TYPE DESIGN INFORMATION PAGE last updated on Sun Apr 20 08:00:06 EDT 2014

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Type design in the United Kingdom



[Drawing by Ralph Steadman]

Luc Devroye
McGill University
Montreal, Canada
lucdevroye@gmail.com
http://luc.devroye.org
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0-Fluid-0

Durham, UK-based creator of the bouncy hand-printed Paisy (2007). [Google] [More]  ⦿

100types
[Ben Archer]

Educational and reference site run by Ben Archer, a designer, educator and type enthusiast located in England (who was in Auckland, New Zealnd, before that). Glossary. Timeline. Type categories. Paul Shaw's list of the 100 most significant typefaces of all times were recategorized by Archer:

  • Religious/Devotional: Gutenbergs B-42 type, Gebetbuch type, Wolfgang Hoppyl's Textura, Breitkopf Fraktur, Ehrhard Ratdolt's Rotunda, Hammer Uncial, Zapf Chancery, Peter Jessenschrift, Cancellaresca Bastarda, Poetica.
  • Book Publishing&General Purpose Text Setting: Nicolas Jenson's roman, Francesco Griffo's italic, Claude Garamond's roman, Firmin Didot's roman, Cheltenham family, Aldus Manutius' roman, William Caslon's roman, Pierre-Simon Fournier's italic, Ludovico Arrighi da Vicenza's italic, Johann Michael Fleischmann's roman, ATF Garamond, Giambattista Bodoni's roman, Nicolas Kis' roman, Minion multiple master, Unger Fraktur, John Baskerville's roman, Lucida, Optima, Bauer Bodoni, Adobe Garamond, Scotch Roman, Romanée, ITC Stone family, Trinité, ITC Garamond, Sabon, ITC Novarese, Bitstream Charter, Joanna, Marconi, PMN Caecilia, Souvenir, Apollo, Melior, ITC Flora, Digi-Grotesk Series S.
  • Business/Corporate: Akzidenz Grotesk, Helvetica, Univers, Syntax, Courier, Meta, Rotis, Thesis, Antique Olive.
  • Newspaper Publishing: Times Roman, Bell, Clarendon, Century Old Style, Ionic, Imprint.
  • Advertising and Display: Futura, Robert Thorne's fat face roman, Vincent Figgins' antique roman (Egyptian), Memphis, Fette Fraktur, Avant-Garde Gothic, Deutschschrift, Peignot, Erbar, Stadia/Insignia, Penumbra, Compacta, Bodoni 26, WTC Our Bodoni.
  • Prestige and Private Press: Romain du Roi, Golden Type, Johnston's Railway Sans, Doves Type, Walker.
  • Signage: William Caslon IV's sans serif, Trajan.
  • Historical Script: Snell Roundhand, Robert Granjon's civilité, Excelsior Script.
  • Experimental/expressive: Mistral, Beowolf, Dead History, Behrensschrift, Eckmannschrift, Neuland, Element, Remedy, Template Gothic.
  • Onscreen/multimedia: Chicago, Oakland, OCR-A, Base Nine and Base Twelve, Evans and Epps Alphabet.
  • Telephone Directory publishing: Bell Gothic.

Link to Archer Design Work. [Google] [More]  ⦿

24exp
[Chris Henley]

24exp was the online portfolio of Buckinghamshire, UK-based freelance designer and art director Chris Henley. Some time alter, he set up Good and Brave in Milton Keynes, UK.

Creator of the rounded octagonal typeface GAS (2012) and the 2d typeface Build Me Up and Knock Me Down (2013).

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

3 Things

Design studio in London that created an experimental geometric typeface called Shellington (2012).

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

3Form

Birmingham, UK-based design firm. Creators of the futuristic type Slacker Journal for the journal by that name, 2001. No longer active. [Google] [More]  ⦿

8 Faces
[Elliot Jay Stocks]

8 Faces is published in England by Elliot Jay Stocks Design Ltd. Volume 1 (2010) features interviews with Erik Spiekermann, Jessica Hische, Ian Coyle, Jason Santa Maria, Jos Buivenga, Jon Tan, Bruce Willen, and Nolen Strals. Volume 2 (2011) has interviews with eight designers: Martin Majoor, Ale Paul, Stephen Coles, Tim Brown, Nick Sherman, Rich Rutter, Veronika Burian, and José Scaglione. Written and edtited by Elliot Jay Stocks. [Google] [More]  ⦿

A. Jay Bisset

Graphic designer in Berkhampstead, UK, who created an experimental typeface in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

A2 Graphics--SW--HK
[Scott Williams]

A2 Graphics/SW/HK is a London based design bureau founded in 1999 by Scott Williams and Henrik Kubel. They co-designed AF-Klampenborg (1997-1999) and FY-Brush Script Regular. [Google] [More]  ⦿

A2 Type
[Henrik Kubel]

A2-Type (or simply, A2) is a type foundry set up in the autumn of 2010 by the London based design studio A2/SW/HK. The designers are Henrik Kubel and Scott Williams. A2's bespoke type design is mainly the responsibility of Henrik Kubel, though every typeface is developed and approved by both partners. Kubel is self-taught, making his first typefaces while studying at Denmark's Design School from 1992-97. Their typefaces:

Custom type by them include a masthead for Toronto Life (2010), a custom face for Weekendavisen (2007-2010), Design Museum London (2010), Faber&Faber (2009-2010), Afterall Publishing (2006-2010), Faulkner Browns Architects (2007), Penguin Press (2005), and Norrebro Bryghus (2005).

At ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam, he speaks about New Transport.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Aah Yes

Southampton, UK-based foundry, est. 2006. Font families include Regalese (2008, 8 weights with stylish rounded serifs), Arrow Heaven (2007, 6 styles of fonts with 62 arrows in 40 orientations each), Lydiard (2007, sans cum comic book), Sanzettica (2007, 36 sans styles of the geometric kind), Demigrunge (2007), Nidex (2007, caps-only grunge), Rocksolid (2007), Perio (2007, a grungy didone), Havenbrook (2007, a 22-style family), Sudoku Blank (2007), Pikelet (2007, grunge headline face), Sanzettica (2007, a 40-style geometric sans family, but the x-weight is unacceptably large), Hunniwell (2007, felt tip style), Meriden (2007, display sans family), Saint Val (2007), Funkywarp (2006), Cheedo (2006, bi-lined), Old Forge (2006, roman style), Blank Manuscript (2006, music font), Disgrunged ABCD (2006), Disgrunged 1234 (2006), Beeble (2006), Choob Stripes (2006), Diffie (2006), Pixettish (2006), Caldicote (2006, a 13-style serif family), Starbell (2006), Tuzonie (2006, grunge), Cabragio (2006, free-flowing informal), Deltarbo (2006, sans), Write (2006, an almost architectural script), Dascari (2006, an informal headline sans), Smeethe (2006, comic strip face), Crockstomp (2006, grunge), Dorkihand (2006), Meltifex (2006, melting letters), Rappica (grunge), Blue Sugar (2007, grunge), Front Desk (2007), Powdermonkey (2007), Sideshadow (2007), Spiky (2007), Zebra Spots (2007), Amescote (2007, a 6-weight sans), Mivron (2007, outline sans), Puggu (2007, comic strip font), Luzaine (2007), Overlapper (2007), Satron (2007), Stubble (2008, grunge), Newsanse (2008, a 15-style large x-height disaster), Rysse (2008, an 11-style grunge family), Chelp (2008, grunge), Snather (2008: thin, rounded squarish), Keybies (2008, piano key font), Quickle (2008), Pevensey (2008: 21 styles, each with 1200 glyphs, transitional style), Spiraltwists (2008), Music Sheets (2009), Snazzy (2009), Shelflife (2012, a macho sans), Langton (2012, a workhorse sans family), Indipia (2012, a corroded family), Bradwell (2012, condensed sans), Dunsley (2013, a hand-drawn sans), Darnalls (2013, antiqued book face).

View the Aah Yes typeface library. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Aaron Bass

Illustrator and graphic designer in Farnham, UK, who created some experimental counterless typefaces in 2013.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aaron Jarred

Graphic designer and illustrator studying Graphic Communication at UCA, Farnham, UK. He created Modular (2011, a kitchen tile face). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aaron Nicholls

Graphic design student at the University of Creative Arts, Epsom, UK. Worthing, UK-based creator of the sans family Static (2010). MyFonts link to his foundry and to his persona. He designed the monoline octagonal face Exogenetic (2010). Behance link. MyFonts link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Abattis
[Dave Crossland]

Abattis is a free software type foundry launched in 2009 by Dave Crossland. Auto-description on his wiki: I'm a designer and nerd in Bournemouth, UK, and I do systems and network consultancy for a living. I completed a BA (Hons) Interaction Design degree at Ravensbourne College in 2006, and am currently on the MA Typeface Design course at Reading, from October 2007 to July 2009. My design philosophy centers around the parameterisation and automation of design to improve the design process, and some of my old ideas are published at designprocess.com. He is a proponent of open source code and of free fonts, and involves himself with dedication in the Open Font Library project. He defines Free fonts as follows: Free Fonts are about freedom, not price. They are fonts you are free to use for any purpose, fonts whose internals you are free to study, fonts you are free to improve, fonts you are free to redistribute, and fonts you are free to redistribute improved versions of which means - in the specific context of font software - fonts you are explicitly free to embedded, subset, bundle and derive from to create any kind of artwork. To be truly Free they must allow commercial use and even to be sold by anyone - as it is about freedom, not price. His dreams: Dave dreams of a free culture of visual communication around the world, so he decided to free fonts. His Masters thesis related the history of the software freedom movement to the practice of type design.

In 2009, for his MA work at Reading, he designed Cantarell, a free sans family, done together with Jakub Steiner, free at CTAN. OFL page.

Finally, in 2009 or 2010, he started work on the Google Font Directory.

Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Abbas Mushtaq

Abbas Mushtaq (Leeds College of Art) is working on a font called Parallel Lines (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Abbie Vickress

Student at UWE in Bristol, UK. FontStructor who made the circus fonts Ornamental Circus (2010) and Draft Two (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

ABC Types (was: Absolutetype)
[Tony Mayers]

ABC Types is Tony Mayers' foundry. Identifont link. Tony produced film titles in London's West End. He learned the craft of phototypesetting. In 1979, he moved to Manchester, where he founded The Quick Brown Fox Company. He created Concept Crisis (grunge face), Concept Sans, De-Generation, Generation Gothic, Generation Graffiti, Generation Headline, Generation Lost, Generation Open, Generation Pixel, Generation Uncial, Monolith Roman, Monolith Sans, Poster Gothic, Ranger, Society, and Text Gothic. Before ABC Types, he ran Absolutetype, where he sold the faces mentioned above. The typefaces are now digitally available from Cedars, PA-based International Type Founders (ITF), which was created by Steve Jackaman. The latest address for ABC Types was in Cedars, PA. It is identical to that of ITF. Tony Mayers has died.

Ascender also sells its collection. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Abi Fuller

During her studies at the University for the Creative Arts Farnham, UK, Abi Fuller designed the pattern-filled octagonal typeface Tribal (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ablaze Studio
[James Cianciaruso]

James Cianciaruso (Ablaze Studio) (b. 1967) lives in the UK. Dafont link. He created these fonts: Chaos Times (2007, grunge), Arkham (2007, Arabic simulation face), Leicester (2007, old typewriter face), and Veggi terra (2007, fruit and veggie dingbats). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Abygail Bradley

During her studies in Manchester, UK, Abygail Bradley created the rhombic typeface Diamond Heist (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

A.C. Smithy

Student at UWE in Bristol, UK. FontStructor who made the Celtic caps faces Radiating Bold (2011), Radiating (2011) and Closed Energy (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

ACME Fonts (or: CHK Design)
[Christian Küsters]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Acorntype
[John Eickhoff]

John Eickhoff (Bristol, UK) cast type until 2005 under the name Acorntype. He used Monotype machines to cast, and produced several specimen booklets and broadsheets. [Google] [More]  ⦿

A-D Foundry
[Daniel Westwood]

A-D Foundry is a small independent type foundry established by Daniel Westwood (of Family) in the UK in early 2010. Their typefaces include the inline face Mason Regular (2010), Kläda (2011, a bilined face made for a UK-based online fashion label), Retail (2011), Process (2011, stencil), and the monolined Agostin family (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam

London-based designer of Bootround (2006, a techno version of Amelia). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Ascroft

Wigan, UK-based designer of the monoline geometric sans typeface Castor (2014), a typeface finished during his studies at Salford University. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Bibilo

Media Production student at the University of Lincoln, UK. As iFontMaker, he created the scratchy hand Shotgun Shak (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Brandon

Graphic designer in Manchester, UK. Behance link. Creator of the free modular font ABStochome (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Brightman

Graphic designer in Northampton, UK. Behance link. In 2010, he designed Typegram, a modular typeface that consists of puzzle pieces. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Conley

During his studies in Norwich, UK, Adam Conley created the blocky 3d typeface Iso Blok (2013) and the experimentak Doll Face (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Gorton

Manchester, UK-based typographer and digital artist who studies at Pendelton College in Manchester. His stern display face High Rise (2010) was inspired by concrete city monsters. In college, he created several other (unfinished) alphabets: i, ii, iii, paper cut typeface, Weekender (counterless, paper cut-out face). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Gravely

Studied Graphic Design at London Guildhall University from 2000-2003. Worked for six months in a design/marketing agency working on commercial projects for clients such as Wella and Vodafone. At present designer for a design/print company based in Newbury, UK. With the experimental typeface Landing Ship, he won an award at the 2005 FUSE competition. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Greasley
[Wearecolt]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Adam Green

Graphic design student at the University of Creative Arts based in Farnham, in 2012-2013. He created the experimental circular font Modular in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Hesling

During his studies at the University of Salford, Huddersfield, UK-based Adam Hesling designed a handprinted poster face and a piano key face (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Jeffries

British designer of the children's hand font Adams Font (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Knights

Students at the University of Leeds (UK) who made a nice Bodoni poster in 2011. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Reeves

Graphic design student at the University of Salford in Manchester, who created Masking Tape (2012), Decipher (2012, a minimalist face dedicated to Alan Turing), Shedge (2013, a stiletto face for a local band called Shedge), and Sporidium (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Rogers

Graphic designer in Derby, UK, who created YCN 3 Prong Type in 2012 at the University of Derby. He also created fun Dog Icons (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Stewart

British designer of the hand-printed typeface Adams (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adam Witton

Graphic designer who studied at University College Falmouth. Now based in London, Adam designed Infected Type (2012, ornamental caps). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Admix Designs
[Joe Prince]

Joe Prince (Admix Designs) was a student at Academy of the Canyons near LA, 2007-2011. Hisc typefaces:

Google Font Directory link. Additional Google link. Klingspor link. Devian Tart link. Cargo collective link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adrian Smith

When you click on "download", you get Adrian Smith's APL2741 font (1994-1999) in truetype format. It looks like a slanted Courier. Adrian Smith resides in York, UK. He also made Dyalog Std TT, a Courier-like truetype font (1996) for use as a system screen font. Another typewriter font is KAPL (2001). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adrian Talbot
[Talbot Type]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Adrian Williams
[Club Type]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Adrian Williams

British advertising typographer and type designer, b. 1950, Somerset. Co-designer with Rosemary Sassoon of Sassoon Primary and Sassoon Infant in 1990. He ran Club Type/Adrian Williams Design Limited in Merstham, Surrey (UK). His typefaces now owned by Monotype Imaging: Bulldog (2005-2010, +Slab: based on 1870 Figgins), Column, Congress (1974), Congress Sans, Eurocrat, Leamington (1978, can be found at Elsner & Flake), Mercurius, Monkton, Poseidon, Raleigh (1978), Rileyson (2010), Seagull (1978, + Bob McGrath, design owned by Ingrama), Stratford, Worcester Rounded (1974), Worchester. Perhaps the most famous in this list is the slab serif family Congress (1974), which has been digitally revived to death by URW++, Elsner&Flake, TypeShop, Scangraphic, SoftMaker, and Linotype. Williams was attached to the Swiss foundry Ingrama, where he made Leamington, Raleigh and Seagull. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Adumdee

UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who created the spiky face Witchita (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aegir Hallmundur
[The Ministry of Type]

[More]  ⦿

Aidan Cooke

Blackpool, UK-based designer of the hipster typeface Penultimate (2013), which was created during his studies at the University of Huddersfield. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aidan Croucher

Graphic designer in Hastings, UK, who made an experimental typeface in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aidan Shephard

During his studies in Norwich, UK, Aidan Shephard created an unnamed illustrative typeface (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aimé Alexia

UK-based designer of Azu (2005, handwriting). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aimee Winston

Graphic design student in London. Creator of Culture Face (2010, Asian look). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Airside

British design studio, est. in 1998 in London by Alex Maclean, Fred Deakin and Nat Hunter. In 2009, they designed Airplot (2009), a typeface specifically for Greenpeace's Airplot campaign against a new runway at Heathrow. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aizhan Abdrakhmanova

Graphic designer in London who created Mirror (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alan Birch

British designer of LCD (1981, ITC), Crystal (1981, cyrillicized in 1993 by A. Kustov), Bitmax (1990), Rubber Stamp (1983, a grungy military stencil), and Synchro (1984).

MyFonts write-up. Linotype link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alan Bright

British designer of Brighton Bold (1979, Letraset), Brighton Light (1979, Letraset), and Brighton Medium (1979, Letraset). For another execution, see B820-Roman-Regular from SoftMaker. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alan Cheetham

Derby, UK-based designer. He made the straight-edged experimental display typefaces Lazer Addiktz (2013: free EPS format typeface) and Next Level (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alan Jeffrey
[bbold]

[More]  ⦿

Alan M. Stanier
[Dancers]

[More]  ⦿

Alan M. Stanier
[SouthArabian]

[More]  ⦿

Alan M. Stanier
[Ogham]

[More]  ⦿

Alan M. Stanier
[Cypriote metafont]

[More]  ⦿

Alan M. Stanier
[Cherokee metafont]

[More]  ⦿

Alan Meeks

Prolific type designer, b. London, 1951. Alan started work in 1970 for Graphic Systems as a lettering artist. In 1975, he joined Letraset as the Senior Type Designer and Studio Manager where he was responsible for all the artwork produced by the Letraset studio. During his tenure at Letraset, he designed over 40 popular typefaces, including Bramley, Candice, Bickley Script and Belwe. Most of these faces also showed up in the Scangraphic collection. Together with type director Colin Brignall, Alan contributed to the success of Letraset. All the original typographic artwork produced at Letraset was produced by hand cutting the fonts in Rubylith, a highly-skilled technique known as stencil cutting. Alan was responsible for training the entire Letraset studio in this art. Most of the original Letraset artwork has now been archived at St. Brides Printing Library, London. Today, Alan works independently, specializing in all facets of corporate identity including type design, typography, packaging, and development of logos and symbols.

His oeuvre (sold via MyFonts) includes:

Galadriel, Kornelia and Sparky are floating around freely in cyberspace.

FontShop link. Linotype link.

View Alan Meeks's typefaces. Yet another page with Alan Meeks's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alan Rimmer
[Fatchair]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alan Trott

Winchester, UK-based designer of the grotesque (school project) typeface RIG (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alberto Romanos

Londoner who designed a font for an imaginary language---check Behance. For his MA degree, he is working on variations of Frutiger (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alberto Vitullo

Italian photographer who works in London. He created the alchemic typeface Universe (2013), a custom typeface made for Feel Good Inc. Collective in Genoa, Italy. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aleksandra Grünholz

Polish graphic designer and illustrator. She created the grungy typeface Dead Metal (2012) and the beautiful serifed text face Milosc (2012). In 2012, she added the great octagonalized version of Bodoni called Quadratoni. Just brilliant. As a Polish graphic design student, Aleksandra Grünholz created the Puenta transitional text family in 2012.

Another URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alessandra Grasso

During her graphic design studies in London, Alessandra Grasso created the spiky typeface Aliens (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Alexandrou

Milton Keynes, UK-based creator of Greenlish (2012), a font that mixes Latin and Greek. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Banks

Alex Banks (AB Design) is based in Warrington, UK. Creator of the octagonal font Sliced AB (2006) and the chunky Chukny (2013).

Devian tart link. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Benson

British creator of the hand-printed typeface Amelia Lily KT (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex C. Beaumont

Alex C. Beaumont (ACB Graphics) is a student at London College of Communication. He creates experimental designs, and this includes a typeface called Fracture (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Camacho Pizarro

Graphic designer and illustrator from Barcelona who works in London. Behance link.

Creator of Excritura (2013, a calligraphic script influenced by the work of the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudi), Die Modularität (2012), De Palo (2011), Scriptura (2011, a calligraphic connected script), Variable (2010), this triangle/circle based modular type, of GoodBye (experimental type based on Barcelona's night lights), and of a geometric custom-designed face for the Aroy Restaurant in Barcelona.

Cargo collecive link. Linotype link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Davies

Caterham, UK-based designer. Creator of the experimental circle-based typeface Circle One (2012). During his studies at University of the Creative Arts Farnham in the UK, Alex davies designed the experimental typeface Triangle One (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Duncan
[Magnum Software]

[More]  ⦿

Alex Dyson

During his studies in Leeds, Alex Dyson created Decorative New Roman (2012).

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Elnaugh
[Little A]

[More]  ⦿

Alex Fowkes

London-based designer of an untitled decorative 3d caps typeface in 2012.

