was the one who established the contact between George and Mr. Kristensen back in 1986. The font was first used in 1989 in a book by Martin Lowry, British renaissance historian, with the title Venetian Printing. George Abrams' chalk drawings of the entire alphabet in regular and italic were scanned, more precisely vectorised on-screen and downloaded in Denmark by the Kristensens and therefore, in one sense, could be called the first Danish complete font. A sample of the first use of Abrams' Venetian. A second sample from "Venetian Printing". Abrams Venetian was digitized at some point by Jorgen Kristensen for Poul Kristensen Grafisk Virksomhed Printer.

    Apostrophe wrote this about Abrams Caslon: This was actually reviewed by Caflish and, if I remember correctly, Mark vonBronkhorst, so there are at least 3 or 4 copies of it out there, other than the Abrams' estate original data. Sumner Stone once said that this is the best Caslon he has ever seen. At least he has seen it; I haven't.

    The typefaces by Abrams (Abrams Venetian and Augereau) are preserved in the New York City-based Abrams Legacy Collection (see also here).

    Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fabio Luiz Haag
    [ByType (was: Foco Design; will be Fabio Haag Type)]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fat stencil typefaces: Stephen Coles's List

    Stephen Coles lists fat stencil typefaces in the FontShop store.

    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ferrets N Fonts
    [Perry Mason]

    Perry Mason is the prolific ozzie creator (based in Newcastle) of Nato, a truetype font apparently made for NATO military vehicle lettering (2001). Since that first font, he has made well over 1000 fonts, mostly in 2001, but some as late as 2003. Back-up of his fonts at Just Us Now, now defunct. Alternate URL for Just Us Now (also defunct). Yet another URL. List of his fonts, by date, and alphabetical list. Perry Mason's dingbats. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Font Mesa
    [Michael Hagemann]

    Michael Hagemann's creations have a 1850-1920 style or at evoke the Wild West. Font Mesa is located in Naperville, IL.

    Free fonts include Cactus Sandwich (Mexican simulation face), Timepiece (originally called Tax Cut), Timepiece 3D, Magic School One and Two (2004, two Harry Potter typefaces), Wild Ride, Corleone (2001: see also here), Corleone Due (2001), MightyRapids (2001: discontinued) and the Ferrari logo font FerroRosso (2002).

    Michael Hagemann's commercial fonts by year of production:

    • 2001: La Mesa (2001), Maverick's Luck (2001), Desperado (2001), Rio Mesa, Maverick's Luck (based on a bank document from 1876), La Macchina (2001, Lamborghini car lettering)
    • 2002: Brewmaster Modern (lettering of Budweiser Racing), Saddlery and Saddlery Post (Western-style caps: a revival of Minaret by Ihlenberg in 1868; Solo calls it Trocadero), FerroRosso (lettering as in the Ferrari logo), Stampede (a family based on lettering used in document from the Chicago, Indiana&Eastern Railway Co. in 1902), Main Strike (a Tuscan font, based on Tuscan Ornate, or Bracelet, fonts that date from before 1860), Red Dog Saloon, Rough Riders (great Western-style caps), Draft Beer.
    • 2003: OK Corral (revival of Caslon and Catherwood's Italian from 1821), OK Corral Lined (same as OK Corral with layers; called Italianate Barnum by Dan Solo), Gold Standard (a Tuscan font based on a few letters found on an old Gold Certificate from 1882), Rodeo Clown (based on Carnival), Taqueria, Cove.
    • 2004: Bronc Stomper, Open Range, Saloon Girl, Gillé Classic an exquisitily detailed family based on work by Joseph Gillé, 1820's, and implemented elsewhere under the names Circus, Roma and Madame; this was originally called Home Style; some say that the original goes back to Silvestre), Miss Scarlett (Gone with the Wind poster lettering), Open Range, High Noon, Draft Beer Classic (2002-2005, connected 50s script), High Country, American West, West Wind, AmericanPop (Coca-Cola font).
    • 2005: Rodeo Roundup (rope font; Solo called it Rope Initials), Algerian Mesa (extended to the gigantic font family Tavern; the original Algerian goes back to Stephenson and Blake), Conestoga (circus font), Rough Riders (a nice Western font based on the logo of the Beach Creek Railroad Company in the 1860s), Rough Riders Redux, Mesa Pointe (pointing hands, from 19th century sources), Black Pearl (an ornamental blackletter typeface based on an original from ca. 1860; it has two beautiful manicules; some say it is based on an 1860 font called Rimmed Black by West, published by Farmer&Little), Saloonkeeper (inspired by the Leinenkugels brewing label), Wanderer (inspired by the title logo of the TV show The Wild West), Lynchburg (inspired by the Jack Daniels Green Label Whiskey logo).
    • 2006: Flat Rock (a revival of Inverted Shaded by Julius Herriet, done at Conner in 1886; Solo calls it Big Cat), Livery Stable (revival of GlypticShaded by Ihlenburg at MS&J, 1878. See also Glyptic and Glyptic No.2, 1878), Happy Holly Day, Main Street (a Tuscan typeface that revives Soutache by Julius Herriet and Bruce, 1873).
    • 2007: Birdcage (2007, after a lettering sample in Rob Roy Kelly's American Wood Type book), Lonestar, Lonestar Western, Railhead (2007: 4 styles, a revival of an 1870s type style that was originally available from both Bruce's New York and James Conner's&Sons type foundries called English Two-Line Ornamented No.4; an earlier version was English, done in 1853 by Caslon, Austin, Woods and Sharwoods; and before that, the typeface was created by a German designer in 1849), Flying Dutchman (2007, a revival of a MacKellar, Smiths&Jordan Co Kanzlei-style font from 1876), and Western Sky (2007, a revival of a late 1800s Italian font known as Italian Slab Fancy or Dodge City: it is Italic Ornate from Smith, 1874, MS&J). Country Western (2007, 11 styles; plus versions called Country Western Script and Country Western Swing) is a revival of the classic William Page font known as Clarendon Ornamented originally designed in 1859 and again in 1877 by Vanderburgh&Wells. Abbiente (2007) is his first foray into the world of Bodoni and Didot. Buffalo Bill (2007) is a beautiful Western style font that revives a classic from James Conner's foundry from 1888 [Solo also calls it Buffalo Bill].
    • 2008: Gold Rush and Gold Spur (2008) are further Wild West style families, based on typos from the Bruce Foundry, 1865. Silverland (2008, 8 styles; a revival of Ornamented No. 1490 by Ihlenberg, 1874, Bruce) and Belgian (2008, 5 styles; a revival of Ornamented No. 1515 by Julius Herriet, 1861, Bruce) are further revivals of typefaces from the Bruce Foundry.
    • 2009: Spanish Main (revival of an old MacKellar Smiths&Jordan blackletter font named Sloping Black, 1896; others mention Witham and MS&J and give the date 1869), Spanish Rose, Black Rose (spiky blackletter based on BlackOrnamented No. 532, Ihlenberg, 1873, Bruce), Bella Rose (2009, blackletter), Broadgauge Ornate (revival of an 1869 Western poster typeface by Ihlenberg at MacKellar Smiths&Jordan). Apple Pie (2009) is some sort of Bodoni Ornate---it revives and extends a William Hagar Type Foundry face, ca. 1850 [MS&J added a lowercase in 1869]. This was followed immediately by Bodoni Ornamental. Hickory (2009) is an ornamental Western face, a revival of an old unnamed font dating back to 1852 and was sold through a few different type foundries including Bruce, MacKellar Smiths&Jordan and James Conner's Sons.
    • 2010: Gunsmoke is a Far West font, a revival of a James Conner's Sons font that has been around the block under different names such as Extended Clarendon Shaded, Original Ornamented and Galena [Solo called it Galena]. Night Train is another Far West font.
    • 2011: Gold is a multi-style slab serif font family based on the classic Gold Rush (1865, Bruce), with the shadows removed. Images: Gold Black, Gold Thin.
    • Undated: Cowboy Serenade (based on Phidian by Ihlenberg, 1870, MS&J; Solo's names: Eureka, Shaded Phidian), Gold Fever (based on Caxtonian, 1878, MS&J), Old Thunder (based on a Tuscan typeface from the 1800s).
    • 2013: Great Western, Cowboy Western, Cowboy Rodeo.
    • 2014: Magnum Sans.
    • 2015: Grillmaster (a basic sans family consisting of 128 fonts).
    • 2016: Pitmaster.

    Klingspor link. Fontspace link. Dafont link. Creative Market link. MyFonts page. View Michael Hagemann's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fontek (Letraset Fontek)

    Collection of typefaces at Letraset. Newest typefaces include Donaldson Hand (Tim Donaldson), La Gioconda (based on letters from Giovanni Francesco Cresci, done by Richard Dawson and Dave Farey), Spidercave (Michael Gills), Locomotiv (Phill Grimshaw), Bobbysox (Alan Dempsey), Bouchon (Roselyne and Michel Besnard), Eplica (Yvonne Diedrich), Uffington (Tim Donaldson). The fonts: Aachen Bold, Aachen Medium, Academy Engraved, Agincourt, Algerian Condensed, Ambrose, Aquinas, Aquitaine Initials, Aristocrat, Arriba, Arriba-Arriba, Artiste, Augustea Open, Avalanche Script, Avenida, Axis Bold, Balmoral, Bang, Banner, Becka Script, Belwe Mono, Belwe Mono Italic, Bendigo, Bergell, Bertie, Bertram, Bible Script, Bickley Script, Bitmax, Blackmoor, Bluntz, Bobbysox, Boink, Bordeaux Display, Bordeaux Family, Bordeaux Italic, Bordeaux Roman, Bordeaux Roman Bold, Bordeaux Script, Bouchon Bold, Bouchon Light, Brighton Bold, Brighton Light, Brighton Medium, Bronx, Burlington, Buzzer 3, Cabaret, Cabarga Cursiva, Campaign, Cancellaresca Script, Carlton, Carumba, Caslon 540 Ital/Swash, Caxton Light Italic, Caxton Roman Bold, Caxton Roman Book, Caxton Roman Light, Chalkline Bold, Challenge Bold, Challenge Extra Bold, Champers, Charlotte Bold, Charlotte Book, Charlotte Book Italic, Charlotte Family, Charlotte Medium, Charlotte Sans Bold, Charlotte Sans Book, Charlotte Sans Book Italic, Charlotte Sans Family, Charlotte Sans Medium, Charlotte Sans Small Caps, Charlotte Small Caps, Chiller, Chipper, Choc, Chromium One, Citation, Claude Sans, Claude Sans Bold Italic, Claude Sans Italic, Collins, Comedy, Commercial Script, Compacta, Compacta Bold, Compacta Italic, Coptek, Corinthian Bold, Corinthian Bold Condensed, Corinthian Light, Corinthian Medium, Crillee Bold Italic, Crillee Extra Bold Italic, Crillee Italic, Crillee Italic Inline Shadow, Cult, Dancin', Data 70, Dave Farey Display Fonts, David Quay Display Fonts, David Quay Scripts, Demian, Demian Bold, Design Font Attitudes, Design Font Calligraphic Ornaments, Design Font Celebrations, Design Font Commercials, Design Font Delectables, Design Font Diversions, Design Font Diversities, Design Font Eclectics, Design Font Energetics, Design Font Expressions, Design Font Incidentals, Design Font Industrials, Design Font Inspirations, Design Font Journeys, Design Font Mo' Funky Fresh Symbols, Design Font Moderns, Design Font Naturals, Design Font Organics, Design Font Organics II, Design Font Primitives, Design Font Radicals, Design Font Urbans, Design Font Well Beings, Design Font Wildlife, Digitek, Dolmen, Donaldson Hand, Doodlebug, Dynamo Shadow, Edwardian Medium, Elysium Bold, Elysium Book, Elysium Book Italic, Elysium Family, Elysium Medium, Elysium Small Caps, Emphasis, Enviro, Eplica Bold, Eplica Bold Italic, Eplica Book, Eplica Book Italic, Eplica Family, Eplica Medium, Eplica Medium Italic, Epokha, Equinox, Etruscan, Faithful Fly, Fashion Compressed No. 3, Fashion Engraved, Figural Bold, Figural Book, Figural Book Italic, Figural Family, Figural Medium, Figural Small Caps, Fine Hand, Flamenco Inline, Flamme, Flight, Fling, Follies, Forest Shaded, Frances Uncial, Frankfurter, Frankfurter Highlight, Frankfurter Inline, Frankfurter Medium, Freestyle Script, Freestyle Script Bold, Gigi, Gilgamesh Bold, Gilgamesh Book, Gilgamesh Book Italic, Gilgamesh Family, Gilgamesh Medium, Gilgamesh Small Caps, Gilgamesh Titling, Gill Display Compressed, Gill Kayo Condensed, Gillies Gothic Extra Bold Shaded, Glastonbury, Globale, Globale Bold, Globale Bold Italic, Globale Family, Globale Italic, Goo Goo Gjoob, Gravura, Green, Greyton Script, Hadfield, Hand Drawn, Harlow, Harlow Solid, Harvey, Hazel, Heliotype, Helvetica Bold Condensed, Helvetica Medium Condensed, Highlight, Hollyweird, Ignatius, Impakt, Indy Italic, Informal Roman, Inscription, Iris, Isis, Jazz, John Handy, Jokerman, Kanban, Katfish, Katytude, Klee, La Bamba, La Gioconda, La Gioconda Bold, Lambada, Laser, Laser Chrome, Latino Elongated, Laura, LCD, Le Griffe, Lexikos, Lightnin', Limehouse Script, Lino Cut, Locarno Italic, Locarno Light, Locomotiv, Magatama, Malibu, Marguerita, Martin Wait Display Fonts, Martin Wait Scripts, Mastercard, Mekanik, Mekanik Italic, Milano, Mistral, Mo' Funky Fresh, Montage, Neo Neo, Oberon, Odessa, Old English, One Stroke Script, One Stroke Script Bold, One Stroke Script Shaded, Orange, Orlando, Pablo, Papyrus, Party, Pendry Script, Phill Grimshaw Display Fonts, Phoenikia, Pink, Plaza, Pleasure Bold Shaded, Pneuma, Potato Cut, Prague, Premier Lightline, Premier Shaded, Princetown, Pristina, Pritchard, Pritchard Line Out, Pump, Pump Demi Bold, Quadrus, Quixley, Rage Italic, Ragtime, Rapier, Refracta, Regatta Condensed, Retail Script, Retro Bold, Retro Bold Condensed, Riva, Robotik, Robotik Italic, Romic Light, Romic Light Italic, Roquette, Ru'ach, Rubber Stamp, Rundfunk, Santa Fe, Savoye, Scratch, Scriba, Scriptease, Scriptek, Scriptek Italic, Scruff, Shaman, Shatter (op-art), Sinaloa, Skid Row, Slipstream, Smack, Smudger, Spidercave Bold, Spidercave Book, Spidercave Book Italic, Spidercave Family, Spidercave Ornamented, Spooky, Spotlight, Squire, Squire Extra Bold, Strobos, Superstar, Synchro, Tag, Tannhauser, Teknik, Telegram, Tiger Rag, Tim Donaldson Display Fonts, Tim Donaldson Scripts, Tiranti Solid, Trackpad, Tropica Script, Twang, Uffington, Ulysses, University Roman, University Roman Bold, University Roman Italic, Van Dijk, Van Dijk Bold, Varga, Vegas, Vermont, Victorian, Victorian Inline Shaded, Vienna Extended, Vivaldi, Wade Sans Light, Wanted, Waterloo Bold, Westwood, Wild Thing, Willow, Xylo, Young Baroque, Zaragoza, Zennor, Zinjaro. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fonteria CD
    [Manfred Klein]

    "The 50 Fonteria fonts were made in the nineties when Manfred started to play with digital type. This compilation was intended to be distributed commercially, but somehow it came to nothing. So Manfred decided to distribute the collection as free fonts - for private use* only." In 2001, Fonteria CD was produced. It had these creations: Artist, BodoniTwinsCaps, Caslonia, CircusOne through CircusFour, Clown, CrazyTimes, Emmenthaler, Ermir, Erpressung, FloRaTialen, GaraNitials, GaraSans, Imre, Jockey, Jonas, KL1GridZebra, KL1MonoSansInvers, KL1MonocaseSerif, KleinsDancingSlapzerif-Light, Laurens, LernschrittABC, Mighty, MightySpecial, MirrorKleinShadows, MonoAlphabet, MonoAlphabetSerif, Monument, Mutoni, PfeileOne through PfeileThree, Pointout, RootsOfMatisse, SMHand, SaltoOne, SaltoTwo, SonnCar, Steamdecor, StonageStamp, Stoneage, WalNuss, Zoography-Normal. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fontscape: Small x-height

    Fontscape lists serif typefaces with small x-height: Afterlife BB, Bernhard Modern, Caslon Titling, RTF Cotillion, Eva Antiqua SG, Koch Antiqua, Metropolis SG, ITC Mona Lisa, Mussica, Nicolas Cochin, Rundfunk, Sackers Solid Antique Roman. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    FontSite
    [Sean Cavanaugh]

    Online font site run by Sean Cavanaugh (b. Cape May, NJ, 1962) out of Camano Island, WA. This used to be called Title Wave Studios. In the archives, find essays on writing style, rules of typography, and a comparison by Thomas Phinney (program manager of Latin Fonts at Adobe) of T1 and TTF. The Fontsite 500 CD (30 USD) offers 500 classical fonts with the original names, plus a few names I have not seen before, such as Bergamo (=Bembo by Francesco Griffo), Chantilly (=Gill Sans), Gareth (=Galliard), Palladio (=Palatino, Savoy (=Sabon), URWLatino, Unitus, Toxica, Publicity, Plakette, Pericles, Opus (=Optima), Melville, Function, Flanders, Cori Sans, Binner. Uli Stiehl provides proof that many of the fonts at FontSite are rip-offs (identical to) of fonts in Martin Kotulla's collection. Free fonts: Bergamo, CartoGothic (1996-2009), CombiNumerals. At MyFonts, the CombiNumerals Pro and CombiSymbols dingbat families are available since 2010. The site has a number of fonts with the acronym FS in the name, so I guess these are relatively original (but I won't swear on it): Allegro FS, Beton FS, Bodoni Display FS (+ Bold, Demibold), Bodoni No 2 FS (+ Ultra, Bodoni Recut FS (+Bold, Demibold), and so forth. His 500 Font CD has these fonts:

    • Garalde, Venetian: Bergamo, Bergamo Expert, Bergamo SC&OsF, Caslon, Caslon Expert, Gareth, Garamond, Garamond Expert, Garamond SC&OsF, Garamond Condensed, URW Palladio, URW Palladio Expert, Savoy, Savoy Expert, Savoy Small Caps&OsF, Vendôme.
    • Slab Serif: Clarendon, Glytus, Typewriter, Typewriter Condensed.
    • Script: Commercial Script, Deanna Script, Deanna Swash Caps, Hudson, Legend, Mistral, Park Avenue, Phyllis, Phyllis Swash Caps, Vivaldi.
    • Uncial: American Uncial, Rosslaire.
    • Blackletter: Fette Fraktur, Fette Gotisch, Olde English.
    • Borders and symbols: Celtic Borders, Deanna Borders, Deanna Flowers, Picto, Sean's Symbols.
    • Transitional: URW Antiqua, Baskerville, Baskerville Expert, New Baskerville.
    • Didone, modern: Bodoni, Bodoni Expert, Bodoni Small Caps&OsF, Modern 216, Walbaum.
    • Sans serif: Chantilly, Franklin Gothic, Franklin Gothic Condensed, Franklin Gothic Cnd. SC&OsF, Function, Function Small Caps&OsF, Function Condensed, Goudy Sans, Opus, Opus Small Caps&OsF, Syntax, Letter Gothic.
    • Decorative: Ad Lib, Algerian, Arnold Boecklin, Binner, Caslon Antique, Chromatic, Copperplate Gothic, Davida, Delphian Open Titling, Function Display, Glaser Stencil, Goudy Handtooled, Handel Gothic, Hobo, Honeymoon, Horndon, Mercedes, Mona Lisa, OCR-A&OCR-B, Plakette, Reflex, Salut, Stop, Toxica, VAG Rounded.
    Some more fonts: Alperton, Anaconda, Arizona, Bamboo, Bellhop, Bellows Book, Bernhard Modern FS (2011), Le Havre. MyFonts link. Fontspace link. His art deco fonts, as always without "source" and confusing Victorian, art nouveau, and psychedelica with art deco, include Rimini, Arnold Boecklin, Eldamar, Erbar Deco, Rangpur, Pinocchio, Azucar Gothic, Boyle, Busorama FS, Winona, Abbott Old Style, Almeria (after Richard Isbell's Americana) and Adria Deco, Bernhard Modern FS (2011). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    François Rappo

    Swiss designer (b. 1955) located at Lake Geneva. Recipient of the 2012 Jan Tschichold prize. He is Head of the Master in Art Direction at ECAL/University of Art & Design Lausanne. His typefaces:

    • The gorgeous revival family Didot Elder (published at Optimo, 2004), which is based on work by Pierre Didot from 1819.
    • The stylish typewriter family CEO (2005, Optimo).
    • At B&P Foundry, the serif family LaPolice BP (2007-2008).
    • The Theinhardt family (2010, Optimo), which was named after the (generally accepted) designer of the first sans.
    • At B&P Swiss Typefaces, he published New Fournier (2011) based on the typography of Pierre-Simon Fournier. It comes in 24 styles.
    • Genath (2011, Optimo). Erik Spiekermann twitters: Best Caslon alternative yet. The typeface is based on a baroque type from the Genath foundry in Basel, and is based on a specimen from 1720 that is most likely Johann Wilhelm Haas's first design in Basel.
    • Clarendon Graphic (2015, Optimo). Comprehensive, perfect, all-encompassing, a new standard for Clarendon. It has 26 styles including some stencil cuts.
    • Plain.
    • Practice (2016). A typeface family for magazines.
    • Apax (2016). A superb ans family.

    Klingspor link. Swiss Type Design link. Pointypo piece on him. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Frank Bartuska

    Lettering artist. Designer (d. 1975) of Trophy Oblique (Agfa, 1950), Caslon No. 641, News Gothic Condensed Bold and other News Gothic weights (1958-1966) and many other photolettering typefaces. For a digital revival, see PL Trophy Oblique.

    Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Franko Luin
    [Omnibus Typographi]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Freda Sack

    Prolific British type designer (b. 1951) who cofounded The Foundry in London with David Quay in 1989. Fonts: Proteus EF (1983), University EF Roman (1984), Paddington (1977), Jenson Old Style EF (with Colin Brignall, 1982, at Letraset), Victorian EF (with Colin Brignall, 1976), Foundry Architype Bayer (unicase font, The Foundry, 1996), Ignatius (1987), Caslon 540 Italic with Swashes (1981), Orlando (1986), University Roman Italic (1984), Promotor (1983), and Vermont (1987).

    FontShop link. Linotype link.

    Catalog of some of her digitized typefaces. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Frederic Goudy
    [GoudyFonts.Com]

    [More]  ⦿

    Frederic William Goudy
    [Goudy's typefaces]

    [More]  ⦿

    Fry
    [Joseph Fry]

    Founded in 1764 in Bristol by Joseph Fry and Isaac Moore who interpreted the work of Baskerville and Caslon. Joseph retired in 1787 and left the company to his sons Edmund and Henry. The foundry moved to Type Street (now Moore Street) in London. Joseph's son Edmund sold up to the Fann Street Foundry in 1828. The foundry no longer exists. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fyrisfonts
    [Stefan Lundhem]

    Stefan Lundhem started Fyrisfonts. He is the designer of Garajannon (Garamond family), Spartacus (a Roman, CODEX-like lettering font), Beckhem Gothic, Fournament, Primus, Fyris Fraction, Fyris Fraktur, Krabat, Heltime (mix of Times and Helvetica), Terminator, Bessie (2001, multiline art deco typeface modeled after Marcia Loeb's 1972 alphabet, Rainbow), Billie (2001, art deco titling, modeled after Marcia Loeb's 1972 alphabet, Zig Zag), Jämför abc, Miami Blues and Miami Vice (beautiful, now called Bessie and Billie, respectively). The pages in Swedish contain an in-depth study of Jenson and Adobe Jenson MM, Caslon, Cloister Old Style, Fraktur, Garamond, Minion MM, MultipleMaster fonts, Myriad MM, OpenType, Poynter, RailwayType, Newspaper type, Web fonts, Web typography, and screen typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Garrett Boge

    Seattle-based type designer (b. 1951, Spokane, WA) who founded LetterPerfect Fonts in 1986. He designed many wonderful typefaces, such as his revival of Free Roman, designed by Ross George, or the fun handwriting font Bermuda LP (1996), the wonderful wonderful wonderful Spumoni (1990, possibly based on a Spedball example; similar to Art Department JNL made in 2011 by Jeff Levine), the original jungle family Kolo (with Paul Shaw, 1996; an Adobe face), the OldClaude family (with Paul Shaw, 1993, 1997, also at Adobe; named after Claude Garamond), ChevalierLP (great caps!), DidotLP (1995, now at Adobe), Longhand (handwriting, 1998), Spring (clean script, 1990), DeStijl (1990), Hardwood (1990), Hadrian Bold (1990), Koch (1990), Longhand (1998), Roslyn (1990), Silhouette (1990), Tomboy (1990), Visage (1990), Wendy (1990, 1997, also at Adobe), Uppsala (with Paul Shaw, 1998), Manito (1990), Florens, Pontif (a Trajan font done with Paul Shaw, 1996), Cresci (with Paul Shaw, 1996), Catacomb, Philocalus, Sabina, Stockholm (1998, with Paul Shaw), Göteborg, Kryptic, Binney, Pietra (with Paul Shaw, 1996), Donatello (with Paul Shaw, 1997), Ghiberti (with Paul Shaw, 1997), Beata (with Paul Shaw, 1997). All of these fonts are available at LetterPerfect. He has made others too, such as Creme (1990), InkjetNine, InkjetSeven (1992, for ReadersDigestInkjetFonts). Unclear if he also made NYCaslon in 1990 for Monotype. At Letterperfect, Kathy Schinhofen, Garrett Boge and Myron McVay together designed the whimsical curly connected script family Jackalope LP (2011).

    FontShop link. Bestselling typefaces at MyFonts. Klingspor link.

    View Garrett Boge's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Gebrochene Schriften

    Proposed classification of blackletter typefaces. Main page, by Bernhard Schnelle. He has:

    • Xa Gotisch. Examples: Bamberg, Belwe Gotisch, Caslon-Gotisch, Cloister Black, Fette Gotisch, Ganz Grobe Gotisch, Goudy-Text, Manuskript-Gotisch, Maximilian, Sebaldus-Gotisch, Trump-Deutsch, Weiß-Gotisch Wilhelm-Klingspor-Gotisch.
    • Xb Rundgotisch. Examples: Gotico, Kühne-Schrift, San Marco, Uhlen-Rundgotisch, Wallau, Weiß-Rundgotisch.
    • Xc Schwabacher. Examples: Alte Schwabacher, Ehmcke-Schwabacher, Neue Schwabacher, Nürnberger Schwabacher, Rediviva, Renata-Schwabacher.
    • Xd Fraktur. Examples: Amts-Fraktur, Breitkopf-Fraktur, Fette Fraktur, Fichte-Fraktur, Humboldt-Fraktur, König-Type, Luthersche Fraktur, Mainzer Fraktur, Poppl-Fraktur, Thannhaeuser-Fraktur, Unger-Fraktur, Walbaum-Fraktur, Wieynk-Fraktur, Wittenberger Fraktur (Monotype, 1904 or 1906; Adobe's digital Wittenberger Fraktur), Zentenar-Fraktur.
    • Xe Fraktur-Varianten. Examples: Claudius, Engravers Text, Fette Deutsche Schrift (Koch), Fette Kanzlei, Hermann-Gotisch, Hölderlin-Fraktur, London Text (Blackletter 686), Post-Fraktur, Rhapsodie, Wedding Text (Blackletter 681).
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Georg Salden
    [TypeManufactur (was: GST Georg Salden Typedesign)]

    [More]  ⦿

    George Abrams
    [Expert Alphabets]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    George Ostrochulski

    Letter designer at Mergenthaler from the mid-1930s and head of the letter design department from the mid-1950s until his death in 1971. He worked on and produced Caslon Old Face in the 1950s, a faithful revival of William Caslon I's classic face. The lowercase is Moxon's 1669 Great Canon. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    George Williams

    George Williams's site (now defunct) site was a discovery! George Williams (b. 1959) wrote spline-generating code and then went on to produce several fonts with his software between 1987 and 1998:

    • Art nouveau style: Carmen, Ambrosia (1989), Fantaisie Artistique, Baldur, Monopol, Parisian, Peignot, Bocklin, Edda.
    • Lombardic: Lombardic.
    • Victorian: Caprice, Ringlet.
    • Uncial: Uncial Animals, Roman Uncial Modern.
    • Ornamental caps: Versal, Decorative, Square Caps, Extravagant Capitals, Floral Caps, Morris, Andrade.
    • Display typefaces: Crystal, Flash, Cupola, Santa Barbara Streets (2013-2014; after the street signs in Santa Barbara, CA).
    • Blackletter: Rotunda (1998), Bastarda, Textura Modern, Fractur (a remake of Wittenbach).
    • Art deco: Piccadilly, Mirage (1999, prismatic).
    • Calligraphic: Humanistic.
    • Text: Caslon.
    • Slab: Monospace.
    • Sans: Caliban.
    • Bamboo Gothic (2007).
    • TIS620-2529 (a Thai font).

    George Williams writes: I have been slowly working to provide free unicode postscript fonts for the three major groupings of styles used by European (Latin, Greek and Cyrillic anyway) type designs: serif, sans-serif and typewriter (or Times, Helvetica and Courier). Monospace is my approximation to Courier. Close examination will reveal that it is a bad copy of courier. Caslon Roman (1992-2001) is a serif font (designed by William Caslon in 1734), it's not a bad copy of Times, it's a bad copy of something else. Caliban is a bad copy of Helvetica. If Microsoft can call their version of Helvetica Arial, then Caliban seems appropriate for mine. Yet another URL.

    George Williams is best known as the inventor and creator of FontForge, the bigest and best free font editor today. It made him the darling of the Open Software community. Interview with OSP.

    Fontspace link. Dafont link. Abstract Fonts link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gerald Giampa
    [Lanston Type Co]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Gerard Tuke Meynell

    British designer (b. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1877, d. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1942) of Imprint (1913; +Imprint Shadow), now available at Agfa-Monotype and URW++. It is a 10-weight transitional family, codesigned by J.H. Mason, Ernest Jackson and Edward Johnston, who commissioned this typeface modelled on Caslon's designs from Pierpont and the Monotype Corporation as the text typeface for The Imprint, a magazine about fine printing and typography. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Gerda Delbanco
    [Delbanco-Frakturschriften]

    [More]  ⦿

    Gilles Le Corre
    [GLC --- Gilles Le Corre]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    GLC --- Gilles Le Corre
    [Gilles Le Corre]

    French painter born in Nantes in 1950, who lives in Talmont St Hilaire. His fonts include 2010 Cancellaresca Recens (inspired by a chancery type of Francisco Lucas from the late 16th century), 2009 Handymade (comic book style), 2009 Lollipop (chancery style), 2009 GLC Plantin, 2009 Primitive (2009, a rough-edged roman script), 2008 Script 2 (2008), GLC Ornaments One (2008) and 2008 Xmas Fantasy (2008: blackletter). In 2008, he started GLC -- Gilles Le Corre and became commercial. Creative Market link. He is best known for his historic revivals:

    • 161 Vergilius (2010)
    • 750 Latin Uncial (2010): inspired by the Latin script used in European monasteries from circa 5th to 8th, before the Carolingian style took over. The uppercases were mainly inspired by a 700's manuscript from Fécamp's abbey in France.
    • 799 Insular (2010): inspired by the so-called insular style of Latin script that was used in Celtic monasteries from about 600 until 820.
    • 825 Karolus (2009), and 825 Lettrines Karolus (2009).
    • 1066 Hastings (2009).
    • 1350 Primitive Russian (2012) was inspired by a Russian Cyrillic hand of Russkaja Pravda. It has rough-edged Latin charaters and many old Russian glyphs.
    • 1420 Gothic Script (2008).
    • 1431 Humane Niccoli (2010), after writings of Florence-based calligrapher Niccolo Niccoli (1364-1437).
    • 1456 Gutenberg (2008, based on a scan of an old text). Followed by 1456 Gutenberg B42 Pro, which was based on the so called B42 character set used for the two Gutenberg Latin Bibles (42 and 36 lines).
    • 1462 Bamberg (2008).
    • 1467 Pannartz Latin (2009): inspired by the edition De Civitate Dei (by Sanctus Augustinus) printed in 1467 in Subiaco by Konrad Sweynheym and Arnold Pannartz, who was the punchcutter.
    • 1470 Sorbonne (2010) was inspired by the first French cast font, for the Sorbonne University printing shop. The characters were drawn by Jean Heynlin, rector of the university based on examples by Pannartz. It is likely that the cutter was Adolf Rusch.
    • 1470 Jenson-SemiBold (2008).
    • 1475 BastardeManual (2008, inspired by the type called Bastarde Flamande, a book entitled Histoire Romaine (by Titus Livius), translated in French by Pierre Bersuire ca. 1475, was the main source for drawing the lower case characters).
    • 1479 Caxton Initials (2009): inspired by the two blackletter fonts used by the famous William Caxton in Westminster (UK) in the late 1400s.
    • 1483 Rotunda Lyon (2010): inspired by a Venetian rotunda found in a 1483 book called Eneide printed in Lyon by Barthélémy Buatier (from Lyon) and Guillaume Le Roy (from Liège, Belgium).
    • 1484 Bastarda Loudeac (2008).
    • 1470 Jenson Latin (2009), inspired by the pure Jenson set of fonts used in Venice to print De preparatio evangelica in 1470.
    • 1491 Cancellarasca Normal and Formata (2009): inspired by the very well known humanist script called Cancellaresca. This variant, Formata, was used by many calligraphers in the late 1400s, especially by Tagliente, whose work was mainly used for this font.
    • 1492 Quadrata (2008).
    • 1495 Lombardes (2008): a redrawn set of Lombardic types, which were used in Lyon by printers such as Mathias Huss, Martin Havard or Jean Real, from the end of 14OOs to the middle of 1500s.
    • 1495 Bastarde Lyon (2008, based on the font used in the "Conte de Griseldis" by Petrarque).
    • 1499 Alde Manuce Pro (2010): inspired by the roman font used by Aldus Manutius in Venice (1499) to print Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, the well-known book attributed to Francesco Colonna. Francesco Griffo was the punchcutter. The Italic style, carved by Francesco Colonna, illustrates the so-called Aldine style.
    • 1509 Leyden (2008; a Lombardic typeface inspired by the type used in Leyden by Jan Seversz to print Breviores elegantioresque epistolae).
    • 1510 Nancy (2008, decorated initial letters was inspired by those used in 1510 in Nancy (France, Lorraine) for printing of Recueil ou croniques des hystoires des royaulmes d'Austrasie ou France orientale[...] by Symphorien Champion; unknown printer).
    • 1512 Initials.
    • 1514 Paris Verand (based on initial caps that Barthélémy Verand employed for the printing of Triumphus translatez de langage Tuscan en François.
    • 1522 Vicentino (2011). Based on Ludovico Vicentino Arrighi's 1522 typeface published in La Operina.
    • GLC 1523 Holbein (2010, after Hans Holbein's Alphabet of Death.
    • GLC 1525 Durer Initials (2010). Sample R.
    • 1529 Champ Fleury Pro and 1529 Champ Fleury Initials (2010): based on Geofroy Tory's original drawings and text face.
    • 1532 Bastarde Lyon (2008, based on work by an anonymous printer in Lyon (France) to print the French popular novel Les Grandes et inestimables Chroniques du grand et enorme geant Gargantua).
    • 1533 GLC Augereau Pro: inspired by one of Antoine Augereau's three roman typefaces: the Gros Romain size, used in 1533 to print Le miroir de l'&aciorc;me..., a poetic compilation by Marguerite de Navarre, sister of the French king François I.
    • 1534 Fraktur (2009; inspired by the early Fraktur style font used circa 1530 by Jacob Otther, printer in Strasbourg (Alsace-France) for German language printed books).
    • 1536 Civilité manual (2011). Based on a handwritten copy of Brief story of the second journey in Canada (1535) by French explorer Jacques Cartier.
    • 1538 Schwabacher (2008, based on a font used by Georg Rhan in Wittemberg (Germany) to print Des Babsts Hercules [...], a German pamphlet against roman catholicism written by Johannes Kymeus).
    • 1540 Mercator Script was inspired by an alphabet of Gerardus Mercator, who is known for his maps as well as his Literarum Latinarum, quas Italicas cursoriasque vocant, scribendarum ratio (1540).
    • 1543 Humane Petreius (2012) was inspired by the typeface used in Nuremberg by Johannes Petreius for De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium, the well-known mathematical and astronomical essay by Nicolas Copernicus.
    • 1543 German Deluxe (2009): a Schwabacher inspired by the sets of fonts used in 1543 by Michael Isengrin, printer in Basel, to print New Kreüterbuch, which is a book with numerous nice pictures, the masterpiece of Leonhart Fuchs, father of the modern botany.
    • 1543 HumaneJenson-Bold (2008, after the typeface used in Vesalius' 1543 book De humani corporis fabrica).
    • 1543 HumaneJenson-Normal (2008, same source).
    • 1545 Faucheur (2011) is a rough garalde typeface that was inspired by the set of fonts used in Paris by Ponce Rosset, aka Faucheur, to print the story of the second travel to Canada by Jacques Cartier, first edition, printed in 1545.
    • 1546 Poliphile (2009), inspired by the French edition of Hypnerotomachie de Poliphile ("The Strife of Love in a Dream") attributed to Francesco Colonna, 1467, and printed in 1546 in Paris by Jacques Kerver.
    • 1550 Arabesques (2008, caps).
    • 1557 Civilité Granjon (2010).
    • 1557 Italique (2008, based on Italic type used by Jean de Tournes in Lyon to print La métamorphose d'Ovide figurée).
    • 1565 Renaissance (2010), inspired by French renaissance decorated letters.
    • 1565 Venetian Normal (2008, initial decorated letters that are entirely original, but were inspired by Italian renaissance engraver Vespasiano Amphiareo's patterns published in Venice ca. 1568).
    • 1584 Rinceau (2008, a set of initial letters is an entirely original creation, inspired by French renaissance patterns used by Bordeaux printers circa 1580-1590).
    • 1584 Pragmatica Lima (2011). Based on fonts used in 1584 by Antonio Ricardo to produce the first publication ever printed in Southern America.
    • 1585 Flowery (2009): inspired by French renaissance decorated letters.
    • 1589 Humane Bordeaux (2008, inspired by the Garamond fonts used by S. Millanges (imprimeur ordinaire du Roy) in Bordeaux ca. 1580-1590. The alphabets were used to reprint L'instruction des curés by Jean Gerson).
    • 1590 Humane Warszawa is a rough-edged garalde typeface inspired by a font carved circa 1590 for a Polish editor.
    • 1592 GLC Garamond (2008, inspired by the pure Garamond set of fonts used by Egenolff and Berner, German printers in Frankfurt, at the end of sixteen century. Considered the best and most complete set at the time. The italic style is Granjon's).
    • 1610 Cancellaresca (2008, inspired by the Cancellaresca moderna type of 1610 by Francesco Periccioli who published it in Sienna).
    • 1613 Basilius (2012) was based on the hand-drawn types used by Basilius Besler (Germany) for the carved plates of his botanical manual Hortus eystettensis.
    • GLC 1619 Expédiée (2015). A grungy Civilté.
    • 1621 GLC Pilgrims (2010).
    • 1634 René Descartes (2009), based upon his handwriting in a letter to Mersenne.
    • 1638 Civilité Manual (2010). Inspired by a French solicitor's document dated 1638.
    • GLC 1648 Chancellerie (2011). Inspired by the hand-written 1648 Munster peace treaty signed by roi Louis XIV and Kaiser Ferdinand II.
    • 1651 Alchemy (2010): a compilation created from a Garamond set in use in Paris circa 1651.
    • GLC 1669 Elzevir (2011) was inspired by the font typefaces used in Amsterdam by Daniel Elzevir to print Tractatus de corde, the study of earth anatomy by Richard Lower, in 1669. The punchcutter was Kristoffel Van Dijk.
    • GLC 1672 Isaac Newton (2012) is based on the hand of Isaac Newton.
    • GLC Morden Map (2011). Based on an engraved typeface used on a pack of playing cards published by Sir Robert Morden in 1676.
    • 1682 Writhed Hand: very irregular handwriting.
    • 1689 GLC Garamond Pro (2010): inspired by Garamond fonts used in an edition of Remarques critiques sur les oeuvres d'Horace by DAEP, published in Paris by Deny Thierry and seprately by Claude Barbin.
    • 1689 Almanach (2009): inspired by the eroded and tired fonts used by printers from the sixteenth century to the early years of twentieth for cheap or fleeting works, like almanacs, adverts, gazettes or popular novels.
    • 1695 Captain Flynt.
    • 16th Arabesques (2008, an exquisite ornamental caps scanfont).
    • 1715 Jonathan Swift (2011). An example of the hand of Irish poet and novelist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745). It is a typical exemple of the British quill pen handwriting from about 1650-1720.
    • GLC 1726 Real Espanola (2012). Based on the set of typefaces used by Francisco Del Hierro to print the first Spanish language Dictionary from the Spanish Royal Academy (Real Academia Española, Dictionario de Autoridades) in 1726. These transitional styles are said to have been the first set of official typefaces in Spain.
    • 1741 Financiere (2009): inspired by the Fournier's font Financière. While it appears handwritten, it was in fact carved in 1741 by Pierre Simon Fournier le jeune and published in his Manuel Typographique in Paris (1764-1766).
    • 1742 Frenchcivilite (2008).
    • 1751 GLC Copperplate (2009), a 6-style family about which Gilles says: This family was inspired by an engraved plate from Diderot&Dalembert's Encyclopedia (1751), illustrating the chapter devoted to letter engraving techniques. The plate bears two engravers names: "Aubin" (may be one of the four St Aubin brothers?) and "Benard" (whose name is present below all plates of the Encyclopedia printed in Geneva). It seems to be a transitional type, but different from Fournier or Grandjean.
    • 1756 Dutch (2011).
    • 1776 Independence (inspired mainly from the font used by John Dunlap in the night of 1776 July 4th in Philadelphia to print the first 200 sheets of the Congress' Declaration of Independence establishing the United States of America).
    • 1781 La Fayette (2010): a formal bâtarde coulée script with caitals inspired by Fournier (1781).
    • 1785 GLC Baskerville (2011). Le Corre explains: The Baskerville's full collection was bought by the French editor and author Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais who used it to print---in Switzerland---for the first time the complete work of Voltaire (best known as the Kehl edition, by the "Imprimerie de la société littéraire typographique"). We have used this edition, with exemplaries from 1785, to reconstruct this genuine historical two styles.
    • 1786 GLC Fournier (2010), based on several books printed in Paris just before the Didot era set in. The Titling characters are based on hymns printed by Nicolas Chapart.
    • 1790 Royal Printing (2009): inspired by various variants of Romain du Roy.
    • 1791 Constitution (2011).
    • 1792 La Marseillaise (2011). Based on the original manuscript of the French revolutionary song La Marseillaise which later became the French national hymn---it was composed in one night (April 25, 1792) by captain Rouget de Lisle.
    • 1805 Austerlitz Script Light: a typical French handwriting style from that period, named after one of the few battles that Napoleon actually won.
    • 1805 Jaeck Map (2011). Inspired by the engraved characters of a German map, edited in Berlin at the end of 1700s. The engraver was Carl Jaeck or Jaek (1763-1808).
    • 1809 Homer (2011), a grungy typeface named after the "homer" message pigeons.
    • 1815 Waterloo (2008): a handwriting typeface originating in Napoleon's government. Why do I feel that GLC is nostalgic for the era of Napoleon? Their own present dwarf-version of Napoleon is not exactly a huge success.
    • 1820 Modern (2009) was inspired by a didone font used in Rennes by Cousin-Danelle, printers, for a Brittany travel guide.
    • 1822 GLC Caslon (2010): inspired by a Caslon set used by an unknown Flemish printer from Bruges, in the beginning of 1800s, a little before the revival of the Caslon style in the 1840s.
    • 1845 Mistress (2009): calligraphic script.
    • 1848 Barricades Italic, a quill pen italic.
    • 1859 Solferino (2009).
    • 1863 Gettysburg (2008; inspired by a lot of autographs, notes and drafts, written by President Abraham Lincoln, mainly the Gettysburg address).
    • 1864 GLC Monogram Initials (2011) was inspired by a French portfolio containing about two hundred examples of Chiffres---deux lettres, created for engravers and jewelers in Paris in 1864, and drawn by French engraver C. Demengeot.
    • 1871 Victor Hugo (2011). Based on manuscripts from the final part of the life of Victor Hugo (1802-1885).
    • 1871 Whitman Script (2008) and 1871 Dreamer Script (2008): inspired by manuscripts by American poet Walt Whitman. See also 1871 Dreamer 2 Pro (2012).
    • 1880 Kurrentschrift (2010): German handwriting, based on late medieval cursive. It is also known as "Alte Deutsche schrift" ("Old German script"). This was taught in German schools until 1941.
    • 1883 Fraktur (2009): inspired by fonts used by J. H. Geiger, printer in Lahr, Germany.
    • 1885 Germinal: based on notes and drafts written by Émile Zola (1840-1902).
    • GLC 1886 Romantic Initials (2012).
    • 1890 Registers Script (2008): inspired by the French "ronde".
    • 1890 Notice (2009): a fat didone family.
    • 1902 Loïe Fuller (art nouveau face).
    • 1906 Fantasio (2010): inspired by the hatched one used for the inner title and many headlines by the popular French satirical magazine Fantasio (1906-1948).
    • 1906 French News: a weathered Clarendon-like family based on the fonts used by Le Petit Journal, a French newspaper that ran from 1863 until 1937.
    • 1906 Fantasio Auriol (2010), inspired by the set of well known Auriol fonts used by the French popular satirical magazine Fantasio (1906-1948).
    • 1906 Titrage (2009): a didone headline typeface from the same newspaper.
    • Underwood 1913 (2007, an old typewriter font, whose commercial version is Typewriter 1913), and 1913 Typewriter Carbon (2008).
    • 1920 French Script Pro (2010).
    • 1920 My Toy Print Set, 1925 My Toy Print Deluxe Pro (2010): inspired by rubbert stamp toy print boxes called Le petoit imprimeur.
    • 1968 GLC Graffiti (2009).
    • 1917 Stencil (2009; with rough outlines).
    • 2010 Dance of Death (2010): based on Hans Holbein's Alphabet of Death.
    • 2009 Primitive (2016).
    • 2009 GLC Plantin Pro (2016).
    • 2010 Pipo Classic: a grungy typewriter slab serif family.
    • 2010 Cancellaresca Recens (2016).
    • 2011 Slimtype (2011, +Italic) and 2011 Slimtype Sans (2011): an old typewriter typeface.
    Creative Market link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    GoudyFonts.Com
    [Frederic Goudy]