Behance link. Cargo Collective link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Gollner

Designer of the free fonts Digital 2, Warp 1, and Roxanne. He has built a career in London that does not involve typefaces: I've been in the business of the visual arts for almost 20 years. After introducing desktop publishing into the UK by concieving and managing Neal's Yard Desktop Publishing Studio in 1988 aged 21. In 1990 I moved into graphic design. I joined Decode Design as technical director and designer where I co-designed Collier's Rules, a book on design and typography. In 1991 I became the art editor of DEC User, a monthly magazine from Emap Business Publishing. In 1993 I joined Project Multimedia, a conference company that organised events for multinational companies all over the world. I was a senior event designer: designing conference print, logos, sets, presentations, animations and videos. On January 16th 2006, I started work on a documentary on dating and relationships in support of Help The Aged's Hug campaign. Instigated and produced by George Blackstone, The Things We Do for Love was completed in April and had it's cast and crew screening at The Curzon Soho in London's West End on April 26th. Since then it has been shown at the 2007 Portobello Film Festival. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Haigh
[HypeForType]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alex Haigh
[Thinkdust]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alex Harriott

UK-based youngster (b. 1994) who created the graffiti face Prince Dub (2007). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Harwood

Alex Harwood (Plymouth, UK) designed the modular typeface Degnoid in 2014 during his studies at Plymouth College of Art. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Hunt

During his graphic design studies at UCA Farnham, Alex Hunt (London) created an unnamed modular typeface (2013), which only uses rectangles, circles and triangles. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Iliescu

Designer and illustrator in Coventry, UK. In 2011, he created the quaint World War I era poster headline face Prest. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Moseley
[Crazy Diamond Design Historical Fonts]

[More]  ⦿

Alex Phipps-Attwell

Graphic designer in Leeds, UK, who created the typefaces Milo (2013) and Blueprint Letterforms (2013) during his studies. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Preston

During his studies in Oakham, UK, Alex Preston designed the connect-the-dots typeface Enkelhet (2013), Gentleman (2013, a bilined display typeface), Borders (2013), Droop (2013), the circle-based typeface Circles (2013), and the experimental typefaces Wirbel (2013) and Kurvor (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Price

Student at UWE in Bristol, b. 1992. During his studies at UWE, he used FontStruct to create the textured typefont Balloon (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Satriani

Graphic design student in London who created Futura Champagne (2011). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Smye-Rumsby

Designer from Bristol, UK, who created some fonts at FontStruct in 2009. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alex Tomlinson
[Skyhaven]

[More]  ⦿

Alexander Glenn

Graphic designer in London, UK. He graduated from Nottingham Trent Univeristy in 2007. Behance link. Designer of the folded paper font Origami (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alexander Jones

Graduate of the University of Salford in Greater Manchester (2008) in graphic design. Designer of the outline monoline sans face Hire (2010), done on commission for Andy Golpys. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alexander Kay

Type designer and punchcutter, b. Edinburgh, Scotland, 1827, d. Philadelphia, 1905. Born Alexander Thompson MacKaye, he apprenticed with a bookbinding tools manufacturer, and went to London in 1850, where he worked for punch-cutting expert John Skirving. He cut typefaces for English typefounders such as Henry Caslon, Vincent Figgins, and the Stephenson Blake company. After that, he joined L. Johnson&Co. in Philadelphia in 1854, where he changed his surname from MacKaye to Kay. He stayed with L. Johnson&Co (later Binny&Ronaldson, then MacKellar, Smith&Jordan) for 40 years, until he lost much of his sight to cataract. His most famous are Binny Old Style and Ronaldson Old Style (1884, MacKellar, Smith&Jordan). The latter family was digitized by Canada Type as Ronaldson Regular (2008) and by Lars Törnqvist as Fitzronald (2013). The former was digitized by Monotype as Binny Old Style MT. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alexander Klement

London-based designer of Lathe (2013), a 3d computer-generated typeface based on Futura.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alexander Wilson

Scottish typefounder, b. St. Andrews, 1714, d. Edinburgh, 1784. Educated in London, he started the Wilson foundry in 1742 at St. Andrew's in a partnership with John Baine, and set up shop in Glasgow in 1744, where he began work with Glasgow University Printers, Robert and Andrew Foulis. William Miller (who later started Miller&Richard), Richard Austin and Johann Christian Bauer all worked for Wilson. Wilson's first known specimen sheet was issued in 1772. However, William Rind seems to be using these types as early as February, 1770 in his Virginia Gazette. The business was left to his son Andrew and later to his grandson Alexander. Under Alexander's tenure, it went bankrupt in 1845.

Several specimen books exist, including A specimen of printing types by Alexander Wilson&Sons, dated 1783. Life and Letters of Alexander Wilson (by Alexander Wilson) was reprinted in 1983 by Diane Publishing Company, and is freely viewable at Google.

Wikipedia link.

They are credited with the first British modern face, Scotch Roman, whch became very popular in the United States. Mac McGrew: Scotch Roman is derived from a face cut and cast by the Scotch foundry of Alexander Wilson&Son at Glasgow before 1833, when it was considered a novelty letter. The modern adaptation of the face was first made in 1903 by the foundry of A. D. Farmer&Sons, later part of ATF. It is a modern face, but less mechanical than Bodoni, and has long been popular. Capitals, though, appear heavier than lowercase letters and tend to make a spotty page. Hansen's National Roman is virtually the same face, with the added feature of an alternate r with raised arm in the manner of Cheltenham Oldstyle. When Monotype copied Scotch Roman in 1908, display sizes were cut to match the foundry face, but in keyboard sizes, necessarily modified to fit mechanical requirements, the caps were lightened and the entire face was somewhat regularized. Scotch Open Shaded Italic, a partial set of swash initials, was designed by Sol Hess in 1924. Similar swash letters, but not shaded, were also drawn by Hess and made by Monotype for regular Scotch Roman Italic. Linotype had adapted Scotch Roman to its system in 1903, retaining the heavier capitals, but in 1931, by special permission of Lanston Monotype, brought out Scotch No.2 to match the Monotype version. Compare Atlantic, Bell, Caledonia, Original Old Style. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alexandra Whitfield

Graphic communication design student at the London College of Communication from 2010-2012. In 2012, she designed the grunge face Hemophic. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alfred John Fairbank

English calligrapher, b. 1895, Grimsby, d. 1982, Hove, Sussex. Student at the Central School of Arts and Crafts, disciple (in his own words) of Edward Johnston. In 1921, he co-founded the Society of Scribes and Illuminators, and was honorary secretary from 1931 to 1933.

He wrote several books on handwriting, including A Handwriting Manual (1932), many times reissued. In 1932, Alfed Fairbank proposed Dryad Writing for schools. It is a connected regular and legible style of writing that was influenced by Francisco Lucas (16th century, Spain), and could be called chancery script. After the Second World War he founded the Society for Italic Handwriting.

His only typeface was the first italic for Monotype, Bembo. This was not the italic that was put out for general use, and was eventually released (in 1928) as Bembo Narrow Italic. It is sometimes referred to as Fairbank Italic. The Bembo family is of course due to Stanley Morison at Monotype, after models of Francesco Griffo and Giovanni Tagliente. It has digital reinterpretations such as Bamberg Special (Softmaker) and Bergamo (Softmaker).

It is possible that Fairbank MT (2003, Robin Nicholas) is named after him.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alfred Rehbach

London-based graphic designer who created the fat slabby display face Alexandra (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ali

UK-based art student (b. 1988) who created the handwriting font Ali (2006). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ali Salih

Designer in based in Hertfordshire, UK. Behance link.

Creator of a fat counterless typeface in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alias
[Gareth Hague]

Alias is a typefoundry and graphic design agency founded by David James and Gareth Hague, and is based in London. Their fonts can be bought through T-26, ITF and/or FontWorks UK. They also did substantial corporate type design work.

Partial font list: AES (1995, David James), August (1996, a fifties font by Gareth Hague), Caustic (2012, calligraphic script family), Elephant (1994-1995, Gareth Hague), Enabler (1995, David James), Factory, Granite (1995, Gareth Hague), Harbour (1998, Gareth Hague), Intimo (2000), Jackdaw (1997, Gareth Hague), Jude, Key, Klute (1997, Gareth Hague), Mantis (1996, Gareth Hague), Metropolitan (1996, Gareth Hague), Metsys, Sister (1995, Gareth Hague), Text (1995, Gareth Hague).

Corporate typefaces include Prada Candy (2012).

Old link.

View the Alias typeface library. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alice Beavon

During her graphic design studies, Alice Beavon (Birmingham, UK) created an unnamed modular geometric typeface (2012). In 2013, she published a modular bilined typeface possibly called Sense Of Memory. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alice Savoie
[Alice Savoie, Frenchtype]

[More]  ⦿

Alice Savoie, Frenchtype
[Alice Savoie]

Graduate student from Estienne in 2006 and the University of Reading in 2007. In 2012, she was a Ph.D. student at the University of Reading. Thesis topic: International cross-currents in typeface design: France, Britain, and the US in the phototypesetting era, 1949-1975.

Pic by Ralph Herrmann. Her typeface Capucine Greek has been awarded as the best text typeface of the Greek alphabet exhibition, taking place during the 3rd international conference on typography and visual communication in Thessaloniki, Greece, 2007. Capucine is a very informal, almost hand-printed family covering both Latin and Greek in many styles. She also made the constructivist face Pozor (2005) and the connected handwriting face Jeanine, done in 2006 at the École Estienne in Paris, where she studied from 2004-2006.

In 2009, she codesigned Ysobel (Monotype; winner of an award at TDC2 2010) with type designers Robin Nicholas, head of type design at Monotype, and Delve Withrington. The sales pitch: According to Nicholas, the idea for the Ysobel faces started when he was asked to create a custom, updated version of the classic Century Schoolbook typeface, which was designed to be an extremely readable typeface - one that made its appearance in school textbooks beginning in the early 1900s.

In 2010, finally, she published Capucine at Process Type Foundry.

Brill (2012), codesigned with John hudson for Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands, won an award at TDC 2013.

Typecache link. Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alicia Pfeffer

During her studies in Manchester, UK, Alicia Pfeffer created Lattice (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alien Head Graphics

The alien font "alien_font_8" has some strange runes. Alien Head Graphics is located in Oxfordshire, UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alina Popa

During her studies at the University of Reading, UK, Alina Popa created the photographic alphabet Desire (2014), which is based on photographs of sexual paraphernalia. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alison Carmichael

UK-based letterer. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alistair Parsons

London-based graphic designer. Creator of Distorted Lines (2011, grunge). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Allan Sommerville

British graphic designer who made this poster of eyes in 2009. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Allen Zuk

A few original designs by Canadian graphic designer Allen Zuk include Swing (was freely downloadable), Beat, the Kooky family (since 2004 a Bitstream font), Creep, Shadow, Krumple, Arson, Skritch, Schroder. Zuk used to run web pages/outfits called trashtype fonts and Financial Peril. These have disappeared. Home page (his original font pages are gone). Zuk used to work in Edmonton. In 2000, he moved to the UK where he worked as a freelance designer and copywriter until 2004. He currently lives in Toronto. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Almedia Interactive (or: MAK Alagha, or: Applied Graphic Arts, or: AGA Fonts)
[Mohammad Alagha]

Mohammad Alagha is Almedia Interactive (or: MAK Alagha, or: Applied Graphic Arts), an Arabic font producer active since 1994. The (beautiful!) AGA Fonts for Arabic are exclusively sold by Almedia Interactive Limited, which is based in the UK. His fonts include AGA-AbasanRegular, AGA-AladdinRegular, AGA-BattoutaRegular, AGA-DimnahRegular, AGA-FuratRegular, AGA-GranadaRegular, AGA-JuhynaRegular, AGA-KayrawanRegular, AGA-MashqBold, AGA-MashqRegular, AGA-NadaRegular, AGA-PetraRegular, AGA-RasheeqBold, AGA-SindibadRegular.

  • Free fonts in 2012: AGA Andalus, AGA Cordoba Reg, AGA Cordoba Bold, AGA Cordoba Reg, AGA Granada, AGA Sindibad Reg, AGA Sindibad Bold, AGA Mashq Reg, AGA Mashq Bold, AGA Rasheeq Reg, AGA Rasheeq Bold, AGA Kayrawan, AGA Balloon, AGA Juhyna, AGA Furat, AGA Aladdin.
  • Dingbats, beautiful arabesques and ornaments: AGA Horoof, AGA Arab Cities, AGA Greeting Phases, AGA Islamic Phrases, AGA Kalemaat, AGA Names, AGA Arabesque (Regular, Bold and Outline), AGA Islamic regular, AGA Greetings 1 and 2, AGA Publishing regular.
  • Commercial fonts in 2012: Alquds, Gaza, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Beirut, Demashq, Amman, Baalbek, Baghdad, Doha, Kufa, aden, Jeddah, Riyadh, Masqat, Benghazi, Onwan, Mishmish, Barqooq, Hassan, Hazem, Zokhrof.

Another URL. Free font sublink. Fontspae link. Dafont link. Download here. The beautiful dingbat fonts AGA Arabesque and AGA Arabesque Desktop (1994-1996) are here and here. OFL link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alvaro Arregui

London-based graphic designer. He created a custom Taiwanese display face. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Amber Hicks

Graphic design student at Southampton University's Winchester School of Art, who created the purely geometric typeface Marcato (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Amber Maxwell

During her graphic design studies at UCA Farnham, Amber Maxwell (London) created the modular typeface Angle Right (2013), which only uses rectangles, circles and triangles. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Amber Reyland

UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who created the hand-printed face Teenage Kicks (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ambyr Gregg

Ambyr Gregg (Brighton, UK, b. 1990) created Nisaba (2013).

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ami Littlefair

During her graphic design studies in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, Ami Littlefair created Paperclip (2013), Colostic (2013: purely geometric shapes), Backtrack (2013) and Croudi (2013, a stitching typeface). Inspired by the constructivist movement, she created Geometric Typeface (2013) by superposing and juxtaposing geometric solids. Other geometric experiments include Line Alphabet (2013), Diagonal Alphabet (2013, a stitching font), Connecting Alphabet (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Amitai Landau Pope

Liverpool, UK-based designer of a bilined display typeface called Candi (2013).

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ampersand Creative

Ampersand Creative (Liverpool, UK) created the hairline avant-garde sans typeface Duality (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Amy Barstow

Amy Barstow (Leeds, UK) created a multiline typeface in 2013 for a school project at Huddersfield University. This typeface was inspired by the lines used by couture house Viktor & Rolf.

Still in 2013, she created The Modern Roman (an art deco face) and The Perfect Woman. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Amy Beth

Student at UWE Bristol in the UK. FontStructor who made the grunge face Tooth Decay (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Amy Kilner

Amy Kilner (Sheffield, UK) was inspired by Kandinsky's paintings when she created the Kandinsky Font (2013, Font Bureau).

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Amy Richards

Student at UWE in Bristol. During her studies at UWE, she used FontStruct to create Fizz (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ana Araujo

London-based designer of the display typeface Floffy Foffi (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ana Novakovic

Graduate of of the Graphic and Media Design program of the London College of Communication at the University of the Arts London, who is based in London, where she works as a graphic designer. Fontstructor who made the modular art deco typefaces Mercury and Mercury Bold in 2012. In 2013, she created Modular Typeface and Fontastic Typeface (gridded). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ana Rita Cruz

UK-based designer (b. 1984) of the beautiful and artistic display face Font Bola (2007, aka Secret). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anders Orrberg

Swedish freelance graphic designer located in London. Behance link. Creator of the formal upright script/display face Rund (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andie Lines

English sign writer who will soon publish Gotheau, Jester and Castle with Letterhead Fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andonis Moushis

During his studies in Nottingham, UK Andonis Moushis designed the alchemic typeface Circus (2013) for the Museum of the Circus. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrea Buttieri

London-based creator (b. 1991) of the tweetware font Morden (2013).

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrea Wirth

London-based designer of Dazed&Confused (2011): Custom font derived from Serifa for the fashion section themed 'Vibrations/Movement'. The font looks as though it shivers/vibrates. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andreas Pohancenik
[zwei]

[More]  ⦿

Andrew Ashton
[Ashton]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Boag

Andrew Boag's writings about type and typography. Cofounder of "Boag associates in London, ex-typography teacher at the University of Reading (1985-1990), and special projects manager at Monotype. Dead link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Brash

British graphic designer. Creator of the Greek simulation font Eschaton (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Byrom

Andrew Byrom was born in Liverpool, England in 1971. After Graduating from the University of East London in 1996 he opened his own design studio and worked for various clients including Penguin Books, The British Academy of Composers and Songwriters, The Industrial Design Centre, Time Out Online and The Guardian Newspaper. Around this time he also began teaching graphic design at The University of Luton and Central Saint. Martins. Byrom moved to the USA in 2000 to teach at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, IL. He has recently been commissioned to design typefaces and type treatments for Elle Decoration, The New York Times Magazine, McGraw-Hill, and Turner Classic Movies. In 2006 he moved to Long Beach to take up an Associate Professor position at California State University, where he is currently the Area Head of the Graphic Design Department. He created the experimental typeface Interiors (2002), about which AIGA writes: Interiors (3D type) is a collaboration between type designer Andrew Byrom and designer Joel Wolter. It was originally conceived as a digital font (Interiors) and was inspired by an old wooden chair in Byrom's office that, when looked at from a certain angle, resembled the letter h. Using the three-dimensional principles of this simple form, and closely adhering to type design conventions, 26 letters of the alphabet were drawn and generated as a font. The characters were then constructed in three dimensions using tubular steel into full-scale furniture frames. Because the underlying design concept is typographical, the end result becomes almost freestyle furniture design. Letters like m, n, o, b and h can be viewed as simple tables and chairs, but other letters, like e, g, a, s, t, v, x and z, become beautifully abstract pieces of furniture. He also made the distressed font Bloodclot, the stencil family Byro Stencil (free), Byro Sans, 1byrosquare (2000), 2byroround (2000), ByroBlock Stencil (2000, stencil), Concussion (dot matrix with various size dots), Easy Vie, Venetian (2009, like Venetian blinds), Fresh (1995, scratchy type), Ply, Rage, St. Auden, Bandaid (2006), 3D Dot Matrix. He divides his time between teaching, designing for various clients and playing with his sons, Auden and Louis. He has recently been commissioned to design typefaces and type treatments for Elle Decoration, The New York Times Magazine, McGraw-Hill, and Turner Classic Movies. In 2006 he moved to Long Beach to take up an Associate Professor position at California State University, where he is currently the Area Head of the Graphic Design Department. Speaker at ATypI 2009 in Mexico City. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew C. Bulhak

Australian creator of ModeSeven (1998, pixel font based on the Teletext bitmap font) and the splendid Flicker family (2002), pixelized in the format of kitchen tiles. Bulhak runs the news blog Null Device, and is lecturer in Computer Science at Australia's RMIT University. Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Foster

British designer (b. 1976, Bedford) of Mister Loopy (2009). He went commercial in 2009: via MyFonts, one can now buy Spud AF (2009, a potato cut font), Peepz AF (2011, a collection of faces of boys), and the hand-printed Scribbles AF family (2011, +Biro, +Felt Tip, +Marker).

MyFonts link. Klingspor link. Dafont link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Hunt
[Quantum Enterprises]

[More]  ⦿

Andrew Hunt

Codesigner at Wolfram Research of some Mathematica fonts, such as Math5Mono, Math5MonoBold (1999), Math5, Math5Bold (1998). Not to be confused with the other Andrew Hunt, who set up Quantum Enterprises in Somerset, UK, a company involved in handwriting fonts, custom fonts, logo fonts, and related type services. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Iontton

Andrew Iontton (Anerio Designs, London) created the free art deco face Slab Head (2011) and the free sans face Cap Disk (2011). Milk (2011) is an angular face. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Lines Graphic Arts (or: Drewfont Foundry)
[Andrew Patrick Lines]

Andrew Lines (b. Lowestoft, Suffolk, UK, 1958) is a signage and logo specialist in Norfolk, UK. His fonts are sold through MyFonts. He started Drewfont Foundry (Great Yarmouth, UK) in August 2001 as part of Andrew Lines Graphic Arts. Fonts include Gotheau (2001, blackletter), Starman (2002), Spaceboy (2001), Jester (2001, bouncy), Celt (2001), and The Castles (2001, an Arnold Boecklin remake?), Histry (2004), Seahorse (2004), Nondy (2004). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Martin
[Thumbnail Designs]

[More]  ⦿

Andrew Osman

Andrew Osman (b. 1985) is a London-based designer. He graduated from Central Saint Martins in 2008. He has since worked for Wood McGrath and Christie's Marketing. In 2012 Andrew joined Stephen Barrett as a typography tutor at the University of East London. His creations nclude the sans typefaces Ursus (2013) and Corvus (2013). He also made the wedge-serifed all caps typeface Dalston Waste (2013, with Fraser Muggeridge). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew P. Smith

London-based and Australia-born designer of Doodlebug (Letraset, a nice scratchy handwriting face), Jokerman (1995, Esselte), Retro Bold (1992, a slab serif done with Colin Brignall), Scratch (1995), Smudger (1994), Chiller (1995, Esselte), the frivolous curly font Laughin (FontHaus, since 2006 also at Group Type: sample, another sample, and another one), Doubler Script (FontHaus), Chipper (1995), and Faxsimile (at 2Rebels, 1998). Creator of Barbed Wire AS (1998). Goo Goo Gjoob (Letraset Fontek) was inspired by the hand-writing and drawings of John Lennon (see also John Lennon (2008, a free font by Analia Wainer). Potato Cut (Fontek) is a comic book face.

Klingspor link. FontShop link.

View Andrew P. Smith's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Patrick Lines
[Andrew Lines Graphic Arts (or: Drewfont Foundry)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Polhill

Web professional with six years of commercial experience. Polhill graduated from Brunel University with a degree in Product Design BSc, and lives in London. Creator of the free font Comic Andy (2009). Dafont link. Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Poynter

London-based creator of the hand-printed outline face Poynterism (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Richards

British graphic designer in Manchester who used FontStruct to make the squarish faces Barcelona (2011) and Barca Thick (2011). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Sabatier

Brand identity designer in London. He created a typeface for the identity of Life Bank (2009). Another typeface by him is Pressure (2009, severe octagonal). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Young

Manchester, UK-based designer of the gorgeous MICR-look futuristic face Blazium (2003). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andy Anlody

UK-based designer of the fat finger font Andy (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andy Benedek
[Font Factory]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Andy Budd

Managing Director of Clearleft in Brighton, UK. He has a blog, where people were prompted for the names of type families, if they could only buy six of them. Continued here and here. The totals are tallied for you:

  • Akzidenz Grotesk (2 votes): Akzidenz Grotesk is the classic alternative to its dowdy and overused relation, Helvetica. If you ever feel the need to use Helvetica, resist the urge and try Akzidenz instead.
  • Avenir or Avenir Next (2 votes): Futura is a wonderful typeface, although is can feel slightly sterile at times. Adrian Frutiger set about humanizing Futura and created Avenir in 1988. Avenir is a beautiful typeface but is restricted to just 12 weights. In 2004 the typface was completely revised and Avenir Next was released with a stunning 96 weights. If you are looking for a modern sans, you need look no further.
  • Neutraface (2 votes): Designed by Christian Schwartz for House Industries, Neutraface captures the 1950s stylings of architect Richard Neutra in a beautiful typeface meant for application on the screen, in print, and in metalwork. If you are ever in need of a classy retro face, they don't get any more polished than this. [...] Tired of Futura and Gill Sans? Neutraface is a beautiful art-deco alternative. Modern yet retro, this typeface comes with loads of ligatures and 7 beautiful figure styles. If this typeface was a drink it would be a Vodka Martini, shaken, not stirred.
  • Engravers Gothic: For a period of about two years, I attempted to inject this font into every single project I worked on. Even if I couldn't fit it into the main scene, I screened it back somewhere in the distance just to feel better about myself. For a brief time, I was actually creating design projects for the sole purpose of using Engravers Gothic in them. It was at this point that I sought professional help.
  • Myriad: Its quite simply the most readable sans-serif typeface ever invented for print at least. On the web, that'd be Lucida Grande, but thanks to Apple, I don't really have to buy that now, do I?
  • Meta: Like a good mullet, this typeface has something for everyone. Its clean lines make it ideal for logotype, headings, and other professional applications, but its curvy flourishes keep it from looking sterile or uptight.
  • Agency: Originally designed in 1932, and then expanded to multiple weights and widths in the 1990s by David Berlow, this typeface can be made to look futuristic or retro. Im partial to flexible faces, and Agency is second-to-none in this regard. Use it for old movie posters. Use it for your pathetic Star Trek Convention flyers. Agency feels at home in any environment.
  • Palatino: Also abused in both web and print work, Palatino is undeniably versatile and (imho) a much better option overall than Times.
  • Proxima Nova: I am counting down the minutes until this typeface is available. No joke.
  • Dynasty Light: Someone please give me an excuse to use this in my next project. I take that back: no excuse needed.
  • Trajan Pro: I am a sucker for classic Roman letterforms, and it doesn't get much better than Trajan.
  • Warnock Pro Light Italic: I stumbled across this gorgeous typeface just recently, and its one of the hottest italics I have had the pleasure of using in recent months.
  • Frutiger: Originally designed for the signage at Charles De Gaulle Airport in Paris, Frutiger is a beautifully fluid and legible typeface. Without doubt the most influential typeface in the past 30 tears, Frutiger has been the inspiration for many amazing fonts including the excellent Myriad Pro.
  • DIN Schriften: DIN stands for Deutsche Industrie-Norm, the German industrial standard. Originally used for German road signage, this typeface was the darling of 90s graphic designers, and like FF Meta, is starting to make a comeback. With its wide open letter forms DIN is am extremely clear and legible typeface, great at any size.
  • Mrs Eaves: If I had to choose one serif typeface it would be Mrs Eaves. Named after John Baskervilles wife, this stylised version of Baskerville is loved by graphic designers around the world. Mrs Eaves is a modern serif that retains an air of antiquated dignity. Playful without being too scripty, its a fully featured typeface with a beautiful collection of ligatures.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Andy Cooke

British graphic designer who lives in Stoke-on-Trent. Behance link. His type experiments include a handwriting face and a piano key face, both made in 2008. No downloads. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andy Hau

UK-based architect and designer. Behance link. Creator of the origami face KaWaii Desu (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andy Lethbridge

During his studies, Andy Lethbridge (Portsmouth, UK) created an op-art typeface called Modular Alphabet (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andy Long

British type designer. Based in South London, he co-started ACME with Christian Küsters. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Andy Stockley

Designer from the UK who created Spira (1999, Font Bureau), a beautiful Venetian revival font family, and AT Pastor (FontHaus), an elegant high-legged serif face.

FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Andy Walker

Designer at the Department of Mathematics, University of Nottingham of the GNU chess font, to be used with "gnuchess". [Google] [More]  ⦿

Angela Michanitzi

Angela Michanitzi (AVMC Studios, London, UK) created the tweetware squarish typeface AM Oceanus in 2014. Other typefaces include Dione (3d) and Gaea. Angela lectures at the University of the Arts in London.

Dafont link. Behance link. Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Angus Macpherson

British designer who works as a designer at Church of London. Creator of commercial typefaces at The Type Foundry, such as Nord Express (art deco; based on the Nord Express train poster) and Grande Fete (hairline avant garde caps face). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anigma New Media (was: Abracadabra)

Designers in West Midlands, UK, of comics fonts such as BritComicsNormal, BurningRubberBlack, BananaSundaeBold, LithoComixItalic, PoopedEyesExtraBold, ChunkyComixSemiBold, LithoComixItalic, Chalkpat, Cheesey-Nibble, Fatkid, Irtusk-BoldItalic, Jellybean, Jilted-Medium, Leafmold-Leafmold, Squish, Swink, Uptight, ChunkyComixStretchItalicsItalic, ClassikComikNormal. Shareware and freeware PC truetype fonts.

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Animeluva

Durham, UK-based designer of the artificial language font Theban (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anna Ghislaine

Aka Bob Todd, Anna Ghislaine (b. 1985, lives in London, UK) created Precursors (2005), a font based on the Precursor writing seen in the Jak & Daxter games. Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anna Molony

Nantwich, UK-based designer of Helvetica Shadows (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anna Simons

Scribe, calligrapher and teacher (1871, Mönchengladbach-1951, Prien). From 1896-1903, she studied at the Royal College of Art in London, and was a student of Edward Johnston in 1900. She taught at Weimar from 1908-1914 and collaborated with the Bremer Presse from 1918 on. She created the initials for "Dante" (Berlin: Rowolth 1930) and for "Augustinus" (München: Bremer Presse 1924). Jakob Erbar was one of her students. The Bremer Presse published Anna Simons Titel und Initialen für die Bremer Presse in 1926. The book blurb: A portfolio of titles and initials designed by Anna Simons for the Bremer Presse. Along with Graily Hewitt, Eric Gill, and Percy Smith, Simons was one of Edward Johnston's star pupils at the Royal College of Art in London, and she has inscribed this copy to him on the title-page in black ink. It was after studying with Johnston, whose Writing&Illuminating,&Lettering she translated into German, that Simons in 1918 went home to Germany to work at the Bremer Presse. During her time at the Presse, she would design many titles and initial sets for them, and in 1926 this portfolio was issued to showcase her work. Each sheet in the portfolio is headed by one of Simons' Bremer Presse title designs, including her titles for the Divine Comedy, Fichte's Reden an Die Seutsche Nation, Chansons d'Amour, Albii Tabulli Elegiae, and others. The titles are followed by the initials she cut for the work. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anna Zoladz

During her studies in Birmingham, UK, Anna Zoladz designed the hand-drawn typeface Slink (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Annabel Grant

During her studies in 2014 in Huddersfield, UK, Annabel Grant created an all-caps typeface that was inspired by the art of El Lissitzky (1890-1941). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anne Wehebrink

Designer at ACME in London. Her creations include AF Oneline (1998), a geometric hairline monoline stencil font.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Annemarieke Kloosterhof

Annemarieke Kloosterhof was born and grew up in The Netherlands. In 2012 she started her graphic design studies at Central Saint Martin's University of the Arts in London. During her studies, she created Alphabet for Architects (2014). Behance link. Cargo Collective link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Annet Stirling

Amersham, UK-based designer and stone carver. At Google Web Fonts, she published the distinctive hand-lettered typeface Snowburst One (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Annette O'Sullivan

Annette O'Sullivan trained as a graphic designer and worked in design studios in New Zealand prior to further study in typography at the London College of Printing. She has an MA degree in typography and graphic design. While in Britain, she worked in publishing and museum design, notably for The Museum of the Royal Welch Fusiliers, Caenarfon Castle, North Wales, the Hong Kong Museum of Coastal Defence, Hong Kong and the Royal Armouries Artillery Hall, Fort Nelson. She currently lectures in typography at Massey University, Wellington, and continues to explore contemporary typographic application within a historic context. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Annsley G. Flood
[Gloomnshloom]

[More]  ⦿

Anouk Faber

British dark artist, b. 1990, aka Diagonna. She created Block Font, Pixel FF and Inverted Pixel FF in 2011. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anthony Burrill

Designer at ACME of AF Video Wall (1998, a gridded pixel font).

In 2012, he published the stencil typeface Kit Form (HypeForType).

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Anthony Gibson

Leeds, UK-based designer of an unnamed hand-printed typeface in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anthony James

Another one of my favorite designers, Anthony James (Manchester, UK), has this license for his refreshing art deco typeface Kaiju (2014): It is absolutely free and can be used for personal or commercial use. Downloads: Bold, Regular.

Chase (2014) is a free monoline sans. QG (2014) is a minimalist free typeface. Argö (2014) is a commercial decorative fashion mag didone typeface.

Facebook page. Behance page. Facebook page. Buy his commercial typefaces here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anthony Morgan

Anthony Morgan (London) created the octagonal typeface family Carbonado (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anthony Nash
[Classic Font Company]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Anthony Prudente

Typefounder in Polegate, UK, who was born in 1981 in Croydon, Surrey, UK. He created the art deco typeface Foreman (2012), which is typified by condensed tall-legged letters.

Hurstmonceux (2013) is an antiqued Victorian typeface. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Anthony Roberts
[Fathom Creative]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Anthony Robinson

UK-based creator (b. 1967) at FontStruct in 2008 of Metal Vampire (athletic lettering meets vampire), Moonbase Tokyo (neat futuristic oriental simulation), Sir Robin's Minstrels (blackletter), Starscraper (techno), Moonmonkey (outline LED font), First.

In 2010, he added the non-FontStruct faces Chromium (a great special effect face), Clawripper, Dirty Play, HairyMonster, HairyMonsterSolid, Punched, and Slasha, mostly inspired by blood, guts, and murders. Static Buzz (2010) is a texture face. Newcastle (2010) is a castle-themed alphabet. Blinger (2010) is a star-studded outline face. New York Punk (2010) is grungy. Dinosaurs (2011) is a dingbat face. NUFC Shield (2011) is a shield face. Zombified (2011) and Sound Sample (2012) are grunge faces.

Rollerball 1975 (2012) is the font used in the Rollerball movie. Western Show Caps (2012) is a Western circus font. Stoned (2012) evokes letters carved in stone.

In 2013, Robinson published the textured athletic lettering font Robbie Rocketpants, Airlock, Cargo Bay (a great army stencil, with a negative letter option), Dogma (a grungy Lombardic face), and the grungy blackletter face Flesh Wound. MDMA (2013) is a halftone simulation texture face. Barbarian (2013) is an alphading typeface on the theme of swords. Camouflage (2013) is a textured typeface. Atheist (2013) is an outline typeface. Power (2013) is inspired by lettering on pwer buttons. Witching Hour (2013) is a halloween font. Dystopian Future (2013) is a grungy typeface. Olde Stencil (2013) is a stenciled blackletter typeface. Anonbats (2013) has scanbats and dingbats related to the famous hacker group Anonymous. Creature Feature (2013) is a slimy typeface. Ka Blamo (2013) is a comic book font. Beer Goggles (2013), Supercreep (2013), KaBoing (2013), Gloop (2013, an oil slick face), Barbarian (2013), Voodoo Vampire (2013) and Ye Olde Oak (2013) are textured typefaces. Anti Everything (2013) is a blood drip typeface. PCB (2013) is a printed circuit board font. Dickensian Christmas (2013) is a decorative Christmas font.

Typefaces from 2014: Counter Dial.

Dafont link. Aka Anfa. Home page. Another URL. FontStruct link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anthony Sheret

Founder of the Entente, a Brighton (UK)-based design and art direction studio formed with Edd Harrington in late 2008. The studio is named after the relationship between both parties: The Friendly Understanding. Alongside Entente, he also runs Colophon Foundry.

His typefaces include Apercu (2009, +Mono (slab); see here), Monosten, Montefiore, and Reader. All are sans faces. With Edd Harrington at Colophon, he designed Value Sans in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anthony Smith

Anthony Smith graduated from The Arts Institute At Bournemouth with a BA in Graphic Design. He made a modular typeface in 2011 called Hollow Type. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Antonio Roberts

Birmingham, UK-based Antonio Roberts (aka Hellocatfood) wrote a program called glitch that will replace a certain portion of the font data by random values, esulting in glitch typefaces. A prototype example was called Dataface (2012, free at OFL). OFL link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Antonio Rodrigues

Brazilian designer in London and Brasilia, who created the modular monoline display face Colibri (2012), the hairline sans typeface The Fake Blondes (2012), and the fashion mag typeface Models (2012). He created several other modular alphabets and typefaces in 2013, including Boogie (a fat disco typeface), Stay With Me (fashionable fat didone), Concrete Butterflies (2013, paper cutout theme), London (blackboard bold, derived from Bodoni MT Bold) and Cardboard.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Antonio Rodrigues

Freelance illustrator and graphic designer in London, who drew a modular typeface in 2012 that is based on tangrams. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Antony Walton

Londoner who created the oriental simulation face Japanish (2010). He also got interested in the Russian avant garde period, and made a constructivist family called Potemkin (2010). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Antria Sofroniou

During her studies in Canterbury, UK, Cyprus-born Antria Sofroniou designed an unnamed Latin typeface for a children's book. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aoyce C

Graphic designer in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. Creator of The Simple Font (2012, experimental, geometeric and minimalist) and Geometric Font (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

April Syder

During her studies in Nowich, UK, April Syder created an ornamental caps typeface called London Typography (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ari Rafaeli
[ARTypes]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Arjun Harrison-Mann

Design student in Birmingham, UK. Creator of Forma (2012), an alchemic typeface that was inspired by Aztec and third century Coptic symbols and signs. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Arminda Borges

London-based creator of an unnamed display typeface in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Arron Tierney

Manchester, UK-based designer. Behance link. Creator of the triangle-themed face Kosmos (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Art nouveau timeline
[Rachel Oke]

An art nouveau timeline drawn by Rachel Oke (Exeter, UK). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Artem Sukhinin

Graphic designer in London, UK, who seems to specialize in geometric and modular type. His creations include SQ (2010, free at Dafont, a FontStruct font), T2 (2010, a tall multiline face of extraordinary grace), Infographique (2010), Mod Gothic (2010, metal band face), and Pyramid (2010).

In 2012, he made the (free) neon tube font Chrome (+Light, +Black).

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Arthur

Arthur is a bespoke font for Guinness, dated 2011. Produced by the Jones Knowles Ritchie studio in London. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Arthur Beresford Pite

Architect, born in 1861 in London, died in 1934 in Beckenham, Kent. He created this architectural alphabet. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Arthur Rackham

Born in London in 1867, Rackham became a famous illustrator, and was noted for hand lettered titles, decorative marginalia, hand-drwan headers and borders, and color plates. Scriptorium made a font family called Rackham based on his lettering. Rackham died in Limpsfield, Surrey, in 1939. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Arthur Vanson

British designer of Stratford, a blackletter font done at Letterhead Fonts in 2002. Also in 2002, he made the 6-weight Hindlewood fraktur family (in Sans, Soft, or Hard; and Regular or Groteque) and the 3-weight signage font Opening Night (2002). Other fonts include Red Sable Script (2006, photolettering age script), Senatus, Flash Script (signage), LHF Chesham Sans, Wade Grotesque (2003), Wade Dynamic (2008, bold sans), Cincinnati Poster (2003, signage), Tallington (2003, a great gas-pipe lettering font), Stevens Percepta (2003, inspired by showcard writer/designer Mike Stevens), Speedstyle (2004, comic book face), LHF Tideway Script (2004, connected fifties script), Essendine (roman), Stevens Percepta (flared headline sans), Tallington (strong sans), and American Sans. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Artworks

This site offers a truetype font (called CRMackintosh) for the Mac based on the writing of Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The font costs 13 UKP. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Arty Type
[James Marsh]

James Marsh Art&Design (or Arty Type) (Hythe, UK) is a visual arts and illustration company located in Hythe, UK.

His typefaces are modular, and include Soma Slab (2013), Soma Slab Tall (2013), Somaskript Tall (2012), Origami Incised (2012), Groovy (2012, +Inline: sixties face), Dropout (2012), Rough Diamond (2012), Thorny (2012), Tangent (2011, a geometric monoline sans), Scroll (2010), Marsh Scroll (2011), Tulip (2011, modular, heavy, and counerless), Somatype (2011, über-organic; +Skwosh), SomeSkript and SomaSkript Incised (2012, organic), and Nutcase (2010).

In 2013, he published Angleface, Anglepoise (a paper clip typeface family) and Mortice (octagonally cut).

Klingspor link. Behance link.