    A subpage of Ascender, which is reviving most of Goudy's fonts. They compiled a rather incomplete list of other revivals, conveniently leaving out all free fonts. The main source for commercial Goudy fonts is Lanston, now part of P22. I will provide a better list below.

  • 1896: Camelot
  • 1897: Unnamed
  • 1897: A “Display Roman”
  • 1898: DeVinne Roman. Revived by Nick Curtis in 2014 as Tedlo Roman NF.
  • 1902: Pabst Roman, Pabst Italic
  • 1903: Powell
  • 1904: Cushing Italic
  • 1904: Boston News Letter
  • 1905: Copperplate Gothics
  • 1905: Caxton Initials
  • 1905: Globe Gothic Bold
  • 1905: Caslon Revised
  • 1908: Monotype No. 38-e, Monotype No. 38-e Italic
  • 1910: Norman Capitals
  • 1911: Kennerley Old Style, Kennerley Open Caps
  • 1911: Forum Title
  • 1912: Sherman (revived in 2017 by Pentagram and Chester Jenkins for Syracuse University).
  • 1912: Goudy Lanston
  • 1914: Goudy Roman
  • 1914: Klaxon
  • 1915: Goudy Old Style
  • 1915: Goudy Catalogue
  • 1915: Goudy Old Style Italic
  • 1916: Goudy Cursive
  • 1916: Booklet Old Style
  • 1916: National Old Style (for a revival, see National Oldstyle NF (2014, Nick Curtis).
  • 1916: Goudytype
  • 1917: Advertiser’s Roman
  • 1917: An Unnamed Design
  • 1918: Kennerley Italic
  • 1918: Cloister Initials
  • 1918: Hadriano Title
  • 1918: Goudy Open
  • 1918: Goudy Modern
  • 1919: Collier Old Style
  • 1919: Goudy Modern Italic
  • 1919: Goudy Open Italic
  • 1919: Goudy Antique
  • 1921: Nabisco
  • 1921: Lining Gothic
  • 1921: Garamont, Garamont Italic
  • 1921: Goudy Newstyle
  • 1924: Goudy Italic
  • 1924: Italian Old Style, Italian Old Style Italic
  • 1924: Kennerley Bold, Kennerley Bold Italic
  • 1925: Goudy Heavy Face
  • 1925: Goudy Heavy Face Italic
  • 1925: Marlborough
  • 1925: Venezia Italic
  • 1926: Aries
  • 1927: Goudy Dutch
  • 1927: Companion Old Style, Companion Old Style Italic
  • 1927: Deepdene
  • 1927: Record Title
  • 1927: Goudy Uncials
  • 1928: Deepdene Italic
  • 1928: Goudy Text
  • 1929: Strathmore Title
  • 1929: Lombardic Capitals
  • 1929: Sans Serif Heavy
  • 1929: Kaatskill
  • 1929: Remington Typewriter
  • 1930: Inscription Greek
  • 1930: Trajan Title
  • 1930: Sans Serif Light
  • 1930: Mediaeval
  • 1930: Hadriano Lowercase
  • 1930: Advertiser’s Modern
  • 1930: Goudy Stout
  • 1930: Truesdell, Truesdell Italic
  • 1931: Deepdene Open Text
  • 1931: Deepdene Text
  • 1931: Ornate Title
  • 1931: Sans Serif Light Italic
  • 1931: Deepdene Medium
  • 1932: Goethe
  • 1932: Franciscan
  • 1932: Deepdene Bold
  • 1932: Mostert
  • 1932: Village No. 2
  • 1932: Quinan Old Style
  • 1932: Goudy Bold Face
  • 1933: Goudy Book
  • 1933: Goudy Hudson
  • 1933: Goethe Italic
  • 1933: Deepdene Bold Italic
  • 1934: Saks Goudy, Saks Goudy Italic, Saks Goudy Bold
  • 1934: Hadriano Stone Cut
  • 1934: Village Italic
  • 1934: Textbook Old Style
  • 1934: Hasbrouck
  • 1935: Tory Text
  • 1935: Atlantis
  • 1935: Millvale
  • 1936: Bertham
  • 1936: Pax
  • 1936: Mercury
  • 1936: Sketches Unnamed
  • 1937: Friar
  • 1938: University of California---FB Californian , University of California Italic---FB Californian Italic
  • 1938: New Village Text
  • 1938: Murchison
  • 1939: Bulmer
  • 1941: Scripps College Old Style
  • 1942: Goudy Thirty
  • 1943: Spencer Old Style, Spencer Old Style Italic
  • 1944: Hebrew
  • 1944: Scripps College Italic
  • 1944: Marlborough Text
  • Goudy Borders
  • Goudy Fleurons
  • Goudy Sorts
  • Park Ridge
  • ITC Berkeley Old Style , ITC Berkeley Old Style Italic [Google] [More]  ⦿

  • Goudy's typefaces
    [Frederic William Goudy]

    List of Goudy's typefaces, with dates, compiled by Paulo W.

    • 1896 Camelot.
    • 1897 Unnamed, A Display Roman.
    • 1898 DeVinne Roman.
    • 1902 Pabst Roman.
    • 1903 Pabst Italic, Powell, Village.
    • 1904 Cushing Italic, Boston News Letter, Engravers Roman.
    • 1905 Copperplate Gothics, Caxton Initials, Globe Gothic Bold, Caslon Revised.
    • 1908 Monotype No. 38-e, Monotype No. 38-e Italic.
    • 1910 Norman Capitals.
    • 1911 Kennerley Old Style, Kennerley Open Caps, Forum Title.
    • 1912 Sherman, Goudy Lanston.
    • 1914 Goudy Roman.
    • 1915 Klaxon, Goudy Old Style, Goudy Old Style Italic.
    • 1916 Goudy Cursive, Booklet Old Style, National Old Style (often used in silent movies), Goudytype.
    • 1917 Advertisers Roman, An Unnamed Design.
    • 1918 Kennerly Italic, Cloister Initials, Hadriano Title, Goudy Open, Goudy Modern.
    • 1919 Collier Old Style, Goudy Modern Italic, Goudy Open Italic, Goudy Antique.
    • 1921 Nabisco, Lining Gothic, Garamont, Garamont Italic, Goudy Newstyle. Mac McGrew: National Oldstyle was designed by Frederic W. Goudy for ATF in 1916. It is based on lettering he had done about fifteen years earlier for National Biscuit Company, hence the name. It was moderately popular for a while for publication and advertising display work, and for titles for silent motion pictures. Compare Nabisco.
    • 1924 Goudy Italic, Italian Old Style, Italian Old Style Italic, Kennerly Bold, Kennerley Bold Italic.
    • 1925 Goudy Heavy Face, Goudy Heavy Face Italic, Marlborough, Venezia Italic.
    • 1926 Aries [image by Nikolas Matses].
    • 1927 Goudy Dutch, Companion Old Style, Companion Old Style Italic, Deepdene, Record Title, Goudy Uncials.
    • 1928 Deepdene Italic, Goudy Text.
    • 1929 Strathmore Title, Lombardic Capitals, Sans Serif Heavy, Kaatskill, Remington Typewritter.
    • 1930 Inscription Greek, Trajan Title, Sans Serif Light, Mediaeval, Hadriano Lower-case, Advertisers Modern, Goudy Stout, Truesdell.
    • 1931 Truesdell Italic, Deepdene Open Text, Deepdene Text, Ornate Title, Sans Serif Light Italic, Deepdene Medium.
    • 1932 Goethe, Franciscan, Deepdene Bold, Mostert, Village No. 2, Quinan Old Style, Goudy Bold Face, Goudy Book.
    • 1933 Goudy Hudson, Goethe Italic, Deepdene Bold Italic.
    • 1934 Saks Goudy, Saks Goudy Italic, Saks Goudy Bold, Hadriano Stone Cut, Village Italic, Hasbrouck.
    • 1935 Tory Text, Atlantis, Millvale.
    • 1936 Bertham, Pax, Mercury, Sketches Unnamed, Sketches Unnamed.
    • 1937 Friar.
    • 1938 University of California O.S., University of California Italic, New Village Text, Murchison.
    • 1939 Bulmer.
    • 1941 Scripps College Old Style.
    • 1942 Goudy Thirty.
    • 1943 Spencer Old Style, Spencer Old Style Italic.
    • 1944 Hebrew, Scripps College Italic, Marlborough Text.
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Greg Kolodziejzyk
    [Image Club Graphics]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Grosse Pointe Group LLC
    [Mark Solsburg]

    The Grosse Pointe Group LLC is located in Westport, CT, and is run by Mark Solsburg, who also owns Group Type, ansd who was involved in or ran FontHaus and TypoBrand. Under the Grosse Pointe label, we find a digital font called Stradivarius (1992), named after Imre Reiner's 1938 formal script font Symphonie (Bauer; renamed Stradivarius in 1945). At Group Type or the other outfits of Solsburg, we find these fonts: Carpenter (a 1995 revival of an old connected ATF script by James West), Aquiline (an absolutely wonderful 16th century script), Bank Gothic (1994, a revival of Morris Fuller Benton's original---see also Bank Gothic BT), Aries (a 1995 revival of a lapidary by Eric Gill), Schneidler Initials (a 1995 revival of Friedrich Hermann Ernst Schneidler's Trajan-style typeface), Raleigh Gothic (a 1995 typeface based on Morris Fuller Benton's design. See also Raleigh Gothic RR for a different revival), Ovidius Script (a medieval simulation script, dated 2006, designed by Thaddeus Szumilas; in Light, Demi and Bold weights), Metro Sans (2006, a great Bauhaus style sans family based on William Addison Dwiggins' Metro #2), Corvinus Skyline (1991; a revival of a condensed modern family by Imre Reiner by the same name, 1934), Cloister Initials (2006, a revival of an illuminated caps typeface by Goudy), Regular Joe (2006, an out-of-place childish handwriting font), and Caslon Antique (1993; based on an original by Bernd Nadall). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Group Type
    [Mark Solsburg]

    Mark Solsburg's outfit located in Westport, CT. Before GroupType, Solsburg worked at ITC, which he left in 1989 to start FontHaus. Later he started TypoBrand and Grosse Pointe Group LLC. Solsburg headed the Type Directors Club for a few years. He is presently located in Ann Arbor, MI. He is President / CEO of DsgnHaus (1989-present), and partner in TypoBrand LLC (2004-present), a specialized typographic consulting firm founded by type designer, Mark van Bronkhorst; former type designer for Adobe, Linnea Lundquist, and Mark Solsburg. It seems that the FontHaus collection is now being marketed under the Group Type label at MyFonts. Group Type does technology consultation in the field of providing software and type typeface fonts for designers, publishers and typographers, related to the selection, purchase and use of design software and type typeface fonts for use in graphic, industrial, interactive and communications design. They specialize in revivals. Their fonts include

    • Aquiline. An absolutely wonderful 16th century script.
    • Arbor Brush (2012). A brush font that seems almost painted.
    • Aries. A 1995 revival of a lapidary typeface by Eric Gill.
    • Bank Gothic (1994). A revival of Morris Fuller Benton's original---see also Bank Gothic BT. Now also Bank Gothic Distressed.
    • Bristol (Adornado and Solid). By Steven Shanks.
    • Broadway Poster.
    • Carpenter Script (1995). Revival of an old connected ATF script by James West.
    • Caslon Antique (1993). Based on an original by Bernd Nadall.
    • Cloister Initials (2006). A revival of an illuminated caps typeface by Goudy.
    • Cooper Poster.
    • Corvinus Skyline (1991). By Ann Pomeroy. A revival of a condensed modern family by Imre Reiner by the same name.
    • Craw Modern (2012). A revival of Craw Modern by Freeman Craw (1958, ATF).
    • Diane Script.
    • Fortis (2012), formerly Atlas. In the wood style of Latin Wide, with heavy sharp triangular serifs.
    • Girder Poster.
    • Gotico Black. A balckletter.
    • Grosse Pointe Metro (2006-2009). A great Bauhaus style sans family based on William Addison Dwiggins' Metro #2). See also Detroit Metro.
    • Grotesca (1995).
    • Laughin. Andrew Smith contributed his Laughin, which was earlier at FontHaus.
    • Maxim.
    • Ovidius Script. A medieval simulation script, dated 2006, designed by Thaddeus Szumilas. Comis in Light, Medium and Bold.
    • Poster Gothic.
    • Raleigh Gothic (1995). A typeface based on Morris Fuller Benton's design. See also Raleigh Gothic RR for a different revival.
    • Regular Joe (2006). An out-of-place childish handwriting font.
    • Ronde Script (2012). This ronde comes from the French side. Group ype says that it was modeled after Parisian Ronde by the Chappelle foundry in Paris, but its roots go back to Nicolas Gando.
    • Schneidler Initials (1995). Revival of Friedrich Hermann Ernst Schneidler's Trajan-style typeface.
    • Sitcom. Ann Pomeroy contributed Sitcom.
    • Spire. By Ann Pomeroy. A condensed didone family heavily based on Sol Hess's Spire (Lanston).
    • Stradivarius.

    View the Group Type typeface libary. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Günter Gerhard Lange

    Known to his peers as GGL. German type designer, born in Frankfurt-an-der-Oder in 1921, d. 2008. He fought in World War II and lost his leg in a battle in France. Starting in 1941, Lange studied as apprentice of Georg Belwe at the Academy of Graphic and Book Arts in Leipzig. After graduation in 1945, until 1949, he was assistant of Professor Walter Tiemann, while also practicing painting and graphic design independently. In 1949, he continued his studies with Professors Hans Ullmann and Paul Strecker at the Hochschule für Bildende Künste in West Berlin. From 1950 onwards, he worked at Berthold AG in Berlin, where he designed his first type, Arena in 1951. In 1955, he became Reader in Typography at the Meisterschule für Graphik, Druck und Werbung in West Berlin. One of his many students was Manfred Klein. He also was Advisor in Visual Communications and Reader at the U5 Academy of Graphic Design and Art Direction Munich, and Instructor at the School of Applied Art in Vienna. H. Berthold AG's artistic director from 1961 to 1990, Lange was responsible for the creation and meticulous production of many of Berthold's typefaces. According to Dieter Hofrichter, his motto was 8 point is the moment of truth (when proofing typefaces). In 1989 he received the Frederic W. Goudy Award from the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). Recipient of the year 2000 TDC medal. After ten years of retirement from his position as Berthold AG's artistic director, Lange resumed his design activities in 2000 at Bertholdtypes (now Berthold Direct Inc) in Chicago. Bio at ATypI.

    Lange's own designs include his revivals of many classical typefaces. Here is a list, all Berthold typefaces:

    Yvonne Schwemer-Scheddin writes a day after his death: Dear type friends, yesterday morning, the 2nd of December 2008, Günter Gerhard Lange died, 87 years old. We lost an upright, steadfast fighter for quality in type design. Not only Berthold's artistic director, but a friend and objective adviser to many who needed personal help or an evaluation in type design. GGL was Berthold. For Berthold GGL "enhanced" many type designs of other well known type designers. His valued critizism was a great help, because it came from a positively tuned man. GGL transferred the lead heritage and its classical type typefaces into photocomposition and into the digital format on a high aesthetic and historically authentic level - as for instance Garamond or Van Dijk. Akzidenz-Grotesk is not thinkable without GGL. Bodoni Old Face one of the best contemporary text typefaces. With his sans serif Imago you can be different and yet classical. And the Americans should be pleased with the revival of Deepdene, which he also turned into a well working textface with a distinct character. But perhaps most important of all, he relentlessly encouraged the young, teaching and talking up to almost the end. Thus opening fences, eyes and hearts to art, architecture, literature and for the values of studies and love for the correct details without which the whole would not function. He was a rare communicator, because he lived his convictions and values. He became an example, a light of orientation. We lost a passionate type lover and expert---an authentic man. An era has come irreversible to its end.

    Credit for some images below: Danielle West. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Günther Flake

    German type designer (b. 1951, Hamburg) who co-founded Elsner&Flake in 1986 with Veronika Elsner. There, he designed many typefaces, including EF Renova (2006, a boutique sans; see also Renova Pro, 2016), EF Beasty (1993, with Gisela Will), Bluset EF (2000-2010, a monoline sans family), EF Casanova Script (2006-2007, Petra Beisse; the Pro version in 2015 also had input from Jessica Franke), EF Cash Monospaced (1994), EF Double Pac, EF TV Nord (a sans family), Eurostile Mono, Glaser Stencil, EF KiddingKid, EF Petras Script, EF StealPlate (1994), EF Thordis Mono, EF TwinPick, Versa Old Style EF.

    At Apply Design in 1999, he co-designed a nice series of stencil fonts with Sigrid Claessens: WaltonStencil-BlackRough, WaltonStencil-WhiteRough, LaPinaStencil, LasertacStencil, ReedonStencil, RoundedStencil, SerpentineStencil, StencilAntiqua, TeaChestStencil, WesternStencil, AdveraStencil, ArstonStencil, BankStencil-Medium, BankStencil-MediumRough, CaslonFinaStencil-Black, CaslonFinaStencil-BlackRough, ChicoStencil-Rough, ChicoStencil, FerroStencil, GeometricStencil, GlaserStencil, Futura Headline, Futura Index, Futura Text.

    In 2010 he created a digital family based on Morris Fuller Benton's Bank Gothic, called Bank Sans EF.

    Linotype link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Haas'sche Schriftgiesserei

    German/Swiss foundry established in 1790 (however, see timeline below) and based in Basel/Münchenstein. Many of its shares were acquired by D. Stempel in 1927. Linotype takes over Haas in 1989. Their collection includes:

    • Kompakte Grotesk (1893)
    • Steinschrift (1834). See also here.
    • Enge Grotesk (ca. 1870)
    • Commercial-Grotesk Halbfett (1940)
    • Altgrotesk halbfett (1880)
    • Haas gotisch schmal. This typeface was digitally revived by Gerhard Helzel.
    • Bodoni-Kursiv, Bodoni-Antiqua (Bodoni, 1780). The 1924 cuts of Bodoni formed the basis of Berthold Bodoni, which can now be had under that name in digital form.
    • Ideal-Antiqua (ca. 1880)
    • Caslon Antiqua and Caslon Kursiv (William Caslon, London, 1720)
    • Alt-Fraktur and Fette Alt-Fraktur (ca. 1840)
    • Fette Gotisch (ca. 1860)
    • Halbfette Normande (1850) and Normande fett (by Thorne, London, 1810)
    • Nürnberger Schwabacher (originally, ca. 1600, published in 1930)
    • E.A. Neukomm: Bravo (1945), Chevalier (1946). Digital forms of Chevalier can be found at Agfa and LetterPerfect. Elsner&Flake's Escorial is another digital form of it. And so is PrimaFont's Chauvinist.
    • A. Auspurg: Castor (1924), Pollux (1925).
    • Hermann Eidenbenz: Graphique (1941), Clarendon (1953). Clarendon became a Linotype face.
    • Adrian Frutiger: Ondine (1954), a calligraphic font done at Deberny et Peignot before it was taken over by Haas.
    • Walter J. Diethelm: Diethelm Antiqua (1945-1950).
    • M. Miedinger: Helvetica (1957), Horizontal (1964), Pro Arte (1954). Helvetica became Linotype's big prize face.
    • Eugen+M. Lenz: Profil (1943-1947). In the digital era, Profil became Decorated 035 at Bitstream.
    • P. Wezel: Constellation (1970).
    • H. Baumgart: Quirinale (1970).
    • Richard Gerbig: Riccardo (1941, a script face).
    • Edmund Thiele: Superba (1934), Normale Grotesk (1942), Troubadour Lichte (1931, script). Troubadour survives digitally as Rechtman Script (Intecsas). Superba was digitally revived by Red Rooster.
    • Anzeigen Grotesk (1943, Linotype) is a heavy condensed sans in the style of Impact.
    In Chronik der Haas'schen Schriftgiesserei (2002), Hans Reichardt describes this timeline:
    • 1654: Johann Jakob Genath (1582-1654) runs a print shop and foundry in Basel.
    • 1708: His son Johann Rudolf Genath (1638-1708) leaves the foundry to his second son Johann Rudolf Genath II.
    • 1737: Johann Rudolf Genath II has no children and makes Johann Wilhelm Haas (1698-1764) his official heir. Haas had come from Nürnberg to Basel in 1718 to work with Genath.
    • 1745: Haas takes over, and dies in 1764. His son Wilhelm Haas Münch (1741-1800) then takes over.
    • 1772: Wilhelm invents a hand press, and in 1776 develops a system for printing maps.
    • 1800: Wilhelm is succeeded by his son, Wilhelm Haas Decker (1766-1838).
    • 1830: Wilhelm Haas Decker leaves the business to his son Georg Wilhelm Haas (1792-1853) and to Karl Eduard Haas (1801-1853).
    • 1852: Two employees, Jakob Haas and G. Münch take over. But in 1857, they sell the company to Otto Stuckert (1824-1874) who lived in Lörrach.
    • 1866-1895: The Basler Handelsbank was the main investor in the business, and sells it in 1895 to Fernand Vicarino.
    • 1904: Max Krayer becomes owner.
    • 1921: A new plant is built in Münchenstein.
    • 1924: Work on a new cut of Bodoni has started. Later, Stempel and Berthold would use this type, and it became well-known as Berthold Bodoni.
    • 1927: The company becomes an AG (Aktiengesellschaft) and strikes business cooperation deals with D. Stempel AG and H. Berthold AG.
    • 1940-1941: Caslon Antiqua and Kursiv (1940) and Riccardo (1941) are created.
    • 1944: Eduard Hoffmann becomes Director when Max Krayer dies.
    • 1945-1958: In the Post World War II boom, these typefaces were created: Bravo (1945), Graphique (1945), Chevalier (1946), Profil (1947), Clarendon kräftig and fett (1953), Pro Arte (1954), Neue Haas-Grotesk halbfett (1957), Neue Haas-Grotesk mager (1958).
    • 1968: Alfred Hoffmann succeeds Eduard Hoffmann.
    • 1972-1982: An expansion period follows. The company takes over Deberny&Peignot (Paris) in 1972, Fonderie Olive (Marseille) in 1978, and Grafisk Compagni (Copenhagen) in 1982.
    • 1989: Linotype takes over Haas and dissolves the company. Linotype itself keeps the name and the rights to the typefaces, and gives the foundry to Walter Fruttiger, who continues that part of the business as Fruttiger AG.
    • 1990: Società Nebiolo (Turin) is taken over.

    View the Haas typeface library. See also here. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Hamilton Holly Wood Type Co.
    [James Hamilton]

    Founded by Edward J. Hamilton as the J. E. Hamilton Hollywood Type Company after the introduction in 1880 of Hollywood type. Located in Two Rivers, Wisconsin, this company was the successor firm to the William H. Page Wood Type Company, Morgans and Wilcox, and Vanderburgh, Wells&Company, and thus possessed most wood type in the USA in 1906. In 1906, they published a specimen book of all the wood-type designs in their possession, and, incredibly, destroyed all the original paper designs and patterns for the individual letters. This brought a heavy blow to the wood type industry. The lithograph dealt it another blow, and wood type became obsolete soon afterwards. Samples of their specimen books are starting to appear on the web. See here and here for samples of pointing hands from the 1901 catalog, and here for fists from their 1900 catalog. About their start: Just after 1880, Max Katz finances the business, and it becomes Hamilton&Katz for a few years. Katz sells out to William Baker, and the name of the firm becomes The Hamilton Co., or Hamilton&Baker. A bit later, Hamilton buys out Baker, to form the Hamilton Manufacturing Company. And then the takeovers start in earnest: in 1891, they buy the William H. Page Wood Type Company, then in 1898 Heber Wells, in 1899 Morgans and Wilcox Mfg Co., and in 1918 Tubbs Mfg Co. Amazingly, the company lasted until 1985, and enjoyed the lion share of the wood type business in the 20th century.

    Hamilton Wood Type Catalog #14 (1899) can now be viewed on-line. Ross Connard's PDF file of that same catalog. Scans from the 1899 catalog: Fist, Page 27, Page 30, Page 35, Page 36, Page 39, Page 65, Page 66, Page 68, DeVinne Condensed, Devinne Double Extra Condensed, Jenson Old Style, Bradley, The Inland, Page 106.

    Additional typefaces: Ben Franklin (1895, distressed edge font---other fonts in that style include Plymouth, Pabst and Blanchard), Bradley (1900, based on an ATF typeface by Will Bradley), Old Style (1900, after William Caslon IV's Caslon, ca. 1816), Cheltenham (1891, 1900), Cheltenham Black Expanded (1900), Clarendon Condensed (1899, after the original by Bill Stark & Co., 1853), Cooper Black (ca. 1900). DeVinne Condensed (1895), French Clarendon (1890), Antique No7 (1889), Antique Tuscan (1881, after Wells&Webb, 1854), Etruscan No4 (1895).

    A note on digitizations of the collection. There are two main sources, one commercial, and one free. The commercial revival project of Richard Kegler / P22 is called HWT, or Hamilton Wood Type. The free font project is by Dick Pape, who dogitized many of Hamilton's typefaces in his American Wood Type collection. Download page for Dick Pape's fonts.

    In 2017, Jeff Levine published Wood Sans Narrow JNL, which is also based on Hamilton Wood Type. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hanken Studio
    [Alfredo Marco Pradil]

    Graduate of the College of Architecture and Fine Arts, Batangas State University, The Philippines, who has been working as a graphic designer since 2005. He is currently located in Dubai, UAE and is a prolific type designer. His typefaces:

    • Zwizz (2017). A Swiss typeface family.
    • Cerebri Sans (2017).
    • HK Nova (2017). A geometric sans family inspired by Century Gothic and Futura. The Medium weight is tweetware. See also HK Nova Narrow and HK Nova Rounded.
    • Illuma (2017). A free headline sans typeface.
    • Number 23 (2017). A text typeface family.
    • HK Caslon (2017).
    • Polarity (2017).
    • Placid Amor (2016). Copperplate style.
    • Ludema (2016). A tweetware sans typeface.
    • Alienware (2016). A custom typeface for Dell's Alienware computers.
    • Extremis Compakt (2016). A custom typeface for Extremis.
    • Number 23 (2016). A Caslon-style text family.
    • El Enra Rounded (2016). A condensed headline sans.
    • Faldore (2015-2016). A simple sans typeface family.
    • Hans Grotesque (2016). A sans designed for long texts.
    • Decalotype (2016). A free sans typeface.
    • HK Compakt (2016). Inspired by Akzindenz Grotesk.
    • HK Serif (2016).
    • Jellee (2016). A very soft heavy rounded sans typeface. Download.
    • El Enra (2016). A free bold condensed sans.
    • Type 36 (2016). a geometric sans.
    • Arco Perpetuo (2016). A free subtly rounded sans family.
    • Industri (2016). A tweetware sans.
    • Okomito (2016). A sans with large open counters. Okomito Medium is free.
    • Comprehension Semibold (2016).
    • Radnika (2016). Announced as a workhorse sans. Followed in 2017 by Neue Radnika Schriftart, or Radnika Next.
    • Hanken Sans (2016).
    • ADA Hybrid Display (2016).
    • The free geometric sans typeface Orkney (2016, with Samuel Oakes).
    • Caslon OS (2015, Open Font Library).
    • The basic sans typefaces Now (2015, Open Font Library: geometric), Now Alt (2015), Einstellung Schrift (2015, geometric sans), Elenar (2015; and the free Elenar Love), Amicale (2015), HK Explorer (2015), HK Explorer Soft (2015), HK Explorer Sharp (2015), HK Grotesk (2015: free; extended to HK Grotesk Pro in 2016), Industri (2015, caps only headline face), Monoist (2015, monospaced), Glacial Indifference (2015, Bauhaus-inspired), Malakas (2015), Genome (2015) and Gen Light (2014, OFL).
    • Arca Majora (2014) and Arca Majora 2 (2016). A free heavy geometric sans face.
    • SAG Block (2014).
    • Ahamono and Ahamono Monospaced (2012-2015). A free rounded monospace typeface with typewriter features.
    • Neue Hans (2014), Hanken Round (2014, a free rounded sans), Neutrage (2014, a neutral signage sans).
    • Hard Edge (2014). An octagonal typeface.
    • Teknik (2014). A technical sans typeface.
    • Bullet (2014).
    • The grotesk typefaces Primary Hans (2014) and Hans Kendrick (2014) and Neue Hans Kendrick (2016). Both have elements of Avenir and Futura, and are characterized by a relatively small x-height.

    OFL link. Hellofont link (for purchasing his fonts). Behance link. Facebook link. He operates as Hanken Studio. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Henry Caslon

    British typefounder from the famous Caslon family. Author of Specimen of Printing types (1841), which showcases the typefaces of Caslon, Son and Livermore. PDF file of that book. Excerpts: Albion No. 1, Double Pica No. 3, Five Line Pica Open, Four Line Pica Shaded, Italian [this is a famous Western face, dating from 1821, and entitled the Italian Monstrosity by James Clough (who considers it not a monstrosity at all---the title refers to bad reputation of Caslon's Italian in the eyes of type critics such as T.C. Hansard and Nicolete Grey)], Nine Line Pica, Ornament No. 113, Ornament No. 159, Seven Line Pica Italian, Sixteen Line Pica Compressed, Ten Line Pica Compressed, Two Line Letters No. 4, Two Line Pica Chessmen.

    Images of some type specimen from Henry Taylor Wyse's book of 1911: AngloSaxon, Antique Old Style, Baskerville, Black No. 4, Cheltenham, Cheltenham Bold Outline, Cheltenham Heavy Italic, Cheltenham Old Style, Cheltenham Old Style, Lining Carlton, Morland, Morland Italic, Old Face, Old Face Heavy, Old Face Italic, Original Black, Ornaments. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Henry Taylor Wyse

    Scottish author of Modern type display and the use of type ornament (1911, Edinburgh), a book which can be found in full on the web. See also here. PDF of that book, and the text file. Most of the specimens discussed in the text are from H.W. Caslon Typefounders, Stephenson Blake, Charles Reed and Miller & Richard. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Henry Taylor Wyse on Scottish printers

    Henry Taylor Wyse writes in 1911 in Modern type display and the use of type ornament: Scottish printers received their supplies of type in the early days of printing from Holland. The first Scottish type-founder was Alex. Wilson, a native of St Andrews, who migrated to London in 1737 as an assistant apothecary. Accompanied by a friend, he was conducted over a type foundry there, and, thinking he could improve upon the current methods of type-founding, he started, along with a Mr Baine, a type foundry in his native town in 1742. The business prospered to such an extent, that the foundry was soon removed to Camlachie, a small village near Glasgow. While in Glasgow, Wilson formed many friendships with the professors of the University there, and also with Robert and Andrew Foulis, the University printers. He is probably best known by the magnificent founts of Greek letters which he cut, and which were used for the splendid edition of the Greek classics issued by the University. In 1834 the Glasgow Type Foundry, as it was called, was transferred to London. In 1845 the firm became bankrupt, and most of the punches and matrices were bought by the Caslons. William Miller, a foreman in the Glasgow Foundry, started business in Edinburgh in 1809 as Wm. Miller & Co. In 1822 the title of the firm was changed to William Miller. In 1832 Mr Richard was admitted as a partner, the firm again becoming Wm. Miller & Co. In 1838 it was styled Miller and Richard. To this firm belongs the credit of being the first British Foundry to successfully introduce machines for casting type. William Miller died in 1843. Mr Richard and his son carried on the business till 1868 when Mr Richard, senior, retired, the conduct of the business devolving upon Mr J. M. Richard and Mr W. M. Richard, whose sons are the present proprietors. Messrs Miller & Richard are now the only type-founders in Scotland. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Henry Taylor Wyse: The early British typefounders

    Henry Taylor Wyse writes in 1911 in Modern type display and the use of type ornament:

    GUTENBERG, the inventor of printing, as well as his immediate successors, cut their own punches, made their own matrices, and cast their own type. In the early part of the sixteenth century } however, as the number of printers increased, type-founding as a regular business began to be developed, and periodical markets for the sale of type were held throughout Europe. In England the pioneers of printing, Caxton, Wynkn de Worde, and Pynson, were founders as well as printers, casting type however mostly for their own use. One of the most noted of these founder-printers was John Day, who began business in 1546. He cut founts of Roman, Saxon, and Italic letters, and was the first English founder-printer who cut Roman and Italic letters which would range as one fount. After Day's death, English printers had to depend upon Dutch matrices from which to receive their supplies of type. The year 1585 witnessed a revival of the Oxford University Foundry and Press under Joseph Barnes. During the next century it received two important gifts. Dr John Fell, its Chancellor, in 1677 presented it with a complete foundry, consisting of over seventy sets of punches and matrices for Roman, Italic, Oriental, Saxon, and black letter founts, as well as all the necessary utensils and apparatus requisite for a complete printing office. In the same year Francis Juvinus presented similar gifts to the University.