View James Marsh's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

ARTypes
[Ari Rafaeli]

ARTypes is based in Chicago, and is run by Ari Rafaeli. UK-based pre-press production specialist who has made type 1 font revivals in 2006-2007, listed below. I am confused as this outfit seems to have grown out of Angus R. Shamal's ARS Type in Amsterdam. Who is who and what is what? List of typefaces categorized by revival type:

  • Hermann Eidenbenz: Graphique (1946) now called Graphique AR, a shadow face.
  • Jan van Krimpen (Enschedé) revivals: Romulus Kapitalen (1931), Romulus Open (1936), Curwen Initials (Van Krimpen did these in 1925 for The Curwen Press at Plaistow, London), and Open Kapitalen (1928).
  • Jacques-François Rosart: Rosart811, a decorative initial face that is a digital version of the 2-line great primer letters cut by J. F. Rosart for Izaak&Johannes Enschedé in 1759 (Enschedé no. 811).
  • Stephenson Blake revivals: Borders, Parisian Ronde.
  • Rudolf Koch (Klingspor) revivals: Holla, Koch-Antiqua-Kursiv Zierbuchstaben, Maximilian-Antiqua, Neuland 24pt.
  • Bernard Naudin (Deberny&Peignot) revival: Le Champlevé.
  • W. F. Kemper (Ludwig&Mayer) revival: Colonia. P.H. Raedisch: Lutetia Open (2007) is based on the 48-pt Lutetia capitals engraved by P. H. Raedisch under the direction of Jan van Krimpen for Enschedé in 1928.
  • Richard Austin: Fry's Ornamented (2007) is a revival of Ornamented No. 2 which was cut by Richard Austin for Dr. Edmund Fry in 1796. Stephenson, Blake&Co. acquired the type in 1905, and in 1948 they issued fonts in 30-pt (the size of the original design), 36-, 48- and 60-pt.
  • Max Caflisch (Bauer) revival: Columna.
  • Elisabeth Friedlaender (Bauer) revivals: Elisabeth-Antiqua, Elisabeth-Kursiv (and swash letters). Linotype Friedlaender borders.
  • Herbert Thannhaeuser (Typoart) revival: Erler-Versalien.
  • O. Menhart (Grafotechna) revivals: Manuscript Grazhdanka (cyrillic), Figural, Figural Italic (and swash letters). Also, Grafotechna ornaments (maybe not by Menhart).
  • Hiero Rhode (Johannes Wagner) revival: Hiero-Rhode-Antiqua (2007).
  • F. H. E. Schneidler (Bauer) revival: Legende.
  • Herbert Post revival: Post-Antiqua swash letters.
  • Georg Trump (Weber) revivals: Trump swash letters, Trump-Gravur (called Gravur AR now). The outline caps face Forum I-AR is derived from the Forum I type designed by Georg Trump (1948, C. E. Weber). Signum AR-A and Signum AR-B (2011) are based on Trump's Signum (1955, C.E. Weber). Palomba AR (2011) is based on Trump's angular calligraphic face Palomba (1954-1955, C.E. Weber). Amati AR (2011) is based on a Georg Trump design from 1953.
  • Hermann Zapf revival: Stempel astrological signs.
  • F.H. Ernst Schneidler: Zentenar Initialen is based on the initials designed by Prof. F. H. E. Schneidler, ca. 1937, for his Zentenar-Fraktur types.
  • Isaac Moore: Old Face Open (Fry's Shaded) is a decorative Baskerville which was probably cut by Isaac Moore for Fry ca. 1788. A revival was issued in eight sizes by Stephenson Blake in 1928.
  • Border units and ornaments: Amsterdam Apollo borders, Gracia dashes, Primula ornaments, Bauer Bernhard Curves, Weiß-Schmuck, Curwen Press Flowers, Klingspor Cocktail-Schmuck, Nebiolo fregi di contorno, Attika borders, English (swelled) rules, Künstler-Linien, an-Schmuck, Primavera-Schmuck.
  • Freie Initialen are derived from initials made for the Stempel Garamond series. The type was issued in 1928 in three sizes (36, 48, and 60 pt); the AR version follows the 60-pt design.
  • Initiales Grecques, based on Firmin Didot's design, ca. 1800.
  • Emil A. Neukomm revivals: Bravo AR (2007; originally 1945).
  • Ernst Bentele revivals: Bentele-Unziale (2007).
  • Joseph Gillé: Initiales ombrées (2007) is based on Gillé's original all caps face from 1828.
  • Maria-Ballé-Initials (2007), after an original font from Bauersche Giesserei.
  • Raffia Initials (1952, Henk Krijger): revived by ARTypes in 2008 as Raffia.
  • Ornaments 1 AR (2010): from designs from 18th and 19th century typefounders that were ancestors of the Stephenson Blake foundry.
  • Ornaments 2 AR (2010): Ornaments 2 contains designs for the Fanfare Press by Berthold Wolpe (1939) and for the Kynoch Press by Tirzah Garwood (ca. 1927).
  • Ornaments 3 AR (2010): based on designs by Bernard Naudin for Deberny et Peignot, c. 1924; and ornaments based on designs by Oldrich Menhart, Karel Svolinsky and Jaroslav Slab for the state printing office of Czechoslovakia and Grafotechna.
  • Ornaments 4 AR (2010): based on the Amsterdam Apollo and Gracia ornaments and the Amsterdam Crous-Vidal dashes (designed by Crous-Vidal).
  • Ornaments 5 AR (2010): based on the Amsterdam Primula ornaments designed by Imre Reiner, 1949.
  • Ornaments 6 AR (2010): based on designs for the Curwen Press by Edward Bawden and Percy Smith.
  • Yü Bing-nan revival: Freundschafts-Antiqua AR (2010). Freundschafts-Antiqua (which was also called Chinesische Antiqua) was designed in 1962 by the Chinese calligrapher Yü Bing-nan when he was a student at the Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst at Leipzig in 1960.
  • Sans Serif Inline (2011). Based on the 36-point design of the Amsterdam Nobel Inline capitals (1931).
  • Hildegard Korger revivals: Typoskript AR (2010) is based on a metal type which was produced in 1968 by VEB Typoart, Dresden, from a design of the German calligrapher and lettering artist Hildegard Korger.
  • Hans Kühne revival: Kuehne-Antiqua AR (2010) revives a Basque face by Hans Kühne.
  • The Troyer AR ornaments (2010) are based on the first series of ornaments designed for American Type Founders by Johannes Troyer in 1953.
  • The Happy Christmas font (2011) is a snowflake font that is based on designs by Amsterdam and Haas, c. 1950. December Ornaments (2011) contains the 36 Amsterdam designs which were originally issued in 24 and 36 point.
  • Walter Diethelm: Diethelm AR (2011) revives Walter Diethelm's Diethelm Antiqua (1948-1951, Haas).
  • Walter Brudi revivals: Pan AR (2010, based on a 1957 font by Brudi).
  • Hermecito (2013) is a 46-style type system based on an angular serif. It covers Cyrillic, Latin, Greek and several other scripts. Besides being eminently readable, it also has extensive coverage of mathematical and phonetic symbols. Renzo (2013) is along the same lines but with sharpened serifs.
MyFonts link.

View the typefaces made by Ari Rafaeli / ARTypes. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ashendene Press
[C. H. St. John Hornby]

"Founded in 1895 at Ashendene, Hertfordshire, England, by Sir C. H. St. John Hornby and moved in 1899 to Chelsea, London. It was a leader (with the Kelmscott Press and the Doves Press) in the 19th-century revival of fine English printing. Its edition of Dante (1909) is considered an achievement comparable to the Kelmscott Chaucer of William Morris. The Subiaco type used by the Ashendene Press was designed by Sir Emery Walker and S. C. Cockerell from an early Italian typeface. The Ashendene Press, which set all of its editions by hand, issued 40 books in the years from 1895 to 1915 and from 1920 to 1935. " Note: Its Ptolemy Roman type was designed based on the roman lettering of Leonhard Holle used in "Ptolemy" (1482). The Subiaco type (1902) is now owned by Cambridge University Press. Its punches were cut by E.P. Prince. It is a humanist face with blackletter tendencies, and is based on the first roman used in Italy for printing, developed around 1464 at subiaco by Conrad Sweynheym and Arnold Pannartz. The Ashendene Press disappeared in 1936. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ashleigh Claire Etherington

Graphic designer and illustrator in Southend-on-Sea, UK, who created a fat lettering typographic poster for pub signage in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ashley Dean Newall

Designer who used FontStruct in 2009 to make Dance (dancing dudes making the Latin capitals), Signature (handwriting), Flex and Slab. Aka Adne Wall, he is located in the UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ashley Dsouza

This British graphic design student created the ornamental caps alphabet Fish Face (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ashley Eldrid Havinden

British type designer (1903-1973), who made Ashley Crawford (1930, a heavy caps face at Monotype with a vey recognizable inline style; digital version from Monotype), and Ashley Script (1955; metal number 574 at Monotype, a brush script based on her own handwriting; now digitally available at Monotype).

Ashley Havinden was director and art director at W. S. Crawford, an advertising agency in London. The typeface Ashley Crawford (1930) was the resuklt of a request by Stanley Morison of Monotype to make a typeface based on Crawford's Chrysler advertizing campaign.

Xavier (1992, Jason Castle) is an art deco family based on Ashley Crawford.

Linotype link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ashley Garrod

Designer from Liverpool who graduated from Liverpool John Moores University in July 2009 with a BA Hons in Graphic Design. She made CircleType (2009, letters based on lines and arcs) and the experimental modular typefaces Craft Fonts and Tessellated Fonts.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ashley Kirby

Student at UWE in Bristol. During her studies at UWE, she used FontStruct to create Cast a Shadow (2012, +Dotted). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ashley Religion

Student at UWE Bristol in the UK. FontStructor who made the constructivist face Beat The Whites With The Red Wedge (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ashliegh Wick

Ashliegh Wick's school project at Sunderland University in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, was an unnamed constructivist typeface (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ashton
[Andrew Ashton]

Ashton is the Southend, Essex, UK-based foundry of Andrew Ashton, est. 2008. Born in 1971, Andrew Ashton is a book designer and illustrator. He won the British Book Industry Award for Design and Production (Nibbie) 2007 for The Dangerous Book for Boys. He created Bowen Script (2008), a font from the lettering of some Caribbean maps.

In 2013, he published the handwriting typeface Maree. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Asma Nazir

Graphic Arts graduate of the WInchester School of Art, University of Southampton. Asma is a graphic and type designer. Designer of experimntal typefaces such as Genius Loci (2012), Transmission Towers Typeface (2012), Unity Typeface. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Association for Insight Meditation (or: Aimwell)
[Bhikkhu Pesala]

On this site dedicated to Pali fonts, we find Bhikkhu Pesala's free fonts: Akkhara, Cankama (2009, blackletter), Carita (2006, all caps roman), Garava (2006), Guru (2008: made for Buddhist publications, it is a rather complete Latin, Greek and symbol font), Hattha (2007, felt marker face), Kabala (2009, after Kabel...), Lekhana (2008, in Zapf Chancery style), Mandala (2007, geometric sans), Odana (2006), Pali, Talapatta, Talapanna (2007), Veluvana (2006), Verajja (2006), Yolanda (2008, calligraphic). The Pali fonts all have over 1400 Latin characters with diacritics including those needed for Sanskrit and Pali transcriptions. They cover Latin, Vietnamese, chess symbols, and astrological signs, and are based on Zapf's Palatino. Bhikkhu Pesala is a Buddhist monk in London. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aston Rose

Aston Rose (London, UK) designed the alchemic typeface Hunter (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Atomic Type Collection

Typefoundry in Cheltenham, UK. In 2014, they published a collection of 300 handwriting fonts with names like Abigail's Hand, Yank's Hand, and so forth.

The full list: AcaciasHand, AdamsHand, AlainasHand, AlexsHand, AlinasHand, AlisonsHand, AllensHand, AlvinsHand, AmandasHand, AmbersHand, AngelasHand, AnniesHand, ArchiesHand, ArdleysHand, ArronsHand, AshtonsHand, AstersHand, AubreysHand, AudreysHand, AustinsHand, AverysHand, BabcocksHand, BarrysHand, BartsHand, BerniesHand, BerrysHand, BerylsHand, BethanysHand, BettysHand, BinghamsHand, BobbiesHand, BrandysHand, BrendasHand, BrendensHand, BrettsHand, BrodysHand, BrooksHand, BrucesHand, BudsHand, BurkesHand, BurtonsHand, CalvinsHand, CamdensHand, CandysHand, CarlysHand, CarolinesHand, CartersHand, CathysHand, CattsHand, ChasesHand, ChelsiesHand, CherylsHand, ChicksHand, ChristinesHand, CidsHand, ClaytonsHand, CodysHand, ColemansHand, CoreysHand, CormicksHand, CrosbysHand, CrystalsHand, CutiesHand, DarbysHand, DarinsHand, DarlenesHand, DavesHand, DeannasHand, DebbiesHand, DentonsHand, DereksHand, DianasHand, DonaldsHand, DonnysHand, DorothysHand, DunleysHand, DunnsHand, EddiesHand, EdgertonsHand, EdmondsHand, ElliesHand, ElliottsHand, EmilysHand, EmmettsHand, EricasHand, EricsHand, ErinsHand, EvansHand, EvelynsHand, EverlysHand, EwingsHand, FannysHand, FarinasHand, FarrahsHand, FentonsHand, FiniansHand, FletchersHand, FlintsHand, FlorasHand, ForrestsHand, FostersHand, FranklinsHand, FranksHand, FrasiersHand, FrostysHand, FultonsHand, GailsHand, GarthsHand, GarysHand, GavinsHand, GemmasHand, GeorgesHand, GiffordsHand, GinasHand, GinnysHand, GinosHand, GlennsHand, GradysHand, GrantsHand, GreersHand, HaleysHand, HanfordsHand, HanksHand, HansonsHand, HarmonsHand, HenrysHand, HerricksHand, HershelsHand, HigginsHand, HodgesHand, HuntersHand, IrvingsHand, IvysHand, JackiesHand, JacksHand, JamesHand, JanicesHand, JasonsHand, JeffreysHand, JeninesHand, JenkinsHand, JeremysHand, JessiesHand, JilliansHand, JodysHand, JohnsHand, JolenesHand, JoshsHand, JulianasHand, JuliesHand, JustinsHand, KanesHand, KarensHand, KarinsHand, KarlsHand, KaspersHand, KathrynsHand, KeithsHand, KellysHand, KelseysHand, KennethsHand, KianasHand, KimballsHand, KimsHand, KingsHand, KirbysHand, KitsHand, KorasHand, KramersHand, KylesHand, LannysHand, LarkinsHand, LarriesHand, LaurensHand, LauriesHand, LawfordsHand, LeesHand, LeonardsHand, LeroysHand, LesleysHand, LestersHand, LibertysHand, LinfordsHand, LisasHand, LloydsHand, LuanasHand, LydiasHand, MandysHand, MannysHand, MarcelsHand, MarciesHand, MarcosHand, MargosHand, MarionsHand, MattsHand, MerylsHand, MichaelsHand, MiriamsHand, MonicasHand, MontysHand, MorgansHand, MyrasHand, NancysHand, NappysHand, NatsHand, NedsHand, NellysHand, NettiesHand, NewellsHand, NicholesHand, NickysHand, NicolasHand, NolansHand, NortonsHand, NoviasHand, OlliesHand, OpalsHand, OrsonsHand, OscarsHand, ParkersHand, PatriciasHand, PaulasHand, PennysHand, PerkinsHand, PerrysHand, PetersHand, PrincesHand, QueeniesHand, QuentinsHand, QuestsHand, QuinnsHand, RachelsHand, RalphsHand, RamseysHand, RaysHand, ReardonsHand, ReedsHand, RickysHand, RobinsHand, RogersHand, RonaldsHand, RonniesHand, RoscoesHand, RoslinsHand, RossysHand, RoydensHand, RubysHand, RustysHand, RyansHand, SaffronsHand, SammysHand, SandysHand, SashasHand, SawyersHand, ScottsHand, SeftonsHand, SergesHand, SherylsHand, SkylersHand, StacysHand, StanleysHand, StewartsHand, SusansHand, TanyasHand, TashasHand, TaylorsHand, TerrysHand, ThelmasHand, TobysHand, ToddsHand, TracysHand, TrasksHand, TriciasHand, TrixiesHand, TullysHand, TylersHand, UrsasHand, ValeriesHand, VanessasHand, VansHand, VeronicasHand, VictorsHand, VincentsHand, WalkersHand, WallysHand, WangleysHand, WaynesHand, WebstersHand, WeldonsHand, WendysHand, WillysHand, WilsonsHand, WiltonsHand, WinstonsHand, YancysHand, YanksHand, YoungsHand, ZacksHand, ZonkersHand.

View the Atomic Type typeface library. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

AtomicType

Company based in Sussex, UK, active ca. 2001: AtomicType is a distributor of the International TypeFounders library and CD-ROMs. Founded in 1995, ITF's goal is to provide a unique opportunity for the world's best independent small type foundries and typeface designers to display and distribute their fonts. Over 10,000 typefaces are available. Also some custom design work. [Google] [More]  ⦿

ATypI 2007

ATypI 2007 was held at the Faculty of Arts and Architecture at the University of Brighton in Brighton, UK, from 12-16 september 2007. Keynote presentations by Richard Hollis, Humphrey Stone, David Crow, Ken Garland, James Mosley, Matthew Carter, and Michael Harvey. Speakers: Andy Altmann, Bill Baggett, Lynne Joddrell Baggett, Phil Baines, Ebru Baranseli, Chinmay Battacharya, John D. Berry, Anne McLaren Boddington, Karl Rose Cesta, Karen Cheng, Joe Clark, Catherine Dixon, Alessandro Fiore, Gerald Fleuss, Artur Frankowski, Fritz Grögel, George Hardie, Florian J. Hardwig, Andy Haslam, Xurxo Insua Pardo, Pouya Jahanshahi, Viktor Kharyk, Richard Kindersley, Akira Kobayashi, Eiichi Kono, Kevin Larson, David Lemon, Alessio Leonardi, Edna Lucia Cunha Lima, Oliver Linke, Lida Lopes Cardozo Kindersley, Tanja Madved, Thomas Maier, George Matthiopoulos, Sarah McCoy, Yaki Molcho, Klementina Mozina, Caglar Okur, Thomas Phinney, Albert-Jan Pool, Jean-François Porchez, Ieuan Rees, Ole Schaefer, Juliet Shen, Sumner Stone, Keith Chi-Hang Tam, Ipek Torun, Michele Wong Kung Fong and Masayuki Yamamoto. Report by J.-F. Porchez. Flickr picture report. Videos of the talks:

  • Masterpieces of Johann Neudörffer the Elder (1497-1563) (Oliver Linke).
  • The legacy of Edward Johnston (Gerald Fleuss).
  • Reynolds Stone, a life in graven letters (Humphrey Stone).
  • The kindest cut of all the Kindersley Workshop (Linda Lopes and Cardozo Kindersley).
  • Searching for Morris Fuller Benton (Juliet Shen).
  • The word is on the street (Ken Garland).
  • Typography in the Environment (Andy J. Altmann).
  • Teaching type in the city (Karen Cheng).
  • National Armed Forces Memorial Staffordshire (Richard Kindersley).
  • The typographic design of the Valley of the Communities in Jerusalem (Yaki Molcho).
  • Inscribed in the living tile (Joe Clark).
  • Better than a poke in the eye (Kevin Larson).
[Google] [More]  ⦿

ATypI 2007: TypeTech

ATypI 2007 was held at the Faculty of Arts and Architecture at the University of Brighton in Brighton, UK, from 12-16 september 2007. Its TypeTech section was reported on by Christophe Badani here. Since it is in French, I will loosely translate it for my readers:

[Google] [More]  ⦿

Audrey Manlot

London-based designer, b. Paris, who created the script typeface Arrow (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin

Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812-1852) was an English architect, designer, artist and critic, chiefly remembered for his pioneering role in the Gothic Revival style. His work culminated in the interior design of the Palace of Westminster. Pugin designed many churches in England, and some in Ireland and Australia.

Pugin designed several blackletter and uncial style alphabets ca. 1844. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Austin Cowdall

British designer who works in London. He made New Formula Tippex (2001) with letters drawn using a bottle of Tippex. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Avalon Portolan

British designer (b. 1996) of the graffiti typeface Avalon Old Skool Graff (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

AvanType
[Habib Khoury]

Israeli designer Habib Khoury (born in Fassouta, Upper Galilee, 1967) is presently Executive Creative Director of Avant Design Communications, which specializes in trilingual typography and communications. The type division, AvanType, offers commercial Latin, Arabic and Hebrew typefaces. He holds a Masters degree from Central Saint Martins College in London. Habib spent several years in Haifa, London, and New York. His web page is impossible to access on most browsers though. His Hebrew designs: Casablanca, Derby, Falafil, Girnata, Rituals, Talona. His Latin fonts include Adorey, Alluremda, Granada, Merkory and Stocky. He won an award at Bukvaraz 2001 for Maqsaf. At TDC2 2003, he won a Certificate of Excellence in Type Design for Falafil. Arabic typefaces include Ghirnata (1996), Sinan (1992), Alwadi (1996), Onwan (1998), Shallal Ultra Light (1995), Saljook (1997), Barhoom (1995), Alkhoury (1997) Sayaf, Maqsaf and Qasab (1998). He won an award at TDC2 2006 for Hogariet (2005, a Hebrew face) and at TDC2 2008 for Al Rajhi (an Arabic text family). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Avatar of Shadows

South-African or UK-based designer of A Perfect Circle (2003) and Serpentine Bold Flaat (2004). [Google] [More]  ⦿

AVMC Studios

AVMC Studios (London) created a Water font and a Crystal font in 2013---both are experimental and are based on digital images of water and crystals. It is part of the AVMC Group in London. Other typefaces include Hyperion (2013, oriental simulation), Crius (2013), and Uranus (2013, experimental). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bababau
[Xavier Puig]

Xavier Puig is a type and graphic designer, born in Artés, Barcelona. He moved to London in 2003 where he graduated in Visual Communication and Typography at the London College of Communication. He created the severe octagonal face Ihavebeenwaitingforyou (2009) and the LED face Water In My Casio (2009). In 2010, he added Sexything. Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Barbara Brownie

Londoner who created the experimental Bezier-driven Blended Alphabet in 2009. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Barcode Writer in Pure Postscript
[Terry Burton]

Barcode Writer in Pure Postscript is an open source project that facilitates the printing of many barcode symbologies entirely within level 2 PostScript. Hence the process of generating a printed barcode representing a given input is performed entirely within the printer (or print system) where it is no longer the responsibility of your application or a library. Written and distributed by UK-based Terry Burton. Supported formats: EAN-13, EAN-8, UPC-A, UPC-E, EAN-5 & EAN-2 (EAN/UPC add-ons), Code 128 (A, B & C), Code 39, Interleaved 2 of 5 (including ITF-14), Code 2 of 5, Codabar, MSI, Plessey, Postnet. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Barry Slater

Graduate from the Bath School of Art and Design. He designed a counterless geometric typeface called Second Half (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bart Kut

Manchester, UK-based creator of a high-contrast art deco typeface in 2013. In 2014, he created the art deco typeface Zeppelin. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bartosz Janczak

Graphic designer in London. Flickr page. Creator of some experimental faces, including several 3-d alphabets. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bas Jayel

Student at UWE in Bristol, UK. FontStructor who created the ornamental caps typeface Templar (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

bbold
[Alan Jeffrey]

bbold is a blackboard bold math symbol font written in metafont by Alan Jeffrey in 1994, and later converted into a type 1 font. This CTAN page can be used for downloads. Type 1 versions are here, courtesy of Berthold K. P. Horn and Khaled Hosny (2007-2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Beatrice L. Warde

Born in New York in 1900, she died in London in 1969. A typographer, writer, and art historian, she worked for the British Monotype Corporation for most of her life, and was famous for her energy, enthusiasm and speeches. Collaborator of Stanley Morison. She created a face called Arrighi. She is famous for The Crystal Goblet or Printing Should be Invisible (The Crystal Goblet, Sixteen Essays on Typography, Cleveland, 1956, and Sylvan Press, London, 1955), which is also reproduced here and here. The text was originally printed in London in 1932, under the pseudonym Paul Beaujon. Here are two passages:

  • Imagine that you have before you a flagon of wine. You may choose your own favorite vintage for this imaginary demonstration, so that it be a deep shimmering crimson in colour. You have two goblets before you. One is of solid gold, wrought in the most exquisite patterns. The other is of crystal-clear glass, thin as a bubble, and as transparent. Pour and drink; and according to your choice of goblet, I shall know whether or not you are a connoisseur of wine. For if you have no feelings about wine one way or the other, you will want the sensation of drinking the stuff out of a vessel that may have cost thousands of pounds; but if you are a member of that vanishing tribe, the amateurs of fine vintages, you will choose the crystal, because everything about it is calculated to reveal rather than to hide the beautiful thing which it was meant to contain.
  • Bear with me in this long-winded and fragrant metaphor; for you will find that almost all the virtues of the perfect wine-glass have a parallel in typography. There is the long, thin stem that obviates fingerprints on the bowl. Why? Because no cloud must come between your eyes and the fiery heart of the liquid. Are not the margins on book pages similarly meant to obviate the necessity of fingering the type-page? Again: the glass is colourless or at the most only faintly tinged in the bowl, because the connoisseur judges wine partly by its colour and is impatient of anything that alters it. There are a thousand mannerisms in typography that are as impudent and arbitrary as putting port in tumblers of red or green glass! When a goblet has a base that looks too small for security, it does not matter how cleverly it is weighted; you feel nervous lest it should tip over. There are ways of setting lines of type which may work well enough, and yet keep the reader subconsciously worried by the fear of 'doubling' lines, reading three words as one, and so forth.

Drawing of her by Eric Gill. Life story.

Beatrice Warde was educated at Barnard College, Columbia, where she studied calligraphy and letterforms. From 1921-1925, she was the assistant librarian at American Type Founders. In 1925, she married the book and type designer Frederic Warde, who was Director of Printing at the Princeton University Press. Together, they moved to Europe, where Beatrice worked on The Fleuron: A Journal of Typography (Cambridge, England: At the University Press, and New York: Doubleday Doran, 1923-1930), which was at that time edited by Stanley Morison. As explained above, she is best known for an article she published in the 1926 issue of The Fleuron, written under the pseudonym Paul Beaujon, which traced types mistakenly attributed to Garamond back to Jean Jannon. In 1927, she became editor of The Monotype Recorder in London. Rebecca Davidson of the Princeton University Library wrote in 2004: Beatrice Warde was a believer in the power of the printed word to defend freedom, and she designed and printed her famous manifesto, This Is A Printing Office, in 1932, using Eric Gill's Perpetua typeface. She rejected the avant-garde in typography, believing that classical forms provided a "clearly polished window" through which ideas could be communicated. The Crystal Goblet: Sixteen Essays on Typography (1955) is an anthology of her writings. Wood engraved portrait of Warde by Bernard Brussel-Smith (1950). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Becca Haywood

During her graphic design studies in London, Becca Haywood created the utra-fat square-shaped typeface Hole (2013), a candidate for the blackest typeface on earth. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Becky Sewell

During her studies at Flamouth University, UK, Becky Sewell created the minimalist typeface Undervalued (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Archer
[100types]

[More]  ⦿

Ben Dolphin

UK-based designer, who created Synthetic Stencil (2011) and Pixel Error (2011). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Drury

British designer in London. He made D.cal, a tilted nib pen-stroke font (2000). All lines are based on off-set circles. He also designed Unkle (1998, a high tech font used on the album Psyence Fiction, based on lettering from the Disney film Tron) [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Hewitt

Digital artist from Plymouth, UK. He created the experimental typeface Juice (2009). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Howarth

Manchester, UK-based creator of The Car Parts Font (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Hutchinson

London-based designer of the deconstructed typeface Ecelectic (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Jones
[Protimient.com]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ben King

UK-based comic artist, b. 1985. Home page. Designer of GB Nametag (2006), based on the lettering of the Ghostbuster nametags. Ben King also made Ghostbusters Nametag (2006). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Mecke-Burford
[M-B Creative]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ben Mitchell

Freelance graphic designer from Brighton, UK. He created the modular serif typeface Eternal (2007).

In 2010, he was working on the angular serif face Mixteca, which in turn evolved into Feld spar, a typeface with strong unbracketed serifs. Mint (2009-2010, in many weights) is a spiced-up Optima family. And Gecko (was Melia) is a family designed for small sizes.

Typefaces from 2011: Carnet (a take on Gill Sans and the British humanist sans in general), Sentosa (an elliptical sans family).

Typefaces from 2012: Lumen (a typeface developed at the University of Reading for Burmese, Thai and Latin).

Graduate of the MATD program at the University of Reading in 2012. His graduation typeface Lumen covers Latin, Burmese, and Thai.

Flickr link. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Nipper

During his studies at the University of Lincoln, UK, Ben Nipper created the Paper Fold typeface (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Smith

Guildford, UK-based designer of several typefaces or alphabets in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Stevens

London-based web designer. He created a modular stencil face, AlphaBetas (2010). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Swift

Bew Swift (Cogilium) made the hand-printed face Skulduggery (2010). He is from West Sussex, UK. His main typeface is the clean sans family Intra (2010). A preliminary free version can be had. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Theobald-Morgan

Graphic design student at Plymouth University in the UK. Ben created Ribbon Type (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Weeks

British illustrator who got a Masters degree in 2004 from the University of Huddersfield. Now, located in Toronto, he created some nice hand-lettered chalk mural pieces such as one called Metcalf Interns--it has the names of all 2001-2011 Metcalf interns.

Cargo collective link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ben Weiner
[Reading Type]

[More]  ⦿

Ben Wood

Student at Brighton University, Hastings, UK. He created the thin avant-garde type family Quantis (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Benan Barwick

British designer who created glyphs from icons in order to create the experimental Punk Rock Font (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

BenHat

Student at the University of Western England in 2011. FontStructor who made the paper folding face Shami (2011, FontStruct). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Benjamin de Lotz
[Benny Designs (was: Benjamin de Lotz Design&Typography)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Benjamin Fox

British punchcutter and type designer who died in 1877. He was the partner in Besley and Co (est. 1849 by Robert Besley---in fact Besley and Co grew out of Thorowgood and Co in which Besley was a partner until Thorowgood retired in 1849, causing the change of name) in London. He helped Robert Besley in the development and cutting of Clarendon in 1845 at Fann Street Foundry/Thorowgood and Co. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Benjamin Lilof

Graphic designer in Southampton, UK. Creator of FMP-3D (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Benjamin Mounsey

Bristol, UK-based digital artist, who drew a few beautiful ornamental caps in 2011. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Benny Designs (was: Benjamin de Lotz Design&Typography)
[Benjamin de Lotz]

Benny Designs (ex-Benjamin de Lotz Design&Typography) is Benjamin de Lotz's outfit in London. de Lotz (b. 1973) created Bereta (1998), available from 2Rebels. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Bernard Philpot

Welsh creator of the irregular chiseled face ITC Bolthole (2008. ITC>). He writes: My father brought me to a small graveyard in the Welsh hills to show me two headstones carved by the great Eric Gill. I instantly fell in love with the beauty of the carving and the perfection of the letterforms. I still go back to marvel at these works of art. Philpot studied graphic design and typography at the London School of Printing, and soon after graduation started work in a large advertising agency in London.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Bernhard Hörlberger

Hamburg-based designer of the fat counterless modular Porno (2009). He has lived in Austria, Kenya and the UK, and was born in 1986. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Berthold Wolpe

German type designer (b. Offenbach, 1905, d. London 1989), who studied under Rudolf Koch from 1924-27 at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Offenbach. He emigrated to England in 1935 because of his Jewish background. Wolpe taught at the Camberwell College of Art (1948-53), at the Royal College of Art in London (1956-75) and at the City&Guilds of London School of Art (from 1975 onwards). From 1941-1978, he worked as a book designer for Faber&Faber in London, designing over 1500 book jackets. He published Schriftvorlagen (Kassel 1934), Marken und Schmuckstücke (Frankfurt am Main, 1937), A Book of Fanfare Ornaments (London, 1939), Renaissance Handwriting (with A. Fairbanks, London 1959), and Architectural Alphabet. J. D. Steingruber (London, 1972). Designer of

  • Albertus (Monotype, 1932-1940) is a famous lapidary roman with thickened terminals. Images: graphic by Andrew Henderson, image by Anna Morena. The Bitstream version is called Flareserif 821. The Ghostscript/URW free version is called A028 (2000). The Softmaker and Infinitype versions are both called Adelon. The original Monotype version is Albertus MT. The letters are flared and chiseled, and the upper case U looks like a lower case u. The northeast part of the e is too anorexic to make this typeface suitable for most work. Some say that it is great for headlines. It is reminiscent of World War II.
  • Cyclone (Fanfare Press).
  • Hyperion (1931, Bauersche Giesserei). Now available at Berthold, 1952.
  • Pegasus (1938, Monotype).
  • Tempest (1936).
  • The blackletter face Sachsenwald-Gotisch (1936-1937, Monotype).
  • The blackletter face Deutschmeister (1934, Wagner&Schmidt, Ludwig Wagner).
  • Decorata (1950).
  • Johnston's Sans Serif Italic (1973).
Bio at Klingspor. FontShop link. Wiki page. Linotype page.

View Berthold Wolpe's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

BERTLib (Fontstuff)

Fontstuff, est. 2005, sells BERTLib, the "Berlin Electronically Remastered Type Library". It has offices in London. Berthold, which folded in 1993, had a 2000+ type collection, which came in the hands of Freydank, Körbis, Pillich, Talke GbR in 1996 who lent it out to Berthold PrePress GmbH in 1997 under the name The Berthold Type Collection. Babylon Schrift Kontor GmbH, the company of Klaus Bartels, offered type 1 fonts from this collection for sale since 2000, but it disappeared some time later when Bartels died. BERTLib acquired the original Ikarus data of the Berthold Type Collection (over 2000 fonts) and set out to make high quality OpenType fonts with full support of all European languages, and fully Unicode-compliant. Slowly, these fonts are now being released by BERTLib. Not to be confused with Berthold Types Ltd from Chicago, who produced its library from Berthold type 1 data, not Ikarus data, of the same collection. Because of typename protection by Berthold Types, BERTLib had to change some font names. Some fonts also cover Cyrillic and Greek, but Maltese and Turkish are standard in all typefaces. More research needs to be done about the Berthold bankruptcy in 1993. They had a lot of debts. How can two different companies "acquire" or "get" the rights and sources of their collection? Who took care of the debts? Were there some underhanded deals? BERTLib twice refused to send me a list of types to which their own names can be matched. No names of digitizers or font BERTLib font designers or BERTLib owners are given. And finally, one has to pay 2.50 Euros just to see a sample of a font. All that makes me think that this company is one of businessmen rather than passionate type designers. Typefaces from these type designers/foundries have been or are being converted right now: Aldo Novarese, American Typefounders, Bernd Möllenstädt, Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue, Bruce Rogers, Claude Garamond, David Quay, Eric Gill, Erik Spiekermann, Facsimilie Fonts, Frederic Warde, Friedrich Berthold, Georg Trump, Giambattista Bodoni, Gustav Jaeger, Günter Gerhard Lange, Hermann Hoffmann, Herbert Post, Inland Typefoundry of St. Louis, John Baskerville, Justus Erich Walbaum, Karl Gerstner, Louis Oppenheim, Morris Fuller Benton, Nicolas Cochin, Otl Aicher, Schriftenatelier Taufkirchen, Thomas Maitland Cleland, William Caslon. I created this page with remarks on their fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Beth Doherty

During her studies at University of the Arts London in 2013, Beth Doherty created a decorative all caps alphabet. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Beth McLoughlin

Graphic art student at the Winchester School of Art (Winchester, UK) in 2013. She used a grid to created the typeface family Grille in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Beth Nott

British creator of the fat hand-printed typeface Handwriting (2013) and of Bananananananana (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bethan Durie

UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who made the ornamental caps face Ornée (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bethany Dalzell

During her graphic design studies at the Leeds College of Art, Bethany Dalzell designed the bilined art deco typeface Issy Tanner (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Betty Fishcake

UK-based creator of the sci-fi typeface Forlorn Hope (2012).

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bezier Design Limited

Designers of freeware fonts such as Beniolo. Affiliated with Camrose House in Pembroke, UK. Custom font design by Ian Smith. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bhikkhu Pesala
[Association for Insight Meditation (or: Aimwell)]

[More]  ⦿

Big Teezar

British creator of the free font Big Teez SQ (2011). Home page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bill Troop

Bill Troop, a phenomenal wordsmith, runs Graphos. Just read this quote: TYPEFACE DESIGN is obtuse, incomprehensible, unsuitable, unremunerable, and irresistable. With the aid of the computer, it has never been easier to design a typeface, and never easier to manufacture one. Because of PostScript, TrueType, and font creation programs like Fontographer, Font Studio, and Font Lab, there have never been more typeface designs available, nor have there ever been so many typeface designers active. Yet, just as at all times and places there is very little good of anything to be had, so there are remarkably few fine typefaces available today. Printers now have merely a fraction of the first rate types they had in 1930. He is active in the typophile community, where he is a fervent supporter of high quality and ethical typography. Bill Troop grew up in New York and London. He studied classical piano, type design, photography and writing. He is married to the novelist Elspeth Barker, and lives in England. He designed Busted (2008, Canada Type: grunge family) and the luxurious families Didot Headline (2009, Canada Type) and Didot Display. Images of Didot Display: i, ii, iii, iv.

From 2009-2011, he cooperated with Patrick Griffin at Canada Type on a monumental revival of Alessandro Butti's Semplicità typeface---the new family is called Semplicità Pro. The designers write: Bill and I spent some time looking closely at Futura, the instant popularity of which in the late 1920s triggered Butti's design. This was for the most part a pleasant process of rehashing what constitues a geometric typeface, musing over the fundamental phallacy of even having such a classification in type while in reality very little geometry is left after the application of the optical adjustments inherently needed in simplified alphabet forms, trying to understand how far such concepts can go before entering into minimalism, and scoping the relativity between form simplicity and necessary refinement. Mostly academic, but very educational and definitely worth the ticket. [...] For an answer to Futura, Semplicità was certainly quite adventurous and ahead of its time. It introduced aesthetic genetics that can be seen in popular faces to this very day, which is to say eighty years later. Though some of that DNA was too avant-garde for the interwar period during which Semplicità lived out its popularity, much of it remains as an essential aesthetic typographers resort to whenever there is call for modern, techno, or high-end futuristic appeal. The most visibly adventurous forms at the time were the f and t, both which having no left-side crossbar, with the f's stem also extended down to fully occupy the typeface's descender space. Aside from those two letters, Semplicità's radical design logic and idiosyncracy become more apparent when directly compared with Futura. [...] Futura attempted to go as far as geometry could take it, which ultimately made it too rigid and considerably hurt its viability for text setting. Renner himself acknow- ledged some of its flaws, and even proposed alternate fucntionality treatments, with a more humanistic aproach applied to some forms, all of which went nowhere because Futura's momentum and revenue were deemed undisruptable by some- thing so trivial as aesthetic or functionality. William Dwiggins' Metro design, a direct descendent of the Renner’s design, went almost diametrically the opposite way of Futura, with the deco facets considerably magnified and the geometry toned down. Butti decided a design that finds the middle ground in that aesthetic tug of war was probably a better idea than either extreme. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Billelis
[Billy Bogiatzoglou]

UK-based digital illustrator. In 2013, he created a sharp-edged staccato display typeface called Kadrin.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Billy Bogiatzoglou

Digital artist in London. Home page. He created the experimental faces Bebo Sans (2011) and X Code (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Billy Bogiatzoglou
[Billelis]

[More]  ⦿

Billy Flynn

London-based designer of the poster typeface Grizzly (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Billy Sawyer

University of Worcester, UK-based designer of Soft Sans (a compass-and-ruler sans) an unnamed geometric typeface in 2013.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Blackfriars Type Foundry

Type foundry in the early 20th century in London. Richmond Oldstyle (1920s) was digitally revived in 2007 by Nick Curtis as Rowan Oak NF. In 2009, Nick Curtis digitized Whitefriars NF. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Blahfonts
[Giles Edkins]

About ten creations by UK-based Giles Edkins, such as The Daily Blah, Anger, BoringBoring, Loopy, MetalFont, Squiggly, Subtlety (blood-drip typeface), TheDailyBlah, WhatAStupidName, ZanyWhateverItMeans (1997), WonkyTypewriter (1997), Humbug.

Fontspace link. Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Blake, Garnett&Co

Sheffield-based foundry. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Blake Type Foundry

British typefoundry in the late 19th century. One of its types, Blackfriars, was digitally revived by Nick Curtis as Drury Lane in 2007. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Blanca Berning

Graduate of the University of Reading in 2011 who was born in Germany. Her graduation typeface was Clint (2011), a text family for Latin, Greek and Cyrillic. Clint suffers from a multiple personality disease, with asymmetric serifs, a strange axis, some timid ball terminals, and other exogenetic details. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Blanka Kvetonova

London-based graphic designer. Behance link. Her first font was called Letterpress (2010): it is a grunge face with pizzazz. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Blastto
[Carlos Llorente]

Spanish graphic design group Blastto (Madrid) is actually Carlos Llorente, b. Guadalajara, Spain, currently based in London. He created a nice art deco type booklet in 2010, covering Broadway (1929), Bifur (1919), Parisian (1928) and others. Designer of the free experimental face Teardrop (2010) and the gridded face Try Type (2011).

In 2012, he made Pigopago (a free double stroke font).

The tweetware experimental typeface Del Gherp Al Tipo followed in 2013 after a TypoMad workshop in Madrid.

Behance link. Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bob Newman

British graphic and type designer, most famous for his Data Seventy (1970, Esselte/Letraset), a display typeface that emulates the shapes of the early computer types [see Data EF at Elsner and Flake, and for a free knock-off, Westminster]. A cyrillization of Data70 was done in 1976 by Victor Kharyk.

Other designs by Newman include Penny Farthing (1974, Letraset), Odin (1972), Frankfurter (1970, Letraset, with Alan Meeks and Nick Belshaw), Linotype Horatio, and Pump (EF and Linotype versions).

Alternate URL. MyFonts link. FontShop link.

Zach Whalen analyzes Data Seventy in his 2008 thesis and states that Data Seventy is the first full alphabet based on the MICR font E-13B, since it includes both upper and lower case letters.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Bob Oswald
[Rune Fonts]

[More]  ⦿

Bobby Cole

During his studies at Salford University in the UK, Bobby Cole designed a few unnamed typefaces, as well as Freaky Font (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Boico Typography
[Michael Bojkowski]

Dead link. London-based company run by graphic designer and creative director Michael Bojkowski. They are involved in several interesting type projects such as Bubbleblock and RealTransport. For a brief period, Michael Bojkowski and Joe Bland (from Melbourne) ran a joint venture, The Type Testing Centre and Bland Fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Boicozine
[Michael Bojkowski]

Dead link. Design blog with an eye for typography, as practiced and created by designers. Example subpages include a typographic tour of the city of London (a 15 minute video). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bonez Designz
[Fiona Clarke]

Fiona Clarke (aka Dead Duckling, Fie Clarke, and Bonez Designs) lives in Birmingham, UK, where she studied at Birmingham City University. She created the angular face Do You Like My Font Andy (2011), Cubee (2011, very fat and cubic), Boutique (2011, grunge), Anorexia (2011, a shrieky scribbled face), Time to Scribble (2011, sketched face).

In 2012, Fiona added Bonez, A Gothique Time (grungy blackletter).

Typefaces from 2013: Bernadette, Inky (heavy brush), Nebula, Harsh Hand.

Typefaces from 2014: Bernadette.

Dafont link. Devian Tart link. Behance link. Another Behance link. Dafont link [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bonnie Rafferty

Using iFontMaker, Bonnie Rafferty (Wye, Kent, UK) created Bonnie (2011, fat finger face). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Boo to the Business World
[Chris Hall]

Chris Hall lives by the motto boo to the business world. Pick up free fonts Boodudes (funny faces), Symbol, chutzpah, lemans, Atewaza (karate dings), keysmoney&fagsbats (bats), Kill Me Sarah (bats), all designed by Chris Hall from the UK ca. 1999. Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Borna Izadpanah

Iranian graphic designer in London, who created some untitled modular Latin and Farsi typefaces during his studies at the London College of Communication in 2010. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bouma Type Foundry
[George Russell]

George Russell (Bouma type Foundry) is a British web portfolio designer. Creator of these fonts with iFontMaker: 130MinuteFont, 230minuteFontBold, 30MinuteFont, 3HandwrittenScript, 4FiveMinuteFont, 5NurseryDingbat, 6Reeves, 7ScribblySerif, 8ReevesBold. [Google] [More]  ⦿

B&P Typefoundry
[Maxime Buechi]

Defunct type foundry in Lausanne, Switzerland, founded in 2005 by Ian Party and Maxime Buechi. From 2000-2004, Maxime Buechi studied graphic design&typography at the Ecole Cantonale d'Art de Lausanne (ECAL). His typefaces include Rhodesia , a private type designed with Aurèle Sack for the book African Sniper (for NORM) in 2003 (it was not used there, but was used instead in the book Periferic 7), and a corporate typeface for the Centre for Curatorial Studies Bard&Hessel Museum, New York (2006, with Ian Party). In 2007, the following BP fonts saw the light: Neutral BP (Kai Bernau, a supposedly neutral sans family), La Police BP, Romain BP and Romain BP Headline (as the creator, Ian Parry, states: Based on the Commission Jeaugeon's models and on Philippe Grandjean's classic character, the Romain BP celebrates the marriage of geometric rationality and elegance, of science and craftsmanship. The Romain BP Text is actually closer to the Commission's model than Grandjean's Romain du Roi. It is more synthetic in its structure, more radical, and thus, more modern. It is a contemporary text typeface based on a structure that was created in 1690, not a revival mimicking Greandjean's shapes.). In 2007, they released Esquire, an upright script headline face. Other fonts are listed on my site under the various designers' names.