    In the middle of the seventeenth century type-founding and printing began to be carried on as separate businesses in England. Joseph Moxon (1659-1683), Robert and Sylvester Andrews (1683-1733), and Thomas and John James (1710-1782) all figure as early English type-founders. Joseph Moxon combined the business of type-founder and printer with that of hydrographer to the King. In 1669 he printed what is supposed to have been the first type-founders' specimen issued in England. Moxon was suc- ceeded by Robert Andrews and his son Sylvester, who had established a type-foundry in Oxford. This was purchased in 1733 and removed to London by Thomas James, who had been an apprentice to Robert Andrews, but had left his service before 1710, being joined by his son John at a later date. It does not appear that they cut any punches for themselves ; they depended upon Holland for their supply of matrices. By 1758 James' Foundry had absorbed no fewer than nine of the old English foundries. Varying fortunes of the Caslon firm form an interesting chapter in the history of type-founding in England. William Caslon I. (1692-1766) may be said to have been the first English type-founder who whole-heartedly devoted himself to the cutting of punches and the casting of type. Originally an engraver of gun barrels, he attracted the attention of Mr Watts, an eminent printer of his day. This printer, struck by the neatness and taste displayed by Caslon in his engraving, and being in need of a new fount of type, enquired whether he thought he could cut letters for him. After one day's consideration, he replied that he thought he could, and straightway began to cut a series of punches for the type which is now known as Caslon Old Face. It is inter- esting to know that Benjamin Franklin, who later became the well-known American printer, ambassador, and statesman, was at this time a journeyman printer in the service of Mr Watts. The efforts of Caslon gave such satis- faction the type he had produced was so much better than that in common use that the Society for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge, being in need of a new Arabic fount, commissioned him to cut it for them. In the same year (1720) he cut a Pica Roman and Italic fount. His next perform- ance was a Pica Coptic fount for Dr Wilkins' edition of the Pentateuch. These successful founts soon made him famous, and by 1730 he had eclipsed most of his competitors, and secured the exclusive custom of the King's printer. About 1733 he cut a black letter fount, and in 1734 issued his first specimen from Chiswell Street, and it contained no fewer than thirty-eight founts, all of which, with the exception of three, were from his own hand. These thirty-five founts represented the untiring industry of fourteen years. The production of this specimen placed Caslon at the head of his profession, and his type was regarded as the standard. It was illustrated in the second edition of Ephraim Chambers's Cyclopaedia in 1738. In 1739 Caslon purchased half of Robert Mitchell's matrices, the other half being bought by John James. In 1742 Caslon assumed his eldest son, Wm. Caslon II., as a partner, and in the specimen of the same year the firm appears as Wm. Caslon & Son. Caslon II. was as expert as his father at punch-cutting, and the following notice appears in " Ames' Typographical Antiquities," published in 1749: "The art seems to be carried to its greatest perfection by William Caslon and his son, who, besides the type of all manner of living languages now by him, has offered to perform the same for the dead, that can be recovered, to the satisfaction of any gentleman desirous of the same." The "Universal Magazine" of June 1750 contains an article on letter-founding, accompanied by a picture of the interior of Caslon's Foundry. The print includes representations of four casters at work, one rubber (Joseph Jackson), and one dresser (Thomas Cottrell). Punch-cutting and justifying was carried on in secret by the Caslons themselves, but Jackson and Cottrell found means to observe them at work, and learned for themselves the manual part of the "art and mystery." In the year 1757 a movement for higher wages was made by the men in Caslon's employment. The increase of wages was granted, but Jackson and Cottrell, the ringleaders, were dismissed. In the specimen of 1764 eighty-two different founts were illustrated, more than twice as many as had been shown in the specimen of 1734. Most of the new founts had been cut by Caslon II. Caslon I. was in many ways a cultured man, being extremely fond of music. He was married three times. His first family consisted of one daughter and two sons William, who succeeded him, and Thomas, who became an eminent bookseller. Caslon I. died at Bethnal Green on January 23, 1766, aged seventy-four. In 1766 Caslon II., who had succeeded to the business on the death of his father, issued a specimen on the title-page of which the original name of Wm. Caslon appears. Caslon II. died in 1778, aged fifty-eight, leaving the business to his son William (Caslon III.). In 1792 Caslon III. disposed of his interest in Chiswell Street to his mother and sister-in-law. Mrs Caslon senior died in 1795, and as her will was the object of some litigation, the estate was thrown into Chancery, and the foundry put up to auction. It was bought by Mrs Henry Caslon for 520, whereas seven years previously one-third share of the concern had been sold for 3000. In buying the foundry, Mrs Henry Caslon determined to revive the business, and for this purpose secured the services of Mr John Isaac Drury, who cut new Canon, Pica, and Double Pica founts. At the same time, Mr Nathaniel Catherwood, a distant relative, was introduced as a partner. By 1808 the foundry had regained its former position. Both Mrs Henry Caslon and Mr Catherwood died in 1809. In 1802 the firm appeared as Caslon & Catherwood, but in 1809 it was styled Wm. Caslon & Son once more. From 1814 to 1821 the partnership included John James Catherwood, brother of a former partner. From 1830 to 1834 it was styled Caslon & Livermore, then in 1839, Caslon Son and Livermore ; in 1846 Caslon & Son ; and in 1850, H. W. Caslon & Co., Ltd. the name by which it is now so widely known.

    When, in 1757, Wm. Caslon I. summarily dismissed his two workmen, Joseph Jackson and Thomas Cottrell, he little thought that his action would lead to the starting of two new businesses, which would develop into rivals of his own and his successors. Thos. Cottrell started as a type-founder in 1757, and had associated with him for some time, Joseph Jackson, his unfortunate coadjutor. Cottrell's business eventually developed into that of Sir Charles Reed & Sons, while Jackson's foundry, established in 1763, at length became that of Stephenson, Blake & Co., both firms being joined under the same management in 1906. The story of the ups and downs of these firms would be too lengthy for narration in such a work as this, but it may be interesting to relate that the foundries, or at least the punches and matrices of about a dozen concerns were absorbed by Thos. Cottrell's successors. These belonged to Joseph Moxon, 1659-1683 ; R. & S. Andrews, 1683-1733 ; Thomas & John James, 1710-1782 ; Fry and Pine, 1764-1776 ; Joseph Fry & Co., 1776-1782 ; Edmund Fry & Co., 1782-1794 ; Edmund Fry and Isaac Steele, 1794-1799 ; Fry, Steele & Co., 1799-1808 ; and Edmund Fry & Son, 1816-1829, at which date William Thorowgood, who was the then living successor of Thos. Cottrell, took over the business of Edmund Fry & Son, then known as the Polyglot Letter Foundry. In 1838 the style of the firm was Thorowgood & Besley ; in 1849, Besley & Co. ; in 1861, Reed & Fox; and in 1877, Sir Charles Reed & Sons.

    The foundry started by Joseph Jackson in 1763 was put up to auction after his death in 1792, and was acquired by Caslon III., who had left the Chiswell Street firm. In 1807 it belonged to Wm. Caslon, Junior, son of Caslon III. In 1819, Wm. Caslon, Junior, disposed of the foundry to Blake, Garnett & Co., who had become partners for the purpose of acquiring it, and the entire stock was removed to Sheffield. In 1830 the firm was known as Blake & Stephenson, while in 1841, it went under the style of Stephenson, Blake & Co., the name which, in association with Sir Charles Reed & Son, it now bears.

    An obituary notice of Thomas Cottrell, written by his friend Nicols, throws a curious light upon the usages of the time, and is as follows : " Mr Cottrell died, I am sorry to add not in affluent circumstances, though to his profession of a letter founder, were superadded that of a doctor for the toothache, which he cured by burning the ear ! " It is interesting to notice that many of the early type-founders forsook other occupations to follow that of punch-cutting. Joseph Moxon was a hydrographer ; Caslon I. was an engraver of gun barrels ; Alex. Wilson of St Andrews, the first Scotch type-founder, and Joseph and Edmund Fry were all doctors, while John Baskerville of Birmingham was successively a footman, a writing master, a printer, and finally a type-founder. Baskerville seems to have been in many ways a remarkable man. He spent six years of effort and over 600 in improving the typography of his own day. He made everything required for his business, punches, matrices, type, ink, and even printing presses. His type was of beautiful and elegant form ; and the issue in 1757 of the first book printed with it (Virgil) was hailed with delight by the entire literary world. This was not sufficient, however, to compensate him for the years of labour he had spent on his founts. The printers of his own day preferred the bold Caslon Old Face, which had taken them by storm. He spared no effort to bring his founts into the market, but without success. His entire stock of type-punches and matrices were eventually purchased by Beaumarchais for the " Societe Litteraire Typographique " for 3,700, and transferred to France. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    High Contrast Serifs: Stephen Coles's List

    Stephen Coles points out the jewels in the FontShop store.

    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hirwen Harendal
    [Arkandis Digital Foundry]

    [More]  ⦿

    Hoa Nguyen

    During her studies at Nazareth College of Rochester, NY, Hoa Nguyen performed plastic surgery on the O's and Q's of Caslon to create a fun children's storybook text face, Not So O Style (2013). Bulkie (2014) is a plump display typeface. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hoftype
    [Dieter Hofrichter]

    Dieter Hofrichter (b. Mannheim, Germany), established Hoftype in 2010 in München. He attended the Rödel Art School where studied typography and calligraphy under Herbert Post, and applied and decorative arts under Charles Crodel. Later he studied graphic design at the Academy of Fine Arts in Nürnberg under Professor Karl Hans Walter. After his studies, Hofrichter worked for several years as a graphic designer. In 1980, he started designing typefaces for himself in his own studio. He approached G.G. Lange of the Berthold foundry in 1988, and started work in 1989 as a type developer and assistant to Lange at Berthold without realizing that Berthold's owner, Hunt, had studied under Idi Amin Dada. Hofrichter has worked closely with Lange to develop new typeface designs and improve classic designs. In 2010, he set up his own foundry, Hoftype.

    There are certain designers whose style attracts me---almost any type designed by them agrees with my taste. I just know that they are perfectly seasoned and delightfully oiled. Dieter Hofrichter's work falls in that category. I also like classical music, but not all classical music. Beethoven is just about right. Hofrichter's type work is classical, trustworthy and very balanced.

    Klingspor link. Fontsquirrel link. Dieter Hofrichter's typefaces:

    • In 1990, Berthold published Hofrichter's Vergil as a Berthold Exklusiv.
    • In 2000, Berthold released a joint effort of Lange and Hofrichter, a Scotch type named Whittingham.
    • In 2001, he released the newly enhanced Akzidenz-Grotesk (Berthold).
    • Futura Serie BQ (2000, Berthold). This is a new version of the well-known geometric sans serif typeface design by Paul Renner and the Bauer type foundry.
    • Bodoni New Face (Berthold).
    • Gerstner Next (2007, Berthold). This typeface is based on Karl Gerstner's Gerstner Original BQ of 1987.
    • His first commercial typeface at Hoftype is the Impara Sans family in ten styles (2010). Images:i, ii, iii, iv.
    • The medium-contrast slightly flared sans family Epoca (2010, Hoftype), and the 12-style sister family Epoca Classic (2012).
    • The text family Argos (2011, Hoftype).
    • Erato (2011, Hoftype) is a beautiful garalde family.
    • Cala (2011, Hoftype) is a modernized renaissance/garalde family.
    • Corda (2011, Hoftype) is a scriptish serif family.
    • Cassia (2011, Hoftype) is a subdued Egyptian family.
    • Sonus (2011, Hoftype) is a humanist sans family.
    • Sina (2012), which is sure to win awards, is an elegant, pleasant and readable type family characterized by relatively tall ascenders and imperceptible flaring. Sina Nova (2012) is a slimmer version.
    • Foro (2012) is a 16-style slab serif family. A softer rounder version is called Foro Rounded (2013). In 2014, Foro Sans was added---it too comes in 16 monoline styles.
    • Ashbury (2012) is a text family that has elements of Caslon and Baskerville.
    • Sixta (2012) is an eight-style sans family.
    • Hofrichter writes about the roundish serif text family Civita (2012): Civita is a new "Modern Type" with a high stroke contrast, distinct formal features, and a strong personality. It has a fluid ductus but nonetheless a solid structure.
    • Carat (2012). In 2015, the nearly identical typeface Mangan was published---I am befuddled.... Mangan Nova (2015) is the semi-condensed version of Mangan.
    • Capita (2013). A rounded slab serif designed for warmness and easy reading.
    • Quant (2013) is a very elegant contrasted text family, possibly more appropriate for display than for long texts. Quant Text (2013) is the optimized 8-style text version of the Quant family. It comes with a slightly greater width, stronger hairlines and stronger serifs which stabilizes it for small text.
    • Qubo (2013) is a 14-style sans family with contrast in the joins.
    • Equip (2013) is a versatle geometric sans that comes with 16 styles. See also Equip Slab (2013), Equip Condensed (2013) and Equip Extended (2013).
    • Pesaro (2014) was inspired by early prints from Venice like Jensen and Manutius. It is a warm legible text family with Hofrichter-style flaring in strategic places. This beautiful typeface is not be confused with a 2001 typeface by Joachim Müller-Lancé that is also called Pesaro.
    • Campan (2014). A semilinear typeface with hook-serifs and tall x-height.
    • Orgon (2014) jumps right to the head of the pack In the rounded organic sans world. This neutral, uncomplicated and unpretentious sans wows, especially in the heavier weights. It is accompanied by Orgon Slab (2014).
    • Cargan (2014). Advertized as a gentle versatile slab serif typeface family.
    • Carnas (2015) is a rounded elliptical sans family with simple forms and huge counters.
    • Danton (2015). A sturdy typeface family for maazines in Hofrichter's patented Gehry style---no ninety degree angles, avoid monoline, ban symmetry.
    • Halifax. A new interpretation of classic English Sans types such as Gill and Johnston in 16 styles.
    • Calanda (2015). A sturdy slab serif family in 16 styles.
    • Carnac (2015). A sharp version of the minimalist monoline sans typeface family Carnas that features crisper edges.
    • Marbach (2016). An angular serifed text typeface that combines classical and modern elements.
    • Taxon (2016). A 12-style contemporary sans related to Optima and Imago.
    • Carrara (2016). A humanist text typeface family chjaracterized with blunted but poiunty serifs.

    Interview by Dan Reynolds for MyFonts.

    View Dieter Hofrichter's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Human figures, stick figures

    "Char@cter" suggests the following fonts for letters made to resemble humans:

    • apicturefont (Colonial figures with Caslon-Open style letters)
    • arbitre (A whistle-blowing referee)
    • armyboy (All identical soldiers with a simple superimposed letter)
    • BadCabbageICG-Primal (Elongated stick figures)
    • bizarro (It's ..errr.. well, its ummm ... bizarre)
    • CG Victorian Silhouette (People doing various things)
    • Chlorinuh (Think of the Pilsbury Doughboy in a swimming pool)
    • EDBindia (Puffy letters with eyes, wearing a feather headdress)
    • EDBsweatingIt (Puffy people-letters exercising)
    • FuzzyCootie (Sans-serif outline font with female silhouettes)
    • getagrip (Letters made up of arms holding each other's wrists)
    • GroovyGhosties (Cartoony ghosts - the covered-with-a-sheet kind)
    • Groupsex (Suggestive - Stick people in compromising positions)
    • KiddoTRT (Children Playing)
    • Kilroys (Like the WWII Kilroy Was Here)
    • LittleBallerina (Normal letters with a ballerina nearby)
    • PointerCaps (Each letter has a pointing hand)
    • Rad (People in exercise positions)
    • StickLetter (Stick people)
    • stripletter (Black letters with outline nudes superimposed)
    • Vintage Erotique (Elaborate and just what it says)
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    H.W. Caslon Foundry

    Founded by William Caslon in 1716, Caslon's was the leading English typefoundry of the 18th and 19th centuries. It continued under William Caslon II. Upon the latter's death in 1778 the property was split between his wife and his son, William Caslon III. In 1792 the son sold his share to his mother and his sister-in-law to buy the foundry of their rival, Joseph Jackson, who had just died. The family of the sister-in-law kept the main Caslon foundry running until 1937, when it closed and the designs passed to Stephenson Blake (who back in 1819 had purchased the other Caslon foundry). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    H.W. Caslon&Co Ltd
    [Justin Howes]

    H.W. Caslon&Co Ltd was Justin Howes' foundry based in Rushden, UK, with one product, Founders Caslon, in several optical ranges: 1776, Text and Display are the main subfamilies (PC and Mac, truetype, type 1 and opentype). Justin Howes' Lino page.

    Justin (b. Solihull, 1963; d. London, 2005) was director of the Type Museum until 2005, when he moved to the Plantin-Moretus Museum, and then to Reading for postgraduate work. He published "Johnston's Underground Type" for the London Transport Museum in 2000. Justin was a typographer as well as a printing historian. He was responsible for designing many books. He was chair of the Friends of St. Bride from 1998-2003. He died in February 2005 at age 42. Obituary. Quote by Nick Shinn: "Founders Caslon is a trompe l'oeil masterpiece, a carefully crafted amalgam of subtle judgements as to what will best mimic the desired patina of 18th century typography." Obituary at St. Bride. Old URL (now occupied by squatters). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Ian Lynam
    [Wordshape]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Ilya Naumov

    Also Ilya Naumoff. Paris-based designer. During a summer course called Type@Paris (2015), Ilya Naumov designed a contemporary redesign of Caslon called Belka (+Stencil,+Italic). Kawai is a modern serif typeface started by Ilya at the University of Reading in 2014 under the supervision of Gerry Leonidas and Gerard Unger. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Image Club Graphics
    [Greg Kolodziejzyk]

    Image Club Graphics was founded by Greg Kolodziejzyk from Calgary, Alberta, in 1985. ICG sold fonts at about 30 dollars per typeface around 1992 and became successful as a font distributor and direct marketer and software developer. They issued new catalogs regularly. The most recent edition of the CD (called Letterpress 7.0) cost $1500 for 890 fonts. They also had a wide variety of artwork. The ITC on Display CDROM cost 3000 dollars for 375 display fonts.

    Greg writes: In 1994 I sold Image Club to Adobe Systems of Mountain View, California. At that time, Image Club was distributing over 10 million software catalogs to it's customers world wide. With sales topping $20 million in 1996, Image Club is very well known in the industry as a successful direct marketer and software developer. [...] The company still operates in Calgary, but has been purchased back from Adobe by the manager who I had hired years ago who changed the name to Eyewire. In 1998, Eyewire was sold to Getty Corporation for a whopping $30 million.

    The ICG site said at one point that Image Club no longer exists. As a company, it ceased to be sometime between our purchase by Aldus in 1994 and our rebranding as Adobe Studios in 1998.

    Until recently, the Image Club Typeface Library and Image Club clip art products were available at EyeWire. Eyewire then became Veer. The ICG library can now be bought at MyFonts. List of available ICG fonts. Martin Kotulla states that ICG copied fonts in an aggressive manner, and finds it ironic that this pirate was bought by Adobe. Greg Kolodziejzyk's reply: You should add that all fonts "aggressively copied" by this "pirate" were licensed from the foundries who owned the copyrights to those fonts. I can't tell you how many 100's of thousands of dollars we paid over the years to foundries as licensing fees. This statement is false.

    Selected typefaces: Eclat (retro signage script), Cariola Script Std (a wide connected script by James West).

    View the Image Club Graphics typeface library. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    ImageServe Typefaces

    Images of great historic types by Alberti, Amphiarea (1572), Caslon, Cresci, Feliciano (1463), Grandjean (the Grandjean&Alexandre Roman type, dated 1693), Torniello (1517), and Vicentino (1522). Also, pics of the letters on Trajan's column in the Forum (113). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Infinitype

    German company that sells 9999 fonts on a CD for 229 USD. One can download 20 fonts for free, as a teaser. The company is run by Martin Kotulla, owner of Softmaker, who also made the MegaFont CD. Many (most?) fonts are licensed from URW and come with a performance guarantee. Font catalog. Most fonts cover all European languages. Font catalog. Direct download of that catalog. Font name equivalences. The list: Aargau, Abott Old Style, Accent, Accolade, Adelon (lapidary), AdLib, Advertisers Gothic, Aldebaran, Alfredo, Allstar, Alternate Gothic, Alte Schwabacher, American Text, Ancona, Ancona Condensed, Ancona Extended, Ancona Narrow, Antigone, Antigone Compact, Antigone Nord, Antigone Condensed, Antiqua, Artistic, Avignon, Avignon Condensed, Avignon PS, Ballad Script, Ballantines (a broad-nib script), Balloon, Barbedor, Barbedor Osf, Baskerville, Baskerville Nova, Baskerville Old Face, Bay Script, Belfast Serial (a remake of Forsberg's Berling), Belfort, Bellboy, Benjamin [based on ITC Benguiat; identical to Softmaker's B693 Roman], Benjamin Condensed, Benjamin Gothic [free here; this comic book style typeface is based on ITC Benguiat Sans (1979-1980) and is similar to B691 Sans from Softmaker)], Benson, Bergamo, Bergamo Osf, Bernhard Condensed, Bernhard Fashion, Bestseller, Bilbao, Birmingham, Bluff, Boa Script, Bodoni, Bodoni Display, Bodoni No. 2, Bodoni Recut, Bodoni Recut Condensed, Bodoni Standard, Bonita, Book PS, Boston, Boulder, Bravo, Bristol, Broadway, Broadway Engraved, Brush Script, Bryce, Calgary, Calgary Osf, Cambridge, Cambridge Serial, Canossa, Canyon, Carlisle, Casablanca, Casad, Caslon, Caslon Antique, Caslon Osf, Caslon Elegant, Casual, Cathedral Open, Centrum, Century Old Style, Century Expanded, Century PS, Century Schoolbook, Chandler, Chantilly, Chantilly Condensed, Chantilly Extra Condensed, Chantilly Display, Chantilly Serial, Chatelaine, Cheltenham, Cheltenham Condensed, Cheltenham Old Style, Cheltenham Extra Condensed, Cimarron, Clarendon, Clarendon Serial, Clearface, Clearface Serial, Cleargothic, ClearGothic Serial, Colonel, Comix, Commercial Script, Compressed, Computer, Concept, Concept Condensed, Congress, Cooper Black, Copperplate Gothic, Copperplate Condensed, Cornered, Courier PS, Curacao, Curzon, Deco B691, Deco Black, Deco C720, Deco C790, Deco F761, Delano, Delaware, Denver, Derringer, Diamante, Digital, Durango, Disciple, Egyptian Wide, Egyptienne Standard, Elegant Script (revival of the 1972 Berthold formal calligraphic typeface Englische Schreibschrift), Elmore, Ennis, Entebbe, Estelle, Ewok, Expressa, Falcon, Farnham, Fette Engschrift, Fette Mittelschrift, Flagstaff, Flipper, Florence Script, Fraktur, Franklin Gothic, Franklin Gothic Condensed, Franklin Gothic Condensed Osf, Franklin Original, Frascati, Fremont, Front Page, Fuego, Function, Function Condensed, Function Display, Function Script, Gainsborough, Gandalf, SoftMaker Garamond, SoftMaker Garamond Condensed, SoftMaker Garamond No. 7, Garamond Elegant [based on Letraset Garamond], Garamond Nova, Garamond Nova Condensed, Garamond Original, Garamond Standard, German Garamond"> [based on TypoArt Garamond], Giulio, Glasgow Serial [based on Georg Salden's Polo, 1972-1976], Glendale Stencil, Gotisch, Goudita, Goudy Catalogue, Goudy Handtooled, Goudy Old Style, Goudy Heavyface, Granada, Grenoble, Grotesk, Handmade Script, Harlem Nights, Helium, Henderson, Hobo, Hoboken, Hobson, Honeymoon, Horsham, Hudson, Huntington, Iceberg, Illinois, Imperial Standard, Inverserif, Isonorm, Istria, Italian Garamond [based on Simoncini Garamond], Japanette, Jessica, Joseph Brush, Jugendstil, Kaleidoscope, Karin, Kingston, Koblenz, Kremlin Script, Leamington, Letter Gothic, Lingwood, Litera, Livorno, Lyon, Macao, Madeira, Malaga, Marriage, Marseille, Marseille Serial, Maurice, Medoc, Melbourne, Melville, Mercedes, Metaphor, Mexico, Micro, MicroSquare, MicroStencil, Moab, Mobil Graphics, Montreal, Napoli, Neutral Grotesk, Nevada, Newcastle, Nicolas [after Lanstpn's Nicolas Cochin], OCR-A, OCR-B, Oklahoma, Old Blackletter, OnStage, Opus, Organ Grinder, Orkney, Ornitons, Osborne, Otis, Palazzo, Palladio, Palmer, Pamplona, Park Avenue, Pasadena, Pedro, Pelota, Peoria, Persistent, Persistent Condensed, Persistent Osf, Philadelphia, Pizzicato [based on Letraset's Plaza], Plakette, Pollock, Prescott, Prestige, Quadrat, Raleigh, Roman PS,, Salmon, Sans, Sans Condensed, Sans Diagonal, Sans Extended, Sans Outline, Sans PS, Sans PS Condensed, Savoy, Savoy Osf, Saxony, Scott, Seagull, Sebastian [based on ITC Serif Gothic], Sigvar [based on ATF's Baker Signet], Soledad, Square Serif, Stafford" [based on Rockwell MT], Stafford Serial, Sterling, Stratford, Stymie, Sunset [a version of ITC Souvenir], Sunset Serial, Sydney Serial, Tabasco, Tampa, Tampico, Tioga Script, Toledo [based on Trooper VGC], Typewriter, Typewriter Osf, Typewriter Condensed, Unic, VAG Rounded, Velo, Veracruz, Verona, Violin Script, Winona, Worcester. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Inland Type Foundry
    [A.V. Haight]

    The Inland Type Foundry in Saint Louis was established in 1892 by the three sons of Carl Schraubstadter (1827-1897), William A. Schraubstadter (1864-1957), Oswald Schraubstadter (1868-1955) and Carl Schraubs Jr. (1862-1947). Carl had run the Central Type Foundry in Saint Louis and sold it to ATF (American Type Founders) in 1892, and the sons reacted by setting up Inland. Until 1911, Inland was one of the most successful foundries in the United States. In 1911 Inland was purchased by ATF and its equipment divided between that foundry and Barnhart Brothers and Spindler (BBS). A.V. Haight (Poughkeepsie) designed Rogers (art nouveau) at Inland Typefoundry in 1902. He also designed Haight. Nicholas J. Werner, who used to work for Central, also created many designs at Inland. Look for "Specimen book and catalog, a price list of printers' supplies, showing types and rules in which are embodied all the latest styles ... among which ... may be especially mentioned the casting of types on standard line and unit sets." (1902, 464 pages), Specimen Book and Catalog. A Price List of Printers Supplies, Showing Types and Rules in which Are Embodied all the Latest Ideas that Enable the Printer to Produce Superior Work in a most Economical Manner Among which Betterments May Be Especially Mentioned the Casting of Types on Standard Line and Unit Sets (St. Louis, 1897) (a free copy is here and here) and Specimen Book and Catalog. A Price List of Printers Supplies, Type, Rules and Accessories of the Very Latest Designs which Facilitate the Economical Production of Superior Printing. A Notable Improvement Is the Casting of All Type on Standard Line&Unit Sets (St. Louis, 1907). MyFonts page.

    Scans of some typefaces: Becker (art nouveau), Blanchard Italic [Blanchard was revived in 2013 by Paulo W as Blanchard Inland], Commercial Script, Edwards (art nouveau), Inland, Lightface Blanchard, Matthews, Extended Studley, Rogers (art nouveau), Poster French Oldstyle (1897 catalog), Poster Ionic (1897 catalog), Poster Latin Antique (1897 catalog), Pacific Bikes (ornaments, 1897 catalog), Recut Caslon (1907, as taken from the 1923 ATF catalog), Drew (1910, from the 1923 ATF catalog: a digital version called Droobie NF was created by Nick Curtis in 2014), Title Shaded Litho (1911), Litho Roman (1907), Gothic No.578 (1898), Pen Print (1911), Blair (1900), Mtchell (1906, a bold version of the all caps grotesque face Blair; digitally revived by Nick Curtis in 2015 as Mitchell NF), Comstock (1902), Inland Copperplate (1901), Shaw Text (1907).

    Commentaries by Mac McGrew on some of the typefaces:

    • Gothic No. 578: Gothic No. 578 was shown as Gothic No.8 by Inland in 1898 as "the latest candidate for the printer's favor; a popular old typeface entirely recut." It was shown until 1941. It is a bold weight, and is quite similar to Standard Bold which as an import from Germany was very popular in this country in the 1950s. It is also similar to Comstock, but without the added outline. Keystone called it Standard Gothic, although it is not identical to the German face. As a nineteenth-century gothic, the cap G had no crossbar. Paragon Gothic is the same design, without lowercase, cast as a title face.
    • Pen Print: Pen Print and Pen Print Bold were introduced by Inland Type Foundry in 1911, with the latter thought to have been the last typeface cut by that foundry before its sale to ATF. Pen Print Open was designed for ATF in 1921 by Morris Benton, and includes open versions of all the characters shown for the bold. The series has more the appearance of rather crude brush lettering than pen "printing," but the inclusion of an open version is contrary to the conception; perhaps it was intended for two-color printing. The letters have a slight backslant. The bold was also cut by Intertype, in 1927. Compare Dom Casual.
    • Blair: Blair was advertised in 1900 by Inland Type Foundry as new and original, calling it "an exact imitation of the small gothic letter now so popular with engravers for stylish stationery." Its production was continued by ATF until the 1950s. It is similar to Copperplate Gothic Light, but without the tiny serifs of that face. Litho Gothic is the same design but with lowercase. Mitchell (1906) is the same design but slightly heavier. The condensed version was produced in 1903 or earlier. Hansen copied Blair as Card Gothic No.2. Compare Lightline Gothic.
    • Comstock: Comstock was advertised by Inland Type Foundry in 1902 as "a striking novelty, our brand new face." It was revived by ATF in 1957. It is a medium weight conventional gothic, distinguished by a hairline surrounding each letter. The G lacks a crossbar, typical of many nineteenth-century gothics. The design was sponsored by A. H. Comstock of Omaha, according to a review at the time of its introduction. Condensed Comstock was introduced by Inland in 1905, but patented in the name of William A. Schraubstadter in 1908. It has no lowercase, but the design is more contemporary. Monotype has copied both typefaces, but Monotype Comstock Condensed is in 18-point only, without figures. In both foundry typefaces, there are several sizes on 12-point body; No.1 is the largest in regular, but No.1 is the smallest in Condensed. In 1911, a copy of Comstock was issued by Bauer in Germany under the name Astoria, revived in 1957.
    • Inland Copperplate: Inland Copperplate is a shaded Old English typeface, first shown by Inland Type Foundry in November 1901. It is similar to Typo Text (q.v.). although the specimen here, reproduced from an over-inked showing, doesn't reveal the shading.
    • Shaw Text: Shaw Text was introduced by Inland Type Foundry in 1907 as its "latest novelty," although it is a rather conventional Old English face, a little heavier than Wedding Text, and a little lighter and fancier than Engravers Old English. After Inland merged with ATF, Shaw Text continued to be shown until 1954. Compare Plate Text.
    • Litho Antique (1910). Mac McGrew: Rockwell Antique was a reissue of Litho Antique, cut by William Schraubstadter for Inland Type Foundry and introduced in January 1910 when it was advertised as the "newest typeface; one of our best; closely imitating steelplate and lithography." In the late 1920s similar typefaces became popular in Europe, and some were imported into the United States. Morris Benton of ATF added several characters to the old Inland face, matrices of which were then in ATF's vaults, and it was reissued in 1931 as Rockwell Antique. But Benton saw that something more was needed, and redrew it as Stymie Bold (q.v.) in the same year. The alternate characters which were added to Rockwell are the same ones now shown with Stymie Bold. Monotype copied Rockwell but erroneously called it Stymie Bold in some literature, and there has been confusion between the two typefaces ever since; the latter name is often applied to fonts of Rockwell cast on Monotype machines by secondary suppliers. Indicative of this confusion, Stymie Bold Italic on Mono is series 1891, corresponding to Rockwell series 189, while Stymie Bold is 790. English Monotype has several weights of Rockwell, a square serif family which differs from this typeface and should not be confused with it; see Imports in Appendix. Antique Shaded (q. v.) is sometimes called Rockwell Antique Shaded.
    • Herald Extra Condensed (1909). An octagonal typeface.
    • Extra Condensed Title Gothic No.12.
    [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Intellecta Design
    [Paulo W]

    Design company in Brazil run by Paulo W (b. 1970) from Recife. Paulo W is a gaúcho (Brazilian southerner), with interests in multiple areas, including poetry (he has published the digital opus Magical Book), graphic design and, most recently, type design.

    Dafont link. MyFonts. MyFonts link. Abstract Fonts link. YWFT link. Behance link. Blog. Home page. Fonthaus. Monotype. Eshops. Facebook. Flickr. Klingspor link. Wordpress. Devian tart. T26. Linkedin. Identifont. Linotype. ITC. Faces.co. His typefaces:

    • Free fonts: Inductive Resonance (2014: connected script), Retrodings (+Two, 2014), Living In The Past (outlined Tuscan face), Rough Ornaments Free (2014), CornPop Three (borders), Too Good To Be True (2013, retro script), Blanchard Inland (2013), Living Together (2013), Arresto (2013, brush script), Hertziano (2013, non-connected fat script), Japanese Tourist (2013), Nouveau Never Dies Free (2013), The Beat Goes On (2012, fifties script), Stencix (2012), Figgins Brute Trash (grunge), Fontaniolo Beveled (2011, ornamental caps), Czech Gotika (2011), Random Dingbats (2011), Victorian Free Ornaments (2011), Rustic (2011), Armorial (2011), Woman Silhouettes (2011), The Nile Song (2010, hieroglyphics), Smith Typewriter (2009), Sign Flags (2010, semaphore dingbats), Senectus Morbus (2010), MesoAmerica (2010, Indian symbols), ClassicSketches (2010, dingbats), Columns (2010, dingbats of Greek and Roman columns), EasyCuneiform (2010), EasyLombardicTwo (2010), EasyOpenFace (2010, blackboard bold style), Egidia (2010), Significante (2010, dingbats with, e.g., gender symbols), WhiteDominoes (2010, domino pieces), Easy Heraldics (2010), Intellecta Heraldics (2010), Heraldic Devices (2011), KidingsFree (2010, dingbats), RoughTuscan (2010), The French (2009, Fleur de Lys dings), AprendizCaligrafico (2010), Volitiva (2006, Trajan caps and chancery lower case, all based on work by Ludovico Vicentino Arrighi), Gaivota (2006), KurrentKupferstichThin (2006), PaulKlein (2010), PaulKleinTwo (2010), PortuguesArcaicoLectura (2005), ReproxScript (2009, based on Jerry Mullen's Repro Script from 1953-1954), RickGearyHomage (2007, scanbats), WestBalaio (2006, ornamental caps), Corto Maltese (2006, scanbats), Renaissance Coiffure (2006), Renaissance Ornaments (2007), Renaissance Shoes (2012, free), TTF Tattoef (2006, tattoo-inspired dingbats), ExperiTypo5 (2006), Lower Metal (2006), Geometric Serif PW (2006), Geometric (2006), Geometric Petras PW (2006), War II Warplanes (2005), Carbono (2005), Times New Vespasian (2005), BoldBold (2005), Vengeance (2005), Doppleganger (2005), Chancelaresca (2005), Cursivo Saxonio (2005), Gotische Minuskel 1269 (2005: a Kanzlei Schrift after Dekan Hermann zu Soest, 1269) and Guto Lacaz (2005, dingbats).
    • Richard Gans revival project: Gans Tipo Adorno, Gans Lath Modern, Gans Titular Adornada (2006), Gans Ibarra (2006), Gans Antigua (2006), Gans Antigua Manuscrito (2006), Gans Radio Lumina (2006), Gans Fulgor (2006), Gans Carmem Adornada (2006), Gans Italiana (2006, extensive Italian-style slab serif family), Gans Titania (2007), Gans Titania Adornada (2007), Gans Titular (2007), Gans Gotico Globo (2007: 9 styles by Iza W), Gans Royality (2007: 3 styles by Iza W), Gans Headpieces (2008), Gans Rasgos Escritura (2010: filets---followed in 2011 by Rasgos Escritura Nuevos), Gan Esquinazos (2010, frames), Gans Blasones (2010, shields), Gans Neoclassic Fleurons (2008), Gans Classical Fleurons, Gans Ding.
    • Wood-inspired typefaces: Dead Wood Rustic (2007), Taranatiritza (5 wood type styles, after William Hamilton Page), Majestade (2007, by Iza W---two Tuscan style typefaces), Decorative Tuscanian (2007), Concave Tuscan (2010, wood type), Palermo (2007, by Iza W---Tuscan style family), Teatro (2009, Tuscan), Bruce Double Pica (2009, Tuscan; the Beveled weight is free), Antique Extended (2010, slab serif wood type), Dark Wood (2009, gothic), Dark Wood Beveled (2011).
    • Charles Bluemlein's script revivals: Bluelmin Kisaburo (2013), Bluelmin Ralph (2012), Bluelmin Ronald (2012), Bluelmin Sandsfort (2012) and Bluelmin Benedict (2012). (2012).
    • Blackletter: Salterio (2012, +Trash, +Three, +Gradient, +Shadow, +Shadow Two), Leothric (2011, bastarda), Bruce 532 Blackletter (2011, after George Bruce), Schneider Buch Deutsch (2007, +Trash, +Shadow, +Shadow Two), Schneidler halb fette Deutsch (2009, +Beveled), Schneidler Zierbuchstaben, Hostetler Fette Ultfraktur Ornamental (2007, blackletter caps), Gothic 16 CG (2007), Gothic 16 CG Decorative (2007, blackletter caps), Schneidler Grobe Gotisch (2008, Iza W, T-26), Allerlei Zierat (2008, ornament fonts based on a 1902 catalog of Schelter & Giesecke), Allerlei Zierat Capitals (2007), Psalter Gotisch (2009, a blackletter after the Benjamin Krebs blackletter face by the same name, ca. 1890), Münster-Gotische (2009, a blackletter family after a 1896 typeface by the same created by Schelter&Giesecke), Koberger N24 Schwabacher (2007), Student's Alphabet (2007, blackletter), Like Gutemberg Caps (2007), Nürnberg Schwabacher, Gotische Frame (2007: four framed blackletter styles by Iza W), Gotische (2007: ten ornate blackletter styles by Iza W), Gothic Garbage, Gothic Shadow, Gothic Trashed, Gothic Flourish (2009), Gotica Moderna (octagonal, blackletter), AltDeutsch (2007, four severe blackletter fonts by Iza W), Fin Fraktur, Gotische Bouffard, Heimat RGS, Gothic Handtooled Bastarda (2006), HostetlerFetteUltfrakturOrnamental (2007, blackletter caps), Gothic Handtooled Bastarda (2006).
    • Historical revivals: Pantographia (2010: a digitization, as is, of several alphabets from Edmund Fry's Pantographia, 1799), Caslon2000, Caslon B, Delamotte Large Relief (2010), Figgins Brute (2007: 8 heavy Egyptian styles by Iza W based on Figgins' 1817 specimen book), Erased Figgins Brute (2007), Gras Vibert (2007, a didone family; followed by Gras Vibert Two in 2009).
    • Erotic or human alphabets: American Way of Life (2011), Roman Silhouettes (2011), Silvestre Weygel (2007, named after Martin Weygel'a erotic alphabet from 1560, which in turn was based on Peter Flötner's 1534 alphabet), Gravure (caps typeface made of human silhouettes), Innocence (2007, dingbats of girls).
    • Medieval chancery hand: Portugues Arcaico (2005, three medieval handwriting styles), Kurrent Kupfertisch (2006, a medieval hand done with Fernanda Salmona), Dovtrina Christam 1622 (authentic old manuscript face), Catania (2007, exquisite medieval caps in 3 styles by Iza W).
    • Typewriter typefaces: Remix Typewriter (2012), Smith Trash (2012), Neo Bulletin (2010, +Trash), Remington PW (old typewriter face), Olivetti Linea (old typewriter face), Erased Typewriter 2 (2007: 4 styles by Paulo W), RIP Typewriter (2009), Shadow Typewriter (2007), Underwood Typewriter (by Iza W).
    • Calligraphic: Broken Kiss (2015), Derniere Script (2015), Bradstone Parker Script (after Zaner's penmanship), Jan van den Velde Script (2011, based on the penmanship of Jan van den Velde as illustrated in vna den Velde's 1605 book Spieghel der schrijfkonste; developed jointly by Paulo and Iza W), Penabico (2010, with Iza W); Penabico is a free interpretation of the copperplate script styles to be found in the Universal Penman, London, 1741, by George Bickham---it contains over 1500 calligraphic glyphs and 250 ornaments. Samples of Penabico: i, ii, iii, iv, v, vi, vii, viii, ix), Easy Calig, Intellecta Mixed Script (2008), Spencerian Constancia (2008), Calligraphia Latina Soft4 (2010, quilled ornaments), Intellecta Script commercial (2009), Spencerian By Product (2009), Spencerian Palmer Penmanship Pro (2010), Indenture English Penman (2010), Calligraphia Latina (2008-2010, in weights called Soft2, Dense, 3, Soft4, Mixed, Square Edition).
    • Victorian, Edwardian: Engel (2007, by Iza W in 15 styles that have a 1870s look), Compendium (Victorian), Costado (2009, a Victorian / Western face).
    • Ornamental caps: Campi (2009), Doppel Mittel Lapidar Azure (2012), Musirte Antiqua (2012), The House of Usher (2012), Peterlon (2012), Dolphus Mieg Alphabet (2011, +Two), Dolphus Mieg Monograms (2011), Human Nature (2011), English Arabesque Revival 1900 (2011), Imprenta Royal Nonpareil (2011), XVI Century Shaw Woodcuts (2011), Ichweis Caps (2011), Cherubim Caps (2011), Rara Beleza (2011), Gothic 1880 Revival (2011), Angelicaps (2010), Unnamed Caps Two (2010), VertiCaps (2010) Rebimboca Caps (2010), Rebimboca Beveled (2012, free), Rebimboca Gradient (2012, free), Rebimboca Trash (2012, free), Rebimboca Outlined (2012, free), Republica Presente (2010), Speedball Metropolitan Caps (2010, after a design by Ross F. George), Nice Initials (2010), Morphelic (2010), DurerGotischCapitals (2010), Egmontian (2007, ornamental caps family), Saducismus Triumphatus (ornamental caps), Vogus (Victorian caps), Victorian Ornamental Capitals (2009) and Frompac 1889 Arabesque (2007) [both are classical arabesques published in Ludwig Petzendorfer's Schriften-Atlas. Eine Sammlung der wichtigsten Schreib- und Druckschriften aus alter und neuer Zeit nebst Initialen, Monogrammen, Mappen, Landeskarten und heraldischen Motiven fur die praktischen Zwecke des Kunstgewerbes, 1889], Lettrines Petin (+Ornée), Numa Initials (2006), Gradl Initialen, Vampirevich (2009, ornamental caps), Paulus Franck 1602 (2006, ornate caps), Geodec (2006, baroque caps), HostetlerFetteUltfrakturOrnamental (2007, blackletter caps), Cadels (2007, ornate caps by Iza W), Manuscript XIV Century (2007, by Iza W--four Lombardic caps), Merona (2007, by Iza W--ten Lombardic caps fonts), Selena (2007, by Iza W---ornate Victorian caps), Leyenda (great Victorian era ornamental caps), Mixed Capital Style (2007, caps), Lenda (2008, capitals), Kidnaped at Old Times (2008, ornamental caps, ransom note style), Mortised Capitals, Is Not ABrazilian Font (hand-printed blackboard bold caps), Robur The Conqueror (2009, ornamental caps), Georgia Capitals (2009), Decadence avec Elegance (exaggerated ornamental caps).
    • The American Advertise series: American Advertise No. 9 (2008), American Advertise No. 17 (2007, 19th century caps), American Advertise 018 and 019 (2008), American Advertise Square Series (2007), American Advertise 003 (2012), American Advertise 004 (2010), American Advertise 005 (2010), American Advertise 006 (2010, alphadings), American Advertise 007 (2010, ornamental caps).
    • Ornaments, fleurons: Transportation Dings *2015), Cornucopia of Dingbats Eight (2015), Animals Old Cuts Two (2015), Unpublished Ornaments Two (2013), Classix (2012), Cornucopia of Dingbats (2012-2014, +Two, +Three, +Four, +Five, +Six, +Seven), Cornucopia of Ornaments (2013; +Two, +Three, +Four, +Five, +Six, 2014), Cornucopia Caligrafica (2012), Vintage Hands (2012), Human Silhouettes (2012; +Free, 2013; +Two, 2013; +Human Silhouettes Three, 2013; +Four, 2013; +Five, 2014; +Six, 2014; +Seven, 2014; +Eight, 2014; +Nine, 2015), Easy Fleurons (2012), Floreale Two (2012), Neoclassic Fleurons Free (2011), Calligraphic Frames Soft (2011, +Two), Jugendstil Flowers Free (2011), Easy Ornaments (2011), Blasons (2011), Blasons Free (2012), Armorial (2011), Monograms Soft (2010, with Iza W), Easy Tiles (2010), Free Tiles (2010), Rough Fleurons Two (2010), Vegetable Breathe (2010), Corn Pop Plus (2010), Mortised Fleurons (2010), Mortised Ornaments (2011), Mortised Ornaments Free Two (2013), Golden Times (2010), Stahlhelme und Kronen (2010), Rough Fleurons (2006), Nouveau Never Dies (2009, ornaments), GeodecBruceOrnamented6 (2006, after a sample from the Bruce Type Foundry), Grave Ornamental (2006), BlackOrnaments (2008), Hera Hedelix (2009, ornamental tiles), Mortised Ornaments (2009), Soft Fleurons (2007), Half Flower (2007), Frames 1 (2007, by Iza W), Flower Essences, Micro Fleurons (2009), Naturella (2009, leaf and grape dingbats by Iza W), Black Fleurons (2010), Easy Fleurons Two (2011), Intellecta Borders (2008, by Iza W), Intellecta Style (2007, borders).
    • Fonts made before 2007: Brute Aldine (2007, Western family), Bad Situation (2007, after a design by Freeman Delamotte from 1864), Benjamin Franklin (2007), Geodec Petras Enhanced (2006), Deutsche Poster (2006), FatFontGrotesk (2006), Orchis (2006, an art deco family by Iza W), Fantis (2006), Frompac (2006, with Iza W), Geodec Fog (2006), Intellecta Modern (2006), Intellecta Modern 2 (2006), Intellecta Romana Humanistica (2006), Advantage (2006, together with Iza W), Biza (2006, together with Iza W), Elegancy (2006, together with Iza W), Estiliza (2006, a sans family together with Iza W), Experitypo 4, Stairway to Heaven, Copperplate PW, Dings PW, Roger Dean, Gliphs PW, Luxeuil, Watchtower Bible 1965, Gabinete Portugues (11 fonts), Elara (2009), Xilografuras (dingbats), Beta, Alta, Paleolitica Nacional, Shakespeare Studs, Copperplate collection (5 fonts), Wine, Ampersamp, James Poem, Leal Conselheiro, Haeckel Enygma, Iza B, Of, Lementa (2006, ornate family), Pirates (dingbats), Wire Clip (2009), Divina Proportione (2009, dingbats), Tharagaverung (2007), Correo (2009, a nice manly bold face), Titivilus (2007, Roman lettering), Pirates De Luxe (2007, dingbats), Geodec Minuskel (2006), Geodec Spyral (2006), Copperplate Decorative (2006), Feosa (2006), Francesco Decorative (2006, Iza W), Geodec Petras Enhanced (2006), Ibarra Flourished (2006), Intellecta Decorative 017 (2006), Intellecta Decorative 018 (2006), Intellecta Slab Bold (2006), Kansas Decorative (2006), Pingente (2006), Sixties Living (2006), Caractere Doublet (2007), DeutschePosterSteinschrift (2007; by Iza W), Bailarina (2007), GP Casual Script (2007), Colonia Portuguesa (2007), Contouration (2007), Deco Experiment 3 (2007), Floresco (2007), Flower Jars (2007, by Iza W---a very nice idea), Frutisis (2007), Intellecta Monograms (2007: 19 monogram fonts by Paulo W), Intellecta Monograms Random Sample (2012-2013: several typefaces), Peloponeso (2007, by Iza W), Porcupine (2007, by Iza W), Southern Flight (2007, by Iza W---condensed), TTF TTTOEF 4 (2007, by Iza W---dingbats), GeodecBruceFlourished, HostetlerNormande, Victorian Ultra Parphernalia (2007), Angels (2007), Angels Free (2013), Mondrongo (2007), Oorlog (2007).
    • Fonts in 2008: Das Riese (3d engraved caps, +Shadow), Economica (sans, T26), Antiqua Double 12, Bad Baltimore (+Beveled, +Typewriter), Calligraphia Latina (2008-2009, in weights called Soft2, Dense, 3, Mixed, Square Edition, Free), Fry's Alphabet, Grissom (bug dingbats, by Iza W), Latinish (by Iza W), Lettering Deco (by Iza W), Litho Romana Inland, Quadratta Serif (a slab serif by Fernando Diaz), TTF TATTOEF 7 (by Iza W).
    • Fonts made in 2009: Eingraviert (engraved; scans: i, ii, iii), Eingraviert Beveled (2011), Greko Roman Oldstyle, Ortodoxa do oriente, Sans Square, Speedball (by Iza W, Victorian style), Speedball Western Letters (after Ross F. George's lettering), Elara (2009), Intellecta Roman Tall, Force Brute & Ignorance, Sunamy Caps, Starret, The Pilgrim (alphadings), Renaisperian (alphadings), Real Caps Two, Mateus Bold (4 bold styles), Intellecta Crafts (arts and crafts family), Bruce 1490, Bradley Dingies (five dingbat typefaces, after William H. Bradley), Allerlei Zierat Renaissance, Grave Plus, the grungy Monkey series (Victorian Monkey, Monkey Poesy, Monkey Messed Gutenberg Caps, Monkey Was Here, Monkey Insinuation, Monkey In The Middle Ages), Montezuma (dingbats), Grotesque and Arabesque, Calhambeque (old car dingbats), Eiger (2009, a 3d sketched headline face).
    • Faces made in 2010: Polen, Pencraft (capitals were inspired in Swagger Capitals, an original design from Carl Stephen Junge, at Barnhart Brothers & Spindler; lowercase based Pencraft Specials, an ornamental variation of the Pencraft Oldstyle series, as displayed in the BBS catalog from 1922), Salamemingoe (children's hand), BarberPoles, Beware the neighbors (scary), BlackInitialText, CaligrafiaDivina, CornPop, CowboyHippie Pro, Grotesca3-D, Nardis, Senzacuore, Speedball Metropolitan Poster (2010, after a design by Ross F. George), TagWood, Tosca, TypographyTribute, Zooland, Bubbleboddy-Fat, bubbleboddylight-Light, Pretoria Gross (a Victorian family done with Iza W), Wood Font Five (wood plank font), Wood Font Four, Herr Foch (art nouveau), Rebimboca, Octagon French (a 3d beveled typeface due to George Nesbitt, 1838), Picuxuxo (retro futuristic, comic book style), Large Old English Riband, Ornamental Riband, Kidings (Dutch dingbats), Hostil (originally done in 2007: a headline family; followed by Hostil Shadow Two (free, 2012) and Hostil Gradient (free, 2012)), Grotesca, Heptagon French, Antiquariaat (condensed), Cortinado, Sanoxio (3d headline face), Violentia (grunge), Swirlies (spiral dings).
    • Faces from 2011: Dia de los Muertos (fantastic skeletal masks), Inland Becker, Rasgos Escritura Nuevos, Jaggard (2007, a renaissance penmanship caps typeface modeled after Joachim Romann's Queen (1954-1956, Stempel)), Jaggard Two, Naive Ornaments Black, Augustus (+Beveled: roman letters), Sayonara (oriental simulation face; the Beveled style is free), Trash Barusa (inline ornamental face), Free Ribbons, Black Ornaments Three, Calligraphia Latina Soft 5, Heraldic Devices Premium, Ornate Blackboards, Benjamin Franklin Beveled, Baltimore Typewriter Beveled, Bernardo Beveled, Van den Velde Script (a free interpretation of the work of the famous master penman Jan van den Velde, found in the Spieghel der schrijfkonste, in den welcken ghesien worden veelderhande gheschrifften met hare fondementen ende onderrichtinghe (Haarlen, 1605)), Indenture English Penmanship, Penmanship Birds and Ornaments (2012), Beware The Neighboors Shadow (texture face), White Free (shadow face), Delamotte Large Relief Beveled.
    • Typefaces made in 2012: Porosa, Presto, Derradeira (signage script), About Sweet Memories (brush script), Intellecta Ribbons, Irrelevante (beveled caps), Laus Sus Chris (Christian dingbats), Unpublished Ornaments, Heavy Squared Writing (brush face), Mezcla Titan, Sweet About (retro script), Publicité, Hard to read monograms, Free Medieval, Doctor Polidori (initial caps), Mixed Silhouettes (One through Five), Glosilla Castellana Cursiva (inline type family), Sayonax (a textured version of the oriental simulation typeface Sayonara), Wood Stevens (free), Rockabilly (fifties script), Interdite Script (heavy calligraphic face), Prismatica (free), Cristalid (free prismatic face), Zed Leppelin (free), Neo Bulletin Outline (free), Neo Bulletin College (2012), Victorian Free Ornaments (+Two), Spanish Army Shields (+Two), Varius Multiplex, Stephens Heavy Titling.
    • Typefaces from 2013: Face of Yesterday (calligraphic script), Ribbon in the sky, Dreamer (a flowing upright semi-connected script), Vorname (blackletter), Barocque Capitals, Close To You (a rabbit-eared script), Wappen (heraldic shields), Eletroz (hand-printed), Morcrepito (blackletter), Metropolitan Poster Black, Animal Silhouettes, Intellecta Pointers and Hands, The Loyalist (script), Vonnegut (a left-leaning script), Perhaps Love (left-leaning script), So Lonely (script), Exposition (upright script), Plaster of Paris (connected script), Volstead (connected script), Versitia (connected script), Porongo (heavy brush script), Fat Fantasy, Das Krieg (soldier dingbats), Corn Pop Two (ornamental corners), Corn Pop Four, Corn Pop Five, Astrodings, Vulnavia Sans (comic book face), Capitular Heraldica, Mirella Initials Ornamntals (a swashy calligraphic script; with Iza W), Carpete (retro script), Free Writer, Round Hand, Exclusivite (fifties script), Hertz Oscillations (fat retro script), Heavy Rock (fifties script), Raindrops (retro script), Ralph Walker (ronde), Exiles (retro signage script), Mr. Richmond Caps (art nouveau alphadings), Berengard Caps Two.
    • Typefaces from 2014: Prester John, Animals Old Cuts, Take a Pebble, Corn Pop Five (borders), Kidnapped at German Lands (ransom note font), Kidnapped at German Lands 2, Kidnapped at German Lands 3, Kidnapped at German Lands 4 (finished in 2016).
    • Typefaces from 2015: Rogeer (script), Chart Moss, Eliensee, Speedball Ragged, State Bridge, Derniere Script, Grissom Four (dingbats of critters), Das Modern, Zona Pro (a sans family).
    • Typefaces from 2016: Ares Modernos, Soldier William Holmes (vintage handwriting), Doctor Russel (script), Hollandisch Closed (blackletter), Rough Flowers (floral ornaments), Equis (crosses), Mattaaus (a counterless poster font), Holland Morleau (a Kanzlei style blackletter font), Rough Vignettes, Rechnung (a bejeweled didone), Alphabet Fantasie (decorative caps), Phantasinian (blackletter), Loosing Memory (blackletter), Laandbrau (blackletter), Lord Radcliff.
    Showcase of Intellecta Design's fonts, numbering 554 as of early 2017. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Intermicro

    Russian foundry that produced fonts between 1991-1996. Its designers included Isay Slutsker, Svetlana Ermolaeva, Emma Zfcharova, M.G. Rovensky, N.N. Kudrashov, Z.A. Maslennikova, P. Kusanian. Its fonts include ArbatC, BruskovayaC, CaslonC, GymnasiaC, LidiaC, LiteraturnayaC (co-copyright with Poligrafmash), Mysl Narrow, Granit, Kudryashev, KudryashevSans, NewspaperSansC, and OptimusC. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Isaiah Thomas

    Typefounder, 1749-1831. Author of A Specimen of Isaiah Thomas's Printing Types. Being as Large and Complete an Assortment As Is to Be Met With in Any One Printing Office in America. Chiefly Manufactured by That Great Artist, William Caslon, Esq.; of London (Worcester, Massachusetts: Printed by Isaiah Thomas, 1785).

    I cite a blurb from an exhibit at Columbia University: The experiences of Adam Mappa and John Baine show that American printers wanted a domestic typefounding industry, but only if it could produce type of the quality of the English and Scottish foundries. The year after Mappa's foundry was advertised for sale, Isaiah Thomas issued this printer's specimen of type, not for sale but available for use in his printing office. The title page makes the truthful boast that this was as large and complete an assortment "as is to be met with in any one Printing-Office in America," adding that the type was "Chiefly manufactured by that great Artist, William Caslon, Esq; of London." Writing to Thomas in 1793, Ebenezer T. Andrews, in Boston, thought that Baine's type was "by no means handsome." But Thomas had not only to pay dearly for the imported type, he also had to pay import duties. By 1792, when he tried, unsuccessfully, to have the tax on type waived, the duties stood at 7-1/2% of the value of imported goods of all kinds. Instead, Congress raised the import duties on all goods to 10% in 1794, and, in order to protect the foundling American typefounding industry, specified the following year that this included all imported printing types. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Isay Solomonovich Slutsker

    Russian type designer (b. Orel, Russia, 1924, d. 2002). He lost both legs in World War II, but persevered and graduated in 1949 from the Moscow Printing Institute. He started working at the Type Design Department of VNIIPoligraphmash (National Printing Research Institute). From 1991 he worked for ParaType, Moscow. Isay Slutsker worked for major Soviet publishers, Khudozhestvennaya Literatura and Prosveshcheniye, designing and illustrating general fiction literature and textbooks. Slutsker designed many typefaces for a number of scripts and writing systems. Among his Cyrillic and Latin designs are Baltica (1951-2, a spin-off of Candida-Antiqua by Jakob Erbar; in co-operation with Vera Chiminova; Paratype did a revival in 1998); Bruskovaya Gazetnaya ('Slab-serif newstype', 1949; in co-operation with Alexandra Korobkova); Mysl (1986, a makeover of the typeface originally created by Vera Chiminova in 1966); PT Caslon (1962 and 1992, a version of the ATF Caslon; assisted by Tatiana Lyskova and Manvel Shmavonyan; also called Caslon 540); ITC Franklin Gothic Cyrillic (1993; assisted by Tatiana Lyskova); PT BT Humanist 531 Cyrillic (1988, based on the Bitstream version of Syntax, by Hans Eduard Meier; assisted by Manvel Shmavonyan); PT BT Geometric Slabserif 712 (1999, based on the Bitstream version of Monotype Rockwell; assisted by Manvel Shmavonyan); MyslNarrowC (1992-1996, at Intermicro, together with Svetlana Ermolaeva and Emma Zfcharova). Slutsker's Greek typefaces are Obyknovennaya Novaya ('New Standard', 1950s); Rublenaya Slutskera ('Slutsker Sans'; 1960s); Chronos (1980s). Isay Slutsker created several typefaces for Hindi, Bengali, Gujarati and Kannada. He designed two Amharic and one Hangul typeface, Inmin. Slutsker's Humanist 531 Cyrillic was among the winners of Kyrillitsa'99 and won an award at Bukvaraz 2001.

    Russian bio. FontShop link. Klingspor link.

    View some of Isay Slutsker's digital typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    ITC Garamond opinion
    [Bill Troop]

    Bill Troop's opinion on Tony Stan's ITC Garamond: It's a great typeface. And by the way, all you Garamond snobs -- what makes you think anything else is an authentic revival? Granjon, long 'historically' considered the most faithful revival, is probably the least: in its designer's own words, it's half Caslon. Stempel? A Garamond without an overhanging f is not a Garamond, and though the individual characters are often pretty, it is detestable in mass. Monotype? The best in many respects, but it's Jannon, not Garamond. Adobe? A marvellous, regularized typeface for classy menus, but hardly reminiscent of the genius that came from Garamond's own hand. No. 3? Again, not authentic, but terribly useful, especially in magazine work. No, no, there are very few good Garamonds. I look at ITC Garamond this way: it's not a Garamond revival. It's an attempt to create a contemporary typeface of tremendous legibility that contains as much of the beauty of Garamond's letterforms as is consistent with those goals. The major problem is that the book weight is too light. That can theoretically be solved by using the Adobe multiple master version. ..... Ultimately, the main point of a printing type is to save money on paper, isn't it? Well, ITC Garamond does that more attractively than most, I think. Now excuse me while I adjust my bulletproof shield. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    J. Matthews

    Designer of Rothbury at the Inland Type Foundry. Acquired by H. W. Caslon in 1906 from the Inland Type Foundry. Shown as a 1937 typeface at Stephenson Blake. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    James Clough

    James Clough (b. 1947, London) studied typographic design at the London College of Printing. For more than thirty years he has lived and worked in Milan as typographer, designer and calligrapher and since 1990 also as a teacher of the theory and history of typography and visual communication at various institutions including the Milan Polytechnic University (since 2002) and the ISIA of Urbino. He lectures on many aspects of calligraphy, type design and the history of typography in Italy, Britain and Switzerland. Recent essays of his research for English and Italian publications include a study of the various editions of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili (first printed by Aldus Manutius in 1499), types used by the earliest printers in Milan and Venice, the 20th century revivals of Bodoni's types and a study of historical and contemporary script types. In 2005 he curated the Mondovì Museum of Printing. He is on the scientific board of Bibliologia, and wrote the introduction to volume 2 in 2007.

    In 2015, James Clough and Chiara Scattolin coauthored Alphabets of Wood: Luigi Melchiori & the history of Italian wood type (Tipoteca Italiana, Cornuda, Italy). David Wolske writes: Alphabets of Wood is the most recent and arguably the most beautiful addition to the new wave of wood type scholarship. It is also important because it is the first publication to seriously examine the historical and cultural significance of Italian wood type manufacturers. In the first part of the book, James Clough calligrapher, writer provides a broad historical overview of wood block printing, from fourteenth- and fifteenth-century hand carved imagery and text through the nineteenth-century American origins of moveable wooden type. In Chapter 6 Clough introduces us to Luigi Melchiori, a skilled designer and manufacturer of wood type, active during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in the Veneto Region of Italy. Through beautifully paced layouts, sumptuous photography, and a richly textured typographic palette, Melchiori's life, work, and legacy are situated in the context of other Italian wood type manufacturers. In the second part of Alphabets of Wood, Chiara Scattolin digs deep into the archive of wood type fonts, specimen books, tools, and documents held by Tipoteca Italiana. Detailed testimonies from peers help to humanize "the Bodoni of wood type," making it easy for contemporary typographers, graphic designers, letterpress printers, and artists to recognize themselves in the pride and craftsmanship Melchiori brought to his work. Every chapter of the book is illustrated with stunningly handsome antique wood type specimens. Two eight-page letterpress inserts on a toothy, soft-white paper stock provide an arrestingly modern counterpoint. The Stamperia of Tipoteca Italiana printed all sixteen frame-worthy pages using original wood type from Tipoteca's Wood Type Archive. Typographically the book echoes the best of Italian design, finding a harmonious balance between industrial sharpness and sensuous fluidity. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    James Hamilton
    [Hamilton Holly Wood Type Co.]

    [More]  ⦿

    Jason Castle
    [Castle Type]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Jay Rutherford
    [Typoart GmbH (or: VEB Typoart)]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Jeff Levine
    [Jeff Levine: Additional typefaces]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Jeff Levine: Additional typefaces
    [Jeff Levine]

    This is a list of fonts by Jeff Levine not categorized anywhere else on my pages.

    [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Jeroen Visser
    [Vizi]

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    Jill Pichotta

    Designer who works near Boston and mostly worked for Font Bureau. Jill Pichotta's typefaces:

    • Gangly (1996-1998). Codesigned with Joe Polevy.
    • HipHop (informal printing, 1993).
    • RomeoSkinnyCondensed (1991). One of the thinnest fonts on earth.
    • Rats (with Jean Evans, 1997).
    • FB Garamond Text and Display (1992-2000). Modeled after Ludlow's Garamond done in 1929 by Douglas Crawford McMurtrie and Robert Hunter Middleton.
    • Californian FB Text and Display (1994-1999). Done in cooperation with David Berlow and Richard Lipton.
    • Aardvark.
    • A redesign of Matthew Carter's Postoni (1997), called Stilson (2009, with Richard Lipton and Dyana Weissman): Since 1997, The Washington Post's iconic headlines have been distinguished by their own sturdy, concise variation on Bodoni, designed by Matthew Carter. For the 2009 redesign, Richard Lipton, Jill Pichotta, and Dyana Weissman expanded the family with more refined Display & Condensed styles for use in larger sizes. Originally called Postoni, the fonts were renamed in honor of The Post's founder, Stilson Hutchins.
    • Caslon FB (1992, Font Bureau) comes with this text: Our familiar Caslon Bold headletters were invented around the turn of the twentieth century in the United States and were only loosely based on William Caslons romans. The best of the Caslon Bolds originated at the Keystone Type Foundry of Philadelphia, whose Caslon Bold Condensed appeared about 1905, probably drawn by R.F. Burfeind. Jill Pichotta revised his Bold Condensed&drew the Bold Extra Condensed.

    FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Jim Parkinson
    [Parkinson Type Design]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Jimena Zazas

    Graduate from FADU, University of Buenos Aires, who created the scriptish typeface Gluttony (2010), which was derived from Adobe Caslon. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Jintanat Jintasawaeng

    Jintanat Jintasawaeng (Denver, CO) modified Adobe Caslon into an ornamental typeface called Kin Sia in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Joe Treacy
    [Treacyfaces]

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    John Baskerville

    Birmingham-based British writing master, stonecutter, letter designer, typefounder and printer (1706-1775). Designer of transitional typefaces. In 1757, he created his famous serif typefaces, which were called transitional as they were somewhat between the old style typefaces of William Caslon and the modern types of Bodoni and Didot. He increased the thick-thin contrast over that found in Caslon's types, making the serifs sharper and more tapered, and shifted the axis of rounded letters to a more vertical position. The curved strokes are more circular in shape, and the characters became more regular. In 1757, Baskerville published his first work, a collection of Virgil, which was followed by some fifty other classics. In 1758, he was appointed printer to the Cambridge University Press. It was there in 1763 he published his master work, a folio Bible, which was printed using his own typeface, ink, and paper. The modern types became more popular than Baskerville, and people had to wait until 1917 when Bruce Rogers revived Baskerville's type for the Harvard University Press, followed by Stanley Morison's revival in 1924 for the British Monotype Company. Linotype introduced it in 1931.

    In modern times, we find the 1978 rendering of ITC New Baskerville by Matthew Carter and John Quaranda. Linotype offers 38 Baskerville typefaces. URW Baskerville has 51 styles.

    Biography by Nicholas Fabian. CV in Spanish. Wikipedia. In 2009, the Baskerville Project was conceived, an animated movie with David Osbaldestin as its Creative Director, and Caroline Archer and Ben Waddington as researchers. Linotype link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    John D. Boardley
    [Old Style typefaces]

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    John Henry Mason

    British type designer (b. London, 1875, d. London, 1951) who created Imprint (Monotype, 1913) together with Gerard Meynell, F. Ernest Jackson and Edward Johnston. This family, which includes Imprint Shadow, has a large x-height and is related to Caslon. Imprint was copied by Bitstream, who called it Dutch 766.

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    John Stephenson
    [Stephenson Blake]

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    Johnson Ball

    Author of "Wiliam Caslon 1693-1766" (Kineton: The Roundwood Press, 1973), a 494-page magnum opus on Caslon's life. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Jonas Schudel

    Designer (with Fabio Luiz Haag) of a grotesque sans at Dalton Maag, 2007-2009, called Effra, which was inspired by a 1816 design from the Caslon font foundry. Discussion at Typophile. Followed in 2013 by Effra Corp (Dalton Maag) which supports Greek and Cyrillic as well.

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    José Alberto Mauricio
    [Alter Littera]

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    Joseph Fry
    [Fry]

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    Joseph Jackson

    British punchcutter who apprenticed with William Caslon I in London. He started his own foundry in 1763. His typefaces include an Anglo-Saxon type for an edition of the Domesday Book. Vincent Figgins apprenticed for Jackson from 1782. On his death in 1792 the business was purchased by William Caslon III. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Joseph Warren Phinney

    American type designer, 1848-1934. He worked in Boston, first at the Dickinson foundry, and later at ATF, where he was vice-president. He designed these typefaces:

    • Aesthetic (1882, Dickinson). This Victorian typeface was revived by Aridi as Spring.
    • Cloister Black (Kinsley/ATF, 1904, available from Bitstream). According to McGrew, Cloister Black (or Cloister Text) was introduced by ATF in 1904. Its design is generally credited to Joseph W. Phinney, of ATF's Boston foundry, but some authorities give some or all of the credit to Morris Benton. It is an adaptation of Priory Text, an 1870s version of Caslon Text (q.v.), modernizing and eliminating the irregularities of that historic face, and making it one of the most popular versions of Old English. Flemish Black (q.v.), introduced at the same time, has the same lowercase and figures but a different set of capitals. Note the alternate V and W, and tied ct. ATF also makes a double lowercase l, while Monotype makes f-ligatures and diphthongs. Compare Goudy Text, Engravers Old English.
    • Italian Old Style (1896, cut the punches; note--this is the Stephenson Blake name, who bought the typeface from ATF; the original name was ATF Jenson, and it in turn was modelled after Morris's Golden Type, according to Eason). Tom Wallace explains the origins of his own Phinney Jenson in 2007: In 1890 a leader of the Arts & Crafts movement in England named William Morris founded Kelmscott Press. He was an admirer of Jenson's Roman and drew his own somewhat darker version called Golden, which he used for the hand-printing of limited editions on homemade paper, initiating the revival of fine printing in England. Morris' efforts came to the attention of Joseph Warren Phinney, manager of the Dickinson Type Foundry of Boston. Phinney requested permission to issue a commercial version, but Morris was philosophically opposed and flatly refused. So Phinney designed a commercial variation of Golden type and released it in 1893 as Jenson Oldstyle. Phinney Jenson is our version of Phinney's version of Morris' version of Nicolas Jenson's Roman.
    • Abbott Oldstyle (1901). According to McGrew: Abbott Oldstyle is an eccentric novelty typeface designed in 1901 by Joseph W. Phinney for ATF. Upright stems taper inward slightly near the ends, while most other strokes are curved. Like many other typefaces of the day, each font contains several alternate characters, logotypes, and ornaments as shown. Some early specimens call it Abbot Oldstyle, without the doubled t. It bears ATF's serial number 1 because it headed the alphabetical list when the numbering system was introduced about 1930, rather than being their oldest face. Walter Long, who supplied the specimen, writes: All the fonts (sizes) are the same as to content and every item is shown on the specimen proof. So this may be the first complete font proof published, as the typeface was obsolete before founders and printers began showing all characters, and advertising typographers were still far in the future. However, a few characters in the specimen are worn or broken. Compare Bizarre Bold. For a digital version, see Abbott Old Style (2010, by SoftMaker). See also Brendel's Monsignore (1994), Alan Prescott's New Abbott Old Style APT (1995), Opti/Castcraft's Abbess Opti (1990-1993), FontBank/Novel's Abbess (1990), SSI's Mandrita Display (1994), and Nick Curtis's Abbey Road NF.
    • Bradley. McGrew's comments: Bradley (or Bradley Text) was designed by Herman Ihlenburg---some sources credit it to Joseph W. Phinney---from lettering by Will H. Bradley for the Christmas cover of an Inland Printer magazine. It was produced by ATF in 1895, with Italic, Extended, and Outline versions appearing about three] years later. It is a very heavy form of black-letter, based on ancient manuscripts, but with novel forms of many letters. Bradley and Bradley Outline, which were cut to register for two-color work, have the peculiarity of lower alignment for the caps than for the lowercase and figures, as may be seen in the specimens; Italic and Extended align normally. The same typeface with the addition of German characters (some of which are shown in the specimen of Bradley Extended) was sold as Ihlenburg, regular and Extended. Similar types, based on the same source and issued about the saUte time, were St. John by Inland Type Foundry, and Abbey Text by A. D. Farmer&Son. They were not as enduring as Bradley, which was resurrected fora while in 1954 by ATF. Also compare Washington Text. For a free digital revival, see Bradley Gratis (2005, Justin Callaghan).
    • Camelot (1896). McGrew states: Camelot or Camelot Oldstyle was the first typeface designed by Frederic W. Goudy. He offered it to Dickinson Type Foundry (part of ATF) in Boston, which accepted it and sent him $10, twice what he had modestly asked for it. This was in 1896; it was apparently cut and released the following year as drawn, without lowercase. In February 1900 a design patent was issued in the names of Goudy and Joseph W. Phinney, and assigned to ATF. Phinney was a well-known designer for Dickinson-ATF, and apparently it was he who added the lowercase alphabet. Its success encouraged Goudy to make a distinguished career of type designing, and this typeface was included in ATF specimen books as late as 1941. Compare Canterbury.
    • Cheltenham Old Style&Italic. McGrew's historical comments: The design of Cheltenham Oldstyle and Italic is credited to Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue, an architect who had previously designed Merrymount, a private press type. For Cheltenham he had the assistance of Ingalls Kimball, director of the Cheltenham Press in New York City, who suggested and supervised the face. Original drawings were made about 14 ' inches high, and were subjected to much experimentation and revision. Further modification of the design was done by the manufacturers. Some historians credit this modification or refinement to Morris F. Benton; another source says it was done at the Boston branch of ATF, which suggests that the work may have been done by Joseph W. Phinney. In fact, Steve Watts says the typeface was first known as Boston Oldstyle. Mergenthaler Linotype also claims credit for developing the face, but it was first marketed by ATF. Trial cuttings were made as early as 1899, but it was not completed until about 1902, and patented in 1904 by Kimball. It was one of the first scientifically designed typefaces.
    • Engravers Old English (McGrew states: a plain, sturdy rendition of the Blackletter style, commonly known as Old English. It was designed in 1901 by Morris Benton and another person identified by ATF only as Cowan, but has also been ascribed to Joseph W. Phinney.).
    • Flemish Black (1902) (McGrew: It has the same lowercase as Cloister Black, which was introduced at the same time, but a distinctly different set of capitals. Cloister Black attained much greater popularity and longer life.).
    • Globe Gothic (McGrew: a refinement of Taylor Gothic, designed about 1897 by ATF at the suggestion of Charles H. Taylor of the Boston Globe, and used extensively by that paper).
    • Jenson Oldstyle&Italic, about which McGrew expounds: Jenson Oldstyle, though a comparatively crude typeface in itself, did, much to start the late nineteenth-century move toward better types and typography. Designed by J. W. Phinney of the Dickinson Type Foundry (ATF) and cut by John F. Cumming in 1893, it was based on the Golden Type of William Morris for the Kelmscott Press in 1890; that in turn was based on the 1470-76 types of Nicolas Jenson. Morris had established standards for fine printing, in spite of the fact that he did not design really fine types. Serifs in particular are clumsy, but the Jenson types quickly became popular. BB&S introduced Mazarin in 1895-96, as a revival of the Golden type, redesigned by our artist. But it was a poor copy, and was replaced by Morris Jensonian. Inland's Kelmscott, shown in 1897, was acquired by BB&S and renamed Morris Jensonian in 1912; Keystone had Ancient Roman (q. v.); Crescent Type Foundry had Morris Old Style. Hansen had Hansen Old Style (q. v.); and other founders had several other typefaces, all nearly like Jenson. It is hard to realize that Jenson was inspired by the same historic type as the later and more refined Centaur, Cloister, and Eusebius. ATF spelled the name "Jensen" in some early specimens, and added "No. 2" to the series, the latter presumably when it was adapted to standard alignment or when minor changes were made in the design. A 5-style family that includes LTC Jenson Heavyface and LTC Jenson Regular was published in 2006 at P22/Lanston. HiH produced its own typeface in 2007, called Phinney Jenson.
    • Jenson Oldstyle Heavyface, introduced at the same time as the roman. McGrew: "ATF advertised Phinney's Jenson Heavyface in 1899 as "new and novel-should have been here long ago." Jenson Condensed and Bold Condensed were introduced in 1901."
    • Satanick (McGrew: [..] issued by ATF in 1896, was called "the invention of John F. Cumming of Worcester, Massachusetts." It has also been credited to Joseph W. Phinney of ATF; probably Cumming cut it from Phinney's drawings. However, it was a close copy, though perhaps a little heavier, of the Troy and Chaucer types of William Morris. De Vinne called it "a crude amalgamation of Roman with Blackletter, which is said to have been modeled by Morris upon the style made by Mentel of Strasburg in or near the year 1470." See Morris Romanized Black.).
    • Taylor Gothic (McGrew: ATF's Central Type Foundry branch in St. Louis claims to have originated Quentell in 1895 or earlier. The conversion to Taylor Gothic was designed by Joseph W. Phinney, while the redesign as Globe Gothic in about 1900 is credited to Morris Benton).
    • Vertical Writing (McGrew: Vertical Script is a simple-almost childish-monotone upright script design, produced by Hansen in 1897. Although letters connect, they are widely spaced. The Boston foundry of ATF introduced a similar Vertical Writing, shown in 1897 and patented in 1898 by Joseph W. Phinney. Both are oversize for the body, with kerned descenders.).

    Wiki. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Judith Tan

    Creator of the ornamental typeface Bubble Beads (2013), which has its roots in Adobe Caslon Pro Semibold. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Justin Howes
    [H.W. Caslon&Co Ltd]

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    Kak
    [Katerina Kozhukhova]

    Kak is a Russian type and design magazine run by Peter Bankov and Katerina Kozhukhova. Alexander Tarbeev designed the typefaces KakC and DenHaag for the mag. This sub-page explains how to tell Bembo, Garamond, Janson, Caslon and Baskerville apart. Katerina Kozhukhova also designed a bouncy hand-printed typeface, Ka (Letterhead). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Katerina Kozhukhova
    [Kak]

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    Kazuha Canak

    Bridgeport, CT-based graphic designer. For a course at SASD (Shintaro Akatsu School of Design) taught by Gary Munch, Kazuha created Kazlon (2013)---obviously named after Caslon. Kazuha Canak grew up in Neuss, Germany. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Kelly Johnson
    [Mad Hatter]

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    Keystone Type Foundry

    Philadelphia-based foundry, 1888-1917. The history of this short-lived foundry was told by James Eckmann in The Keystone Type Foundry, 1888-1917: a reprint [from] Printing&graphic arts, volume VI, number 1, February 1958 (Lunenburg, Vermont: The Stinehour Press, 1958). Their work appeared in Keystone Type Foundry, 1901 (362 pages), Abridged specimen book, type: nickel-alloy on universal line comprising a price list of types, borders, leads and slugs, brass rule, brass galleys; miscellaneous cuts and general supplies for printers (1906, 636 pages, see also here, here and here), A book of Keystone type typefaces (2nd ed., Philadelphia, ca. 1920), Catalogue and specimen book. Keystone products, consisting of type, material, furniture, complete line of miscellaneous supplies for printers and publishers, machinery and wood goods (Philadelphia, ca. 1910), See also Keystone Products Catalogue and Specimen Book, Consisting of Type, Material, Furniture, Complete Line of Miscellaneous Supplies for Printers and Publishers, Machinery and Wood Goods (1915).

    Typefaces: Admiral, Ayer (Mac McGrew: Ayer was introduced by Keystone Type Foundry in 1909, which said it was "named for F. Wayland Ayer, founder of Keystone Type Foundry and the great advertising agency which bears his name." The non-kerning italic was added in 1910.), Ben Franklin, Ben Franklin Condensed, Ben Franklin Open, Bulletin, Caslon Adbold, Caslon Adbold Extended, Caslon Adbold Extra Condensed, Caslon Bold, Caslon Bold Condensed, Caslon Bold Extended, Caslon Bold Italic, Caslon Lightface, Caslon Lightface Condensed, Caslon Lightface Italic, Caslon Title Extended, Charcoal, Charter Oak, Compressed Gothic, Condensed Lining Gothic, Crayonette, Elite Typewriter, Gothic Condensed No. 3, Gothic No. 102, Gothic No. 114, Harris Italic (1910), Harris Roman (1909), Herculean Gothic, Italia Condensed (1906), John Alden Decorative Initials (1906), John Hancock, John Hancock Condensed, John Hancock Extended, John Hancock Outline, Keystone Gothic, Laureate (1906: revived in 2012 by Isabel Urbina), Lining Antique [Keystone], New Model Remington Typewriter, Outline, Outline Condensed, Remington, Remington Typewriter, Round Gothic (1884), Skeleton Lining Gothic, Skeleton Lining Gothic No. 19, Smith Premier, Title Gothic [Title Gothic No. 9, Condensed Title Gothic No. 11], Venezia, Washington Text (1902, blackletter), Washington Text Shaded.

    Digital pictures I took from the Specimen Book of Type (1903): Bulletin, Keystone Bikes, Boldface Cellini, Crayonette Open, Keystone Cyclers, Encore, Lining Antique, Lining Gothic, Outing Initials, Remington Typewriter, Remus, Ronde Initials, Salem, Venezia, Victoria Italic, Worcester. Catalog A-C, Catalog C-P, Catalog P-Z.