IN 2013, the typefoundry morphed into Swiss Typefaces, which is jointly run by Ian Party and Emmanuel Rey. Maxime Buechi now mainly runs a big tattoo parlor in London. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brae Savva

During his graphic design studies at Norwich University of the Arts, UK, in 2013, Brae Savva designed an unnamed modular monospaced display typeface. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brett Naughton

Creator of Yafit (2013), a Celtic /uncial/ gaelic / insular typeface. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brian Hollingsworth

Artistic director in London, who created an Escheresque typographic poster called The Truth (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brian Horsfall
[Startype]

[More]  ⦿

British APL Association

APL font links. Some downloads too: from Adrian Smith (York, UK), APL2741PS-APL2 (2002), APL2741x (2000), JSansPS (2000), KAPLPS (1995-2001); from Amadeus Information Systems Limited, the big slab-serifed monospaced font SImPL (1996-2001). [Google] [More]  ⦿

British Letter Foundry
[John Bell]

John Bell (1746-1831) was a London-based publisher of several periodicals and newspapers. He founded the British Letter Foundry in 1788, with Richard Austin as punchcutter. The foundry closed in 1798.

John Tranter tells the story: John Bell, an English publisher and bookseller, advertised a book called The Way to Keep Him in The World newspaper in London in June 1787, saying: 'J. Bell flatters himself that he will be able to render this the most perfect and in every respect the most beautiful book, that was ever printed in any country.' That was a tall order. In his quest for perfection he set up a type foundry, and hired a young punchcutter named Richard Austin to cut a new typeface for him. The face, named after Bell, was based on a typeface designed some thirty years before by John Baskerville, another perfectionist. Baskerville had said 'Having been an early admirer of the beauty of Letters, I became insensibly desirous of contributing to the perfection of them.' Though Baskerville went broke eventually, his typeface was indeed very close to perfection, and went on to become one of the most popular faces of all time. John Bell's type foundry didn't do well. He closed down his shop within two years and went on to other things, and his typeface sank almost without trace in England. Newer trends in typefaces (Didot in France, and Bodoni in Italy) eclipsed the modest elegance of Richard Austin's design. The Americans, though, took a shine to it. It was copied as early as 1792, and always remained popular there. A complete set of type cast from Bell's original matrices was purchased by the American Henry Houghton in 1864 and installed at his Riverside Press. He thoughtlessly labelled it 'English Copperplate'. Later, the distinguished American book designer Bruce Rogers used the face frequently, naming it 'Brimmer', after the author of a book he'd seen the face used for when he worked as a young man at the Riverside Press. The designer Daniel Updike also worked at Riverside, and also used the 'English Copperplate' type extensively in later years, naming his version of it 'Mountjoye'. Bell's type would have remained obscured by these disguises perhaps forever, but for the alert eye of Stanley Morison. He was doing research at the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris in 1926 when he came across a copy of the first specimen sheet of type samples issued from John Bell's foundry in 1788. No copy of it existed in England at that time, and Morison recognised the face immediately as the original of the 'Brimmer' and 'Mountjoye' fonts used in America. He researched the matter and in 1931 published an important monograph which, as the type scholar Alexander Lawson says, 'returned the name of John Bell to its proper place in the pantheon of English printers'. The typeface was unique in another way. Until Richard Austin cut the face in 1788, all numerals were traditionally written like lower-case letters -- small, with some numerals hanging below the line. Bell is the first typeface to break with that tradition cleanly: Austin's numerals are larger than lower-case letters (at two-thirds the height of the capitals) and sit evenly along the line. The trend was taken up. These days the numerals in most printed matter are (unfortunately) the full size of the capital letter, and are called titling figures, ranging figures, or lining figures.

See also here. FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

British Library

Publishers of the free font Reader Sans, which covers Cyrillic, Greek, Latin, Hebrew and Slavonic. The copyright says Bitstream. [Google] [More]  ⦿

British Sign Language (BDA)

Free BDA fingerspelling font. See also here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

British Standards for Type Classification

Typeface classification according to "British Standards 2961:1967" (or BS 2961), British Standards Institution, London, 1967.

  • Humanist: Centaur, Jenson, Verona, Kennerley.
  • Garalde: Stempel Garamond, Garamond, Caslon Old Face, Granjon, Sabon, Bembo.
  • Transitional: New Baskerville, Baskerville, Caslon, Fournier, Perpetua.
  • Didone: Bodoni, Bauer Bodoni, Torino, Walbaum.
  • Mechanistic: Clarendon, Memphis, Rockwell, Lubalin.
  • Lineal
    • Lineal Grotesque: Franklin Gothic Demi-Bold, Franklin Gothic, News Gothic, Alternate Gothic.
    • Lineal Neo-Grotesque: Helvetica Light, Akzidenz Grotesk, Folio, Helvetica, Univers.
    • Lineal Geometric: Avant Garde Medium, Avant Garde, Futura, Eurostile, Erbar.
    • Lineal Humanist: Gill Sans, Goudy Sans, Optima.
  • Incised: Albertus, Latin, Friz Quadrata.
  • Script: Brush Script, Mistral, Park Avenue, Zapf Chancery.
  • Manual: Neuland, Broadway, OCR-A, Pritchard.
  • Black Letter: Fette Fraktur, Old English, Goudy Text, Wilhelm Klingspor-Schrift.
  • Non-Latin.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

British Standards Institute (BSI)

BSI is the National Standards Body of the UK, with a globally recognized reputation for independence, integrity and innovation in the production of standards that promote best practice. It develops and sells standards and standardization solutions to meet the needs of business and society. After that paragraph, my brain needs a bit of rest. I think it says that they run a bureaucratic joint and that people better listen, or else. MyFonts pencils OCR-A down under the name of BSI, but I think that font was made by URW++. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

British typeface--font law

Discussion at the FontWorks site of British typeface/font law, with some private interpretations. FontWorks UK is a type vendor. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brittany Coxon

Brittany Coxon (aka Britt7094) is the Newcastle, UK-based designer of Randomness (2005). Home page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brokenbiskits

British creator of the druggy (useless?) face Gaian. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brook Elgie

Graduate student of typography at the University of Reading, 2006. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bruno Formiga

Graphic and web designer in Cambridge, UK. Creator of Atomo (2013, an experimental typeface) and Medieval (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bruno Maag
[Dalton Maag]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Bryan Talbot

Bryan Talbot is a comic book artist, graphic novelist in Lancashire, UK. Comicraft's John Roshell created a typeface based on his lettering, Bryan Talbot, for Bryan's Alice in Sunderland.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Burdock

Burdock Design is located in London. It created the modular geometric tiling face Shapes (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

C. H. O. Daniel

Printer from the UK. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

C. H. St. John Hornby
[Ashendene Press]

[More]  ⦿

C3J Design

British design firm run by "Chris". Dafont link. Creator of the dotted line face Meticulous Round (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Calligraphy&Lettering Arts Society

CLAS is located in London. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Callum Best

Callum Best (Bournemouth, UK) created the art deco typeface Ark Deco (2012).

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Callum Copley

Creator of an experimental typeface in 2009. He lives in the Sheffield/Hull area of the UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Callum Crew

Bristol, UK-based graphic designer who created Harmony (2012, an Arabic simulation face inspired by the Alhambra in Granada) and Diversity (2013), a grid-based geometric typeface.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Calum Bennett

Graphic design student at the University of Salford, Manchester, UK who made the futuristic face Apastron (2011).

Salford Type Foundry link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Calum Rudd

Wigan, UK-based typographer and graphic designer, who created the high-contrast fashion mag font Myth (2010). Currently studying at Staffordshire University. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Camila Cardenosa

London-based designer of the market signage typeface R Kelly & Son (2013).

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carl Cooper
[Styler Design]

[More]  ⦿

Carl Rylatt

Brighton, UK-based creator of the copperplate caps typefaces Laudanum (2012, available from Ten Dollar Fonts) and Fuck Powerpoint (2012).

Tenebrae (2013) is a spooky spurred display typeface. Tenebrae is inspired by the Giallo films of the 70s and other cult cinema film posters. It can be bought at Ten Dollar Fonts.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carl Seal

Designer at Tealeaf Digital Type Foundry in the UK, who set up the free font foundry Little Red Circles. The typefaces are preponderantly of the grunge style, which was in fashion at the time of their creation, ca. 1998-1999:

  • By Carl Seal: BaskerSans4, Bitmapbreakfast, Bull, Butter, Calliglession, CarlSeal, ChewyBold, ChewyExtraBold, ChewyMedium, ChewyNormal, ChewySemiBold, ChewyUltraBold, ChewyVariations, Crushedtalc, DuoGypsy, EasyLino, FormaBold, FormaMedium, FormaNormal, GeekNormalish, Geekfat, Grivant, Growbag, Growbaged, Gypsy, Inbreed, IndexCapsLoose, IndexCapsStraight, IndexCapsTooLoose, IndexCapsTooStraight, Instamatik, Kyleaged5, Kyleaged5half, LadyBoy, Leavingglassvegas, Litrecs, MatrixBlow, MatrixNorm, MatrixSuck, Mend, MetisRota, Mrfish, MunchBold, MunchExtraBold, MunchLight, MunchMedium, MunchNormal, MunchSemiBold, MunchUltraBold, MunchUltraBoldBlack, MunchUltraLight, MunchVariations, Next, NuChina, NuEngland, NuJapan, Nudgedashak, Passion, PrintisDead, RaygunA, RaygunB, Reposans, Rupture, Scritch, Shakasonikphormal, Shati, SheMale, Skript, Something, StampBold, StampHeavy, StampLight, StampMedium, StampRegular, StampThin, StampUltraThin, Synsis, Timig, Tweak, UnderWorldBlock, UnderWorldLine, Unrulycucumber, UnstukLino, Untitled, Userunknown, Whanted, Yatta.
  • By Mark Bradley and Carl Seal: Phobia.
  • By Tony Howell: Yuleo.
  • By Jon Ratcliffe: Calligruffy.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Carl Simcox

Graphic designer in Hull, UK. Creator of the gridded typeface Hypno (2012). He also created the original typographic poster called Seedy Motel (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carl Sutton

Graphic designer and illustrator from Brighton, UK, who created some minimalist geometric monoline faces such as Womb (2009). Carl now lives in Cardiff. Tycho (2009) is very organic.

In 2012, he made the modular typeface Trap.

Aka Deprived Anxiety. Alternate URL. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carl Thomas Redfern
[CTR Font Foundry]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Carlos Llorente
[Blastto]

[More]  ⦿

Carmen Lam

A graduate from Cambridge School of Art, carmen Lam lives in Bury Saint Edmunds, UK. She created a comic book face, and a hand-printed face called The Typeface in 2011. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carol Kemp

Freelance lettering designer from Sussex, UK, b. 1965 Rustington, Sussex. In 1987, she graduated in typography and hand lettering at the Exeter College of Art and Design. Since 1987, Carol has worked as a freelance lettering designer, producing hand drawn and digital lettering, calligraphy and type designs for hundreds of companies worldwide. She created these fonts:

  • The clean food dingbat font Delectables (1994).
  • Party (1993, a dingbat font for Letraset).
  • Gastropub (a blackboard face done for Marks and Spencer).
  • ITC Jiggery Pokery (1998).
  • ITC Zinjaro (1994, Mexican-style letters).
  • WacWakOoops (comic book face, Agfa Creative Alliance).

Linotype link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Caroline Archer

British printer who obtained a Ph.D. in typography and graphic communication at the University of Reading in 1999. After a stint as a freelance journalist and writer, specializing in the graphic arts, she wrote four books on design and printing. She is a partner of Typevents. She and Shelley Gruendler became Executive Directors of ATypI in 2005, and will mainly be in charge of organizing the ATypI meetings. Currntly (in 2010) she is a Research Fellow at the Birmingham Institute of Art & Design, Birmingham City University. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin, where she looked at the British typeface trends from 1920-80 through the work of three of the leading UK printers of the period: The Curwen Press [London] that enjoyed promoting artists' and ornamental continental founts; The Kynoch Press [Birmingham] which favoured English revival types; and Percy Lund Humphries [Bradford] that was interested mainly with continental sans serif types. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Caroline Ibikunle

During her studies at UCA Farnham, UK, Caroline Ibikunle (Sutton, UK) created the experimental geometric typeface Neo (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Caroline Kan

Design student in London. Designer of the experimental typeface Triangle (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carolyn Puzzovio
[Pomegranate Fonts]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Carrie-Anne

Plymouth, UK-based creator of the hand-printed typeface Ribcage (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Caslon wiki

The Caslon wiki states: William Caslon's types of the early eighteenth-century were extremely popular then, and strongly revived in the late nineteenth century, producing many versions. Since the Caslon Foundry was in business for a long time, there are many Caslon typefaces. Caslon's designs were markedly different at different sizes (for instance, some of his uppercase Cs had serifs at top and bottom, some only at the top); variation in design is not therefore necessarily a sign of "inauthenticity". Caslon's type was popular in every sense. It was popular in the eighteenth century (until it was eased out by modern faces in the early 19th). When the fashion of "old face" revived in the 19th, many in England and America looked to Caslon's type as the model. And, at a time when lay people probably knew less about font-names than they do now, "Caslon" was a name quite a few people did know. George Bernard Shaw, for example, absolutely insisted that his work be set in Caslon. This vast popularity of Caslon's types led to a practically endless range of copies, among them Caslon 540 from American Type Founders in 1902, and Caslon 3, a slightly bolder face also from ATF in 1905, which was later modified for use on Intertype and Linotype technologies. Both designs have the warm, solid, straightforward style that has made Caslon popular for over 200 years; these Caslons, however, have shorter descenders, and higher contrast, features that enable them to hold up better with the faster presses and the new varieties of paper introduced at the turn-of-the-century. As with Garamond, there are not only typefaces which use the Caslon name, but typefaces which are Caslon-inspired. Of some importance historically is Imprint, which was designed by (English) Monotype in 1913 for use in the (short-lived) Imprint journal. Because the journal was interested in the "improvement" of typography, it chose to release its typeface for general use. It took the "cleaning up" of Caslon's type for modern use a stage further, deliberately increasing x-height, reducing the notoriously loose fit of some of Caslon's type, and removing some of its archaic character. Wikipedia. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Caslon: Wikipedia

Excerpts from the wiki page on Caslon: Caslon refers to a number of serif typefaces designed by William Caslon I (1692-1766), and various revivals thereof. Caslon shares the irregularity characteristic of Dutch Baroque types. It is characterized by short ascenders and descenders, bracketed serifs, moderately-high contrast, robust texture, and moderate modulation of stroke. The A has a concave hollow at the apex, the G is without a spur. Caslon's italics have a rhythmic calligraphic stoke. Characters A, V, and W have an acute slant. The lowercase italic p, q, v, w, and z all have a suggestion of a swash. [...] Caslon's earliest design dates to 1722. Caslon is cited as the first original typeface of English origin, but type historians like Stanley Morison and Alfred F. Johnson, a scientist who worked at the British Museum, did point out the close similarity of Caslon's design to the Dutch Fell types cut by Voskens and other type cut by the Dutchman Van Dyck. [...] Nicols writes: "he (Caslon) cut the beautiful fount of English which is used in printing Selden's Works 1726. Nicols describes this character as far superior over comtemporary Dutch founts used in English books at this period. Rowe More does not give any comment on this. Dutch founts were in use by several printers in England at that time. The Oxford University Press used the "Fell-types", character cut by the Dutch typefounder Voskens. The Cambridge University Press had received in January 1698 some 52 series of alphabets from Holland, all cut by Van Dyck. But even before that in 1697 thay used the Text-sized roman and italic of Van Dyck in an edition of Gratulatio Cantabrigiences. Character of Van Dyck and Voskens is found also in: William Harison, Woodstock Park, Tonson, 1706. Although Nicols attributes this character to Caslon, the fount used in Seldens Works is actually cut by Van Dyck. The italic is identical to the Van Dycks Augustijn Cursijf fount in specimen sheets issued in 1681 by the widow Daniel Elzevir. This woman had bought the typefoundry of Van Dyck after Van Dyck died. The roman in this book, is a Garamond. This fount is used in the first volume and in the greater part of the second volume, It is found in a specimen sheet of the Amsterdam printer Johannes Kannewet, in accompagny with Van Dyck's Augustijn Cursijf. The only thing known about this Kannewet is that he was a printer, not a typefounder. This specimen-sheet is preserved in the Bagford-collection in the British Museum, and can be dated 1715 or earlier because Bagford died in 1716. There is no reason to suppose anything is added on a later date to this collection. The roman is named: Groote Mediaan Romyn. This fount is also found on a specimen sheet of the widow of Voskens. Therefore it can be assumed to be the work of Voskens. The earliest use of it at Amsterdam is 1684. The earliest use of a roman and italic cut by Caslon can be identified in books printed William Bowyer in 1725, 1726 and 1730. The founts cut by Caslon and his son, were close copies of the Dutch Old face cut by Van Dyck. These founts were rather fasionable at that time. The alternative founts they cut for text were a smaller, rather than a condensed letter. The Caslon types were distributed throughout the British Empire, including British North America. Much of the decayed appearance of early American printing is thought to be due to oxidation caused by long exposure to seawater during transport from England to the Americas. Caslon's types were immediately successful and used in many historic documents, including the U.S. Declaration of Independence. After William Caslon I's death, the use of his types diminished, but saw a revival between 1840-1880 as a part of the British Arts and Crafts movement. The Caslon design is still widely used today. For many years a common rule of thumb of printers and typesetters was When in doubt, use Caslon. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cass

British designer. Creator of Citybloxx (2008), a shadowed handwriting font. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cassandra

UK-based artist (b. 1985) who created My Untidy Handwriting (2005). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cassia Friello

Graphic designer in the UK, who created a decorative caps alphabet in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cat Hamilton

Oxford, UK-based creator of Digital Diamond Stitch Type (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Catherine Dixon

Catherine Dixon is a freelance designer, writer, and Senior Lecturer in Typography at Central Saint Martins College of Art&Design, London. She completed her PhD, A description framework for typeforms: an applied study at Central Saint Martins in 2001. She has worked together with Phil Baines on book designs for Phaidon Press; Laurence King; and for the award-winning Penguin Books Great Ideas series. She is a frequent contributor to Eye. Other writing includes a web site and the book Signs: lettering in the environment (Laurence King 2003). Speaker at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon on the topic of Nicolete Gray's Lisbon (with Phil Baines). At ATypI 2009 in Mexico City, she spoke on Lambe-lambe letters: Grafica Fidalga, São Paulo a project she undertook with Henrique Nardi (Tipocracia). Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin, where she dealt with a lettering project for the Pozza Palace in Dubrovnik, and took people on a lettering walk of Dublin. Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Catherwood

Caslon and Catherwood published a now famous Italian in 1821. Scans: From Nicolete Gray's book, another scan. [Google] [More]  ⦿

CCG Arts

CCG Arts (UK) created the display face Happy (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

CCW Resources (or: Cursive Writing)

Commercial cursive (didactic) writing site, with a few pay fonts named CCW Cursive 1 through 5, CCW Precursive 1 through 4. All come in dotted, lined, outlined and arrow styles to help young students. The company, CCW Resources, is located in Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cecil A. Wade

British lettering (b. 1896) artist who wrote Manual of Lettering (1952, Blandford Press, London) and Modern Lettering from A to Z (1932), a book which shows many alphabets. We also find a 1934 edition: Ed. Pitman Isaac & Sons LTD - London.Example. There are several art deco alphabets. Another example (scanned by Sam Judge). His books provided inspiration for several digital typefaces:

  • Nick Curtis: Slapdash Deco NF (2005, based on a showcard alphabet presented by Cecil Wade in his Manual of Lettering), Block Party NF (2008).
  • Jim Parkinson: Wigwag (2003, a display family inspired by Ross George as well as the work of Samuel Welo and Cecil Wade).
  • Richard Dawson: Letraset Comedy (with Dave Farey).
[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Cecilia Redondo-Zaratiegui

Graphic Communication student at Bath Spa University. Designer of Cross Stitch (2013, a stitching typeface), Stencil (2012) and Sierra (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ceyda Cemal

UK-based creator of the teardrop display typeface Organic Type (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ch. Rud & Son

London-based foundry, active at the end of the 19th century. Creators of the Victorian/almost art nouveau face Artistique Recherche. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Changbae Seo

Seoul-based graphic designer who spent some time in London. Behance link. As an experiment, he took a standard font, and connected the letters using a certain geometric algorithm to get a special effect. More analytic geometry went into the design of the squarish but rounded display face Box (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chantelle King

Australian-born graphic design student at Manchester Metropolitan University. She created the experimental typeface Bang (2012).

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlee Pincombe

During his studies, Charlee Pincombe (Colchester, UK) created an imaginary sci-fi typeface for the Scxience Museum of London (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charles Nolan

Graphic designer currently studying Graphic Communication with Typography at the University of Plymouth, UK. Creator of the Tycho typeface (2012), a dot matrix face that is based on the Imperial Villa Katsura in Kyoto.