    Digitizations:

    • The slab serif John Hancock (ca. 1903) and condensed slab serif John Hancock Condensed (ca. 1917, Lanston Monotype) were digitized as Hancock RR (1994) by Steve Jackaman (Red Rooster).
    • The Remington typewriter typefaces (ca. 1905) were digitized as Secret Service Typewriter RR (2002) by Steve Jackaman (Red Rooster).
    • Roman TyresRR (1997) was made by Steve Jackaman (Red Rooster).
    • Poor Richard RR is based on a Keystone design from 1919, namely Ben Franklin, Ben Franklin Condensed, Ben Franklin Open (named after Benjamin Franklin's "Poor Richard Almanack"). There is also a free font Poor Richard (1994, Projective Solutions).
    • Caslon FB (1992, Font Bureau) comes with this text: Our familiar Caslon Bold headletters were invented around the turn of the twentieth century in the United States and were only loosely based on William Caslons romans. The best of the Caslon Bolds originated at the Keystone Type Foundry of Philadelphia, whose Caslon Bold Condensed appeared about 1905, probably drawn by R.F. Burfeind. Jill Pichotta revised his Bold Condensed&drew the Bold Extra Condensed.
    • Gibbs Mason designed the art nouveau typeface Vanden Houten (1904) at Keystone. This typeface was remade by Dan X. Solo as Dutch Treat at Solotype.
    • Emerge BF (2009, John Bomparte) is a flare serif typeface that was inspired by Admiral, c.1900.
    • Old Softy NF (2010, Nick Curtis) is a soft round typeface based on Round Gothic (1884).

    Commentaries by Mac McGrew:

    • On Harris Roman: Harris Roman was announced by Keystone Type Foundry in 1909. It was "named in honor of the late Joel Chandler Harris, author of Uncle Remus." It is a plain modernized roman, somewhat similar to Century Expanded. In 1910 Harris Italic was added; it was designed to be cast without kerns. Advertising claimed, "Non-kerning italics will save endless annoyances and losses resulting from broken letters, and the purchase price is the same as any other type of our make."
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    Klaus Bartels
    [Babylon Schrift Kontor]

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    Konstantin Golovchenko
    [Apostrof]

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    Kris Holmes

    Born in Reedly, CA, in 1950. She studied calligraphy at Reed College with Lloyd Reynolds and Robert Palladino, and she studied roman brush writing in a workshop with Fr. Edward Catich. In New York, she studied lettering with Ed Benguiat at the School of Visual Arts. Later she studied calligraphy and type design with Hermann Zapf at Rochester Institute of Technology. She received her B.A. from Harvard University and her MFA from UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television, specializing in Animation. In 2012, she was honored with the Frederic W. Goudy Award in Typography from Rochester Institute of Technology, for her achievements in the lettering and typographic arts. Kris Holmes teaches type design at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

    Kris Holmes worked as a staff designer at Compugraphic Corporation in type design. She was part of the team that helped design the city fonts for Apple: Chicago, Geneva, Monaco, New York. [Kris did the truetype versions.]

    She founded the Bigelow&Holmes foundry in 1976 with Charles Bigelow. Kris Holmes has created over 300 typefaces, including the scripts Isadora, Kolibri, Apple Chancery, and Apple Textile. With Charles Bigelow, she co-designed Apple Capitals.

    Creator of the ubiquitous Lucida family around 1985 (with Charles Bigelow): Lucida Blackletter, Lucida Bright, Lucida Calligraphy, Lucida Casual, Lucida Console, Lucida Fax (1985), Lucida Handwriting, Lucida Math, Lucida Mono, Lucida Sans, Lucida Sans Typewriter, Lucida Typewriter (1994), Lucida. includes Greek, Cyrillic, Arabic, Hebrew, Thai, and Devanagari scripts. In addition to their popularity in computer operating systems like Macintosh OS X, Microsoft Windows, and Plan 9 from Bell Labs, Lucida typefaces have been widely used for scientific and technical publishing in Scientific American, Notes of the American Mathematical Society, and other mathematical, technical and scholarly books. Also with Bigelow, Kris designed the Lucida Icons, Stars, and Arrows fonts, which Microsoft later purchased and reassembled into Wingdings fonts. Other type designs by Holmes include ITC Isadora (1983), Sierra (1983, Hell: font now sold by Linotype), Leviathan (1979), Baskerville (revival in 1982), Caslon (revival, 1982), Galileo (1987), Apple New York (1991), Apple Monaco (1991), Apple Chancery (1994 [the Bitstream version is Cataneo]), Kolibri (1994, URW, since 2005 available as OpenType Pro with over 1200 glyphs), Wingdings (1990-1992, a dingbat font made with Charles Bigelow, now owned by Microsoft and Ascender) and AT Shannon (a simple lapidary sans family, with Janice Prescott, 1982, Agfa; now owned by Monotype Imaging).

    For the Go Project, Kris Holmes and Charles Bigelow designed the free typeface families Go and Go Mono in 2016. The font family, called Go (naturally), includes proportional- and fixed-width faces in normal, bold, and italic renderings. The fonts have been tested for technical uses, particularly programming. These fonts are humanist in nature (grotesques being slightly less legible according to recent research) and have an x-height a few percentage points above that of Helvetica or Arial, again to enhance legibility. The name Go refers to the Go Programming Language. .

    FontShop link. Klingspor link. Kernest link.

    View Kris Holmes's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    K.T. Kristian Möller
    [KTKM]

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    KTKM
    [K.T. Kristian Möller]

    Karl Thomas Kristian Möller's foundry in Stockholm, est. ca. 2010, is called KTKM. He did a revival called Baskerville Old Face KTKM (2010), which aims to improve over the old Stephenson Blake version, about which Jan Tschichold wrote: The so-called Baskerville Old Face of the type foundry Stephenson Blake&Co. of Sheffield [...] is probably not immediately linked to Baskerville, but it is very much influenced by it. It is one of the most beautiful types of which the mats still exist; it has an incomparably different spirit than the streamlined re-cuts of today's Baskerville. Even keeping the general restraint extremely expressive. According to Berthold Wolpe (Signatures No. 18), the punches were cut and shown in samples in 1776 by Isaac Moore, who came from Birmingham to Bristol.

    Corporate typefaces by him include Quality Arrows (pictograams for Quality Hotel park in Södertäje, Sweden) and Hemköp Hand (for a grocery store). Unpublished typefaces: KM Caslon Antiqua (based on the Haas version), KM Caslon Kursiv, KM In Pectore (a display version of Bembo), KM Minerva (after a Linotype typeface by Reynolds Stone), KM Philatelie (an original antiqua), KM Ratio Latein Text (after Friedrich Wilhelm Kleukens's famous typeface Ratio Latein, 1925), KM Signwriter (a Trajan typeface after Eric Gill's instructions for the W.H. Smith bookstore), KM Universalitet.

    In 2013, he created Volunta Roman and Italic (a didone typeface).

    Home page. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Ladislas Mandel

    Born in 1921 in Transylvania, he trained at the Fine Arts Academy of Budapest (Hungary) and then at the Beaux-Arts in Rouen (Normandy, France). Ladislas Mandel was a stonecutter, painter and sculptor. However, he spent his life in France, mostly as a type designer at Deberny&Peignot, where he worked since 1954. In 1955, he headed the type atelier. He was taught by and cooperated with Adrian Frutiger during nine years at Deberny, finally succeeding Frutiger in 1963 as type director. In 1955, he was in charge of the transformation of the Deberny type repertoire from lead to phototype. He created original designs under the label International Photon Corporation, and turned independent designer in 1977. After that, he specialized in typefaces for telephone directories, and made, e.g., Colorado in 1998 with Richard Southall for US West. He cofounded the ANCT in Paris in 1985 and taught there and at Paris VIII. In 1998, he published the book Ecritures, miroir des hommes et des sociétés (éditions Perrousseaux), which was followed in 2004 by Du pouvoir de l'écriture at the same publisher. He died on October 20, 2006.

    • His typefaces for the Lumitype-IPC (International Photon Corporation) catalogue include originals as well as many interpretations of famous typefaces: Arabica Arabic (1975), Aster (1960-1970), Aurélia (1967), Baskerville (1960-1970), Bodoni (1960-1970), Bodoni Cyrillic (1960-1970), Cadmos Greek (1974), Cancellaresca, (1965) Candida (1960-1970), Caslon (1960-1970), Century (1960-1970), Clarendon (1960-1970), Edgware (1974), Formal Gothic (1960-1970), Frank Ruehl Hebreu (1960-1970: this is one of the most popular Hebrew typefaces ever), Gill Sans (1960-1970), Gras Vibert (1960-1970), Hadassah (1960-1970), Haverhill (1960-1970), Imprint (1960-1970), Janson (1960-1970), Mir Cyrillic (1968), Modern (1960-1970), Nasra Arabic (1972), Néo Vibert (1960-1970), Néo-Peignot (1960-1970), Newton (1960-1970), Olympic (1960-1970), Plantin (1960-1970), Rashi Hebreu, Sofia (1967), Sophia Cyrillic (1969), Sphinx (1960-1970), Textype (1960-1970), Thai (1960-1970), Thomson (1960-1970), Times Cyrillic (1960-1970), Univad (1974), Weiss (1960-1970).
    • Types done or revived at Deberny&Peignot: Antique Presse (1964, Deberny&Peignot), Times (1964).
    • Types for phone directories: Clottes (1986, Sneat - France Telecom), Colorado (1998, U.S. West, created with the help of Richard Southall), Galfra (1975, Seat, Promodia, Us Seat, English Seat: there are versions called Galfra Italia (1975-1981), Galfra Belgium (1981), Galfra UK (1990), and Galfra US (1979-1990)), Lettar (1975, CCETT- Rennes), Letar Minitel (1982-1983), Linéale (1987, ITT-World Directories), Lusitania (1987, ITT-World Directories), Nordica 1985 (ITT-World Directories: Nineuil says that this is done in 1987-1988), Seatypo Italie (1980).
    • Other typefaces: Portugal, Messidor (1983-1985, old style numerals font for the Imprimerie Nationale), Solinus (great!!, 1999), Laura (1999).
    Ladislas Mandel, l'homme derrière la lettre is Raphael de Courville's thesis in 2008 at Estienne. In 1999, Olivier Nineuil wrote Ladislas Mandel: Explorateur de la typo français (Etapes graphiques, vol. 10, pp. 44-64). Olivier Nineuil's description of his achievements. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Lanston Type Co
    [Gerald Giampa]

    The Lanston Type Co was based in PEI, Canada, moved in 2002 to Vancouver, and moved later that year to Espoo, Finland. In 2004, Lanston was sold to P22. It has classic and wonderful offerings such as Albertan, Bodoni, Caslon, Deepdene (Frederic Goudy, 1929-1934; see D690 Roman on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, or URW Deepdene, or Barry Schwartz's Linden Hill (a free font)), Goudy Oldstyle, Jacobean Initials, Kennerly, Kaatskill, Water Garden and Jefferson Gothic. Owned by Gerald Giampa (b. 1950, d. Vancouver, 2009), who wrote me this: Frederic Goudy worked for us for 29 years. We manufactured Monotype casters and keyboards. The English sister company sold casters to England and the Commonwealth and we sold to the Americas and wherever else practical. Tolbert Lanston, our founder, was the inventor of Monotype. We still sell matrices and were punching them until several years ago. Soon we expect to have the equipment moved and operational once again. We are placing it into America's largest printing museum which is in Andover close to Boston. However there is a possibility that it will end up in Hull Québec. Our previous type director was Jim Rimmer of Vancouver, noted type designer. He designs, cuts and cast type in lead. Our typeface Albertan was designed by Jim and is very successful. John Hudson and Ross Mills of Tiro were directly inspired by our facilities in Vancouver. I encouraged them towards type design. The beautiful Bodoni 26 (unicase) can be bought at FontShop. Atlantic 35 (1909-1935) is a modern family first used by the Atlantic Monthly in 1909.

    The fonts: Albertan No. 977, Albertan Bold No. 978, Albertan Title No. 980,&Inline No. 979, Bodoni No. 175, Bodoni Bold No. 2175, Bodoni 26 (a Lanston unicase based on an interpretation by Sol Hess), No. 175, Caslon Old Style No. 337, Caslon Bold No's 637,&537, Deepdene No. 315, Figures Square No. 132, Flash No. 373, Fleurons C, Fleurons Granjon Folio, Fleurons Folio One, Forum No. 274, Francis No. 982, Garamont No. 248, Globe Gothic No's 240,&239,&230, Goudy Initials No. 296, Goudy Old Style No. 394, Goudy Thirty No. 392, Goudy Village (#2) No. 410, Hadriano Stone-Cut No. 409, Hadriano Title No. 309, Jacobean Initials, Jefferson Gothic No. 227, Jenson Old Style No. 508, Kaatskill No. 976, Kaufmann (Lanston Swing Bold) No. 217, Kennerley Old Style No. 268, Metropolitan No. 369, Obelisk No. 2577, Pabst Old Style No. 45, Pabst Old Style Open, Spire No. 377, 20th Century No. 605, Vine Leaves C, Vine Leaves Folio One, Vine Leaves Folio Two, Water Garden Ornaments. P22 writes this about Lanston: In the late 1800s, Tolbert Lanston licensed his technology to an English sister company and became a major international force. Lanston grew rapidly with America's pre-eminent type designer, Frederic Goudy, holding the position of art director from 1920-1947. The Philadelphia-based Lanston Monotype eventually parted ways with its English counterpart. English Monotype became simply known as Monotype from that time forth. Lanston was acquired by American Type Founders in 1969. After a series of other owners, the company found its way to master printer Gerald Giampa, who moved it to Prince Edward Island in 1988. During its time of transition, Lanston continued supplying the American market for monotype casters until January 21, 2000, when the hot-metal component of Lanston was tragically destroyed by a tidal wave. Giampa was one of the earliest developers of PostScript fonts. After the loss, he focused on digitization to an even greater extent. Under his stewardship, Lanston's classic typefaces were digitized in a style that was true to the sources, which are the brass and lead patterns from which the metal type was made. The past few years have seen Giampa and Lanston travel from Canada to Finland, and back again. Now, Lanston has completed another journey back to the United States to come under the care of a new steward: P22. Giampa is answering the call of the sea. He has traded his type founder's hat for that of a ship's captain to sail the northern Pacific coast. During his shore leaves, Giampa will act as typographic consultant to Lanston-P22. The P22 Lanston collection (2005-2006) was designed wih the help of people such as Paul Hunt and Colin Kahn. It includes these typefaces:

    Fonts can be purchased from MyFonts where all fonts have the prefix LTC. Obituary of Giampa and links to obituaries.

    Catalog of the Lanston typeface library. View the typefaces designed by Lanston. A more extensive page of Lanston Monotype typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Large Unicode fonts
    [Alan Wood]

    Alan Wood lists and discusses the main free Unicode fonts. As of 2010, these include:

    • AbRomanSerif (3805 glyphs, Language Geek).
    • Alphabetum (5444 glyphs, by Juan José Marcos). For classical and mediaeval Latin, classical Greek, Coptic, Old and Middle English, and Sanskrit, but also includes characters for most Latin-based European languages and Esperanto.
    • Andika Basic (838 glyphs, SIL).
    • Andron Scriptor Web (1600 glyphs, Medieval Unicode Fiont Initiative).
    • Arev Sans (2851 glyphs, arev Fonts): based on Bitstream Vera Sans.
    • Arial (3381 glyphs, Microsoft).
    • Arial Unicode MS (50377 glyphs, Microsoft). Supplied with Microsoft Office 2002 (XP) and Microsoft Office 2003.
    • Berling Antiqua (842 glyphs).
    • Caslon (3551 glyphs, George Williams).
    • Charis SIL (4661 glyphs, SIL) .
    • Chrysanthi Unicode (4383 glyphs) .
    • CN-Arial (3069 glyphs, Chan-Nguyen).
    • CN-Times (2866 glyphs, Chan-Nguyen).
    • Code2000 (63546 glyphs, James Kass).
    • Courier New (3151 glyphs). Supplied with Microsoft Windows Vista.
    • DejaVu Sans (5466 glyphs). Based on Bitstream Vera Sans.
    • DejaVu Sans Condensed (5466 glyphs).
    • DejaVu Sans Mono (3169 glyphs). Based on Bitstream Vera Sans Mono.
    • DejaVu Serif (3064 glyphs). Based on Bitstream Vera Serif.
    • DejaVu Serif Condensed (3064 glyphs).
    • Dialekt Uni (1400 glyphs). Mainly for phoentics.
    • Doulos SIL (4661 glyphs, SIL).
    • e-PhonTranslit UNI (684 glyphs). Supplied withthe Indolipi package.
    • EversonMono (6396 glyphs, Michael Everson).
    • Fixedsys Excelsior 3.01 (5993 glyphs).
    • Free Idg Serif (6256 glyphs).
    • Free Monospaced (2560 glyphs).
    • Free Sans (3999 glyphs).
    • Free Serif (7971 glyphs).
    • Frutiger Linotype (840 glyphs, Linotype). Supplied with Microsoft Reader.
    • Gandhari Unicode (2265 glyphs, Andrew Glass). Designed for romanisation of Sanskrit and Gandhari.
    • Garava (1319 glyphs, Michael Best).
    • Gentium (1699 glyphs, Victor Gaultney, SIL).
    • GentiumAlt (1699 glyphs, Victor Gaultney, SIL).
    • Hindsight Unicode (2894 glyphs, Darren Rigby).
    • jGaramond (1849 glyphs).
    • Junicode (3096 glyphs, Peter S. Baker). Intended for mediaevalists.
    • Kliment Std (2849 glyphs, Kodeks).
    • Kurdish AllAlphabets (694 glyphs, Ernst Tremel). Intended for Kurdish.
    • LeedsUni (2976 glyphs, Alec McAllister).
    • Legendum (1151 glyphs).
    • Linux Biolinum O (2418 glyphs, Libertine Open Fonts Project).
    • Linux Libertine O (2432 glyphs, Libertine Open Fonts Project).
    • Lucida Bright (1402 glyphs). Supplied with Java Runtime 1.4.2.
    • Lucida Grande (2826 glyphs). Supplied with Apple - Safari 3 Public Beta.
    • Lucida Sans (Java) (2929 glyphs). Supplied with Java Runtime 1.4.2.
    • Lucida Sans (Star Office) (2094 glyphs). Supplied with Sun’s StarOffice 5.2 for Windows.
    • Lucida Sans Typewriter (Java) (1376 glyphs). Supplied with Java Runtime 1.4.2.
    • Lucida Sans Typewriter (Star Office) (1142 glyphs). Supplied with Sun's StarOffice 5.2 for Windows.
    • Lucida Sans Unicode (1779 glyphs). Supplied with Microsoft Windows Vista
    • Marin (3566 glyphs).
    • MD King KhammuRabi (1296 glyphs, Michael Davodian). Mainly for Assyrian, Aramaic, Caldean, Soryoyo, Ashoraya.
    • Microsoft Sans Serif (1997) (3053 glyphs, Microsoft). Supplied with Windows Vista. Version 1.41 (2301 characters, 2257 glyphs) was supplied with Windows XP SP2. Version 1.02 (1090 glyphs) was supplied with Microsoft Windows 2000 and Windows XP.
    • Minion Pro (1663 glyphs, Adobe). Supplied with Adobe Reader 7.
    • Monospace (2862 glyphs, George Williams).
    • MPH 2B Damase (2895 glyphs, Mark Williamson).
    • MS Reference Sans Serif (1193 glyphs). Supplied with Microsoft Encarta.
    • MS Reference Serif (1135 glyphs). Supplied with Microsoft Encarta.
    • Myriad Pro (834 glyphs, Adobe). Supplied with Adobe Reader 7.
    • Quivira (7742 glyphs, Alexander Lange).
    • Reader Sans (1291 glyphs).
    • RomanCyrillic Std (3450 glyphs, Kodeks). Also known as CampusRoman Std.
    • Roman Unicode (3923 glyphs).
    • Rupakara (394 glyphs, Michael Everson).
    • Summersby (1010 glyphs).
    • Tahoma (3301 glyphs, Microsoft). Supplied with Microsoft Windows Vista.
    • Thryomanes (1472 glyphs, Herman Miller). Mainly for old Greek.
    • Times New Roman (3380 glyphs). Supplied with Microsoft Windows Vista. Version 2.82 (1170 characters) was supplied with Windows 2000 and Windows XP.
    • TITUS Cyberbit Basic (10044 glyphs).
    • Verajja (1264 glyphs, Michael Best).
    • Verdana (911 glyphs, Microsoft). Supplied with Microsoft Windows Vista. Version 2.35 (680 characters) was supplied with Windows 2000 and Windows XP.
    Suppliers of commercial Unicode fonts: [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Leslie Usherwood

    The most famous Canadian type designer (1932-1983). Usherwood studied at the Beckenham School of Art, and practiced as a lettering artist in the commercial art field for 15 years. Typesettra was created in 1968, and had more than four type designers in the early eighties. In 1977, Typsettra began designing original typefaces for Berthold, Letraset and ITC. Usherwood's typefaces:

    • Melure (first typeface, designed in 1965 for Headliners International, New York).
    • Caslon Graphique (1980). Digital versions: Caslon Graphique (URW++), Caslon Graphique (ITC), Caslon Graphique EF (Elsner+Flake), Caslon Graphique SH (Scangraphic Digital Type Collection).
    • Caxton Light Italic (Letraset, 1981), Caxton Roman Bold (Letraset, 1981), Caxton Roman Book (Letraset, 1981), and Caxton Roman Light (Letraset, 1981).
    • Flange, a family created for a government program in 1972; a Typesettra font since 1980; a Berthold font since 1981; see Fleming on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, 2002; it is also in the Scangraphic collection as Flower. Aka Frascati.
    • ITC Leawood (1982).
    • Lynton (1980-1981, Berthold).
    • Marbrook (1983, Berthold).
    • ITC Usherwood (1983).
    • Several headline typefaces were conceived by Leslie Usherwood for Berthold in the early 1970s, such as Graphis Extra Fett (1971, a very bold headline face), Statesman (1973, a high contrast large x-height serif face) and Oktavia (1973, a large x-height face). They are also Typesettra typefaces.
    • Several of his typefaces were published/revived by Red Rooster Typefoundry, such as TCAdminister (by Steve Jackaman), Argus (by Paul Hickson), Beckenham (by Paul Hickson, named after the Beckenham School of Art where Usherwood studied), TCCentury (1996, by Steve Jackaman), Chelsea (1993, by Steve Jackaman).
    • At Red Rooster: Alexon (1993: the digital version was done by Steve Jackaman in 1999. This typeface is a relative of the flared-extremity typeface Friz Quadrata), Elston, TCKingsley (digital version by Jackaman, 1999: based on Goudy's Kennerley Old Style, 1911-1924), Lesmore (digital version by Paul Hickson), Claremont (digital version by Paul Hickson), TC Administer (digital version by Jackaman), Sycamore (digital version by Jackaman), Maximo (digital version by Jackaman), Kingsrow (digital version by Jackaman), Goudy 38 (digital version by Jackaman), Extension RR (digital version by Jackaman), Chelsea (digital version by Jackaman), Argus (digital version by Paul Hickson), Beckenham (digital version by Jackaman), Equestrienne (digital version by Paul Hickson), Stanhope (digital version by Paul Hickson; Usherwood's based the design on a turn-of-the-century typeface of the same name from the Soldans&Payvers foundry, circa 1904), Century New Style (digital version by Jackaman), Waverly (digital version by Jackaman).

    Linotype link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Lewis McGuffie

    Graphic designer and sign painter in Tallinn, Estonia. Old German Baltic maps gave him the inspiration for the signage family Livo Display (2014). Other typefaces, all done in 2015: Imperija Roman (2015, an impressive Trajan typeface for posters and editorial use; Lewis explains: The original letters were drawn from a memorial engraving in Ljubljana, Slovenia), Trout Beer (display type), Andra Roman (a humanist sans based on a letter sample dated around 1920 found in the Estonian History Museum), Cream (an Italian western type based on an original wood type), Gauss (a pointy stencil type), Heath Egyptian (based on Caslon's Two-Line Egyptian: a custyom type for London-based craftsman Daniel Heath), Poison, Titanik Tuleva, Hebden (a grotesque and incised pair inspired by the original signs at Hebden Bridge train station in Yorkshire).

    Typefaces from 2016: Fleischer Display, Bobik (a sans / slab / wedge serif triplet of fonts initially developed based on basic principles described in Jean Alessandrini's Codex 80), Cindie Mono (four monospaced fonts of widely varying widths), Cenotaph Titling (a free engraved titling typeface influenced by Eric Gill's inscriptions).

    Behance link. Creative Market link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Libertine Open Fonts Project
    [Philipp H. Poll]

    Now, here is a project with a name I like! This project by Philipp H. Poll has been started in order to create fonts that can be released under the GNU Public License. As of early 2005, we have the following Times New Roman lookalikes: LLibertineCaps, LinLibertine, LinLibertine-Italic, LinLibertineBd. Libertine Grotesque is next on the list of things to do. The fonts come in truetype and fontforge (SFD) text formats. Linux Libertine covers a big range of Unicode, including all characters in MES-1 (Afrikaans, Albanian, Basque, Breton, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Faroese, Finnish, Frensh, Frisian, Galician, German, Greenlandic, Hungarian, Icelandic, Irish Gaelic (new orthography), Italian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Luxemburgish, Maltese, Manx Gaelic, Moldavian (with restrictions), Northern Sámi, Norwegian, Occitan, Polish, Portuguese, Rhaeto-Romanic, Romanian (with restrictions), Scottish Gaelic, Slovak, Slovenian, Lower Sorbian, Upper Sorbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish, Welsh (with restrictions)), IPA, Greek, Cyrillic, math symbols, and a host of other symbol and language sets. TeX archive. The typophiles are not impressed. Charles Ellertson writes: The bowl of the "a" doesn't fit other letters, the top and terminal of the "f" doesn't know where it is going, the descender of the "y" doesn't balance quite right, and the serif on the upper arm of the "z" (which probably reminded the original poster of Caslon) seems out of place. I get the impression, again from the small sample, that the font doesn't quite know whether it is supposed to be slightly condensed or slightly expanded.

    In 2007, the following weights are available: Normal, Kursiv, Fett, Fett Kursiv, Kapitaelchen, Unterstrichen, Grotesk. As a measure of the success of the font, we find that is now used on the logo of Wikipedia.

    As a companion font, they offer Linux Biolinum (2010): The Biolinum is an organic sans-serif and could be also described as organogrotesque (non-linear sans serif). It is still in a beta stage. Biolinum is meant for emphasizing titles but could be used also for short passages of text. For longer texts a serif font such as the Libertine should be used in favour of readability The Biolinum has the same vertical metrics and visual weight as the Libertine, so that it fits perfectly to the Libertine and can be also used for emphasizing within the body text.

    In 2012, Bob Tennent created type 1 versions of Biolinum and Libertine.

    In 2016, LibertineGC was published by Michael Sharpe at CTAN, adding LaTeX support files for Greek (essentially complete LGR, supporting monotonic, polytonic and ancient features) and Cyrillic.

    Another effort at corrections was undertaken by Khaled Hosny in 2016 in his Libertinus family. The Libertinus font family is a fork of Linux Libertine and Linux Biolinum with many bug fixes and improvements. Libertinus Serif is forked from Linux Libertine. Also included are Libertus Math, Libertinus Sans (forked from Linux Biolinum) and Libertinus Mono.

    Dafont link. Fontspace link. CTAN link for Libertineotf. CTAN link for Libertine download. Klingspor link. Klingspor link. CTAN link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Linnea Lundquist

    Noted calligrapher, who also designs type. Stigmata won the Silver prize in the Morisawa Type Design Competition in 1999. It is her fantastic interpretation of European Gothic Cursive writing from the Middle Ages and early Renaissance. Linnea is responsible for the roman transitional family Aitken commissioned in 2002 for Arion Press. Arion Press writes: Hoyem has taken advantage of twenty-first century technologies in order to revive what is believed to be the first type family cut and cast in America. In 1796 two Scotsmen named Binney and Ronaldson started a type foundry in Philadelphia, the first in the country to endure. By 1800 they had produced a remarkably beautiful and utilitarian type, identified simply as Roman No. 1. It is a Transitional face, between Old Style (as in Caslon) and Modern (as in Bodoni). The type was used by Jane Aitken, daughter of Robert Aitken, the famous printer of the American Revolution, and an accomplished printer herself, for the printing of the first American translation of the Bible, by Charles Thomson, in 1808. It was reintroduced by American Type Founders Company in 1892 under the name Oxford and was used by a succession of fine printers, such as Daniel Berkeley Updike, Bruce Rogers, and the Grabhorn Press. Arion Press has 1,200 pounds of the original type that once belonged to the Grabhorn Press. Oxford was cast for hand composition only and was not adapted for Linotype or Monotype composition. The matrices are now in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution and unavailable for further casting. In 2002, Hoyem worked with type designer Linnea Lundquist, assisted by Andrew Crewdson, to create a digital version of this historic face, which he renamed Aitken. The Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin is its first use for book printing. The Aitken design has been optimized for letterpress printing, allowing for the spread of ink biting into paper just like with the original metal type design cut by Binney&Ronaldson. For this book, the type has been printed from photopolymer plates. In 2008, she joied Mark van Bronkhorst at Sweet Fonts and designed Sweet Upright Script with him. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Luciano Perondi
    [Molotro]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Ludlow
    [Robert Hunter Middleton]

    Foundry in Chicago run by Robert Hunter Middleton. Myfonts.com states The type library was largely derivative, with some original scripts. After Middleton's death, and Ludlow's demise, most of the typefaces from the Ludlow library were licensed exclusively to International TypeFounders, Inc., (ITF) and are part of the Red Rooster collection. Fonts by Middleton at Ludlow include Bodoni Campanile, Bodoni (see Bodoni D Black by URW), Coronet, Mandate, Lafayette (now sold by Font Bureau), Tempo (see Tempo by Monotype), and Umbra (now sold by Bitstream and Monotype).

    Ludlow house typefaces revived by Steve Jackaman include Caslon RR Extra Condensed, Chamfer Gothic (the original being from ca. 1898), and Gothic Medium Condensed.

    A renewed Ludlow was established in 2001 and is run from the UK. Current (2002) catalog: Admiral Script (Robert H. Middleton's formal script, 1953: see the digital revival by Ralph Unger in 2005), Adrian VGC (2003), Annonce Grotesque (Wagner&Schmidt, 1914), Delphian Open Title (Robert H. Middleton), Flair (connected writing, 40-50s style), Franklin Gothic ExCnd Title, Founders Garamond (based on the Berner type specimen of 1592), Lotther Text (blackletter based on an alphabet of Melchior Lotther, 1535), Ludlow Ornaments (2001), Ludlow Stygian (art deco, which inspired Nick Curtis' 2009 font Kharon Ultra NF), Maxim (Peter Schneidler, hand-printed font from 1955), Orplid (Hans Bohn), Samson (Robert H. Middleton), Speedball Roman, Ludlow Stencil (1937, Robert H. Middleton; a digital revival includes Jeff Levine's Favorite Stencil JNL (2015)), Tempo MedCond (Robert H. Middleton), Theda Bara (great titling type), Vulcan Shaded (based on the design of the Richard Gans Foundry in Madrid), Karnak Black (Egyptian slab serif originally designed by Robert Hunter Middleton in 1930), Oriana (blackletter font based on a design of the Imprimerie Nationale, Paris), Ludlow Square Gothic (revival/modernization of a 1920s font by Robert Wiebking for Ludlow), The Hardy Arcade (like Umbra), Ogre, Vulcan Bold (a display font inspired by a 1925 design of the Richard Gans Foundry, Madrid), Walbaum. Crestwood (2006, Ascender) is an updated version of an elegant semi-formal script typeface originally released by the Ludlow Type Foundry in 1937.

    View a list of digital typefaces derived from the metal typefaces at Ludlow.

    Ludlow Foundry: List of some digital fonts. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Ludlow Typefaces

    A type specimen book of the Ludlow Typograph Company (2032 Clybourn Avenue, Chicago), published between 1940 and 1958. The list of typefaces shown: Artcraft, Bodoni (Bold, Black), Bodoni Campanile, Bodoni Modern, Bookman, Cameo, Caslon, Caslon Old Face Heavy, Caslon Heavy Italic, Century, Chamfer Gothic, Cheltenham Oldstyle, Cheltenham Cursive, Cheltenham Wide, Commerce Gothic, Condensed Gothic, Coronet, Clearface Bold, Cushing Antique, Delphian Open Title, Eden, Eleven, Engravers Bold, Eusebius, Extra Condensed, Franklin Gothic, Fraktur No. 16, Garamond, Gothic Bold Condensed Title, Gothic Extra Condensed, Greenwich, Hauser Script, Headline Gothic, Hebrew Modern, Karnak, Lafayette Extra Condensed, Laureate, Lining Litho, Lining Plate Gothic, Ludlow Black, Mandate, Mayfair Cursive, Medium Condensed Gothic, Number 11, Old English, Plantin, Powell, Radiant, Record Gothic, Samson, Square Gothic, Stellar, Stencil, Stygian Black, Tempo, True-Cut Caslon, Ultra-Modern, Umbra, Underwood Bold, Victoria Italic. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Mac OS X and Windows XP fonts

    Useful listing of the Mac OS X and Windows Xfonts.

    • For Mac OS X 10.4: American Typewriter, Andale Mono, Arial, Arial Black, Arial Narrow, Arial Rounded MT Bold, Ayuthaya, Baskerville, BiauKai, Big Caslon, Brush Script MT, Chalkboard, Charcoal CY, Cochin, Comic Sans MS, Copperplate, Courier, Courier New, Didot, Euphemia UCAS, Futura, Geneva, Geneva CY, Georgia, Gill Sans, Hei, Helvetica, Helvetica CY, Helvetica Neue, Herculanum, Hoefler Text, Impact, InaiMathi, Kai, Krungthep, LiHei Pro (2003, Dynalab), LiSong Pro (2003, Dynalab), Lucida Grande, Marker Felt, Monaco, Optima, Osaka, Papyrus, Plantagenet Cherokee, Sathu, Silom, Skia, STFangsong, STHeiti, STKaiti, STSong, Thonburi, Times, Times New Roman, Trebuchet MS, Verdana, Zapfino, Hiragino Pro W3[Bold] Hiragino Pro W6[Bold] Hiragino Std W8[Bold] Hiragino Pro W4[Bold] Hiragino Mincho Pro W3, Hiragino Mincho Pro W6, #GungSeo, #HeadLineA, PCMyungjo, #PilGi, Apple Chancery, AppleGothic, Apple LiGothic, Apple LiSung, AppleMyungjo.
    • For Windows XP: Arial, Arial Black, Batang, BatangChe, Gungsuh, GungsuhChe, Comic Sans MS, Courier, Courier New, Estrangelo Edessa, Franklin Gothic Medium, Gautami, Georgia, Gulim, GulimChe, Dotum, DotumChe, Impact, Latha, Lucida Console, Lucida Sans, Mangal, Microsoft Sans Serif (1997), MingLiU, PMingLiU, Modern, MS Gothic, MS P Gothic, MS UI Gothic, MS Mincho, MS P MIncho, MS Sans Serif, MS Serif, Mv Boli, Palatino Linotype, Raavi, Roman, Script, Shruti, SimHei, SimSun, NSimSun, Small Fonts, Tahoma, Times New Roman, Trebuchet MS, Tunga, Verdana.
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Mad Hatter
    [Kelly Johnson]

    Kelly Johnson ("Mad Hatter") is the American creator of the handwriting fonts Etched in a Desk (2008) and Leaky Closet (2008) and of Cydonia Sand Scribbles, aka Son't Read My Journal (2008). He also made Banana Spider (2008, stone chiseled look), Juneau (2008, 3d tin can box look), Cymptum (2005, ink run font). Kelly runs Mad Hatter Designs. Another URL. Dafont link.

    I do not know if this is the same designer, but this Kelly Johnson is a student at Anderson University who hails from from Greenville, SC. She created Goslon, which is a combination of Hoefler & Frere Jones's Gotham and William Caslon's Caslon. Her blog. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Manfred Klein
    [Fonteria CD]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Manfred Klein
    [TypOasis, 2002]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Manfred Klein
    [Dadaism]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Manfred Klein
    [Blackletter, Fraktur, Rotunda]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Manvel Shmavonyan

    Moscow-based Armenian type designer (b. 1960, Artashat, Armenia) and graphic artist. In 1984 graduated from the Moscow Poligraphic Institute, department of Polygraphic Product Design. He worked for the Type Department of Committee of Print in Yerevan, and for the publishing houses Ayastan, Luys and Sovetakan Grokh. At Microsoft's request, in 1999, he was consulted for the Armenian section of the Sylfaen project.

    Creator of PT Margarit Armenian and Asmik (1997, Armenian, based on PT Petersburg, 1992, by Vladimir Yefimov), available from ParaType, where he is an active type designer. These fonts won awards from the Type Directors Club in 1999.

    At ParaType, he also published Propisi Cyrillic + western (1997, a school script family), PT Henman Pictograms (2001, based on Armenian ornaments revived by Henrik Mnatsakanyan), Cooper BT (2000, a Cyrillic version of the Bistream family by the same name), Henman Western, Karolla Western (2002, art nouveau face, based on an alphabet of Lucian Bernhard, 1912), Zagolovochnaya Western (2002, based on a Caslon model from 1725), Haverj Western (2004, flared mini-serifed typeface with an f and a j ready for the paralympics), PT Margarit (1997, based on PT Bodoni by A. Tarbeev), Bardi (2004, Paratype, an extra compressed decorative stenciled typeface based on the lettering created in 1970s by the Armenian type designer Henrik Mnatsakanyan (1923-2001)), Haverj (2004, Paratype, also based on Mnatsakanyan's work), and PT Noah (1997, to accompany Tagir Safayev's PT FreeSet, 1992).

    Asmik, and Humanist 531 Cyrillic (the latter codesigned with Isay Slutsker) won awards at Bukvaraz 2001.

    In 2007, he designed the text and display family Susan (Paratype; award winner at Paratype K2009), which was named after his wife. Award winner at Granshan 2008.

    In 2010, he designed the Ripe Apricot humanist sans family (ParaType). Narevik (2011, Paratype) is a dynamic low contrast design with slightly rounded triangle serifs.

    In 2011, he created the free Google Web Font Marmelad, meant for headlines.

    Jacques Francois and Jacques Francois Shadow (2012, Cyreal) were codesigned with Alexei Vanyashin. They are revivals of the Enschedé no. 811 type specimen (ca. 1760) by Jacques François Rosart (1714-1774), made for Enschedé Printing House. Free at Google Web Fonts.

    Typefaces from 2013: Vaccine (a slab serif family, ParaType). This was followed in 2014 by the humanist Vaccine Sans (2014, with the help of Alexandra Korolkova and Gayaneh Bagdasaryan).

    In 2015, he made Levnam (ParaType), a sans with wide proportions for small text.

    In 2016, Alexander Lubovenko and Manvel Shmavonyan codesigned the 30-style Latin / Cyrillic workhorse sans typeface family Mediator.

    FontShop link. Catalog. MyFonts link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Marc Weymann

    Marc comes from Liechtenstein and Switzerland, but works in London as Marc Weymann Design. Graduate from the type design program at the University of Reading in 2010, where his graduation project included the Formal typeface for Latin and Devanagari. The face is strong and meant to be used for texts. It will survive in most environments.

    At Dalton Maag in 2007, he codesigned Kings Caslon with Ron Carpenter. In 2008, he collaborated with Ron Carpenter and Bruno Maag on the humanist sans typeface Aller. Still at Dalton Maag, in 2007, he created the Horus pictogram set. In 2008, he created the sans typeface Toyota, and the hand-printed typeface Globus. In 2009 at Dalton Maag, he did Metrolink Manchester, McDonalds. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Maria Doreuli

    Maria Doreuli (Moscow) earned her Master degree in graphic design from Moscow State University of Printing. During that time she attended Alexander Tarbeev's type design workshop. During 2009-2012 she worked on RIA Novosti's corporate identity projects. Winner at the Letter 2 competition in 2011 with the serif text family William (2011), which was her graduation project. This contemporary interpretation of Caslon also won First Prize in the Cyrillic typeface category at Granshan 2011. William Headline won at New Cyrillic 2012. Finally, in 2016, William was published by Typotheque. It is available in three optical sizes, a Text version with a large x-height for smaller text from 7 to 12pt, a Subhead version for use at 14 to 30 points, and Display version for text larger than 36 points.

    In 2011 she was named a designer of the year by the Russian newspaper Akzia. In 2012, Maria started type design studies at the KABK in Den Haag. Her graduation typeface there was the reverse contrast display typeface Chimera (2013). Chimera won an award at TDC 2014. It won the Silver Prize in the Latin category at the Morisawa Type Design Competition 2014.