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charles Pearce

Calligrapher and painter, b. 1943, Birmingham, UK. He made several calligraphic fonts: Cantabria (first developed at Camberwell School of Art and loosely based on the work of poet and artist, David Jones), Daniel, Fiorentina, Helena, Penkridge, Ullswater (brush script), Umbria (classic calligraphy). Corporate/custom typefaces: RKO Century Warner, Guinness (Cranks Health Foods font redesign). Author of these books:

  • Calligraphy, The Art Of Fine Writing (1975). Published by Cumberland Graphics division of British Pens as part of the Penstyle Calligraphy Set.
  • Lettering, The Art Of Calligraphy (1978). Published by Platignum as part of their Lettering Set.
  • Italic Writing (1979). Published by Platignum as part of their Italic Handwriting Set.
  • A Young Person's Guide to Calligraphy (1980). Published by Pentalic as part of A Young Person's Calligraphy Starter Set.
  • A Little Manual of Calligraphy (1981). Published by Wm. Collins (worldwide) and Taplinger (USA).
  • A Calligraphy Manual for the Beginner (1981). Published by Pentalic as part of the Pentalic Introductory Calligraphy Course.
  • The Calligraphy Sampler (1985). Published by Wm. Collins.
  • The Anatomy of Letters (1987). Published by Taplinger.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Lettering artist and architect in Glasgow (b. Glasgow, 1868, d. London, 1928). He was a designer in the Arts and Crafts movement and also the main exponent of Art Nouveau in the United Kingdom. Typefaces based on his lettering include ITC Rennie Mackintosh (by Phill Grimshaw), ITC Rennie Mackintosh Ornaments (also by Phill Grimshaw), and Willow (by Tony Forster). Check the Glasgow School of Art, ITC and U&LC.

The CRMFontCo headed by George R. Grant specialises in typefaces based upon the letterforms of Mackintosh. They published multiple styles of these fonts: Rennie Mackintosh (1993, the original by George R. Grant), Rennie Mackintosh Glasgow (2007, with lowercase letters added), and Rennie Mackintosh Artlover (1995: art deco dingbats by George Grant and Joanna McKnight). Later additions include The Classic Charles Rennie Mackintosh Font, The Charles Rennie Mackintosh Artlover Font, The Charles Rennie Mackintosh Stems Font, The Charles Rennie Mackintosh Glasgow Font, The Charles Rennie Mackintosh Renaissance Font, The Charles Rennie Mackintosh Hillhouse Font, The Charles Rennie Mackintosh Moonlight Font, The Charles Rennie Mackintosh Scotland St. Font, and The Charles Rennie Mackintosh Venezia Font<.

a href="RyanIrven--CharlesRennieMackintoshPoster-2010.jpg">Poster by Ryan Irven (2010). See also the free font Nouveau (1992) by Alan Cairns. CRM company link.

View Charles Rennie Mackintosh's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Charles Ricketts

UK-born type designer, 1866-1930. He designed three fonts, "The Vale," (Vale Press, 1896, Ricketts' house) "The Avon," and "The King's." He also designed many decorations and initials. Books with his work. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Charles Robert Ashbee

British type designer, b. Isleworth, 1863, d. Kent, 1942. He made Endeavour Type (1901) and Prayer Book Type (1903). Part of the Arts and Crafts movement, [quoting wikipedi] he was the son of businessman and erotic bibliophile Henry Spencer Ashbee. His Jewish mother developed suffragette views, and his well-educated sisters were progressive as well. Ashbee went to Wellington College and read history at King's College, Cambridge from 1883 to 1886, and studied under the architect George Frederick Bodley.

Ashbee was involved in book production and literary work. He set up the Essex House Press after Morris's Kelmscott Press closed in 1897. Between 1898 and 1910 the Essex House Press produced more than seventy books. Ashbee designed two typefaces for the Essex House Press, Endevour (1901) and Prayer Book (1903), both of which are based on William Morris's Golden Type.

Quoting wikipedia again: Despite his father's amateur career as an enthusiastically heterosexual pornographer, Ashbee was gay. He came of age in a time when homosexuality was illegal and "the love that dare not speak its name". He is thought to have been a member of the Order of Chaeronea, a secret society founded in 1897 by George Ives for the cultivation of a homosexual ethos. To cover his homosexuality, he married Janet Forbes, daughter of a wealthy London stockbroker. CRA, as he was known, had admitted his sexual orientation to his future wife shortly after he proposed. They wed in 1898 and, after 13 years of rocky marriage (including a serious affair on the part of Janet), had children: Mary, Helen, Prue and Felicity. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Charles Snell

English writing master in the 17th century. Matthew Carter revived his roundhand in 1966 for photocomposition and extended it by adding weights. It became Snell Roundhand Script (Linotype) and Roundhand BT (Bitstream). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Charles Williams

London, UK-based designer who created some interlocking geometric type in 2010. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charles Wright

The UK number plate font that came into effect in 2001 is called Charles Wright. It can be bought here from Magnum UK (Alex Duncan) for about 100 dollars in two versions, Charles Wright 2001 Mandatory, and Charles Wright 2001 Regular. The new number plate style is based on a font originally designed in 1935 by Charles Wright but with modifications to character shapes and width to improve readability. If you want a similar free font, consider UKNumberPlate by Gareth Attrill. Another free font was made by Keith Bates at K-Type in 2004, called Mandatory. Keith writes: "I've tried to ease the congestion in the middle of W and M by adding Gill-esque points, and thinned the tail of the Q - a slight improvement." Both the free and the commercial fonts are unofficial.

Old URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlie Beadle

UK-based designer who created a Herb Lubalin poster in 2010. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlie Climo

Charlie Climo (Plymouth, UK) designed the octagonally cut typeface Reticulate (2013) during his graphic design studies. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlie Garrod

Graphic designer in Norwich, UK. Behance link.

He created the 3d shadowed Typeface Illusion (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlie Middleton

During his studies in the UK, Charlie Middleton created the avant-garde sans typeface family Deko (2013). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlie Samways

Born in the UK in 1995, Grimsby, UK-based Charlie Samways designed the bold display typeface Flexibendi (2012), the puxelish The Other Brothers (2012), CS Fox (2012), the grungy face CS Grimrock (2012) and the techno typeface Surfsup (2012).

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlie Witham-Kozma

UK-based creator of the Rebirth family (2011), which includes a stencil and many octagonal faces. That type family was inspired by Wim Crouwel's New Alphabet. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlotte Bagnara

During her studies, Charlotte Bagnara (Manchester, UK) created the connect-the-dots typeface Anger Tracks (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlotte Brown

Leeds, UK-based designer of Home Before Dark (2013, a display sans). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlotte Clarke

During her graphic design studies at the University of Huddersfield, UK, Charlotte Clarke created an outlined "broken" 3d typeface called Juan Gris (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlotte Gray

Charlotte Grey (Hastings, UK) drew an alphabet in one continuous line and called it Connected Typeface (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlotte Macdonald-Knowlson

During her studies at the University of Northampton, UK, Charlotte Macdonald-Knowlson created the grungy typefaces Interrupted Sans (2013) and Smudge Sans (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlotte Tomlinson

British youngster (b. 1992) who created a typeface out of her own handwriting. It is called Charlieface (2008). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charlotte Warren

Design student at Leeds College of Art. Creator of the geometric line typeface Constellation (2012).

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charmm

Student at UWE Bristol in the UK. FontStructor who made the sparkling grunge face Atomise (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chelsea Herbert

Graphic designer in Birmingham, UK, who made Didot Reverse (2012), an Italian typeface. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cherokee metafont
[Alan M. Stanier]

Alan M Stanier's metafont for Cherokee based on the Cherokee script was designed in 1821 by Segwoya. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chicken
[Tim Barnes]

British outfit located in London. MyFonts sells the double-stroked and African-themed comic book style family Picklepie (2008), the curly Galerie Simpson (2011), the playful Message of the Birds (2009), Lemon Flower (2010), No Liming (2009), Out Back (2009) and Pigeonpie (2009), made jointly by Tim Barnes (b. 1967, London) and his six-year old daughter Lydia Barnes (b. 2001, London).

In 2013, Tim Barnes published the hand-printed caps family Pegasus, Lobo (an interlocking letter typeface), Barb (angular poster face), Ply, and the crazy mixed-glyph typeface Coo Coo I Coo Coo For You Too. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Chloe Johnston

Student at UWE in Bristol, UK. She created the curlicue face Keys (2011, FontStruct). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris

British creator of these fonts: Curls (2006, a curly sans), Curlial (2006), Absolute Zero (2006, pixel face), and Minimono (2006, pixel face). Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Au

Graphic designer in Manchester, UK, who studies graphic design at the University of Salford. He created the hand-printed face Remnant (2010).

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Bentham

Leeds, UK-based graphic designer who created the display typefaces Bones (2012) and Cuckoo (2012).

Cargo collective link. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris' British Road Directory
[Nathaniel Porter]

Chris Marshall's web site on British roads and traffic signs. He has a subpage on fonts used on British highways. Based on these specifications, Nathaniel Porter and John Prentice (who added Greek characters, based on Greek road signs) made a set of free fonts that follow the British highway system. These include Transport Medium, Medium Greek and Heavy (the main British highway font), Motorway Permanent (for numbers on signs), Motorway Temporary (for use on temporary signs), Pavement (for painted lettering on the road surface), and VMS (an octagonal font for use in light-up panels). Erik Spiekermann blasts his implementation of Transport: A gentleman called Nathaniel Porter has digitized Transport Heavy, and it is being used by various agencies. The data is even worse than the Swedish Tratex font which must have been done by an amateur on on Ikarus system without corrections. This one here is just a raw scan. Amazingly, it works as a font. Too heavy for signs, but just shows how good font software has become if it can actually make a working font from a scan that looks like a piece of German rye bread. I suspect that this version of Transport Heavy is being used in Italy and Spain. And in Greece as well. They also made Old Road Sign Font after the road sign lettering in the UK in use before 1964. Its origins go back to 1944. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Brown

British flash specialist. He created these pixel faces in 2009: Perfecto Small, Future File. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Clarke

Bristol, UK-based freelance graphic designer. He created the Type Cube, which can be used to make modular fonts---a bit like a 3d-real life version of FontStruct's bricks. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Cooke

Brighton, UK-based designer of the ultra geometric commissioned face Situation Modern (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Copping

Portsmouth, UK-based designer who is working on the high-legged display face Dilfana (2004). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Corbett
[Pixelscript]

[More]  ⦿

Chris Dale

Student at the University of Greenwich, UK. Designer of the experimental face Binary Code (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Dickinson
[More Type]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Chris Edwards

Heybridge, UK-based designer of Edwards Gothic (2013), an adaptation of Century Gothic. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Gray
[Narate]

[More]  ⦿

Chris Hall
[Boo to the Business World]

[More]  ⦿

Chris Helingoe

UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who made the cubist face Kaos (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Henley
[24exp]

[More]  ⦿

Chris Jeffreys

Creator of the ornamental typeface Trust Me 97, which won an award at the Creative Review Type Competition 2005. He works at The Chase, UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Kontogeorgos

During his studies at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London, Chris Kontogeorgos created the graffiti typeface BerlinGraffic (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris O'Leary

Norwich, UK-based designer of the sans typeface Fotoautomatica (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Page

Chris Page is a graphic designer based in London. He created the multiline caps typeface Gilinier (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Pitney

Student at Leeds University, UK, b. 1986. Creator of the spiky techno face Barbie Final-ish (2006) and the organic techno face Bobel (2007, organic). Alternate URL [dead]. Fonts2u link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Poole

Chris Poole (Pooley Design, UK) is a third year student of Graphic design at the Arts University College at Bournemouth. Behance link. Creator of the monoline rounded minimalist sans face Untitled (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Shuttleworth

Leeds, UK-based designer of the experimental typeface Dead Space (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Stephenson

Designer in Leeds, UK. Chris experimented with exaggerated ligatures in his Interconnect (2012), and the results are fresh, beautiful and promising. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Thornley

Graphic designer and illustrator in Darwen, UK. Behance link.

Creator of the multilined typeface Moon (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris van Niekerk

During his studies at Leeds College of Art, Chris van Niekerk CVN Design) created the fashion mag face Modern No. 4 (2012) and Amstersans (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chris Watson

Chris Watson is an award-winning, London-based illustrator with an incorrigible knack for steely, hand-drawn illustrations. Besides being commissioned from around the world by the likes of Levi Strauss and the Guardian, Watson frequently indulges in his penchant for cycling, providing illustrations for periodicals like Cycling Active, Cycling Weekly, and Performance Bikes.

At Voltage, he published Watson Steel Pen No. 1 (a hand-drawn nostalgic poster face), DingBikes (bicycle dingbats) and Watson Grotesk (Tuscan face). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Chris Winter

Brighton, UK-baseed designer of Vintly's Hand (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Chrissy Fox

Plymouth, UK-based designer of the grungy typeface Hopper (2013). That typeface was designed during her studies at Plymouth University. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christian Brown

UK-based designer (b. 1989) of the tall-ascendered pixel font Mode (2006). Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christian Küsters
[ACME Fonts (or: CHK Design)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Christian Schwartz
[Commercial Type]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Christian Widlic

Christian Widlic (Brighton, UK) created a knitting typeface called Askeladden (2011). He writes: Based on Norwegian tradition and the so called lusekofte (the traditional sweater), I have designed a typeface specifically made for knitted sweaters. The typeface is called Askeladden and comes with six different fonts. Askeladden is the main character in many Norwegian folktales. In some ways, he represents the small man who succeeds where all others fail. He always wins in the end, often winning the princess and half the kingdom. Academic project 2011.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christiana Bryan

East Sussex, UK-based designer of the commercial families Sagittar (wedge serif) and Virgo. She calls these "sculptural typefaces". Old URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christie Podioti
[MyChristie (was: Christie Font Foundry)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Christina Schultz

Christina Schultz works as a freelance designer in London and Berlin. Her current focus is on iconography and intelligent fonts. Recent projects include logo, corporate and web design. She graduated from Central Saint Martins School of Art and Design with an MA in Communication Design in January 2005. At ATypI 2005 in Helsinki, she spoke about Piclig (for picture ligature), an intelligent OpenType font, which makes it possible to create symbols out of letters. These letters, when typed in a specific order, merge automatically and form picture ligatures. To achieve this replacement, piclig uses OpenType's contextual character substitution. The font contains a library of 112 symbols which are encoded not as images, but as characters. Piclig occupies little disk space, which is important in applications such as mobile phones. FF PicLig (2005, Fontshop). FF Piclig won an award at TDC2 2006.

FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Christine Taylor

London-based designer of the hip timeless font GF Hegemonic at Garagefonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Algar

During his studies at the University Of Lincoln's School of Art and Design, Christopher Algar (London, UK) designed the display typeface Two-Faced (2013).

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Burke
[Hibernia Type]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Goodwin

Graphic designer and illustrator in Chesterfield, UK. He created the experimental typeface Yatagan (2009). Xone (2009) is a geometric typeface inspired by shapes and children's building blocks. Flux (2009) is a hand-set typeface created in response to creative writing about time and reality. The multiline Flux Deux followed in 2012. Yatagan (2012) is an oddly-curved monoline typeface.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Haanes

Oslo-based Norwegian who was born in Cheltenham, UK, in 1966. Haanes teaches calligraphy, lettering and typography, and is a freelance calligrapher, book designer and typographer. He designed many alphabets, which are mostly calligraphic, but he has also drawn some old Roman lettering and blackletter alphabets. His blog (in Norwegian) has interesting typographic threads, such as this educational comparison between Antiqua faces like Brioso, Adobe Jenson, Bembo, Adobe Garamond, ITC New Baskerville and Linotype Didot. This thread looks at sans faces. He designed a calligraphic alphabet specifically for Cappelen Damm in 2008, which was digitized by Sumner Stone as Litterat. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Hampshire

Designer from Salford, UK. Creator of Tall Boy (2011, condensed, tall, squarish and monoline---done at FontStruct). Roseshock (2012) is a grunge version of Rosewood.

Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Harrold

Graduate of the University College Falmouth, UK. Graphic designer in Bristol. Creator of Simple Simon (2011). Home page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher J. Fynn
[Software&Fonts for Bodhic Languages&Script]

[More]  ⦿

Christopher Jackson

British creator of Christopher's Scribble (2013) and Arty Signature (2013).

Behance link. Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Jarman

Download the (free) Acorn handwriting font. Also, instructions on improving handwriting. JarFont, also free, is not a font but a simulation of the Christopher Jarman cursive handwriting as seen in the handwriting scheme for schools, see e.g., "The Development of Handwriting Skills" by Christopher Jarman now published by Stanley Thornes Ltd, Cheltenham, UK. Now four PC fonts made in 1998: Jarman, Jardotty, Jumper (by Christopher Jarman), Jarsphere.

See also here. Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Keegan

British designer of Awaken (2002, ink splatter).

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Skinner

King's Lynn, UK-based designer of the experimental typeface Pabulum (2013). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Wood
[zone23 fonts]

[More]  ⦿

CIA (BAR CODES) UK

Chris Ireland's commercial product by CIA (BAR CODES) UK, based in Manchester. Demo. Includes Bookland, Codabar, Code 39 (Normal), Code 39 (Extended), Code 39 (Mod 43), Code 93, Code 128 A, Code 128 B, Code 128 C, Code 128 (Automatic ABC), EAN 8, EAN 8 Plus 2, EAN 8 Plus 5, EAN 13, EAN 13 Plus 2, EAN 13 Plus 5, EAN 128, Interleaved 2-of-5, Interleaved 2-of-5 (Mod 10), ISBN, ISSN, POSTNET, UPC A, UPC A Plus 2, UPC A Plus 5, UPC E, UPC E Plus 2, UPC E Plus 5, UCC 128, UCC / EAN 128, UPC Shipping Container Code, SCC-14 Shipping Container Code, SSCC-18 Serial Shipping Container Code, HIBC LIC (Code 128, Code 39), NHRIC (UPC A, ITF, UCC / EAN 128), UPN.

om the spokesman: "Our 'BAR CODE PRO v3.0' for Windows product is unique in that it contains ALL TrueType barcode fonts for all of the popular barcode types; Bookland, Codabar, Code 39, Code 93, Code 128, EAN, Interleaved 2-of-5, ISBN, ISSN, POSTNET, UPC A, UPC E, UPC Shipping Container Codes". [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ciaran Horrex

Web and print designer in London. He created the typeface The Balls (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

City College Manchester, Manchester School of Printing

The Manchester School of Printing, part of City College Manchester, is based at the Wythenshawe Centre. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Claire Deacon

Graphic design student at University College Falmouth, UK, who created the hand-printed typeface Eyre Script (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Claire Mitchell

UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who made the texture face Headless Roman (2010) and Tangle (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Claire Scully

London-based graphic designer who created the commercial typefaces Nature Club (2012), Feather (2012, a caps face) and Anemone (2012, floriated initials) at The Type Foundry. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Claire92

Student at UWE, Bristol, UK, who made the floriated caps face Vintage Mechanism (2011, FontStruct). [Google] [More]  ⦿

ClanSoul

British designer who made the dingbat face death Note (2009). Home page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Clare

Digital artist from the UK (b. 1981) who is involved in Evenstar Art. As Cosmomouse, she created the underlined and boxed caps font House M.D. (2006). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Clare Acheson

Creator of the hand-rendered typeface Rubbish (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Clare Vacha

Illustrator and designer in London. Creator of the Ciomic Sans-style typeface Chat Up (2014). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Clare Vickers

Graphic Design at NUCA in Norwich, UK. She created Fluent (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Clarendon

A discussion on Typophile regarding the history of Clarendon and good versions. This site provides additional information. A summary:

  • The original Clarendon is due to Robert Besley (1845). Robert Bringhurst writes: Clarendon is the name of a whole genus of Victorian typefaces, spawned by a font cut by Benjamin Fox for Robert Besley at the Fann Street Foundry, London, in 1845. These faces reflect the hearty, stolid, bland, unstoppable aspects of the British Empire. They lack cultivation, but they also lack menace and guile. They squint and stand their ground, but they do not glare. In other words, they consist of thick strokes melding into thick slab serifs, fat ball terminals, vertical axis, large eye, low contrast and tiny aperture. The original had no italic, as the face had nothing of the fluent hand or sculpted nib left in its pedigree.
  • Robert Bringhurst: Herman Eidenbenz drew a revival Clarendon for Haas Foundry in Münchenstein, Switzerland, in 1951, and in 1962 the foundry finally added the light weight that transformed the series, paring it down from premodern ponderousness to postmodern insubstantiality. Clarendon LT (Linotype) is the digital version of this face (Linotype says that the face was created in 1953, contradicting Bringhurst).
  • Freeman "Jerry" Craw designed the Craw Clarendon (Book and Condensed) at ATF in 1955-1960. It is available, e.g., as Craw Clarendon EF, OPTI Craw Clarendon, and Craw Clarendon (2013, Jordan Davies).
  • Contemporary Clarendons include Font Bureau's Giza, Storm's Farao and Hoefler's Proteus.

Poster by Elizabeth West. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Clarendon

The original Clarendon is due to Robert Besley (1845). Robert Bringhurst writes: Clarendon is the name of a whole genus of Victorian typefaces, spawned by a font cut by Benjamin Fox for Robert Besley at the Fann Street Foundry, London, in 1845. These faces reflect the hearty, stolid, bland, unstoppable aspects of the British Empire. They lack cultivation, but they also lack menace and guile. They squint and stand their ground, but they do not glare. In other words, they consist of thick strokes melding into thick slab serifs, fat ball terminals, vertical axis, large eye, low contrast and tiny aperture. The original had no italic, as the face had nothing of the fluent hand or sculpted nib left in its pedigree.