    In 2014, Maria Doreuli, Krista Radoeva, and Elizaveta Rasskazova codesigned Sputnik Display for Sputnik News. This organic sans typeface family covers Latin, and various brands of Cyrillic, including the ones used in Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Abkhazia and Mongolia.

    Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam: The contrast between Russian and Bulgarian Cyrillic.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Mark Andresen

    American designer of the interesting font NotCaslon (1995) at Emigre. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Mark Solsburg
    [Group Type]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Mark Solsburg
    [Grosse Pointe Group LLC]

    [More]  ⦿

    Matthew Carter

    Matthew Carter (born in London in 1937, and son of Harry Carter) is one of today's most influential type designers. He trained as a punchcutter at Enschedé in 1956. In 1963 he was hired by Crosfield, a firm that pioneered the new technology of photo-typesetting, to lead their typographic program. He worked for Mergenthaler Linotype (1965-1981), and co-founded Bitstream Inc. with Mike Parker in 1981, adapting many fonts to digital technology. In January 1992, he founded Carter&Cone with Cherie Cone, and often collaborated with Font Bureau. In 1995, he won the Gold Prize at the annual Tokyo type Directors Club competition for Sophia. In 1997, he received the TDC Medal for significant contributions to the life, art, and craft of typography. In 2010, he received a MacArthur grant. He lives in Cambridge, MA.

    John Berry on Carter's art (2002). Apostrophe comments on Berry's article. Interview. His fonts:

    • The Microsoft screen fonts Verdana (1996), Georgia (1996), Georgia Greek, Georgia Cyrillic, Nina and the humanist sans typeface Tahoma (1994). Georgia (in roman and italic only) is a screen version of Miller, Carter's Scotch design. Nina was designed to address the requirements on smaller screens such as phones, and was used in Windows Mobile smartphones before Microsoft switched to Segoe. The Greek and Cyrillic versions of Nina were developed by François Villebrod. Georgia Pro (2010, Ascender) was developed from Georgia with the help of Steve Matteson. For Verdana Pro (2010, Ascender), Carter was assisted by David Berlow and David Jonathan Ross.
    • Apple's Skia (1993), a sans serif designed with David Berlow for Apple's QuickDraw GX technology, now called AAT. [Carter's Skia and Twombly's Lithos are genetically related.]
    • Monticello (2003), based on Linotype's Monticello (1950), which in turn goes back to Binny&Ronaldson's Monticello from 1797, a typeface commissioned by Princeton University Press for the Papers of Thomas Jefferson. It is in the Scotch roman style.
    • Miller (1997, Font Bureau), an extremely balanced family co-designed by Carter, Tobias Frere-Jones and Cyrus Highsmith. Carter explains: Miller is a Scotch Roman, a style that had its beginnings in the foundries of Alexander Wilson In Glasgow and William Miller in Edinburgh between about 1810 and 1820. It is considered that the punchcutter Richard Austin was responsible for the types of both Scottish foundries. Miller is a revival of the style, but is not based on any historical model. Now, there is also a 16-weight newspaper version, Miller Daily (2002), and an 8-weight Miller Headline (2002). This was followed by News Miller, a typeface designed for the Guardian. Note: Georgia (1996) is a screen version of Miller, and Monticello (2002) is a later modification. A comparison of these typefaces.
    • Alisal (1995, +Bold).
    • ITC Galliard (1978), a recreation of Robert Granjon's garalde letters. This typeface was originally conceived in 1965. Bringhurst recommends a Carter and Cone version of this font, called Galliard CC: it has old style figures and small caps. Further versions include Aldine 701 (Bitstream), Matthew (Softmaker), ITC Galliard Etext (2013, Carl Crossgrove, Linotype), and Gareth (Softmaker).
    • The ITC Charter family (1987 for Bitstream and known as Bitstream Charter; licensed to ITC in 1993; see the Elsner&Flake version of ITC Charter). An upgraded commercial version was released by Bitstream in 2004 under the name Charter BT Pro.
    • Vincent (1999), a font commissioned for use in Newsweek. It is named after Vincent Figgins, an English foundry owner and punch cutter who lived in the late 18th century.
    • Walker (1994), designed for The Walker Art Center.
    • Ionic Number One (1999, Carter&Cone).
    • Mantinia (1993, Font Bureau), based on inscriptional forms, both painted and engraved, by the Italian renaissance artist Andrea Mantegna.
    • Big Caslon (1994, Font Bureau), a display typeface based on the largest romans from William Caslon's foundry.
    • Big Figgins (1992) and Big Figgins Open (1998, based on types shown in the specimens of Vincent Figgins of 1815 and 1817). Big Figgins was called Elephant and Elephant Italic in Microsoft's Truetype Fontpack 2.
    • Sammy Roman (1996), loosely based on the 17th century romans of Jean Jannon. A beautiful typeface designed to accompany kanji and kana typefaces produced by Dynalab in Taiwan.
    • Sophia (1993, Font Bureau), a mix with Greek, uncial and classical Roman influences.
    • Shelley Script (1972), a family of formal scripts, split into Andante, Volante and Allegro. It is based on intricate English scripts of the 18th and 19th centuries attributed to George Shelley.
    • Cochin (1977, at Linotype). MyFonts writes: In 1913 Georges Peignot produced a typeface based on Nicolas Cochin's eighteenth century engravings. In 1977, Matthew Carter expanded this historic form into a three part series.
    • Bell Centennial (Linotype-Mergenthaler, 1975-1978), a legible heavily ink-trapped family designed by Matthew Carter as a replacement of Bell Gothic at Mergenthaler. There are also digital Linotype and Bitstream versions. AT&T commissioned the font to replace their previous typeface choice Bell Gothic for their 100th Anniversary.
    • Cascade Script (1965-1966, Linotype, now also known as Freehand 471 BT in the Bitstream collection). Paratype's extension of Freehand 471 to Cyrillic is by Oleg Karpinsky (2011).
    • New Century Schoolbook was designed from 1979-1981 in the New York Lettering office of Merganthaler Linotype based on Morris Fuller Benton's Century Schoolbook from 1915-1923. It was the second face, after New Baskerville, that was digitized and expanded using Ikarus (digital technology). The Bitstream version [Century Schoolbook] is a virtually exact copy, only being moved from a 54 unit to a 2000 or so unit design.
    • Auriol (Linotype), an art nouveau family (including Auriol Flowers 1 and 2 and Auriol Vignette Sylvie) based on the lettering of the painter and designer Georges Auriol. MyFonts explains: Auriol and Auriol Flowers were designed by Georges Auriol, born Jean Georges Huyot, in the early 20th century. Auriol was a French graphic artist whose work exemplified the art nouveau style of Paris in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1900, Georges Peignot asked Auriol to design fonts for Peignot&Sons. The resulting Auriol font was the basis for the lettering used by Hector Guimard for the entrance signs to the Paris Metro. It was re-released by Deberny&Peignot in 1979 with a new bold face, designed by Matthew Carter. These decorative fonts with a brush stroke look are well-suited to display settings. The Peignot drawing office insisted on a more normal appearance in the boldface, calling it Robur. Matthew Carter has returned to Auriol's original design for the whole series.
    • Helvetica Greek (Linotype).
    • Helvetica Compressed (Linotype, 1974, with Hans-Jörg Hunziker).
    • Wilson Greek (1995), compatible with Miller Text, and based on a type cut by Alexander Wilson for the Glasgow Homer of 1756. See here.
    • Olympian (1970, Linotype), designed for newspaper use. This is Dutch 811 in the Bitstream collection. The custom typeface Milne (Carter&Cone) done for the Philadelphia Inquirer is based on Olympian.
    • Gando, a French "ronde" typeface based on the work of Nicholas Gando (mid 1700s), and designed for photo-typesetting at Mergenthaler by Carter and Hans-Jörg Hunziker in 1970. Very similar to Bitstream's Typo Upright.
    • Fenway (1998-1999, Carter&Cone), commissioned by Sports Illustrated to replace Times Roman.
    • Snell Roundhand (1965-1966): a connected cursive script based on the 18th-century round hand scripts from English writing masters such as Charles Snell. Early in the digital era, Matthew published this in the Bitstream collection as Roundhand BT. A Cyrillic version by Isabella Chaeva and Vladimir Yefimov was released by ParaType in 2013.
    • Auriga (1970). (Wallis dates this in 1965 at Linotype.)
    • CRT Gothic (1974).
    • Video (1977).
    • V&A Titling (1981).
    • Deface (in the FUSE 18 collection).
    • Madrid (2001), done for the Spanish newspaper El País.
    • Milne, done for the Philadelphia Inquirer (a revised version of Olympian). Not available.
    • Durham, a sans serif family for US News&World Report.
    • Airport.
    • Century 725 (Bitstream, for the Boston Globe: after a design by Heinrich Hoffmeister).
    • For Microsoft: Georgia, Verdana, Tahoma (1994), Nina.
    • Freehand 471 (Bitstream). A chunky slightly angular script.
    • New Baskerville. [Matthew Carter says that this is wrongly attributed to him. It was directed by John Quaranta.]
    • Postoni [or Post-Bodoni], for the Washington Post, which is still using it. See here.
    • Le Bé, a Hebrew typeface that was used in the Pennyroyal Caxton Bible.
    • Rocky (2008, Font Bureau, with Richard Lipton), for the Herald in Scotland.
    • Time Caledonia.
    • Wiredbaum, for WIRED.
    • Wrigley (for Sports Illustrated). Matthew Carter designed Roster in the 1990s, and it was adopted as a display face for Sports Illustrated under the name Wrigley. Jesse Ragan was instrumental in later expanding the family from its original seven styles to the current 60. In 2015, Carter & Cone and Font Bureau released an expanded 60-style family of this typeface under the new name Roster.
    • Benton Bold Condensed (for Time Magazine).
    • Foreman Light (for the Philadelphia Inquirer).
    • Newsbaum (for the New York Daily News).
    • Carter Latin: Matthew was commissioned in 2003 to create a new design to be cut in wood type by the Hamilton Wood Type&Printing Museum in Two Rivers, WI. He came up with an all-caps, chunky, Latin-serif design.
    • Times Cheltenham (2003), which replaces in 2003 a series of headline typefaces including Latin Extra Condensed, News Gothic, and Bookman Antique.
    • The Yale Typeface (2004), inspired by the late fifteenth-century Venetian typeface that first appeared in Pietro Bembo's De Aetna, published by Aldus Manutius. This extensive family is freely available to members of Yale University.
    • DTL Flamande (2004, Dutch Type Library), based on a textura by Hendrik van den Keere.
    • Meiryo (2004, Microsoft, with Eiichi Kono): this font is part of Microsoft's ClearType project, and includes full Latin and kanji glyph sets. Suntory corporate types (2003-2005), developed with the help of Akira Kobayashi and Linotype from Linotype originals: Suntory Syntax, Suntory Sabon, Suntory Gothic, Suntory Mincho.
    • Rocky (2008, Font Bureau): A 40-style high contrast roman family that is difficult to classify (and a bit awkward). Developed with Richard Lipton.
    • Carter Sans (2010, ITC), based on epigraphic letters used in inscriptions. Created for the identity of the Art Directors Club 2010 class of its Hall of Fame, one the laureates in the 2010 Hall of Fame. Codesigned by Dan Reynolds, this chiseled typeface is loosely based on Albertus.
    • In 1997, he designed Postoni for the The Washington Post's headlines, a sturdy Bodoni.
    • MS Sitka (2013). A typeface with six optical sizes that are chosen on the fly if an appropriate application is present. Developed at Microsoft with the help of John Hudson (Tiro Typeworks) and Kevin Larson (who carried out extensive legibility tests). German link. Typophile link. Sitka won an award at Modern Cyrillic 2014.
    • Van Lanen Wood Type (Hamilton Wood Type, 2002-2013). Carter started work on the wood type in 2002, but technical accuracy issues postponed the implementation. Digital versions were finally done in 2013 by P22's Hamilton Wood Type.
    • Big Moore (2014, Font Bureau): A 1766 specimen by Isaac Moore, former manager of Joseph Fry's foundry in Bristol, England, shows many types inspired by John Baskerville. But a century later, standardization had foisted inept lining figures and shortened descenders upon these designs. Matthew Carter remedies the tragedy with Big Moore. Oldstyle figures, full-length descenders, and historic swashes are restored to this regal serif in two styles. Big Moore won an award in the TDC 2015 Type Design competition.

    Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam.

    Linotype link. FontShop link. Favorite quote: Watching me work is like watching a refrigerator make ice. Another quote: A typeface is a beautiful collection of letters, not a collection of beautiful letters.

    View Matthew Carter's typefaces. Matthew Carter's fonts. The typefaces made by Matthew Carter. See also here. Wikipedia page. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    McMurtrie: Le Moreau-le-Jeune A Typographical Specimen with an Introduction by Douglas C. Murtrie

    Scans of an 8-page booklet by Douglas C. McMurtrie published in Chicago in 1936: Le Moreau-le-Jeune A Typographical Specimen with an Introduction by Douglas C. Murtrie. McGraw writes about Caslon Openface: Caslon Openface was originated by BB&S in 1915, where it was first called College Oldstyle. It started out as a reproduction of a delicate 18th century French typeface known as Le Moreau le Jeune, by the foundry of G. Peignot&Son, but in the American version some strokes are heavier. In a later ad, BB&S said, "Placing it in the Caslon group of types is taking a liberty, but it assuredly 'belongs.' " Actually it has somewhat more affinity for the Cochin types. Caslon Shaded was adapted by ATF from Heavy Caslon in 1917, by W. F. Capitain. Caslon Shadow Title was adapted from Caslon Bold by Monotype about 1928. Compare Cameo, Cochin Open, Gravure, Narciss. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Mecanorma

    French graphics lettering company initially involved in instant lettering (made by Trip Productions), and some original typeface designs. From 1989 until 1994, Mecanorma worked with another Dutch company Visualogik to create digital versions of their typefaces, all having MN in their names. Monotype licensed and digitized some of Mecanorma's typefaces. In 1995, Mecanorma got out of graphics and stepped into home decoration. In 1999, Trip Productions, a Dutch Company located in Lisse, purchased the Mecanorma brand and what was left of the company. In 2004, International TypeFounders from Cedars, PA, licensed the typefaces from Trip Productions and released them as the Mecanorma Collection.

    Their collection includes some great fonts: Access, Artdeco, Artworld, BalloonMN, Brio, BusoramaMN, Campus, CardCamio, Carplate, CaslonAntiqueVL, ChocMN, CircusMN, ComicStripMN, DynamoMN, Galba, Globe-Gothic-Outline, Glowworm, Jackson, LibraMN, MtPlacard, Ortem, Renault, RoslynMN, Sayer, SayerScriptMN, SquashMN, Sully-Jonquieres, Watch-Outline. You can also buy through Atomic Type. Projected new URL, which I am afraid will never be activated because in 1999, the company was bough by the Dutch company Trip Productions.

    MyFonts sells these typefaces: Access, American Uncial, Anatol, Arnold Bocklin (art nouveau), Artdeco, Artworld (an embossed font), Aster, Balloon (brush font), Blippo Black, Brio, British Inserat, Brush, Bulletin Typewriter, Caligra (blackletter), Campus (athletic lettering), Cardcamio, Carplate, Caslon Antique, Celtic (in the style of University Roman), Chicago (dot matrix / marquee typeface), Chinon, Choc (brush script), Circus (Western font), Classic Script (a copperplate calligraphic script), Comic Strip, Commercial Script, Contest, Cooper Black, Dubbeldik, Dynamo, Egyptienne, Estro (Western font), Eurostile, Forelle, Fumo Dropshadow MN, Galba (Trajan typeface), Globe Gothic, Glowworm (a bubblegum font), Gothique (blackletter), Hansson Stencil, Hillman, Hotel (multilined art deco), Isonorm, Jackson, Jubilee Lines (an engraved money font), Latina, Leopard, Libra (uncial), Michelina (anthroposophic), Milton, Mistral, Normalise Din, Old Style, Olive, Orator, Organda, Ortem, Polka (a brush typeface), Renault, Rondo (retro script), Roslyn, Sayer Interview (old typewriter font), Sayer Script, Sayer Spiritual, Squash, Stencil, Stop (stencil typeface), Studio, Swaak Centennial (pure art nouveau), Tzigane, Viant, Vivaldi, Voel Beat (beveled), Watch Outline (LED font), Windsor, Zambesi (African look font).

    Designers include Albert Boton, J.H. Crook, Jan van Dijk, J. Dresscher, Roger Excoffon, U. Fenocchio, L. Fumarolo, William Gillies, N. Glason, Lennart Hansson, B. Jaquet, K. Kochnowicz, J. Larcher, C. Mediavilla, José Mendoza y Almeida, L. Meuffels, Aldo Novarese, Georges Renevey, F. Robert, Manfred Sayer, M. Schmidt, J.P. Thaulez, J. Werner and Bogdan Zochowski.

    The Western slabby font Figaro MT (2004) is ascribed to Mecanorma.

    A list culled from the web: AccessMN-Bold, AccessMN-Medium, AmericanUncialMN, AnatolMN, ArnoldBocklinMN, ArtdecoMN, ArtworldMN, AsterMN-Demi, AsterMN-Roman, BalloonMN-Bold, BalloonMN-ExtraBold, BlippoBlackMN, BrioMN, BritishInseratMN, BritishInseratMNCondensed, BrushMN, Bulletin-Typewriter, BusoramaMN-Bold, CaligraMN, CampusMN, CardcamioMN, CarplateMN, CaslonAntiqueVL, CelticMN-Bold, CelticMN-Italic, CelticMN, CenturyMNCondensed-BoldItalic, CenturyMNCondensed-Bold, CheltenhamMN-Book, CheltenhamMN-BookItalic, CheltenhamMN-Ultra, ChicagoMN, ChinonMN, ChocMN, CircusMN, ClassicScriptMN, ComicStripMN-Italic, ComicStripMN, CommercialScriptMN, ContestMN, Cooper-Black-Italic, Cooper-Black-Outline, CooperBlackMN, CushingMN-Book, CushingMN-Heavy, CushingMN-HeavyItalic, CushingMN-Medium, DubbeldikMN, DynamoMN-Bold, DynamoMN-Medium, DynamoMN-Shadow, EgyptienneMNCondensed-Bold, ElanMN-Extended, ElanMN-Light, ElanMN-Medium, EnrouteVL, ErasMN-Book, ErasMN-Demibold, ErasMN-Ultra, ErasMN, EstroMN, EurostileMN-Extended, EurostileMN-ExtendedBold, EurostileMN-Medium, FidelioMN, FolioMN-Bold, FolioMN-Extrabold, ForelleMN, FranklinGothicMN-Book, FranklinGothicMN-BookItalic, FranklinGothicMN-Heavy, FrizQuadrataMN-Bold, FrizQuadrataMN, Fumo-DropshadowMN, FuturaBlackMN, GalbaMN, Gillies-Gothic-Bold, Gillies-Gothic-Light, Gillies-Gothic-Ultra-Shadow, Gillies-Gothic-Ultra, GlobeGothicMN-Bold, GlobeGothicMNCondensed-Bold, GlobeGothicMNOutline, GlowwormMN, GlowwormMNCompressed, GorillaVL-Bold, GothiqueMN, HanssonStencilMN-Bold, HanssonStencilMN, HillmanMN, HillmanMNCondensed, HotelMN, IrishUncialVL, IsonormMN, Italia-Bold, Italia-Book, Italia-Medium, JacksonMN, JubileeLinesMN, LatinaMN, LeopardMN, LibraMN, MRunic-Condensed, MSwingBold, MachineMN-Bold, MachineMN, MichelinaMN, MiltonMN-Demibold, MistralVL, MtPlacard-Condensed, NormaliseDinMN, OklahomaState, OliveCompactMN, OliveMNBold, OliveNordMN, OratorMN, OrgandaMN-Bold, OrgandaMN, OrtemMN, PascalMN, PolkaMN-Bold, PolkaMN, PopplExquisitMN, PopplExquisitMN-Alternative, RenaultMN, RenaultMNBold, RondoMN, RoslynMN-Bold, RoslynMN-Bold, RoslynMN-Outline, RoslynMNMedium, SaphireMN, SayerMN-Interview, SayerScriptMN-Black, SayerScriptMN-Bold, SayerScriptMN-Light, SayerSpiritualMN-Italic, SayerSpiritualMN, SloganMN, SquashMN-Outline, SquashMN, StencilAntiqueMN, StencilAntiqueVL, StencilMN, StencilMNOutline, StopMN, StudioMN, SullyJonquieresMN-Bold, SullyJonquieresMN, SwaakCentennialMN, Syntax-Bold, Syntax-Roman, ToucheVL, TziganeMN, ViantMN-Bold, VivaldiMN, VoelBeatMN, WashSymbolVL-Light, WatchMN-Outline, WindsorMN, WindsorMNElongated, ZambesiMN.

    MyFonts link.

    View Mecanorma's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Melbert Cary
    [Continental Typefounders Association]

    [More]  ⦿

    Michael Hagemann
    [Font Mesa]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Michelle Dixon
    [Dixie's Delights]

    [More]  ⦿

    Miko McGinty

    Designer who as a student of Tobias Frere-Jones at Yale revived sans designs by William Caslon IV, whose matrices from 1816 were found in the archives of Stephenson Blake. In particular, he revived Caslon's Egyptian (1816), William Caslon IV's set of sans serif capitals. In 1998, Cyrus Highsmith (Font Bureau) refined Miko's version, giving it a more complete character set for Red Herring magazine, 1996-1998. Furter refinements and extensions were done in 2001 by Christian Schwartz in his Caslon's Egyptian. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Modern Typography
    [Paul Barnes]

    Modern Typography is a dot com web presence organized by the London-based type designer and graphic designer, Paul Barnes (b. 1970), typophile extraordinaire. It is promised to have plenty of material for the typophile. In the 1990s, Paul Barnes worked for Roger Black in New York where he was involved in redesigns of Newsweek, US and British Esquire and Foreign Affairs. During this time he art-directed Esquire Gentleman and U&lc. He later returned to America to be art director of the music magazine Spin. Since 1995 he has lived and worked in London. He has formed a long term collaboration with Peter Saville, which has resulted in such diverse work as identities for Givenchy and numerous music based projects, such as Gay Dad, New Order, Joy Division and Electronic. Barnes has also been an advisor and consultant on numerous publications, notably The Sunday Times Magazine, The Guardian and The Observer Newspapers, GQ, Wallpaper, Harper's Bazaar and Frieze. Following the redesign of The Guardian, as part of the team headed by Mark Porter, Barnes was awarded the Black Pencil from the D&AD. They were also nominated for the Design Museum Designer of the Year. In September 2006, with Schwartz he was named one of the 40 most influential designers under 40 in Wallpaper. He cofounded Commercial Type with Christian Schwartz. Author of Swiss Typography: The typography of Karl Gerstner and Rudolf Hostettler (Modern Typography, 2000).

    His typefaces:

    • The (free) font Pagan Poetry (2001), done for one of the sleeves on Björk's albums. The font was made for Show Studio (see also here and here).
    • Codesigner with Christian Schwartz in 2005 of the 200-font family Guardian Egyptian for The Guardian, about which he spoke at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon.
    • In 2007, he worked with Peter Saville on the Kate Moss brand. As a font, he suggested a variation on Brodovitch Albro, a typeface by Alexey Brodovitch, the famous art director of Harper's Bazaar from 1934-58. The Creative Review reactions to this typeface are a bit negative though.
    • In 2003, he created Austin, a high-contrast modern typeface. Now available at Schwartzco and at Commercial Type, Christian Schwartz writes: When hired to design a new headline typeface for Harper's&Queen, Britain's version of Harper's Bazaar, Paul thought to flick back through the pages of its 60's precursor, the über cool Queen. The high contrast serif headlines were lovely, but a little too expected in a contemporary fashion magazine. Some time poring through specimens in St Bride's Printing Library inspired the perfect twist: rather than taking our cues from Didot or Bodoni, we would start with Austin's first creation, turn up the contrast, tighten the spacing and make a fresh new look that would look bold and beautiful in the constantly changing world of fashion. The end result is Richard Austin meets Tony Stan, British Modern as seen through the lens of late 1970s New York.
    • Dala Floda (1997-now) is based on gravestone inscriptions, and was turned in 2010 into a logotype stencil family at Commercial Type. As a stencil family, it is praised by the typophile community. Realted is the semi-stencil typeface family Dala Moa.
    • Publico was designed from 2003-2006 with Christian Schwartz, Ross Milne and Kai Bernau. Originally called Stockholm and then Hacienda, and finally Publico for a Portuguese newspaper by that name.
    • Brunel (1995-now): an English modern, this is an anthology of the late eighteenth and nineteenth century English foundries. It was drawn from original source material, most notably the Caslon foundry and the work of John Isaac Drury).
    • Marian (2012) is a type experiment based on Garamond, consisting of 19 hairline styles with names referring to dates between 1554 and 1812. Commercial Type writes: Marian is a series of faithful revivals of some of the classics from the typographic canon: Austin, Baskerville, Bodoni, Fournier, Fleischman, Garamont, Granjon, Kis and van den Keere. The twist is that they have all been rendered as a hairline of near uniform weight, revealing the basic structure at the heart of the letterforms. Together they represent a concept: to recreate the past both for and in the present. [...] Faithful to the originals, Marian comes with small capitals in all nine roman styles, with lining and non-lining figures, with swash capitals (1554, 1740, 1800&1820), alternate and terminal characters (1554&1571). And like the hidden track so beloved of the concept album, Marian is completed by a Blackletter based on the work of Henrik van den Keere.
    • His classics series, mostly influenced by old Britsh type foundries, includes Figgins Sans (original 1832), Besley Grotesque, Caslon Antique, Fann Street Clarendon, Caslon Italian, Blanchard, Thorowgood Sans, Antique No. 6, Antique No. 3, and Ornamented (original c. 1850 at Caslon, Barnes use a Steven Shanks interpretation).
    • VF Didot (2013) is a custom Didot by Paul Barnes and Christian Schwartz for Vanity Fair, as requested by its design director, Chris Dixon. Based on work of Molé Le Jeune, a punchcutter used by the Didot family in the early part of the 19th century, VFDidot has 7 optical sizes and up to 5 weights in each size, plus small caps and even a stencil style.

      Early in 2014, Christian Schwartz, Paul Barnes and Miguel Reyes joined forces to create the manly didone typeface family Caponi, which is based on the early work of Bodoni, who was at that time greatly influenced by the roccoco style of Pierre Simon Fournier. It is named after Amid Capeci, who commissioned it in 2010 for his twentieth anniversary revamp of Entertainment Weekly. Caponi comes in Display, Slab and Text subfamilies.

      In 2014, Dave Foster and Paul Barnes (Commercial Type) designed Marr Sans. They write: The influence of Scotland in typefounding belies the nation's small size. Marr Sans, a characterful grotesque design, was inspired by a typeface from the 1870s found in the work of James Marr & Co. in Edinburgh, successors to Alexander Wilson & Sons. From a few lines in three sizes, and only one weight, Paul Barnes and Dave Foster have expanded the family from Thin to Bold, plus an Ultra Black weight, a wider companion to the six lighter weights. While Graphik and Atlas represent the greater homogenity of twentieth century sans serifs, Marr, like Druk, revels in the individuality of the nineteenth century, and is like an eccentric British uncle to Morris Fuller Benton's Franklin and News Gothics.

    • Le Jeune (2016, Greg Gazdowicz, Christian Schwartz and Paul Barnes): a crisp high-contrast fashion mag didone typeface family in Poster, Deck, Text and Hairline sub-styles, with stencils drawn by Gazdowicz. This large typeface family comes in four optical sizes, and was originally developed for Chris Dixon's refresh of Vanity Fair.
    • Marian Text (2014-2016) is a grand collection of ultra thin typefaces designed at Commercial Type by Miguel Reyes, Sandra Carrera, and Paul Barnes. Marian Text 1554 depicts the old style of Garamond & Granjon; John Baskerville's transitional form becomes Marian Text 1757; the modern of Bodoni, with swash capitals and all, becomes Marian Text 1800, and the early Moderns of the Scottish foundries of Alexander Wilson & Son of Glasgow, and William Miller of Edinburgh, become Marian Text 1812. And like the original, a black letter: Marian Text Black, referencing the forms of Hendrik van den Keere.
    • Gabriello (2015) is a soccer shirt font designed by Paul Barnes and Miguel Reyes: Inspired by brush lettering, Gabriello was commissioned by Puma. First used by their sponsored teams at the 2010 Africa Cup of Nations, it was later used at that year's World Cup, held in South Africa. It was used on the kits worn by Algeria, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire, and Ghana.
    • Chiswick (2017), a series of three typefaces families based on vernacular forms found in the British Isles from the eighteenth century.

    His St Bride Type Foundry. Dafont link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Molotro
    [Luciano Perondi]

    Molotro is Luciano Perondi's typefoundry, which he runs with Stefano Minelli and Valentina Montagna. This Italian type designer (b. Busto Arsizio, 1976) lives in Busto Arsizio (Varese). At ATypI in Rome in 2002, he spoke about the logo-grammatic approach to type design: "Carattere senza un nome importante". His ATypI 2002 report is here. In this enlightening piece, you can read about his opinions on type. From 2000 on, he is lecturer at the Basic Design Lab of the Politecnico di Milano. In 2003 he founded the Research Team EXP. The research team, formed by type designers and psychologists, studies the reading process, the influences of the irregularity of typefaces on reading and the non linear script. EXP is now starting to work on the effects of presbiopia on reading and on how an adequate design of types could help presbiopian readers. At ATypI 2005 in Helsinki, he spoke about How does the irregularity of letters affect reading? His type designs include

    • Solferino Text (2007), a great transitional understated text typeface for the Corriere della Sera newspaper. Done with Leftloft (Andrea Braccaloni).
    • Minotype (2006, aka Ninzioletto, a stencil face).
    • Zotico/Zotica (2004, a sans family for the Milano Film Festival).
    • Ninzioletto (2004, a stencil typeface designed for the Venice sign system).
    • Tecnotipo (2005, designed for Tecno).
    • Quinta (2006).
    • DeA (2003, for DeAgostini).
    • Ccunami.
    • Csuni (which stands for Carattere Senza Un Nome Importante).
    • Csuni1885 (2003, for Mattioli1885; see also Experience1885).
    • Mattioli1885.
    • DeA, for DeAgostini (2003).
    • Sessantacinque (2003).
    • Eye of Goat: designed in 2005 by Perondi, Valentina Montagna and Federico Zerbinati. It is a medieval ornaments typeface (free for a limited time).
    • Nanoline (hairline sans).
    • Decima (2005), a sans.
    • Lontano (2003). A Caslon-style typeface commissioned for the Matteoli 1885 edition.
    • Brera (2007, a sans family by Leftloft and Molotro).
    • Voland (2010). A commissioned Baskerville typeface for the Italian publishing house Voland.
    • Under the identity design and art direction of FF3300, Molotro created the sans typeface family Divenire, in Regular, Italic and Mono subfamilies, for the Italian Democratic Party in 2012-2013. Since 2014, Divenire can be bought as a reatil font at CAST.
    • Dic Sans (2014). This elliptical sans was inspired by Aldo Novarese's Eurostile. It has its own idiosyncracies, and comes with a gorgeous Dic Sans Extra Bold weight (2014). On the nomenclature---French are allowed to operate Sans Dic, and Americans are permitted to typeset with Extra Bold Dic.
    • Tribasei 16-000 (2006). an experimental typeface.
    • Macho Modular (2015, CAST). Macho was originally designed in 2010 for MAN (Museo d'Arte Provincia di Nuoro) and is based on the idea of modular widths of the 20th-century typesetting systems, as required by the Olivetti Margherita and the hot-metal Linotype machine.
    Klingspor link. Google Plus link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    MoMA 2011

    A rather puzzling news item reached us in January 2011---the MoMA in New York has acquired 23 digital typefaces for its collection. I wonder how one acquires a typeface? Is there only one original? The typefaces were chosen with a foresight of the scope of the digital revolution, and they all significantly respond to the technological advancements occurring in the second half of the twentieth century. Each is a milestone in the history of typography. One can easily set up a web site that shows those 23 fonts, so what is the point of all this? The 23 acquired typefaces are:

    • American Type Founders: OCR-A (1966)
    • Wim Crouwel: New Alphabet (1967)
    • Matthew Carter: Bell Centennial (1976-78)
    • Matthew Carter:ITC Galliard (1978)
    • Erik Spiekermann: FF Meta (1984-1991)
    • Zuzana Licko: Oakland (1985)
    • Jeffery Keedy: Keedy Sans (1991)
    • Erik van Blokland and Just van Rossum: FF Beowolf (1990)
    • Barry Deck: Template Gothic (1990)
    • P. Scott Makela: Dead History (1990)
    • Jonathan Hoefler: HTF Didot (1991)
    • Neville Brody: FF Blur (1992)
    • Jonathan Barnbrook: Mason (1992)
    • Matthew Carter: Mantinia (1993)
    • Tobias Frere-Jones: Interstate (1993-95)
    • Matthew Carter: Big Caslon (1994)
    • Albert-Jan Pool: FF DIN (1995)
    • Matthew Carter: Walker (1995)
    • Matthew Carter: Verdana (1996)
    • Jonathan Hoefler and Tobias Frere-Jones: Mercury (1996)
    • Matthew Carter: Miller (1997)
    • Jonathan Hoefler&Tobias Frere-Jones: Retina (1999)
    • Tobias Frere-Jones and Jesse Ragan: Gotham (2000)
    There are obvious biases here towards certain designers. The destructionist era of Brody and Emigre is overrepresented, and Zapf and Frutiger are underrepresented. This is not meant to be a list of best fonts, only those that had a technological design element, but then why is Monaco not there? And if impact is at least a partial criterion, why is Helvetica missing? Also interesting to note that about 50% of the typefaces in the list are interpretations of older designs. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Morris Fuller Benton

    Prolific American type designer (b. 1872, Milwaukee, d. 1948, Morristown, NJ), who published over 200 alphabets at ATF. He managed the ATF type design program from 1892 until 1937. Son of Linn Boyd Benton. MyFonts page on him. Nicholas Fabian's page. Linotype's page. Klingspor page. Unos tipos duros page. His fonts include:

    • 1897: Cloister Old Style (ATF). [Stephenson Blake purchased this from ATF and called it Kensington Old Style, 1919] [Cloister (2005, P22/Lanston) is based on Jim Rimmer's digitization of Benton's Cloister.]
    • 1898: Roycroft. Mac McGrew on Roycroft: Roycroft was one of the most popular of a number of rugged typefaces used around the turn of the century, when printing with an antique appearance was in vogue. It was inspired by lettering used by the Saturday Evening Post. then a popular weekly magazine, and has been credited to Lewis Buddy, a former Post artist and letterer, but ATF says it was designed "partly" by Morris Benton, about 1898. Gerry Powell, director of typographic design for ATF in the 1940s, says, "Roycroft was first known as Buddy, changed when it was adopted by Elbert Hubbard for the Roycroft Press." Henry L. Bullen, ATF librarian and historian, says, "The first font of type to be made from matrices directly engraved on the Benton machine was 24-point Roycroft. October 4, 1900." While the machine was originally designed in 1884 to cut punches rather than matrices, it is doubtful that no fonts of mats were cut before 1900. Roycroft is also said to be the first typeface for which the large size of 120-point was engraved in type metal, with matrices made by electrotyping. Many typefaces of the day had a number of alternate characters. For this face. ATF gave specific instructions for their intended use: "M with the short vertex, in words the letters of which are open; R with the long tail, as a final letter in all-cap words; the wide h, m, and n, as a final letter only; t with the swash tail, as a final letter but not too frequently; u with the descending stroke, in words having no descending letters; ct ligature, wherever possible; the long s and its combinations, in antique work." Roycroft Open was cut in 1902, probably from the same patterns as the parent face. Roycroft Tinted is a very unusual face, in which the typeface is engraved with the equivalent of a halftone screen of about 25 percent tone value, with a black shadow on the right side; this typeface was cut by the Dickinson Type Foundry branch of ATF in Boston, and includes the same special characters as Roycroft. Compare Post Oldstyle.
    • 1900: Century Expanded (1900: poster by Heather Leonhardt). This was a complete redraw of Century Roman which was designed in 1894 by his father, Linn Boyd Benton, for Theodore Low DeVinne, the publisher of Century Magazine. Digitizations by Elsner&Flake, Bitstream and URW.
    • 1901: Linotext (aka WedddingText).
    • 1901-1910: Engravers.
    • 1901: Wedding Text (some put this in 1907), Old English Text, Engravers' Old English (a blackletter font remade by Bitstream). Wedding Text has been copied so often it is sickening: Wedding Regular and Headline (HiH, 2007), Dan X. Solo's version, Comtesse, Elite Kanzlei (1905, Stempel), Meta, Lipsia, QHS Nadejda (QHS Soft), Blackletter 681, Marriage (Softmaker), Wedding Text TL (by Tomas Liubinas).
    • 1902: Typoscript.
    • 1902-1912: Franklin Gothic. Digital versions exist by Bitstream, Elsner&Flake (in a version called ATF Franklin Gothic), Red Rooster (called Franklin Gothic Pro, 2011), Linotype, and ITC (ITC Franklin Gothic). Discussion by Harvey Spears. Mac McGrew: Franklin Gothic might well be called the patriarch of modern American gothics. Designed in 1902 by Morris Fuller Benton, it was one of the first important modernizations of traditional nineteenth-century typefaces by that designer, after he was assigned the task of unifying and improving the varied assortment of designs inherited by ATF from its twenty-three predecessor companies. Franklin Gothic (named for Benjamin Franklin) not only became a family in its own right, but also lent its characteristics to Lightline Gothic. Monotone Gothic, and News Gothic (q.v.). All of these typefaces bear more resem- blance to each other than do the typefaces within some other single families. Franklin Gothic is characterized by a slight degree of thick-and-thin contrast; by the double-loop g which has become a typically American design in gothic typefaces; by the diagonal ends of curved strokes (except in Extra Condensed); and by the oddity of the upper end of C and c being heavier than the lower end. The principal specimen here is Monotype, but the basic font is virtually an exact copy of the ATF typeface in display sizes, except that Monotype has added f- ligatures and diphthongs. Franklin Gothic Condensed and Extra Condensed were also designed by Benton, in 1906; Italic by the same designer in 1910; and Condensed Shaded in 1912 as part of the "gray typography" series. Although Benton started a wide version along with the others, it was abandoned; the present Franklin Gothic Wide was drawn by Bud (John L.) Renshaw about 1952. Franklin Gothic Condensed Italic was added by Whedon Davis in 1967. Monotype composition sizes of Franklin Gothic have been greatly modi- fied to fit a standard arrangement; 12-point is shown in the specimen-notice the narrow figures and certain other poorly reproportioned characters. The 4- and 5-point sizes have a single-loop g. Gothic No. 16 on Linotype and Inter- type is essentially the same as Franklin Gothic up to 14-point; in larger sizes it is modified and more nearly like Franklin Gothic Condensed. However. some fonts of this typeface on Lino have Gagtu redrawn similar to Spartan Black. with the usual characters available as alternates; 14-point is shown. Western Type Foundry and later BB&S used the name Gothic No.1 for their copy of Franklin Gothic, while Laclede had another similar Gothic No. 1 (q.v.). On Ludlow, this design was originally known as Square Gothic Heavy with a distinctive R and t as shown separately after the Monotype diphthongs; when the name was changed to Franklin Gothic in 1928, it was redrawn, closer to Franklin Gothic but still a bit top-heavy; the unique R was retained in standard fonts but an alternate version like that of ATF was made available separately; also a U with equal arms, a single-loop g, and a figure 1 without foot serifs. Ludlow Franklin Gothic Italic, partially shown on the third line of the specimen, is slanted much more than other versions, to fit the standard 17 -degree italic matrices of that machine. Modern Gothic Condensed and Italic (q.v.) are often though not properly called Franklin Gothic Condensed and Italic, especially by Monotype users. Also see Streamline Block.
    • 1903: Alternate Gothic (ATF). See Alternate Gothic Pro Antique (Elsner&Flake), Alternate Gothic No2 (Bitstream), Alpin Gothic (by Bitstream), League Gothic (2009-2011, The League of Movable Type), and Alternate Gothic No1, No2 and No3 (see the URW version). Mac McGrew: Alternate Gothic was designed in 1903 by Morris F. Benton for ATF with the thought of providing several alternate widths of one design to fit various layout problems. Otherwise it is a plain, basic American gothic with no unusual features, but represents a more careful drawing of its nineteenth-century predecessors. The Monotype copies in display sizes are essentially the same as the foundry originals, with the addition of f-ligatures. The thirteen alternate round capitals shown in the first line of Alternate Gothic No.1 were designed by Sol Hess in 1927 for Monotype, hence the "Modernized" name; with these letters the design is sometimes referred to as Excelsior Gothic. Monotype keyboard sizes, as adapted by Hess about 1911, are considera- bly modified to fit a standard arrangement; caps are not as condensed as in the original foundry design. In 6-point, series 51 and 77 are both the same width, character for character, but some letters differ a bit in design. Note that these two narrower widths are simply called Alternate Gothic on Monotype, while the wider version is Alternate Gothic Condensed! Alternate Gothic Italic, drawn about 1946 by Sol Hess for Monotype matches No.2, but may be used with other widths as well. Condensed Gothic on Ludlow, is essentially a match for Alternate Gothic No.1, but has a somewhat different set of variant characters, as shown in the third line. There is also Condensed Gothic Outline on Ludlow, introduced about 1953, essentially an outline version of Alternate Gothic No.2. On Linotype and Intertype there is Gothic Condensed No.2 which is very similar to Alternate Gothic No. 1 in the largest sizes only, but with even narrower lowercase and figures. Also compare Trade Gothic Bold and Trade Gothic Bold Condensed. For a free version of Alternate Gothic No. 1, see League Gothic (2009-2011, The League of Movable Type).
    • 1904: Bold Antique, Whitin Black [see OPTI Bold Antique for a modern digitization], Cheltenham (digitizations by Bitstream and Font Bureau, 1992), Cloister Black (blackletter font, see the Bitstream version: it is possible that the typeface as designed by Joseph W. Phinney).
    • 1905: Linoscript (1905). Originally at ATF it was named "Typo Upright". Clearface, about which McGrew writes: Clearface was designed by Morris Benton with his father, Linn Boyd Benton, as advisor. The bold was designed first, in 1905, and cut the following year. The other weights and italics were produced through 1911. As the name implies, the series was intended to show unusual legibility, which it certainly achieved. The precision of cutting and casting for which ATF is noted produced a very neat and handsome series, which had considerable popularity. Clearface Heavy Italic has less inclination than the lighter weights, and is non-kerning, a detail which helped make it popular for newspaper use; the specimen shown here is from a very worn font. Some of the typefaces have been copied by the matrix makers. But the typeface Monotype calls Clearface and Italic is the weight called Bold by other sources. Monotype also includes Clearface Italic No. 289, a copy of the lighter weight. Revival and expansion by Victor Caruso for ITC called ITC Clearface, 1978. Also, American Extra Condensed, an octagonal mechanical typeface revived in 2011 by Nick Curtis as Uncle Sam Slim NF.
    • 1906: Commercial Script (versions exist at Linotype, URW, Bitstream (called English 144), and Elsner&Flake), Miele Gothic, Norwood Roman.
    • 1907: Lincoln Gotisch, named after Abraham Lincoln. This found found its way from ATF to Schriftguss, Trennert und Sohn, and Ludwig Wagner. Digital revivals include Delbanco's DS Lincoln-Gotisch. Compare with Comtesses, Lipsia, Elite Kanzlei, Lithographia and Wedding Text.
    • 1908: News Gothic, Century Oldstyle (digital versions by Bitstream, Elsner&Flake, and URW), Clearface Gothic (1907-1910: digital revivals include Clear Gothic Serial (ca. 1994, SoftMaker) and Cleargothic Pro (2012, SoftMaker). McGrew: Clearface Gothic was designed by Morris Benton for ATF in 1908, and cut in 1910. It is a neat, clean gothic, somewhat thick and thin, which incorporates some of the mannerisms of the Clearface (roman) series. However, it can hardly be considered a part of that family. There is only one weight, and fonts contain only the minimum number of characters.
    • 1909-1911: Rugged Roman. McGrew: Rugged Roman was designed for ATF by Morris F. Benton in 1909-11. It was patented in 1915, but the earliest showing seems to have appeared in 1917. It is a rugged face, as the name says, of the sort that was popular early in the century, but appears to have no relation to other typefaces having the name "Rugged." It somewhat resembles Roycroft, but is lighter. But to add to the uncertainty, fonts contained a number of ligatures of the kind which were more common in the early 1900s, in addition to the usual f-ligatures.
    • 1910: Cloister Open Face, Hobo (1910, strongly influenced by the Art Nouveau movement; Hobo Light followed in 1915), ATF Bodoni (Bitstream's version is just called Bodoni, and Adobe's version is called Bodoni Book or Bodoni Poster or Bodoni Bold Condensed, while Elsner&Flake call theirs Bodoni No Two EF Ultra; Font Bureau's version has just two weights called BodoniFB-Bold Condensed and Compressed). McGrew writes about Hobo: Hobo is unusual in two respects---it is drawn with virtually no straight lines, and it has no descenders and thus is very large for the point size. It was designed by Morris F. Benton and issued by ATF in 1910. One story says that it was drawn in the early 1900s and sent to the foundry without a name, which was not unusual, but that further work on it was continually pushed aside, until it became known as "that old hobo" because it hung around so long without results. More time elapsed before it was patented in 1915. The working name was Adface. Hobo was also cut by Intertype in three sizes. Light Hobo was also drawn by Benton, and released by ATF in 1915. It is included in one list of Monotype typefaces, but its series number is shown elsewhere for another Monotype face, and no other evidence has been found that Monotype actually issued it.
    • 1911-1913: Venetian, Cromwell. Mac McGrew: Cromwell is a rather playful typeface, designed by Morris Benton in 1913 but not released by ATF until three years later. It uses the same capitals as Cloister (q.v.) and has the same small x-height with long ascenders and descenders, but otherwise is quite different, with much less formality. Notice the alternate characters and the double letters including overhanging f's.. Cromwell was digitized by Nick Curtis in 2010 as Cromwell NF. Mac McGrew on Venetian: Venetian and Italic were designed by Morris F. Benton for ATF about 1911, with Venetian Bold following about two years later. They are rather reserved transitional typefaces, almost modern, instead of classic designs of Venetian origin as the name implies. The result is closer to Bodoni than to Cloister. The working title was Cheltenham No.2, but the relationship to that family is not apparent. It is carefully and neatly done, but never achieved widespread use. Compare Benton, a later typeface by the same designer, which has similar characteristics but more grace and charm.
    • 1914: Adscript, Souvenir, Garamond (with T.M. Cleveland).
    • 1916: Announcement, Light Old Style, Goudy Bold. Mac McGrew writes: Announcement Roman and Announcement Italic were designed by Morris F. Benton in 1916, adapted from steel or copperplate engravings, but not completed and released until 1918. These delicate typefaces have had some popularity for announcements, social stationery, and a limited amount of advertising work, but are a little too fancy for extensive use. Oddly, some of the plain caps shown in the specimens, both roman and italic, do not seem to appear in any ATF specimens. Foundry records show that a 48-point size of the roman was cut in 1927, but no other listing or showing of it has been found. In fact, sizes over 24-point were discontinued after a few years, and all sizes were discontinued in 1954.. Digitizations: Announcement Roman was done by Nick Curtis in 2009 and called Society Page NF.
    • 1916-1917: Invitation. For a digital revival, see Sil Vous Plait (2009, Nick Curtis).
    • 1917: Freehand.
    • 1917-1919: Sterling. Digitizations include Howard (2006, Paul D. Hunt), Argentina NF (2009, Nick Curtis), and Argentina Cursive NF.
    • 1918: Century Schoolbook (1918-1921). (See ITC Century (Tony Stan, 1975-1979), or the Century FB-Bold Condensed weight by Greg Thompson at Font Bureau, 1992. For Century Schoolbook specifically, there are versions by Elsner&Flake, Bitstream and URW. Bitstream has a monospaced version.) URW Century Schoolbook L is free, and its major extension, TeXGyre Schola (2007) is also free.
    • 1920: Canterbury. Mac McGrew: Canterbury is a novelty typeface designed by Morris F. Benton for ATF in 1920, when trials were cut, but not completed for production until 1926. It features a very small x-height, with long ascenders and descenders; monotone weight with minute serifs; and a number of swash capitals. It is primarily suitable for personal stationery and announcements. Compare Camelot Oldstyle. Digital versions were done by Nick Curtis in his Londonderry Air NF (2002-2004), and Red Rooster in the series Canterbury, Canterbury OldStyle, and Canterbury Sans.
    • 1922: Civilité. Mac McGrew on the ATF Civilité: Civilite in its modern adaptation was designed by Morris Benton in 1922 and cut by ATF in 1923-24. The original version was cut by Robert Granjon in 1557 to imitate the semi-formal writing then in vogue, and is believed to be the first cursive design cut in type. It became popular for the printing of poetry and for books of instruction for children, where the type itself could serve as a perfect model of handwriting. The first of these books was titled La Civilite puerile, printed at Antwerp in 1559. The books were so popular that the design came to be known as "civility" type. Other interpretations of the letter have been made, including Cursive Script, cut in the nineteenth century in 18-point only from French sources by ATF predecessors and by Hansen, but Benton's seems more attractive and legible to modern eyes. The French pronunciation of ci-vil'i-tay is indicated by the accented e, which was used only in ATF's earliest showings. The many alternate characters were included in fonts as originally sold; later they were sold separately and finally discontinued, although the basic font was still listed in recent ATF literature. Also see ZapfCivilite. Compare Freehand, Motto, Verona.
    • 1924: Schoolbook Oldstyle.
    • 1926-1927: Typo Roman.
    • 1927: Chic (American Typefounders; doubly shaded capitals and figures), Gravure, Greeting Monotone, Goudy Extra Bold. The art deco typeface Chic was revived by Nick Curtis as Odalisque NF (2008) and Odalisque Stencil NF (2010).
    • 1928: Parisian, Bulmer (revival of William Martin's typeface from 1792 for the printer William Bulmer; digital forms by Monotype, Adobe, Linotype, and Bitstream), Broadway (1928-1929, see two styles offered by Elsner&Flake, Linotype, Bitstream, and 11 weights by URW), Goudy Catalogue, Modernique, Novel Gothic (ATF, designed with Charles H. Becker), Dynamic. Novel Gothic has seen many digital revivals, most notably Telenovela NF (2011, Nick Curtis), Naked Power (Chikako Larabie) and Novel Gothic SG (Jim Spiece). Images of Bulmer: i, ii, iii, iv, v, vi, vii, viii, ix, x, xi, xii.
    • 1929: Louvaine. McGrew: Louvaine series was designed by Morris F. Benton for ATF in 1928. It is an adaptation of Bodoni (the working title was Modern Bodoni), and many of the characters are identical. Only g and y are basically different; otherwise the distinction is in the more abrupt transition from thick to thin strokes in this series. In this respect, Ultra Bodoni has more affinity to Louvaine than to the other Bodoni weights. The three weights of Louvaine correspond to Bodoni Book, Regular, and Bold. This series did not last long enough to appear in the 1934 ATF specimen book, the next complete one after its introduction. Compare Tippecanoe.
    • 1930: Benton, Engravers Text, Bank Gothic (see Bitstream's version), Garamond-3 (with Thomas Maitland Cleland), Paramount (some have this as being from 1928: see Eva Paramount SG by Jim Spiece). McGrew: Paramount was designed by Morris Benton in 1930 for ATF. It is basically a heavier companion to Rivoli (q. v.), which in turn is based on Eve, an importation from Germany, but is heavier than Eve Bold. It is an informal typeface with a crisp, pen-drawn appearance. Lowercase is small, with long ascenders and short descenders. Vertical strokes taper, being wider at the top. It was popular for a time as an advertising and announcement type.
    • 1931: Thermotype, Stymie (with Sol Hess and Gerry Powell). Stymie Obelisk is a condensed Egyptian headline face---the latter was revived by Nick Curtis as Kenotaph NF (2011).
    • 1932: Raleigh Gothic Condensed (the digital version by Nick Curtis is Highpoint Gothic NF (2011)), American Text (blackletter). Mac McGrew: Raleigh Gothic Condensed was designed by Morris F. Benton for ATF in 1932. It is a prim, narrow, medium weight gothic face, with normally round characters being squared except for short arcs on the outside of corners. The alternate characters AKMNS give an even greater vertical appearance than usual. At first, this typeface was promoted with Raleigh Cursive as a stylish companion face, although there is no apparent relationship other than the name. Compare Phenix, Alternate Gothic, Agency Gothic.
    • 1933: American Backslant, Ultra Bodoni (a great Bodoni headline face; see Bodoni FB (1992, Font Bureau's Richard Lipton). About Agency Gothic, McGrath writes: Agency Gothic is a squarish, narrow, monotone gothic without lower- case, designed by Morris F. Benton in 1932. It has an alternate A and M which further emphasize the vertical lines. Sizes under 36-point were added in 1935. Agency Gothic Open was drawn by Benton in 1932 and introduced in 1934; it follows the same style in outline with shadow, and probably has been more popular than its solid companion. Triangle Type Foundry, a Chicago concern that manufactured matrices, copied this typeface as Slim Open, adding some smaller sizes. ATF's working titles for these typefaces, before release, were Tempo, later Utility Gothic and Utility Open. Compare Raleigh Gothic Condensed, Poster Gothic, Bank Gothic. Digital versions include Warp Three NF (2008, Nick Curtis), which borrows its lowercase from Square Gothic (1888, James Conner's Sons), FB Agency (1995, David Berlow at FontBureau)
    • 1934: Shadow, Tower (heavy geometric slab serif), Whitehall. Font Bureau's Elizabeth Cory Holzman made the Constructa family in 1994 based on Tower. Digital versions include Warp Three NF (2008, Nick Curtis), which borrows its lowercase from Square Gothic (1888, James Conner's Sons), FB Agency Gothic (1995, David Berlow at FontBureau) and Agency Gothic by Castle Type. Eagle Bold followed in 1934. McGrew: Eagle Bold is a by-product of the depression of the 1930s. The National Recovery Administration of 1933 had as its emblem a blue eagle with the prominent initials NRA, lettered in a distinctive gothic style. Morris Benton took these letters as the basis for a font of type, released later that year by ATF, to tie in with the emblem, which businesses throughout the country displayed prominently in advertising, stationery, and signs; naturally it was named for the eagle. Compare Novel Gothic. USA Resolute NF (2009, Nick Curtis) is based on Eagle Bold.
    • 1935: Phenix. This condensed artsy sans was revived in 2011 at Red Rooster by Steve Jackaman and Ashley Muir as Phoenix Pro.
    • 1936: Headline Gothic. For a digital version, see ATF Headline Gothic (2015, Mark van Bronkhorst, Igino Marini, & Ben Kiel at American Type Founders Collection).
    • 1937: Empire (Bitstream version). This ultra-condensed typeface was digitally remade and modernized by Santiago Orozco as Dorsa (2011).
    Linotype link. FontShop link. Picture.

    Typefaces alphabetic order:

    • Adscript
    • Agency Gothic (+Open
    • Alternate Gothic No.1 (+No.2, +No.3)
    • American Backslant
    • American Caslon&Italic
    • American Text
    • Announcement Roman&Italic (1916). For digital revivals or influences, see Friendly (2012, Neil Summerour) and Society Page NF (2009, Nick Curtis).
    • Antique Shaded
    • Bank Gothic Light (+Medium, +Bold, +Light Condensed, +Medium Condensed, +Bold Condensed). For digital versions, see Bank Gothic AS Regular and Condensed (2008, Michael Doret).
    • Baskerville Italic
    • Benton (Whitehall)&Italic
    • Bodoni&Italic (+Book&Italic, +Bold&Italic, +Bold Shaded, +Bold Open)
    • Bold Antique (+Condensed)
    • Broadway (+Condensed). The prototyical art deco typeface (1928-1929).
    • Bulfinch Oldstyle (1903).
    • Bulmer&Italic
    • Canterbury
    • Card Bodoni (+Bold). 1912-1916.
    • Card Litho (+Light Litho)
    • Card Mercantile
    • Card Roman
    • Century Expanded&Italic
    • Century Bold&Italic (+Bold Condensed, +Bold Extended)
    • Century Oldstyle&Italic (+Bold&Italic, +Bold Condensed)
    • Century Catalogue&Italic
    • Century Schoolbook&Italic (+Bold)
    • Cheltenham Oldstyle&Italic (+Condensed, +Wide)
    • Cheltenham Medium&Italic (+Medium Condensed, +Medium Expanded, +Bold&Italic, +Bold Condensed&Italic, +Bold Extra Condensed&Title, +Bold Extended, +Extrabold, +Bold Outline, +Bold Shaded&Italic, +Extrabold Shaded, +Inline, +Inline Extra Condensed, +Inline Extended)
    • Chic
    • Civilite
    • Clearface&Italic (1907, +Bold&Italic, +Heavy&Italic)
    • Clearface Gothic: a flared version of Clearface.
    • Cloister Black
    • Cloister Oldstyle&Italic (+Lightface&Italic, +Bold&Italic, +Bold Condensed, +Cursive, +Cursive Handtooled, +Title&Bold Title)
    • Commercial Script
    • Copperplate Gothic Shaded
    • Cromwell.
    • Cushing Antique (1902).
    • Della Robbia Light
    • Dynamic Medium
    • Eagle Bold
    • Empire
    • Engravers Bodoni
    • Engravers Old English (+Bold)
    • Engravers Bold
    • Engravers Shaded
    • Engravers Text
    • Franklin Gothic&Italic (+Condensed, +Extra Condensed, +Condensed Shaded)
    • Freehand (1917). Mac McGrew: Freehand, a typeface based on pen-lettering, was designed for ATF by Morris Benton in 1917. The working title before release was Quill. Derived from Old English, it is an interesting novelty, and has had quite a bit of use. Compare Civilite, Motto, Verona.
    • Garamond&Italic (+Bold&Italic, +Open)
    • Globe Gothic (+Condensed, +Extra Condensed, +Extended, +Bold&Italic)
    • Goudy Bold&Italic (+Catalogue&Italic, +Extrabold&Italic, +Handtooled&Italic, +Title)
    • Gravure
    • Greeting Monotone
    • Headline Gothic
    • Hobo&Light Hobo (1910). For digital versions, see Informal 707 (Bitstream), Hobbit (SF), Homeward Bound (Corel), Bogo (2016, Harold Lohner), and Hobo (Bitstream).
    • Invitation (+Shaded)
    • Light Oldstyle
    • Lightline Gothic&Title (1908). For a revival, see Benton Gothic Thin NF (2014, Nick Curtis).
    • Lithograph Shaded (1914, with W.F. Capitain).
    • Louvaine Light&Italic (+Medium&Italic, +Bold&Italic)
    • Miehle Extra Condensed&Title
    • Modernique
    • Monotone Gothic&Title
    • Motto (1915). Mac McGrew: Motto is a calligraphic typeface designed by Morris F. Benton for ATF in 1915. It is similar to the same designer's Freehand, drawn a couple of years later, but has plainer capitals, heavier thin strokes, and shorter descenders. But letters combine into legible words with a pleasant, hand-lettered appearance. Also compare Humanistic, Verona.
    • News Gothic (+Condensed, +Extra Condensed&Title)
    • Norwood Roman
    • Novel Gothic
    • Othello
    • Packard (+Bold)
    • Paramount
    • Parisian
    • Pen Print Open
    • Phenix
    • Piranesi Italic (+Italic Plain Caps, +Bold&Italic, +Bold Italic Plain Caps)
    • Poster Gothic (1934).
    • Raleigh Gothic Condensed (1934).
    • Rockwell Antique
    • Roycroft
    • Rugged Roman
    • Schoolbook Oldstyle
    • Shadow
    • Souvenir (1914). Revived in 1977 by Ed Benguiat as ITC Souvenir, but a total failure as a type design. Simon Garfield: Souvenir was the Comic Sans of its era, which was the 1970s before punk. It was the typeface of friendly advertising, and it did indeed appear on Bee Gees albums, not to mention the pages of Farrah Fawcett-era Playboy. Mark Batty from International Typeface Corporation (ITC) on one of his best-selling fonts: A terrible typeface. A sort of Saturday Night Fever typeface wearing tight white flared pants. Garfield also retrieved this quote by type scholar Frank Romano in the early 1990s: Real men don't set Souvenir. Digital revivals also include Sunset Serial by Softmaker, and ITC Souvenir Mono by Ned Bunnel.
    • Sterling&Cursive
    • Stymie Light&Italic (+Medium&Italic, +Bold&Italic, +Black&Italic)
    • Thermotypes
    • Tower Condensed (1934). Revived by Photo-Lettering Inc as PL Tower.
    • Typo Roman&Shaded
    • Typo Script and Typo Script&Extended (1902)
    • Typo Shaded
    • Typo Slope
    • Typo Upright&Bold
    • Ultra Bodoni&Italic (+Condensed, +Extra Condensed)
    • Venetian&Italic (+Bold)
    • Wedding Text&Shaded

    View Morris Fuller Benton's typefaces. A longer list. A listing of various digital versions of News Gothic. More News Gothic-like typefaces. Even more News Gothic-like typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    MToT

    MToT (My type of type) provides users with a web-based typeface specimen collection. Users are able to take a typeface from anywhere on the web and catalog it for their own reference. Collections can be organized via tags, and shared with other MToT users or kept private. Examples include ITC Founder's Caslon, ASffair, and Bodoni. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    MyFonts: Caslon

    All Caslon typefaces at MyFonts, and all typefaces that are related to or a descendant of Caslon. Large web page warning! Another similar list. Short hit list of the most popular Caslon typefaces. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    MyFonts: Caslon Graphique

    The Caslon Graphique typefaces sold at MyFonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    MyFonts: English typefaces

    View the typefaces tagged English at MyFonts. I think that they mean typefaces made in England or with historical ties to England (Baskerville, Caslon, Fry, Stephenson Blake). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    MyFonts: Openface fonts

    Top openface fonts at MyFonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Narciss

    Mac McGrew: Narciss is an adaptation by Linotype in 1925 of Narcissus, designed by Walter Tiemann in 1921 for the Klingspor foundry in Germany, based on a typeface which Fournier had cut about 1745. It is a fairly heavy shaded roman, very similar to Cameo and Gravure, and somewhat similar to Caslon Shaded, Caslon Openface, Goudy Open, etc. (q.v.). This typeface is rather wide, and the white line that gives the shaded effect is narrow. Each size is undersize, about as big as the next smaller size should be. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Neil Summerour
    [Positype]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    New Typography
    [Vernon Adams]

    Vernon Adams (born England, 1967) was a furniture restorer, woodcarver and typeface designer. On August 24, 2016 Vernon Adams passed away from injuries sustained in a scooter accident in May of 2014. New Typography was his type design site. Vernon graduated in 2007 with an MA in type design from the University of Reading and lived in San Clemente, California.

    He developed Mako (2007), a type family for text and image in magazines. Earlier, he created AutoPacHousehold. Nobile (2010) is part of the Google font directory. Through the Open Font Library, one can get the source Fontforge code for this open source sans family. About Mako, he writes that he submitted the font to Fontsmith, which sat on it for a while and rejected it, only to publish a few weeks later Lurpak, which according to Vernon is too similar to his rejected design. Free fonts at Google Code by Vernon, as of the end of 2010 include Coda (a heavy elliptical face), Nobile (mentioned above), Corben (a curvy bold typeface in the style of Cooper Black), and Gruppo (a thin sans).

    In 2011, he added Coustard (a slab serif family), Damion (connected signage script), Smythe (Victorian), Radley (display face), Oswald (a reworking of the Alternate Gothic style: see this dedicated typeface), Candal (sans), Pacifico (connected signage face), Bangers (comic book face), Anton (heavy sans), Bevan (a reworking of Beton, a traditional slab serif display typeface created by Heinrich Jost in the 1930s), Six Caps (a condensed headline face), Meddon (a display font created from the handwritten script of an Eighteenth century legal document), Rokkitt (an Egyptian), Paytone One (headline face), Holtwood One SC (wood block simulation face), Monofett (white on black), Carter One (casual face), Francois One (gothic sans), Sigmar One (think mid twentieth century pulp magazine advertising), Bigshot One, Metrophobic, Mako, Francois One, Nunito (rounded), Shanti, Sigmar, Muli (minimalist sans), Kameron (an Egyptian), Stardos Stencil, Bowlby One, Bowlby One SC (fat poster face), Tienne (serif), Monoton (a multiline face in the style of Koch's Prisma, 1931), Sancreek (emulating an ornamental wood font), Amatic SC (hand-printed poster family), Sancreek (a Tuscan face), Oswald (in the old Alternate Gothic tradition of sans typefaces), Rammetto (based on the Stephenson Blake uppercase display font Basuto, released in 1926), and Michroma (modeled after Microgramma).

    Typefaces made in 2012 include Bench Nine (Google Web Fonts: based on old Stephenson Blake typefaces), Oxygen (a sans typeface available from Google Web Fonts; forked in 2016 at Open Font Library as Comme and in 2017 as Oxygen Sans, with two new oblique styles), Oxygen Mono (Google Web Fonts), Norican (free script font at Google Web Fonts based in part on Stephenson Blake's Glenmoy from the 1920s), Cutive (free at Google Web Fonts, based on the IBM typewriter typefaces Executive and Smith-Premier), Pontano Sans (Google Web Fonts: a light basic sans), Trocchi (Google Web Fonts: derived from Nebiolo's Egiziano, and Caslon & Co's Antique No.4 and Ionic No.2), Seymour One (Google Web Fonts: derived from Sigma One), Anaheim (sans, Google Web Fonts), Cutive and Cutive Mono (Google Web Fonts: based on the typewriter typefaces of IBM's Executive and the older Smith-Premier).

    Typefaces from 2013: Mondo (sans), Oswald (grotesque and stencil), Anton (grotesque).

    In 2016, Jacques Le Bailly extended Nunito to a full set of weights, and an accompanying regular non-rounded terminal version, Nunito Sans.

    Donations to Vernon's family. Memorial. Fontspace link. Dafont link. Google Plus link. Fontsquirrel link. Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Nick Curtis
    [Nick Curtis: Serif typefaces]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Nick Curtis
    [Nick Curtis: Modern typefaces]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Nick Curtis: Modern typefaces
    [Nick Curtis]

    Modern typefaces made by Nick Curtis between 1997 and 2010 include the following.

    [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Nick Curtis: Serif typefaces
    [Nick Curtis]

    It is rare that Nick Curtis makes serif typefaces, as he specializes in type. Nevertheless, we find a few of them in his collection. These are free: ChanticleerRomanNF-Bold, ChanticleerRomanNF (2000-2006, related to Perpetua), Fairfax Station NF (2002, based on Caslon Open), Happy Campers NF (2002), Indubitably NF, Kelmscott Roman NF-Bold, Kelmscott Roman NF (2000, in the style of William Morris). Among his commercial serif typefaces, these stand out:

    • Argentina NF (2009). Based on the elegant titling typeface Sterling (1917-1919, ATF).
    • Decimosexto NF (2006). This family includes Spanish Roman letters and Griffo-style italics, both hand-drawn by Francisco Lucas in Madrid in 1577.
    • Droobie NF (2014). After Drew (1910, Inland Type Foundry).
    • Ingvaeonic-Oldestyle (2007). Based on Viking Oldstyle, from the 1909 H.C. Hansen Type Foundry catalog, due to John F. Cummings.
    • John Alden NF (2010). A quaint serif typeface for a cold winter night, based on an 1884 ATF original.
    • Kifisia Antigua NF (2005). An antiqued (slightly rough outline) interpretation of El Greco Antique, a 1930s typeface by Richard Gans.
    • McKenna Handletter NF (2002): based on a 1923 text family by Elizabeth Colwell for ATF.
    • Mercantile Display NF (2008). Based on Engravers Roman (1912, ATF).
    • Numancia NF (2011). A faithful copy of Numantina (Carl Winkow, 1940s, Fundición Tipográfica Nacional).
    • Cooper's Packard was first handlettered for use in ads for the Packard Motor Company, and later converted to metal by BB&S. A digital version of this was done by Nick Curtis in 2008 under the name Packard Patrician NF.
    • Ragged Write NF (2006). Based on ATF's Hearst, ca. 1904. According to Goudy, Inland Type Foundry pirated this typeface from him. In any case, Rough Write has a large x-height and sufficient roughness to make this a lively text titling face.
    • Rowan Oak NF (2007). Based on Richmond Oldstyle (1920s, Blackfriars Type Foundry of London).
    • Tedlo Rowan NF (2014). Based on DeVinne Roman (1898, Frederic Goudy).
    [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Old Style typefaces
    [John D. Boardley]

    A useful introduction to old style (or garalde) types by John D. Boardley. The types can be recognized by the horizontal crossbar on the "e", and more contrast between thick and thin (compared to humanist typefaces). The serifs have wedges, and the letterforms are smooth and refined. They were in vogue for almost 200 years, starting with Bembo in 1495 (Aldus Manutius and Francesco Griffo) and Francesco Griffo's first italic type in 1501. The French caught on 40 years later, and the Garamond-style typefaces saw the light ca. 1540, thanks to Claude Garamond and Robert Granjon. Christoffel van Dijck and Mikós Kis were doing garaldes in the Dutch region ca. 1600 (see styles like Ehrhardt). Finally, Caslon (William Caslon, ca. 1725) is also classified as a garalde. Old style digital typefaces include Berling, Calisto, Goudy Old Style, Granjon, Janson, Palatino, Perpetua, Plantin, Sabon and Weiss. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Omnibus Typographi
    [Franko Luin]

    Fonts designed by talented Swedish designer Franko Luin (born in Trieste, Italy in 1941, to Slovenian parents). Luin immigrated to Sweden in 1961. After studying at the Grafiska Institutet during the 1960s, Franko Luin spent two decades as a print designer for Ericsson before becoming independent. In the 1990s he was involved in multimedia and typeface design. In 1996, he founded his own typographic studio, Omnibus Typografi. At some point, he led a course in Web Typography at the Berghs School of Communication in Stockholm. Franko Luin passed away on September 15, 2005, in Tyresö, Sweden. Autobiography. Obituary by Dan Reynolds. Linotype pages on Luin.

    His typefaces, all at Linotype:

    View Franko Luin's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    On the history of sans serif

    Linotype had pages on the history of sans serif ("Grotesk" in German), from its inception in 1816 in England and the early versions of William Caslon and Vincent Figgins (1832), through the Akzidenz Grotesk (1900), Reform-Grotesk (1904) and Venus (1907). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    OpenType fonts at Adobe

    Adobe has converted its type 1 library to OpenType. The first fonts ever published by Adobe in OT format included Myriad Pro (30 fonts), Tekton Pro (18 fonts by David Siegel), Warnock Pro (30 fonts by Robert Slimbach), Lithos Pro (5 fonts by Carol Twombly), Chaparral Pro (40 fonts by Carol Twombly), Adobe Jenson Pro (40 fonts by Robert Slimbach, based on Nicolas Jenson's roman and Ludovico degli Arrighi's italic typeface designs), Calcite Pro (3 fonts), Adobe Garamond Pro (6 fonts by Robert Slimbach), Adobe Caslon Pro (6 fonts by Carol Twombly), Moonglow (12 fonts by Michael Harvey), Organica (1 font by Gabriel Martinez Meave), Silentium Pro (2 fonts by Jovica Veljovic) and Trajan Pro (2 fonts by Carol Twombly). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    OSX fonts

    A list of the basic Latin fonts that comes with a standard OS X installation. See also here: #Gungseouche.dfont, #HeadlineA.dfont, #PCmyoungjo.dfont, #Pilgiche.dfont, AlBayan.ttf, AlBayanBold.ttf, AmericanTypewriter.dfont, Apple Chancery.dfont, Apple LiSung Light.dfont, Apple Symbols.ttf, AppleMyungjo.dfont, Arial, Arial Black, Arial Narrow, Arial Rounded Bold, ArialHB.ttf, ArialHBBold.ttf, Ayuthaya.ttf, Baghdad.ttf, Baskerville.dfont, BiauKai.dfont, BigCaslon.dfont, Brush Script, Chalkboard.ttf, CharcoalCY.dfont, Cochin.dfont, Comic Sans MS, Copperplate.dfont, Corsiva.ttf, CorsivaBold.ttf, Courier New, DecoTypeNaskh.ttf, DevanagariMT.ttf, DevanagariMTBold.ttf, Didot.dfont, EuphemiaCASBold.ttf, EuphemiaCASItalic.ttf, EuphemiaCASRegular.ttf, Fang Song.dfont, Futura.dfont, GenevaCY.dfont, Georgia, GillSans.dfont, GujaratiMT.ttf, GujaratiMTBold.ttf, Gurmukhi.ttf, HelveticaCY.dfont, HelveticaNeue.dfont, Herculanum.dfont, Hoefler Text.dfont, Kai.dfont, Krungthep.ttf, KufiStandarGK.ttf, MarkerFelt.dfont, MonacoCY.dfont, MshtakanBold.ttf, MshtakanBoldOblique.ttf, MshtakanOblique.ttf, MshtakanRegular.ttf, Nadeem.ttf, NewPeninimMT.ttf, NewPeninimMTBold.ttf, NewPeninimMTBoldInclined.ttf, NewPeninimMTInclined.ttf, NISC18030.ttf, Optima.dfont, Papyrus.dfont, PlantagenetCherokee.ttf, Raanana.ttf, RaananaBold.ttf, Sathu.ttf, Silom.ttf, Skia.dfont, Song.dfont, Thonburi.ttf, Times New Roman, TimesCY.dfont, Trebuchet MS, Verdana, Webdings, Zapfino.dfont. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    P22 Type Foundry
    [Richard Kegler]

    Richard Kegler's fun Buffalo-based foundry, which he founded in 1995 together with his wife, Carima El-Behairy. Currently, on staff, we find type designers James Grieshaber and Christina Torre. In 2004, it acquired Lanston Type. P22 has some great unusual, often artsy, fonts.

    The fonts are: Industrial Design (an industrial look font based on letters drawn by Joseph Sinel in the 1920s---this font is free!), LTC Jefferson Gothic Obliquie (2005, free), Sinel (free), P22Snowflakes (2003, free), Acropolis Now (1995, a Greek simulation typeface done with Michael Want), P22 Albers (1995; based on alphabets of Josef Albers made between 1920 and 1933 in the Bauhaus mold), Arts and Crafts (based on lettering of Dard Hunter, early 1900s, as it appeared in Roycroft books), Ambient, Aries (2004, based on Goudy's Aries), Arts and Crafts ornaments, Atomica, Bagaglio, Bauhaus (Bauhaus fonts based on the lettering of Herbert Bayer), Bifur (2004, Richard Kegler, after the 1929 original by Cassandre), Blackout, P22 Brass Script Pro (2009, Richard Kegler; based on an incomplete script fond in a booklet from Dornemann&Co. of Magdeburg Germany, ca. 1910 entitled Messingschriften für Handvergoldung; for years, P22 and MyFonts claimed that Michael Clark codesigned this, but Michael does not want any credit, as he did only about 20 letters), Cage (based on handwriting and sketches of the American experimental composer John Cage), P22 Casual Script (2011, Richard Kegler, a digitization of letters by sign painter B. Boley, shown in Sign of the Times Magazine), Cezanne (Paul Cezanne's handwriting, and some imagery; made for the Philadelphia Museum of Art), Child's Play, Child's Play Animals, Child's Play Blocks, Constructivist (Soviet style lettering emulating the work of Rodchenko and Popova), Constructivist extras, Czech Modernist (based on the design work of Czech artist Vojtech Preissig in the 20s and 30s), Daddy-o (Daddy-o Beatsville was done in 1998 with Peter Reiling), Daddy-o junkie, Da Vinci, Destijl (1995, after the Dutch DeStijl movement, 1917-1931, with Piet Mondrian inspired dingbats; weights include Extras, P22 Monet Impressionist (1999), Regular and Tall), Dinosaur, Eaglefeather, Escher (based on the lettering and artwork of M.C. Escher), FLLWExhibition, FLLW Terracotta, Folk Art (based on the work of German settlers in Pennsylvania), Il futurismo (after Italian Futurism, 1908-1943), Woodtype (two Tuscan fonts and two dingbats, 2004), P22 Woodcut (1996, Richard Kegler: based on the lettering carved out in wood by German expressionists such as Heckel and Kirchner), , Garamouche (2004, +P22 Garamouche Ornaments; all codesigned with James Grieshaber), GD&T, Hieroglyphic, P22 Infestia (1995), Insectile, Kane, Kells (1996, a totally Celtic family, based on the Book of Kells, 9th century; the P22 Kells Round was designed with David Setlik), Koch Signs (astrological, Christian, medieval and runic iconography from Rudolf Koch's The Book of Signs), P22 Koch Nueland (2000), Larkin (2005, Richard Kegler, 1900-style semi-blackletter), London Underground (Edward Johnston's 1916 typeface, produced in an exclusive arrangement with the London Transport Museum; digitized by Kegler in 1997, and extended to 21 styles in 2007 by him as P22 Underground Pro, which includes Cyrillic and Greek and hairline weights), Pan-Am, Parrish, Platten (Richard Kegler; revised in 2008 by Colin Kahn as P22 Platten Neu; based on lettering found in German fountain pen practice books from the 1920s), Preissig, Prehistoric Pals, Petroglyphs, Rodin / Michelangelo, Stanyan Eros (2003, Richard Kegler), Stanyan Autumn (2004, based on a casual hand lettering text created by Anthony Goldschmidt for the deluxe 1969 edition of the book "...and autumn came" by Rod McKuen; typeface by Richard Kegler), Vienna, Vienna Round, Vincent (based on the work of Vincent Van Gogh), Way out West. Now also Art Nouveau Bistro, Art Nouveau Cafe and the beautiful ornamental font Art Nouveau Extras (all three by Christina Torre, 2001), the handwriting family Hopper (Edward, Josephine, Sketches, based on the handwriting styles of quintessential American artist Edward Hopper and his wife, Josephine Nivison Hopper, and was produced in conjunction with the Whitney Museum of American Art), Basala (by Hajime Kawakami), Cusp (by James Grieshaber), P22 Dearest (calligraphic, by Christina Torre), Dwiggins (by Richard Kegler), Dyrynk Roman and Italic (2004, Richard Kegler, after work by Czech book artist Karel Dyrynk), Gothic Gothic (by James Grieshaber), La Danse (by Gábor Kóthay;), Mucha (by Christina Torre), Preissig Lino (by Richard Kegler), P22Typewriter (2001, Richard Kegler, a distressed typewriter font), the William Morris set (Morris Troy, Morris Golden, Morris Ornaments, based up the type used by William Morris in his Kelmscott Press; 2002), Art Deco Extras (2002, Richard Kegler, James Grieshaber and Carima El Behairy), Art Deco Display, the Benjamin Franklin revival font Franklin's Caslon (2006), Dada (2006) and the Art Nouveau font Salon (bu Christina Torre).

    In 2006, Kegler added Declaration, a font set consisting of a script (after the 1776 declaration of independence), a blackletter, and 56 signatures. Many of the fonts were designed or co-designed by Richard Kegler. International House of Fonts subpage. Lanston subpage (offerings as of 2005: Bodoni Bold, Deepdene, Flash, Fleurons Granjon, Fleurons Garamont, Garamont, Goudy Thirty, Jacobean Initials, Pabst, Spire).

    Bio and photo.

    In-house fonts made in 2008 include Circled Caps, the Yule family (Regular, Klein Regular, Light Flurries, Heavy, Klein heavy, Heavy Snow, Inline; all have Neuland influences). Kegler / P22 created a 25-set P22 Civilité family in 2009 based on a 1908 publication from Enshedé, the 1978 English translation by Harry Carter, and a 1926 specimen also from Enshedé.

    P22 Declaration (Script, Signatures, Blackletter, 2009) is based on the lettering used in the 1776 Declaration of Independence.

    At ATypI 2004 in Prague, Richard spoke about Vojtech Preissig. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin, where he presented Making Faces: Metal Type in the 21st Century about which he writes: This film has the dual aim of documenting the almost-lost skill of creating metal fonts and of capturing the personality and work process of the late Canadian graphic artist Jim Rimmer (1931-2010). P22 type foundry commissioned Mr. Rimmer to create a new type design (Stern) that became the first-ever simultaneous release of a digital font and hand-set metal font in 2008. At ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik, he showed Making Faces.

    Typefaces from 2014: LTC Archive Ornaments (Richard Kegler and Miranda Roth).

    MyFonts interview.

    View Richard Kegler's typefaces. View the IHOF / P22 typeface library. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Pablo Impallari

    Very prolific Argentinian type designer (b. 1976) located in Rosario. His extensive repertoire:

    Dafont link. Fontspace link. Google font directory link. Klingspor link. Abstract Fonts link. Fontsquirrel link. Google Plus link. On Snot and Fonts link. Another Google Plus link. Creative Market link Behance link. Blog. Home page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    ParaType

    The main digital type foundry in Russia. ParaType was established as a font department of ParaGraph International in 1989 in Moscow, Russia. At that time in the Soviet Union, all typeface development was concentrated in a state research institute, Polygraphmash. It had the most complete collection of Cyrillic typefaces, which included revivals of Cyrillic typefaces developed by the Berthold and Lehmann type foundries established at the end of 19th century in St. Petersburg, and artwork from Vadim Lazurski, Galina Bannikova, Nikolay Kudryashov and other masters of type and graphic design of Soviet time. ParaType became the first privately-owned type foundry in many years. A license agreement with Polygraphmash allows ParaType to manufacture and distribute their typefaces. Most of Polygraphmash staff designers soon moved to ParaType. In the beginning of 1998, ParaType was separated from the parent company and inherited typefaces and font software from ParaGraph. The company was directed by Emil Yakupov until February 2014. After Yakupov's death, Irina Petrova took over the reins.

    Products include FastFont, a simple TrueType builder, ParaNoise, a builder for PostScript fonts with random contours, FontLab, a universal font editor and ScanFont, a font editor with scanning module. Random, customized fonts. Multilingual fonts including, Latin, Cyrillic, Arabic, Greek, Georgian and Hebrew fonts for Macintosh and Windows.

    Catalog. Designers. Alternate URL.

    Famous typefaces by Paratype include Academy, Pragmatica, Newton, Courier, Futura, Petersburg, Jakob, Kuenstler 480, ITC Studio Script, ITC Zapf Chancery, Amore CTT (2004, Fridman), Karolla, Inform, Hafiz (Arabic), Kolheti (Georgian), Benzion (Hebrew).

    The PT Sans (Open Font Library link), PT Serif and PT Mono families (2009-2012) are free. PT stands for Public Type. Another download site. PT Sans, for example, consists of PTSans-Bold, PTSans-BoldItalic, PTSans-Caption, PTSans-CaptionBold, PTSans-Italic, PTSans-Narrow, PTSans-NarrowBold, PTSans-Regular.

    Other free ParaType fonts include Courier Cyrillic, Pushkin (2005, handwriting font), and a complete font set for Cyrillic.

    Type designers include Vladimir Yefimov, Tagir Safayev, Lyubov Kuznetsova, Manvel Schmavonyan and Alexander Tarbeev. They give this description of the 370+ library: The Russian constructivist and avant garde movements of the early 20th century inspired many ParaType typefaces, including Rodchenko, Quadrat Grotesk, Ariergard, Unovis, Tauern, Dublon and Stroganov. The ParaType library also includes many excellent book and newspaper typefaces such as Octava, Lazurski, Bannikova, Neva or Petersburg. On the other hand, if you need a pretty typeface to knock your clients dead, meet the ParaType girls: Tatiana, Betina, Hortensia, Irina, Liana, Nataliscript, Nina, Olga and Vesna (also check Zhikharev who is not a girl but still very pretty). ParaType also excels in adding Cyrillic characters to existing Latin typefaces -- if your company is ever going to do business with Eastern Europe, you should make them part of your corporate identity! ParaType created CE and Cyrillic versions of popular typefaces licensed from other foundries, including Bell Gothic, Caslon, English 157, Futura, Original Garamond, Gothic 725, Humanist 531, Kis, Raleigh, and Zapf Elliptical 711.

    Finally, ParaType offers a handwriting font service out of its office in Saratoga, CA: 120 dollars a shot.

    View the ParaType typeface library. Another view of the ParaType typeface collection. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Parkinson Type Design
    [Jim Parkinson]

    Jim Parkinson's Parkinson Type Design is based in Oakland, CA. This prolific type designer was born in 1941 in Richmond, CA, and lives in Oakland, CA. Originally, a letterer, he went digital in 1990. His Keester and Azuza typefaces won awards at the TDC2 Type Directors Club's Type Design Competition 2002. MyFonts on Jim Parkinson and on his Parkinson Foundry. His impressive output:

    • Typefaces at the Parkinson Foundry: Fresno (2001, inline gothic), Hotel (2001, inline caps), Azuza (2001, a Latin serif family designed for newsprint; some italics were based on Dwiggins' Electra), Amboy (2001, inline like for signpainting), Chuck (2004, a display titling face), Richmond (2003, a geometric sans family in the spirit of Dwiggins' Metro, Erbar by Jakob Erbar and the Underground type of Edward Johnston), Modesto (2001, strikingly similar to John Downer's Panatela, even though both admit that this an unbelievable coincidence; Parkinson's copperplate gothic evolved from Parkinson's lettering on the famous Ringling Bros. and Barnum&Bailey Circus logo), Balboa (2001, a 19th century style condensed sans; extended to a wonderful chromatic layering typeface family in 2015 as Balboa Plus), Sutro (2003, a 19-style slab serif family), Wigwag (2003, a display family inspired by the mid-twentieth century Speedball lettering of Ross George and the work of Samuel Welo and Cecil Wade), Amador (2004, blackletter), Cabazon (2005, blackletter), Avebury (2005, blackletter based on types from the Caslon Foundry), and the lovely Benicia (2003, influenced by GoldenType). He writes about Azuza: In the 1990s I drew a text face for the San Francisco Chronicle. It was based on W. A. Dwiggins's Electra and incorporated many features of the Linotype Legibility Series: More compact, with a taller lowercase X-height, etc. That type was called Electric and it was the Chronicle's text face for nearly a decade, surviving several redesigns. From that, I made Azuza, a more detailed and sensitive style.
    • At ITC (now Linotype), he designed ITC Bodoni, ITC Bodoni Twelve, ITC Bodoni Seventy Two, ITC Roswell Two, ITC Roswell Four (1998) and ITC Roswell Three (1998).
    • His typefaces at Font Bureau include Antique Condensed Two, Buster, Comrade (1998, nice poster font, after the constructivist lettering by Belgian artist Jozef Peeters), El Grande (1991, fat display face), Parkinson (1994), Poster Black (1993), Showcard Gothic (1997), Showcard Moderne.
    • At the Agfa Creative Alliance, he published Showcard Moderne, Antique Condensed Two, Bonita, Commerce Gothic (1998), Diablo (1996), Dreamland (1999, retro-futuristic), Fancy Stuff (1999), Generica Condensed (1994, grotesk), Industrial Gothic (1997), Mojo (psychedelic), Pueblo (1998).
    • At Adobe, one can find Montara, his striking and psychedelic Mojo, and the gorgeous Jimbo.
    • At FontFont, we have the FF Moderne Gothics series [FF Motel Gothic (1996), FF Matinee Gothic (1996), FF Goldengate Gothic (1996)] and FF Catch Words (1996).
    • At Chank, he created Keester (2001).
    • He designed the 4-weight family Electric for the San Francisco Chronicle (it was close to Dwiggins' Electra), but the Chronicle is no longer using it.
    • Parkinson Electra (also based on Dwiggins's type) was published by Linotype in 2010.
    • Typefaces from 2012: Meatball (fat lettering-style typeface), Hoosier Daddy (Western font).
    • The list of newspapers and magazines using his fonts: Activa, Atlanta Journal, Birkenstock, Boston, Brownsville Herald, The Daily Cardinal, Charlotte Observer, Charleston Post&Courier, Chicago Tribune, The Citizen, Journal of Comm, Cromos, Daily Californian, Dallas Morning News, Rochester D&C, Financial Morgen, Design Magazine, Detroit Free Press, Editor&Publisher, El Graphico, National Enquirer, Entrepreneur, Esquire, SF Examiner, The New Examiner, Fast Company, New Fast Company, Montreal Gazette, Hamilton Spectator, Herman Miller, Ilta=Sanomat, InStyle, Kathemerini, Las Vegas Life, Newsweek.
    • Typefaces from 2014: Sutro Deluxe (a layered chromatic wood type emulation font family that extends his 2003 font, Sutro).
    • Typefaces from 2017: Sutro Initials (a chromatic layered pair of fonts).

    MyFonts interview. FontShop link. More FontShop material on him. Klingspor link.

    View Jim Parkinson's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Paul Barnes
    [Modern Typography]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Paul Brent
    [Polyglyphic]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Paul D. Hunt
    [Pilcrow Type]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Paul Shaw

    Paul Shaw's choice of 100 best typefaces of all times:

    • 1-10: Gutenberg's B-42 type, Nicolas Jenson's roman, Francesco Griffo's italic, Claude Garamond's roman, Firmin Didot's roman, Akzidenz Grotesk, Gebetbuch type, Cheltenham family, Helvetica, Aldus Manutius' roman.
    • 11-20: William Caslon IV's sans serif, William Caslon's roman, Pierre-Simon Fournier's italic, Futura, Times Roman, Chicago, Bell, Ludovico Arrighi da Vicenza's italic, Univers, Romain du Roi.
    • 21-30: Johann Michael Fleischmann's roman, Clarendon, ATF Garamond, Giambattista Bodoni's roman, Century Roman, Nicolas Kis' roman, Minion multiple master, Unger Fraktur, John Baskerville's roman, Lucida.
    • 31-40: Ionic, Golden Type, Robert Thorne's fat typeface roman, Wolfgang Hopyl's textura, Vincent Figgins' antique roman (Egyptian), Johnston's Railway Sans, Optima, Bauer Bodoni, Adobe Garamond, Breitkopf Fraktur.
    • 41-50: Bell Gothic, Courier, Trajan, Mistral, Doves Type, Scotch Roman, Syntax, Snell Roundhand, Memphis, Robert Granjon's civilité.
    • 51-60: Fette Fraktur, Ehrhard Ratdolt's rotunda, Romanee, ITC Stone family, Trinité, ITC Garamond, Avant-Garde Gothic, Oakland, Deutschschrift, Hammer Uncial.
    • 61-70: Beowolf, Meta, OCR-A, Sabon, ITC Novarese, Zapf Chancery, Rotis, Base Nine and Base Twelve, Peter Jessenschrift, Excelsior Script.
    • 71-80: Bitstream Charter, Peignot, Erbar, Cancellaresca Bastarda, Joanna, Dead History, Behrensschrift, Eckmannschrift, Poetica, Marconi.
    • 81-90: PMN Caecilia, Stadia, Imprint, Souvenir, Thesis, Apollo, Penumbra, Melior, Neuland, Flora.
    • 91-100: Element, Walker, Remedy, Template Gothic, Digi-Grotesk Series S, Compacta, Antique Olive, Bodoni 26, Evans and Epps Alphabet, WTC Our Bodoni.
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Paulo W
    [Intellecta Design]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Perry Mason
    [Ferrets N Fonts]

    [More]  ⦿

    Peter Wiegel
    [CAT Design Wolgast]

    [More]  ⦿

    Phil Martin
    [Alphabet Innovations International -- TypeSpectra (Was: MM2000)]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Philip Cade
    [Cade Type Foundry]

    [More]  ⦿

    Philipp H. Poll
    [Libertine Open Fonts Project]

    [More]  ⦿

    Photo-Lettering Inc

    A subsidiary/part of House Industries in Yorklyn, DE. I quote: Photo-Lettering was a mainstay of the advertising and design industry in New York City from 1936 to 1997. PLINC, as it was affectionately known to art directors, was one of the earliest and most successful type houses to utilize photo technology in the production of commercial typography and lettering. It employed such design luminaries as Ed Benguiat and sold type drawn by the likes of Herb Lubalin, Milton Glaser and Seymour Chwast as well as countless other unsung lettering greats. The company is best known by most of today's graphic designers for its ubiquitous type catalogs. Physically, the collection takes up about 1500 cubic ft (42 cubic meters) of space and consists of film negatives and positives of most of the 6500 fonts produced in the company's 55 years. There are also countless patterns, cartouches, borders and dingbats, all of which have been preserved in film negative form. Each negative is approximately 28 in (71 cm) by 5 in (13 cm) high. House Industries, a Yorklyn, Delaware-based independent type foundry, purchased the entire physical assets of Photo-Lettering in April of 2003. Through a partnership with Ken Barber, Christian Schwartz and Erik van Blokland, House Industries is carefully digitizing select alphabets from the collection and plans to offer them through a modern web-based interface. The Photo-Lettering interface has allowed us to reach beyond the rigid confines of typography to offer extended features such as layering, color control and multiple master interpolation over six axes. With some of the most talented minds in display typography behind this new display lettering system, users of the system will enjoy the same refined typography as the original Photo-Lettering customers.

    A snapshot of their production, as of mid 2012, in alphabetical order:

    • Atrax. A Mexican simulation typeface.
    • Aztec. A videogame typeface.
    • Banjo Playbill. A tear drop typeface.
    • PL Barclay Outline.
    • BenguiatBuffalo. By Ed Benguiat.
    • BenguiatCaslon, BenguiatCaslonOutline, BenguiatCaslonPlain. By Ed Benguiat.
    • BillSeeWhimsy.
    • PL Brazilia (sans).
    • Brickhouse.
    • PL Britannia.
    • Brixen.
    • BrodovitchAlbro.
    • Bubblegum, Bubblegum Drop.
    • Carlyle Eventide. A 3d titling face.
    • CarusoRoxy.
    • Chicamakomiko.
    • CopelandMilo. A connected script by L.H. Copeland.
    • CopelandTrilliumFills, CopelandTrilliumOutline. A beveled prismatic typeface by L.H. Copeland.
    • DARegatta. A flared didone.
    • DAmicoGothic. A casual flared typeface.
    • DavisonBaroque. A Western / Tuscan typeface.
    • ExotiqueJSplit.
    • FederalReserve.
    • FederalTwelveDiagonal, FederalTwelveHorizontal. These are engraved copperplate typefaces.
    • PL Fiorello (squarish sans).
    • Galaxy Didot (based on a didone typeface by C.E. Coryn).
    • Goliath. A fat Egyptian typeface with a wood style flavor.
    • HanoverBold. A nice Fraktur typeface.
    • HaslerCircus. A Tuscan circus font.
    • HenrionBA. A beveled typeface with several layers.
    • HouseGothicWide. A shadowed unicase typeface.
    • Housebroken. A two-layer stencil caps face.
    • PL Latin.
    • Mierop Inline. A bilined art deco typeface.
    • Millstein Flourish. A beautiful tall-descender typeface.
    • PL Modern Heavy Condensed.
    • Neutra Inline, Neutra Thin. Neutra Thin is a phenomenal geometric hairline sans.
    • Norton Slapstick. A wood simulation typeface by S.E. Norton.
    • Norton Tape. A stencil paper-fold typeface by S.E. Norton.
    • Quaint. After an ornamental typeface from 1938 by Paul Carlyle and Guy Oring.
    • Quicksilver.
    • Quintet. A calligraphic connected script
    • Raymund Circus (+Inline, +Outlined).
    • Smidgen. A signage face.
    • Sodachrome.
    • StanSlope.
    • SuperstarScript. A bubblegum typeface.
    • SwissInterlock.
    • SwissTwoTone. A display sans with two layers.
    • Tiki Palms.
    • TimesSquare. A dot matrix typeface.
    • Tuggle. An oil slick typeface.
    • Voodoo House.
    • PL Westerveldt.
    • WestBarnumUltra, WestBarnumUltraDrop. A fat Egyptian typeface by Dave West.
    • WestBehemoth, WestBehemothItalic. Egyptian typefaces by Dave West.
    • WestEmperorScript. A fat didone by Dave West.
    • WestThud. A fat signage typeface by Dave West.
    • West Elephant. By Dave West.
    • West Italiano. A didone by Dave West.
    • West Kerpow. A comic book typeface by Dave West.
    • Worthe Numerals.
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Pilcrow Type
    [Paul D. Hunt]

    Type and graphic designer from Joseph City, AZ. His first degree was from Brigham Young University. He was a type designer at P22/Lanston from 2004-2007. In 2008, he obtained an MA in typeface design from the University of Reading where he designed the typefaces Grandia and Grandhara (Indic). In January 2009, he joined Adobe just after Thomas Phinney left. He lives in San Jose, CA. His talk at ATypI 2014 in Barcelona was entitled The history of non-Latin typeface development at Adobe.

    He created Howard (2006, a digitization of Benton's Sterling), P22 Allyson (2006, based on Hazel Script by BB&S; a winner at Paratype K2009), the P22 FLWW Midway font family (2006: Midway One, Two and Ornaments; based on the lettering found on the Midway Gardens working drawings of Frank Lloyd Wright---tall-legged and casual), Kilkenny (2005, P22), a Victorian-style font based on the metal types named Nymphic and Nymphic Caps which were designed by Hermann Ihlenburg in 1889. This typeface has almost 1000 glyphs and comes in OpenType format. It includes Cyrillic characters. Check the studies here and here. For another revival of Nymphic Caps, see Secesja by Barmee.

    Designer of the display typefaces Seventies Schoolbook (2004) and Interlocq (2004).

    Hunt also digitized Goudy's Village (2005). Village was originally designed by Fredric Goudy in 1903 for Kuppenheimer & Company for advertising use, but it was decided it would be too expensive to cast. It was later adopted as the house face for Goudy's and Will Ransom's Village Press. The matrices were cut and the type cast by Wiebking. The design was influenced by William Morris's Golden Type. This Venetian typeface was digitized by David Berlow (1994, FontBureau) and by Paul D. Hunt (2005). Hunt's version was eventually released in 2016 by P22/Lanston as LTC Village.

    He revived Hazel Script (BB&S), which he renamed Allyson (2005).

    Still in 2005, he created a digital version of Sol Hess' Hess Monoblack called LTC Hess Monoblack.

    In 2006, he published a nice set of connected calligraphic script fonts, P22 Zaner. Bodoni 175 (2006, P22/Lanston) is a revival of Sol Hess' rendition of Bodoni. He was working on Junius (2006), a revival/adaptation of Menhart Antiqua. Frnklin's Caslon, or P22 Franklin Caslon, was designed in 2006 by Richard Kegler and Paul Hunt in collaboration with the Philadelphia Museum of Art. This slightly eroded font set includes faithfully reproduced letterforms digitized directly from images of impressions made by Benjamin Franklin and his printing office circa 1750. It comes with a set of ornaments.

    In 2007, he used Goudy's 1924 typeface Italian Old Style in the development at P22/Lanston of LTC Italian Old Style. That typeface was remastered and extended to cover several languages by James Grieshaber in 2011.

    In 2014, Paul Hunt finished work on the wood type revival font HWT Bulletin Script Two (P22 & Hamilton Wood Type). This backslanted psychedelic typeface can be traced back to the wood type manufacturers Heber-Wells (Bulletin Condensed, No. 5167), Morgans and Wilcox (Bulletin Script No. 2, No. 3184), Empire Wood Type (1870: Bulletin Script), Keystone Type Foundry (1899: Bulletin Script), Hamilton (117), and Wm. H. Page & Co (No. 111 through No. 113).

    Free fonts at Google Web Fonts: Source Sans Pro (2012; Source Sans Pro for the TeX crowd), Source Code Pro (2012, a companion monospaced sans set by Paul D. Hunt and Teo Tuominen). Source Serif Pro, its Fournier-style relative, was developed at Adobe by Frank Grießhammer. They can also be downloaded from CTAN and Open Font Library.

    Fun creations at FontStruct in 2008-2009: Possibly (a stencil loosely based on the Mission Impossible series logo), Probably (same as Possibly but not stenciled), Med Splode, Arcade Fever, negativistic_small, New Alpha_1line, New Alpha_4line, New Alpha_bit, New Alpha_dot [dot matrix font], New Azbuka [after Wim Crouwel's New Alphabet from 1967], positivistic, slabstruct_1, slabstruct_too, structurosa_1, structurosa_bold, structurosa_bold_too, structurosa_caps, structurosa_faux_bold, structurosa_leaf, structurosa_script, structurosa_soft, structurosa_tape, structurosa_too, structurosa_two, Slabstruct Too Soft, Structurosa Clean Soft, Structurosa Script Clean, Structurosa Clean, Structurosa Clean Too, Structurosa Clean Leaf, Structurosa Boxy, Stucturosa Script Heavy.

    Klingspor link. Google Plus link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Polyglyphic
    [Paul Brent]

    Los Angeles-based Paul Brent (b. 1974, Los Angeles) created Caslon Latina (1965---a Caslonesque face, yes, but with the contrast and feel of a didone), Dubai (sans) and Sinclair (2011, display sans).

    In 2013, he published the slightly flared and calligraphic sans called Sandena. He confesses to influences of Optima and Palatino. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Positype
    [Neil Summerour]

    Positype was founded in 2002 by Athens and/or Jefferson, GA-based designer and type designer Neil Summerour (b. 1972, Azores, Portugal). Neil began developing typefaces in 1996 with the 1996 Olympic Brick Paver Project proprietary typeface. He is the co-principal and senior designer of Athens-based interactive, design, and advertising agency Genetic:ICG. In the summer of 2003, he began teaching Advanced Electronic Design in the Graphic Design Department at The University of Georgia.

    Swash & Kern is the bespoke lettering and typeface design alter ego of Neil Summerour.

    In 2001, Neil published his first two type designs with [T-26] Digital Type Foundry in Chicago, IL. Since then, he has released tens of font families including hiragana and katakana fonts. Positype fonts are sold by Myfonts.com and [T-26].

    Klingspor link. Facebook link. Blog. Behance link. Union Fonts link.

    The list of his fonts:

    • Aago (2017). A 54-style sans family.
    • Aaux, Aaux Office (2002), Aaux Pro (2004), Aaux Next (2009, 72 typefaces), Aaux Alphanumera, Aaux Emoticons.
    • The Air Superfamily (2011), which consists of 81 sans typefaces. Followed by Air Soft (2011).
    • Altar (8-weight Gothic family).
    • Akagi (2008): 20 style sans family. Extended and refreshed in 2011 into Akagi Pro.
    • AMP (at Union fonts).
    • Anago (2012) is a softly rounded sans family, the product of a designer addicted to designing sans families.
    • Anarcharsis (2002): a serif family inspired by incomplete rubbing made from a stone wall located in the Bahamas.
    • Angel Script (2009, TypeTrust).
    • Baka (2005, a fantastic scratchy handwriting face), Baka Too (2006; followed in 2010 by Baka Expert).
    • The Bodoniesque family (Umbrella Type).
    • Claustrum (2003).
    • Clear Sans (2013). Starting from a monoline rather geometric set of thin weights, this typeface family morphs into a more humanist beast, with a, b, d and g having a squeezed look at the intercepts. And maybe because of that, this unclassifiable typeface is quite appealing. Followed by Clear Sans Text and Clear Sans Screen.
    • Couture (2015) and Couture Sans (2015). Summerour was charmed by Imre Reiner's Corvinus when he designed this extremely high-contrast pair of fashion mag typeface families.
    • Cynapse (2003; or Cynapse Pro. 2004, 12 weights). A sans family.
    • Delphi (2014). A decorative multiline typeface by Lily Feinberg and Neil Summerour.
    • Directors Gothic (2013, Lettering Inc). A large retro sans family.
    • Donatora (2004).
    • Ego (2003, octagonal family).
    • Epic (2007-2009, a 12-style contemporary garalde).
    • Ether, Ether Connected.
    • Eva (2003).
    • Filmotype Dancer (2012).
    • Filmotype Harvard (2015). Based on a Filmotype brush script from 1955.
    • Filmotype Horizon (2011).
    • Flirt Script (2014). Flirt Script won an award at TDC 2014.
    • Friendly (2012). In part based on Morris Fuller Benton's upright script typeface Announcement.
    • Fugu (2009, rough-outlined script family, winner at TDC2 2010).
    • Ginza (2008, a squarish techno family), and Ginza Narrow (2011).
    • Halogen (2012). An organic wide techno sans family. In 2014, he added Halogen Slab and Halogen Flare (flared). All have hairlines.
    • Headcold (2004).
    • Iru1, Iru2.
    • Juicy (T-26, 2004, brushdrawn family).
    • Kari and Kari Pro (2005): a connected upright script. Kari Display (2009).
    • Kryptk Flash (2003).
    • Kurosawa Bastard, Kurosawa Hand, Kurosawa Sans, Kurosawa Serif, Kurosawa Hiragana, Kurosawa Katakana.
    • Love Script (2014). A high energy high contrast brush pen / marker script. Love Script won an award in the TDC 2015 Type Design competition.
    • Luce (2004).
    • Lush Script (2011). A connected script inspired by the 1940s.
    • Lust (2012), a curvy hight-contrast didone in the Pistilli style. Neil: The result yielded a rather diverse typographic gene pool: a little Scotch Modern, a little Didone and Didot, a dominant dose of Caslon, and a pinch of Baskerville-- all wrapped up in the leggy body of a Brazilian supermodel. A confident, self-reliant typeface that shows just enough to keep everyone staring and leave them wanting more. Followed by Lust Slim (2014). In 2015, these were extended to the large families Lust Pro [dedicated page] and Lust Pro Didone.
    • Lust Script (2013). This is a curvier, sexier (Neil's words) version of Lust. For use in fashion magazines and large sizes.
    • Macha (2012). A sans family. In 2015, this was followed by Lust Hedonist, which has Didone, Italic and Script sub-styles---the ultimate fashion mag typeface.
    • The Type Trust: Magneta (2009, The Type Trust). Includes a Condensed subfamily.
    • Marshmallow (2017). A super-creamy high-contrast script typeface straight from a parisian bonbonnerie.
    • Muscle (2009, TypeTrust---a futuristic family).
    • Nori (2010): a calligraphic brush typeface obtained by applying the Pilot Japan Kanji Fude brush pen on paper. It has over 1100 glyphs, 250 ligatures, 487 alternate characters, 125+ swash and titling alternates, lining and old style numerals. Awarded at TDC2 2011.
    • Organic (2009, sans family).
    • Penumbra.
    • Plastek (2004-2009).
    • The R.E.M. Athens project involves three fonts published in 2009, REM Orange, REM Accelerate and REM Tourfont. They are based on ideas by Chris Bilheimer for the band R.E.M. (Michael Stipe and Chris Bilheimer). Both attended the fine arts program at the University of Georgia. Michael Stipe, singer and lyricist, formed R.E.M. in 1980. Bilheimer began working with the band in 1994.
    • Romp (2009, condensed hand-printed).
    • Rhythm (2011). An italic inline and solid display family based on ATF's Ratio (ca. 1930) and Herbert Thannhaeuser's Adastra (1928).
    • Rough Love (2014). A brushy crayon script.
    • Shameless (2013). A connected penmanship-style script.
    • Sneakers (2003-2004): athletic lettering family. Also, Sneakers Script.
    • Tactical (2011, octagonal mechanical face; +Stencil).
    • In 2012, he won the Second Akashi Prize in the kanji (!!!) category of the Morisawa Type Design Competition for Tegaki. Tegaki also won at TDC 2013.
    • Truss Ultra Light (2006): hairline architectural font.
    • Vekta Serif (2009), Vekta Neo and Vekta Sans (2009, a sans family at TypeTrust).
    • Wasabi (2010): an organic elliptical family, based on Iru.
    • Yumi (2003, techno font, Union Fonts).

    His life in hiw own words: Neil Summerour is a type designer, lettering artist, calligrapher and designer based in Georgia, USA with one foot in Takamatsu, Japan. After graduating from The University of Georgia Lamar Dodd School of Art with a BFA in Graphic Design, he soon found himself opening his own studio to deal with the flow of freelance work. [...] Neil opened his personal type foundry, Positype, in 2000 to feed his ever-growing desire for type design. He later co-founded TypeTrust (2002) with Silas Dilworth as his addiction to type and lettering grew. [...] He was an adjunct art professor at The University of Georgia in graphic design and taught graphic design at the Governor's School for the Arts. [...] As a typeface designer, he has published over 60 typeface families and produced numerous custom typefaces for clients worldwide. [...] He has won the Type Directors Club Certificate of Excellence in Type Design in 2010 and 2011 for Fugu and Nori, respectively.

    Showcase of Neil Summerour's fonts. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Print and Penmanship 1450-1830

    Course by James Mosley at l'Institut de l'Histoire du Livre (IHL) in Lyon, France, from October 14-17, 2002. Limited to twelve persons. 450 Euros. A beautiful course content: Introduction---the writing, of the Roman capital to the tiny Gothic. The discovery of the Roman capital in Italy to the 15 E century. L B Alberti, Felice Feliciano, Luca Pacioli, Geoffroy Tory, Albrecht Dürer. The invention of printing works and Gothic character. The Italian writing: scrittura umanistica and corsiva cancellaresca. Roman characters and italics in Italy and France, 1470-1600. Nicolas Jenson, Francesco Griffo, Claude Garamond, Pierre Haultin, Robert Granjon, Guillaume Bé. Literature of the engraving of the punches and the foundry of the characters: Joseph Moxon (London, 1683), Jacques Jaugeon (Paris, 1704) Pierre-Simon Baker (Paris, 1764). Characters with the "taste hollandois". Hendrik van den Keere, Nicolas Briot, Christoffel van Dijk, Nicolas KIS, Joseph Moxon, William Caslon. Towards a new penmanship 1560-1740 G.F. Cresci, Lucas Materot, Louis Barbedor, Charles Snell, George Bichkam. Of the "Roman of the roi" in Didot. Philippe Grandjean, John Baskerville, Pierre-Simon Baker, François-Ambroise (and others) Didot, Giambattista Bodoni. A new typography: use of the conceited person-face, antique and the Egyptian woman in printed publicity. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ralph Michael Unger
    [RMU (Ralph Michael Unger Typedesign)]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Red Rooster Typefoundry
    [Steve Jackaman]

    Red Rooster is a Cedars, PA-based foundry run by Steve Jackaman (b. 1954, Greenwich, London). Steve started out at London's Face Photosetting. Red Rooster was founded in Philadelphia in 1990 and has about 500 fonts, mostly complete text families in the classical mould, revivals of Ludlow and other foundries, and revivals of fonts by Canadian designer Les Usherwood from the phototypesetting era. Families of fonts:

    • Alexon (1993, by Les Usherwood), Alghera, Alphabet Soup (2007, a delicatessen signage typeface based on an 80s font he did while at Typographic House in Boston), Alys (calligraphic), Appleyard (1992, A. Pat Hickson), Aquarius (2007, based on a VGC font by that name), Argus (1992, Les Usherwood and Paul Hickson)
    • Badger, Bannock Brae Gothic, Banque Gothique, Bassuto, Beckenham (1992, Les Usherwood and Paul Hickson), Bellini (an Egyptian family), BlockGothic (1996, Steve Jackaman at the Rabbit Reproductions Typefoundry), Bodoni Black Condensed (after R.H. Middleton, 1930), Bodoni Campanile (after R.H. Middleton, 1930), Byron
    • Cameo, Canterbury, Canterbury OldStyle, Canterbury Sans (a tall-ascender sans family based on the 1920-1926 design by Morris Fuller Benton for ATF), Casablanca (1997, avant-garde typeface based on Carlos Winkow's Electra), Caslon Extra Condensed (based on a Ludlow face), TCCentury (1996, Les Usherwood and Steve Jackaman at the Rabbit Reproductions Typefoundry), Century New Style, Chamfer Gothic (after a condensed Ludlow typeface, ca. 1898), Chase, Chelsea (1993, Les Usherwood and Steve Jackaman), Claremont, Coliseum (1992, A. Pat Hickson and Julie Hopwood), Commander (1994, Steve Jackaman), Consort (1994, Steve Jackaman), ConranScript, Creighton (2009, a sans family), Coronet (after a 1937 typeface by R.H. Middleton).
    • Dominus, Dundee (1993, A. Pat Hickson), Dungeon
    • El Paso (2011, a Western/Mexican simulaton typeface based on El Paso from the Face Photosetting collection), Elston, Equestrienne, Erasmus, EuropaGrotesque, Extension
    • Faust (1993: based on a 1958 typeface by Albert Kapr), Flexion Pro (2007, by Hal Taylor and John Langdon), Florentine Cursive (after a 1956 script by R.H. Middleton), ForumTitling, Franklin Gothic Pro (2011, with Ashley Muir), Frenchy
    • Garamond RR Light (after a 1929 typeface by R.H. Middleton), Gargoyle RR (Based on an Adrian Williams design, circa 1976 and Brook Type in 1903 designed by Lucien Pissarro for his private press, Eragny Press), GilmoreFahrenheit, GilmoreSansExtBolExtCondTitl, Gothic Extension, Gothic Medium Condensed (after a 1939 Ludlow typeface), GoudyY38, Grand Canyon (2002, a condensed slab serif family based on wood type). GroveScript
    • Hancock, Hauser Script (after a 1934 Ludlow font by Georg Hauser), Helium (1994, a mini slab serif face), Hess Old Style (1993, a revival of the garalde typeface Hess Old Style by Sol Hess for Lanston, 1920-1923), Honduras
    • Inverness, Iron Maiden RR
    • Jardine, Javelin, Jolly Roger (2003, a digitization of a 1970 font by Phil Martin), Jubilee
    • Keyboard, Kingsley, Kingsrow
    • Leighton, Lesmore, Los Alamos (2007, a condensed sans companion of Grand Canyon)
    • Madrid (based on Nacional, a 1941 typeface by Carlos Winkow), Maximo, Mechanic Gothic DST, Megaphone, Motorcross (2008, after an art deco font from 1930 by Ludwig&Mayer)
    • NewJohnston
    • PallMall, Phoenix Pro (2011: after Morris Fuller Benton's condensed typeface Phenix American, 1935), Phosphate (based on Phosphor by J. Erbar, 1922-1930; contains a nice Inline; Phosphate Pro Solid and Inline was done with Ashley Muir in 2010), Pipeline, Poor Richard, Portobello (loosely based on Aldo Novarese's Pontecorvo)
    • Quest
    • Radiant RR (after a 1938 typeface by R.H. Middleton), Railroad Gothic (an American caps-only grotesque based on a Ludlow original, ca. 1900), Raleigh, RRRaleighGothic, Razor Bill (based on the original typeface from Face, London, circa 1972), Ribbit, RivoliInitials
    • Rocklidge Pro (2011, with Ashley Muir). Based on Jana (Richard D. Juenger, VGC, 1965).
    • Roman Tyres (1997).
    • SaintLouis, Salzburg, Schiller Antiqua (based on Nacional's Hispalis), Schindler, Secret Service Typewriter (2002, based on a 1905 proof of an early Remington typewriter font from the Keystone Type Foundry), Shinn, Shortwave Gothic, Silverado, Sinclair, Sphinx (1992, Steve Jackaman, based on a 1925 design by Deberny&Peignot), Stanhope, Stirling, Superba, Sycamore
    • TCAdminister (1994, Les Usherwood and Steve Jackaman), Tempo, Thingbat, TitanicCondensed, Triple Condensed Gothic
    • Ultraduck, Ultra Modern RR (after a 1928 art deco typeface by Douglas McMurtrie).
    • Venezuela (2000, Mexican simulation face, based on Albert Auspurg's Vesta from 1926, created by Pat Hickson), Veronese
    • Waverly, Willard Sniffin Script (2007, based on Willard Sniffin's 1930s ATF brush script called Keynote)
    • Yeoman Gothic
    • Xctasy Sans (2002, an avant-garde family influenced by the the 1960s typeface Design Fineline)
    FontShop link. MyFonts link.

    Text listing of their typefaces. Alphabetic catalog of the Red Rooster typeface library [large web page warning]. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    R.F. Burfeind

    Designer of Caslon Adbold. Mac McGrew: Caslon Adbold, originating with Keystone in 1913, is characterized by heavier strokes throughout; Extended and Extra Condensed versions followed in 1915 to 1917; all were patented and presumably designed by R. F. Burfeind.

    Caslon FB (1992, Font Bureau) comes with this text: Our familiar Caslon Bold headletters were invented around the turn of the twentieth century in the United States and were only loosely based on William Caslons romans. The best of the Caslon Bolds originated at the Keystone Type Foundry of Philadelphia, whose Caslon Bold Condensed appeared about 1905, probably drawn by R.F. Burfeind. Jill Pichotta revised his Bold Condensed&drew the Bold Extra Condensed. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Richard Kegler
    [P22 Type Foundry]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Richard T. Austin

    London-based punchcutter (1768-1830) who had his own foundry, The Imperial Letter Foundry, in London. Before that, he had worked at John Bell's British Letter Foundry from 1788-1798 (when the foundry closed) as a punchcutter, and at William Miller's foundry in Edinburgh. His typefaces:

    • Tooled Roman (1788).
    • Bell (1788, British Letter Foundry). Originally cut for John Bell by Richard Austin in 1788. Monotype made a metal version in 1931. Available at Monotype in digital form as BellMT (see Monotype Bell 341). It is also available as B694 Roman and Baltimore on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD (2002). Mac McGrew: Bell as cut by Lanston Monotype in 1940 is a copy of the typeface of the same name cut in 1930 by English Monotype at the instigation of Stanley Morison, and was originally cut by Richard Austin for the English printer John Bell in 1788. Lanston describes it as a delicate and refined rendering of Scotch Roman, but without the unduly heavy capitals and some other objectionable characteristics of that face. English Monotype says the letters are open and inclined to roundness; they possess a certain crispness reflecting a French copperplate engraved inspiration. The typeface has been referred to as the first English modern face, with its sharply contrasted shading, vertical stress, and the earliest consistently horizontal top serifs on the lowercase. Bruce Rogers found an unidentified typeface at Riverside Press in 1900; he called it Brimmer and used it to good effect in book work. The same typeface was called Mountjoye by D. B. Updike at the Merrymount Press. It was later identified as Bell, and this may have led to its resurrection by English Monotype.

      The French explain Bell as a British typeface halfway between transitionals (such as Baskerville) and modern typefaces (such as Bodoni or Didot, the "didones").

    • Fry's Ornamented (1796, British Letter Foundry). Also known as Ornamented No. 2 cut by Austin for Dr. Edmund Fry. Stephenson, Blake&Co. acquired the type in 1905, and in 1948 they issued fonts in 30-pt (the size of the original design), 36-, 48- and 60-pt sizes. A digital version by ARTypes in 2007 is also called Fry's Ornamented (2007). David Rakowski made a digital version called Beffle in 1991.
    • Austin's Pica No. 1 (1819). One of the first modern typefaces in Britain.
    • Porson (1806, Caslon Foundry). This Greek typeface is based on the handwriting of the English classicist Richard Porson's transcription of the Medea. Richard Austin was commissioned by the Cambridge University Press to cut it, from 1806 onwards. It was cast by Caslon foundry, but it never appeared in their specimens. It was completed and used only after Porson's death in 1808, in the editions of plays of Euripides produced by Cambridge scholars. Bringhurst notes that after its first appearance, it was soon copied by other founders, and was released by Monotype with some corrections in 1912. By the end of the 19th century, together with New Hellenic (by Victor Scholderer), it had become the main Greek type used in Britain.
    • Scotch Roman (1813, William Miller / Miller&Richardson). This didone typeface was revived in 1907 by Monotype Corporation. It is considered as the first British modern typeface. Also known as Georgian or Brimmer [when Bruce Rogers found the typeface at the Riverside Press in 1900, he used it for books under the name Brimmer]. D.B. Updike used another font of this type at his Merrymount Press where it was called Mountjoye. Scotch Roman#2 (1920) is a revival by Linotype.
    • Antique (ca. 1827). This was revived in 2007 by HiH as Austin Antique.

    FontShop link. Klingspor link. Wikipedia link.

    View Richard T. Austin's typefaces. Alexa Stephenson's detailed image of Bell. View Richard Austin's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Ridgemont StudiosT
    [Deke Martin]

    Deke Martin (Ridgemont StudiosT, a company involved in web and multimedia design) made Claws (1999, caps only) and Werewolf (1999), which was created for the role-playing game, Werewolf, from White Wolf studios.

    Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    RMU (Ralph Michael Unger Typedesign)
    [Ralph Michael Unger]

    Ralph M. Unger (b. 1953, Thuringia, East Germany) says this about himself at MyFonts: Typesetter from the composing stick via Linotype setting machines to the Mac. Jobs in various Thuringian printeries. Barred further education by Communist authorities due to political reasons. Imprisoned in East Germany. Since 1988 in the state of Baden-Wuerttemberg, former West Germany. Jobs in several newspaper printing houses as advertisement compositor. Own office since 1995, in Aalen, Baden-Wuerttemberg. He lives in Schwaebisch Gmuend, and was a freelance type designer for Profonts and URW++, where he contributed frequently to these libraries between 2002 and 2009. In 2009, he founded RMU.