Mac McGrew adds: Clarendon is a traditional English style of typeface, dating from the 1840s, the name coming from the Clarendon Press at Oxford, or, according to some sources, from Britain's Earl of Clarendon and his interest in that country's Egyptian policies. (Such faces were classified as Egyptians, and inspired such later designs as Cairo, Karnak, Memphis, and Stymie.) Early Clarendons were used primarily as titles and display faces, for which their strong and sturdy nature was well suited. They have the general structure of romans, but lack the hairlines typical of those faces. Being heavier, the traditional Clarendons were often used as boldfaces with romans, before the family idea provided matching boldface designs.

McGrew continues his discussion by pointing out various revivals and typefaces with strong similarities: Similar faces were known as Doric or Ionic, before more individualized type names became common; in fact, all three names were sometimes used interchangeably. Most foundries had versions of Clarendon, and sometimes Doric and Ionic, in the nineteenth century, but most of these faces were obsolescent by the turn of the century. However, a few were copied by Linotype, Intertype and Monotype, and thus given a renewed lease on life. Clarendon Medium of BB&S was formerly known as Caledonian. ATF had a similar face known as Ionic No. 522. Keystone showed Clarendon Condensed in 1890. Clarendon [No. 51 of BB&S was called Winchendon by Hansen, and extended to 48-point. Like many pre-point-system faces, some foundries adapted them to point-system standards by casting them on oversize bodies, others on undersize bodies with overhanging descenders. In the later 1950s Stephenson Blake in England revived several of these early Clarendons under the new name of Consort, which became a popular import (and the source of some of our specimens). Consort Bold Condensed is said to be the first Clarendon, of 1845. (Some added members of the Consort family are noted under Popular Imports in the Appendix.) In 1953 a new version of Clarendon was developed by Hermann Eidenbenz for the Haas Typefoundry in Switzerland and later acquired by Stempel in Germany. The Haas Clarendon was copied by Linotype in 1966, in light and bold weights, and about the same time Ludlow brought out three weights of essentially the same face. This was created primarily to set the newspaper ads of a large department store, but it was a good addition to the resources of Ludlow. ATF commissioned a modernized rendition of Clarendon from Freeman Craw, and this was brought out in 1955 as Craw Clarendon (q.v.). About 1961 Monotype brought out Clarendon Bold Extended, similar to Craw Clarendon but heavier. Also see Ionic, News with Clarendon, Manila.

Poster by Elizabeth West. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Clarice Dall'Orto

London, UK-based designer of Conceptual (2014), an experimental font based on circles. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Classic Font Company
[Anthony Nash]

The Classic Font Company is a small foundry with absolutely gorgeous commercial fonts (often revivals of pen drawings) by Tony Nash (b. Bristol, 1944): Abby (blackletter family), Amadeus (1997), Batard, Bede, Byro, Carol (1997, blackletter family), Classic (2000-2002), Copper, Doodles (2000), El Cid (2000), Frameworks, Karen, Kells (celtic uncial), Prima, Priory (1997), Savoy (1997, a great bastarda font family accompanied by Savoy Frames), Scriptoria, Theodore (1995, blackletter font), Tuscany (Lombardic face), Versals (2000, Lombardic capitals). Plus 13 sets of fantastic caps (but not in font format) by Andy Jeffery. Based in North Somerset, UK.

Not to be confused with the rip-off outfit "Classic Font Corporation, USA".

Linotype link.

Identifont lists these faces: Abby, Abby Hilite, Abby Lowlite, Abby Open, Abby Split, Amadeus, Carol, Classic, Copper, Doodles (CFC), El-Cid, FW-Leaves, Kells, Priory, Savoy, Theodore, Theodore Fancy, Tuscany (CFC), Versals.

View Classic Font Company's typeface library. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

ClaWrite
[Matthew Meddy Collins]

ClaWrite is an alphabet based on a 3x3 grid of straight strokes -- which are very easily made with claws, hence the name. It was something I designed in the early 1990s as a system of dragon writing, but it has plenty of applications for us folks in human bodies, too. No kidding, this is an alphabet for dragons. A font was made by Mark Johnston, but I could not find it. Matthew Meddy Collins from the UK made another one, called ClaWrite2009, but that font in turn seems to have been made by Tori Kabuto---help. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Clément Fusil

French student who is studying graphic arts at the Winchester School of Art in the UK. He created a thin and moody typeface called Decay (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Clement Robert

French designer in London who has a Masters from Maryse Eloy Art School in Paris, 2011. Behance link.

Dünn (2012) is a thin blackletter font created in collaboration with Claire Doghmi during a workshop with Jean Widmer. Dünn is the skeletal version of Fette Gotisch. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Clive Bruton

Clive Bruton graduated from the London College of Printing in 1988. He became a type technology specialist. He is a director of INDX/Creatives Connect, a consultancy in London for new technologies and workflow. He started the on-line type publication Fontzone in 1996. Bruton designed Julius, based on Frutiger's Avenir, Adams Rounded, based on VAG Rounded, Christina, and Mad Mach. Someone told me he also designed Debenhams Titling, but I can't find any evidence of that on the web. The link has gone dead. At Typotechnica 2005, he spoke about "a practical demonstration of font customisation, for example the name of the purchaser and their address, on a per-customer basis. With a desktop application to display such information to any end user." [Google] [More]  ⦿

Club 21
[Julian Morey]

The founder of and only designer at at Club 21 is Julian Morey, a graphic designer and font creator from London who designed Pacific (1999, an octic typeface influenced by American naval lettering), VMR (1999), SignPlate (a stencil font), Sigma OT (2008, a sans based on a Stephenson Blake grotesque), Skye (2001, a stencil font), Skye Outline [note: Skye used to be called Axis], Checkout, Alpine (2000), Brassplate, Greenwich (2001, a stencil font with fine breaks; used to be called Bronxville), Codex, Electro, Ionia, Jakarta (2000, an octagonal sports/stencil font; was called Jersey), Kathode, Octago (an octagonal stencil face), Liquid, Simpson Typewriter, Preset, Roadworks (1992, stencil font), Thompson Monospaced, Spacer (1999), Paintworks, Portfolio. FontWorks used to sell their fonts, but now Faces does. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Club Type
[Adrian Williams]

Original typefaces designed by Rosemary Sassoon and Adrian Williams (b. Bridgwater, Somerset, 1950), an English advertising typographer and type designer. Located in Red Hill, Surrey, Club Type was founded in 1985 by Williams and Sassoon. Before that, Williams had been been converting many established metal designs for the new filmsetting devices in 1969, and continued with conversions into the digital era. This led to the production of custom made fonts for Renault, Marks&Spencer, Jaguar Cards and Foster's Lager among others. Wide font services. Sassoon worked on scripts with joined letters. She is most famous for her Sassoon Primary font family (primary school writing). Adrian Williams designed the following families: Admark (1990), Bulldog (1990, a grotesque family based on 1870 Figgins), Bulldog Slab (2009), Bulldog Hunter Std (2010, another slab version), Club Type (1998-2002: his inspiration was the lettering used for cartoon captions in the Mercurius Aulicus, England's first regular newspaper, from 1642 to 1647), Club Type Script Pro (quill pen script), Column (1992), Congress Sans (1992), Eurocrat (1991), Leamington, Mercurius (1989, a bouncy typeface inspired by the lettering used for cartoon captions in the Mercurius Aulicus, England's first regular newspaper, from 1642 to 1647), Monkton (1990), Poseidon (1991), Raleigh (1977, with Carl Dair and Robert Norton), Rileyson (2010, humanist sans family; +Great, +Teen, +Parent), Seagull, Stratford [see Stratford SH, Scangraphic], Veronan and Worcester Rounded and Worchester.

FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Codesign (or: Aviation Partners, or AVP)
[Nicholas Garner]

Nicholas Garner (b. 1949, Windsor) runs Codesign (or: Aviation Partners), a small London-based design firm which has created these commercial type families:

  • Cerafino (2005): informal sans.
  • Delamere (2005): more classical sans.
  • Kensington (2005): titling sans related to Gill Sans.
  • Maisee (2005): an open, wide, generous and broadly smiling sans family.
  • Tenison (2005): connected formal script.
  • Fiendstar (2006, 16 styles; +Cameo (white on black), +Shaded) (after Gill Sans Schoolbook).
  • Rosie (2010): a connected cosy script, in the Mistral style.
  • Norwich (2006): a grungy version of Tenison. Outrage (2006) is more grunge.
  • Cashback (2006).
  • Crystal (2006): a slab serif family.
  • Autobahn (2011) is a monoline elliptical sans family. Garner writes: Autobahn is a robust masculine sans of near monoline thickness and angular characteristics. Autocode (2011) is a monoline monospaced (for programs) elliptical sans based on Autobahn.
  • LaCarte (2007): inspired by a series of handwritten menus produced in 1980. Further extended to La Carte Pen in 2010.
  • Midas (2007).
  • Sky Sans (including hairline weights) (2007).
  • Lamoreli (2007).
  • Backstage (2007). A stencil face.
  • Amy (2010). Nicely handprinted.
  • Atria (2010) An ink-trapped sans-serif.
  • Blocksta (2010). A rounded fat sans.
  • The elegant script face Jacqueline (2010).
  • New Fiendstar (2010).
  • Omniscript (2010).
  • Cambridge (2010). An elegant sans family with a misbehaving lower case q. Accompanied by a Cambridge Round family. It is designed as a schoolbook font, and is useful for dyslexics, since there are no ambiguities between letterforms.
  • Central (2011). A rounded geometric sans family. Followed in 2012 by Central Inline.
  • Combi (2011). This is a wonderful effort, as described by Garner himself: The Combi collection includes Sans, Sans Oblique, a true Italic, Serif, Serif Oblique and a set of Openface capitals. Combi fonts have 5 compatible weights and metrics allowing them to be used in free combination. Inspiration came from Jan Van Krimpen's Romulus (Enschedé, 1931). In addition to the Roman style, Van Krimpen created a set of open capitals, a simple oblique variant and subsequently, an attractive calligraphic italic, Cancelleresca Bastarda. In addition to Van Krimpen's idea, Combi has been influenced by features from many faces including Bembo, Melior and Optima. The object was to create a versatile family of body text and titling faces for use in books, magazines and on the web.

    Polaris (2012) is a rounded sans family that reads well in print and on screens.

    Mensa (2012) is a 36-weight large x-height sans body family.

  • Beaulieu (2012).
  • Clocktime (2012). A dingbat font with clocks.
  • Chokey Pro (2012). A tall connected script face.
  • Alleyn (2013), a soft geometric sans family.
  • Corsica (2013). Corsica is an all-purpose geometric sans-serif typeface of visually uniform stroke thickness. The family contains six weights, two widths and three lowercase size options, together with an italic variant for each.

MyFonts site. Klingspor link.

Showcase of Nicholas Garner's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Colin Banks

Born in Ruislip, Middlesex, in 1932, Colin Banks has been involved in graphic design, corporate identity and typography since 1958 through the London-based partnership Banks&Miles (1958-1998), with John Miles.

Author of London's handwriting (London Transport Museum, 1994) about the development of Edward Johnston's Underground Railway Block-Letter. CV. He died in March 2002 in Blackheath. Obituary by James Alexander.

Banks&Miles had offices in London, Amsterdam, Hamburg and Bruxelles. Their clients included the British Council (it is unclear if he helped design British Council Sans at Agfa Monotype in 2002: a major controversy erupted in the UK when it was learned that the British Council had paid 50k pounds for British Council Sans), English National Opera, the European Parliament Election campaigns, producing corporate identities for the Post Office, Royal Mail, British Telecom, the Institute of Mechanical Engineers, Fondation Roi Baudouin, City and Guilds, Commission for Racial Equality, United Nations University, and major publications etc for UNHCR Geneva. He was consultant to London Transport for over thirty years, then Mott Macdonald engineers and Oxford University Press.

The Royal Mail font is called Post Office Double Line, and was designed by Colin Banks in the 1970s.

The British Council Sans family (2002, Agfa Monotype) is now available for free download here. Included is support for Arabic (Boutros British Council Arabic), Khazak, Greek, Cyrillic, and Azerbaijani.

Other typefaces with Colin Banks's name on it include New Johnston (1979, after Edward Johnston's typeface for the London subway) and the sharp-serifed Gill Facia (Monotype: based on letters drawn by Eric Gill in 1906 for use by the stationers, W. H. Smith) [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Colin Brignall

British type designer and art director, born in 1940 (MyFonts.com says 1945, Warwickshire), who was type director at Letraset for some time. In 1995 Brignall moved to ITC. With the closure of ITC's New York office in November 1999, Brignall was re-appointed Type Director for Esselte Letraset. The latest major project in which Brignall was involved was the ITC Johnston series launched in 1999. He received the Type Directors Club Medal at TDC2 in 2001. The Letraset and ITC collections are now owned (via Linotype) by Monotype.

Bio. Bio at Linotype. His fonts include

  • Aachen Bold (1969), Aachen Medium (1977, with Alan Meeks). The Scangraphic version is Aachen SH. In 2012, Jim Wasco (Monotype) extended Aachen to 18 fonts including an italic, called Neue Aachen.
  • Revue (1969), an unsuccessful display face.
  • Countdown (1965, LED simulation face), cyrillicized in 1993 by A. Kustov at TypeMarket.
  • Superstar (1970, an athletic lettering face now owned by ITC and sold by MyFonts).
  • Italia (1974; see Istria on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, 2002), Italia Book (1977).
  • Premier Lightline (1969), an elegant art deco hairline face.
  • Premier Shaded (1970), caps only shaded art deco face.
  • Romic Light (1979-1980). See R790 Roman on Softmaker's XXL CD (2002).
  • Corinthian (1981).
  • Epokha (1992), a 1910 poster style slab serif.
  • Edwardian (1983). The digital version is at Elsner&Flake, for example.
  • Harlow (1977-1979), a fifties style display script. The Scangraphic versions are Harlow SB and Harlow SH.
  • Octopuss (1970), similar to Harlow.
  • Tango (1974) [a freefont inspired by Tango can be found in Julius B. Thyssen's Kylie 1996-J], yet another face in the spirit of Harlow.
  • Jenson Old Style (1982, with Freda Sack), a Venetian face.
  • Victorian (1976, with Freda Sack).
  • Type Embellishments One, Two and Three (1994): handsome ornaments developed in the Letraset Type Studio by Michael Gills and Colin Brignall to complement the Fontek Typeface Library.
  • Retro Bold (1992, a slab serif done with Andrew Smith).
  • ITC Werkstatt (1999, ITC: a hookish Preissig-style face developed with Satwinder Sehmi).

FontShop link. Klingspor link.

View Colin Brignall's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Colin R. Gibson

Derby, UK-based graphic designer who created experimental typefaces called Bipolar (2012) and OCD (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Colleen Burns

Colleen Burns (London, UK) created the hand-drawn Times Even Newer Roman (2014). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Colophon Foundry
[Edd Harrington]

Colophon is an independent type foundry set up by Brighton-based design studio, The Entente (Anthony Sheret&Edd Harrington) in April 2009. Benjamin Critton (Brooklyn, NY) joined them later. They state: As well as distributing and acting as a platform for fonts designed by the studio, it selects fonts designed by others to distribute and create products for. Working in a similar way to that of a publishers, each typeface that is released by Colophon will be in a limited edition. Each font will be unique in its edition, ranging from 50-500. A specimen book will also be produced for each typeface, and can be purchased as an additional item. These specimen books will always be printed in an edition of 50. They welcome submissions. Fonts:

  • Aperçu (2011), a sans family.
  • Peggs (2009): typewriter style for the identity of Peggs&Son, designed by Edd Harrington.
  • Perfin (2009, by Alison Haigh).
  • Raisonne (2011).
  • Fortescue (2009)L: a text family with triangular serifs.
  • Monosten (2011).
  • Montefiore (2009): a grotesque with wood type influences.
  • Pantograph: Pantograph is an authentic redraw of the typeface employed by the British pantograph etching process. Designed by Hamish Makgill in 2009.
  • Reader (2009): Reader is a neo-grotesque typeface initially created in a medium weight, and now re-cut into a base family of six weights with an additional seventh in the form of Reader Black. The typeface itself has been referenced from an RSPB letter dating 1972. The original typeface, which is unknown, was a monospaced, rounded face. It had geometric proportions which felt like they wanted to break free of the restrictions of a monospaced grid.
  • Perçu (2010): a full sans family that is---in their own words---an amalgamation of classic humanist typefaces such as Johnston and Gill Sans with Neuzeit and Franklin Gothic.
  • Value Sans and Value Serif (2012): Value Sans borrows in style and behaviour from precedents like Elegant Grotesk and Granby. Value Serif pays homage to forebears like Plantin Infant and Italian Old Style. The Sans was drawn first by The Entente (Edd Harrington & Anthony Sheret, UK). The Serif was drawn shortly after, by Benjamin Critton (US). Each borrows their geometries from the other, and nuances were finalised by all parties as Colophon Foundry.
  • Lydia Bold Condensed (2013, Benjamin Critton) revives an angular typeface by Warren Chappell from 1946.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Commercial Type
[Christian Schwartz]

Foundry, est. 2009 or 2010 by Paul Barnes (London and New York) and Christian Schwartz (New York). Their own blurb: Commercial Type is a joint venture between Paul Barnes and Christian Schwartz, who have collaborated since 2004 on various typeface projects, most notably the award winning Guardian Egyptian. The company publishes retail fonts developed by Schwartz and Barnes, their staff, and outside collaborators, and also represents the two when they work together on typedesign projects. Following the redesign of The Guardian, as part of the team headed by Mark Porter, Schwartz and Barnes were awarded the Black Pencil from the D&AD. The team were also nominated for the Design Museum's Designer of the Year prize. In September 2006, Barnes and Schwartz were named two of the 40 most influential designers under 40 in Wallpaper. Klingspor link.

In house type designers in 2010: Paul Barnes, Christian Schwartz, Berton Haasebe, and Abi Huynh.

  • Austin (+Cyrillic): Designed for British style magazine Harper's&Queen, Austin is a loose revival of the typefaces of Richard Austin of the late 18th century for the publisher John Bell. Working as a trade engraver Austin cut the first British modern and later the iconoclastic Scotch Roman. Narrow without being overtly condensed, Austin is a modern with the styling and sheen of New York in the 1970s. Designed by Paul Barnes and Ilya Ruderman from 2007-2009. Has a Cyrillic.
  • Giorgio (+Sans): Giorgio and its matching sans were designed for Chris Martinez at T, the New York Times Style Magazine, bringing runway proportions to the page in contrasting ways. Designed by Christian Schwartz, 2008-2009.
  • Graphik: The dominant trend of the mid twentieth century simple sans serifs still reverberates in visual culture. Graphik proves that it is still possible to create something refreshing inspired by this era. Taking cues from the less-known anonymous grotesques and geometric sans serifs, Graphik is perfectly suited for graphic and publication design. Originally designed for the Schwartz's own corporate identity, it was later finished for Condé Nast Portfolio and then expanded for Wallpaper and later T, the New York Times Style Magazine. Designed by Christian Schwartz in 2009.
  • Guardian (Egyptian Headline, Sans Headline, Egyptian Text, Agate Sans): What happens when you try to make a new sans serif by chopping the slabs off of an Egyptian? That was the original inspiration behind this modern classic designed for Mark Porter and the Guardian newspaper. Comprised of several interrelated families: Sans and Egyptian for headlines; a Text Egyptian; and an Agate Sans, every possible typographic need of a daily paper is fulfilled. Serious news headlines, expressive features, readable text, tiny financial listings, info graphics, and everything in between can be capably handled with ease. Designed by Paul Barnes and Christian Schwartz, 2009.
  • Lyon Text: Begun as Kai Bernau's degree project on the Type + Media course at the Royal Academy of Art (KABK) in The Hague, Bernau extensively revised the typeface in time for its debut in the New York Times Magazine in 2009. Like many of the great seriffed typefaces it draws intelligently from the work of Robert Granjon, the master of the Renaissance, while having a contemporary feel. Its elegant looks, are matched with an intelligent, anonymous nature, making it excellent for magazines, book and newspapers. Designed by Kai Bernau, 2009.
  • Neue Haas Grotesk (2011).
  • Stag (+Sans, Dot, Stencil, Sans Round): Stag started as a small family of slab serifs commissioned for headlines by the US edition of Esquire magazine and eventually grew into a sprawling multi-part family including a flexible sans companion and two additional display variants that are probably best described as special effects. Designed by Christian Schwartz, Berton Hasebe and Ross Milne, 2008, 2009.
  • Atlas Grotesk (2012, by Kai Bernau, Susan Carvalho and Christian Schwartz, Commercial Type). A revival of Dick Dooijes's Mercator.
  • VF Didot (2013) is a custom Didot by Paul Barnes and Christian Schwartz for Vanity Fair, as requested by its design director, Chris Dixon. Based on work of Molé Le Jeune, a punchcutter used by the Didot family in the early part of the 19th century, VFDidot has 7 optical sizes and up to 5 weights in each size, plus small caps and even a stencil style.
  • Zizou or Clouseau (2011). A reworking (from memory) of Antique Olive (1960, Roger Excoffon). This was published at the end of 2013 as Duplicate (2013, with Miguel Reyes). In three styles, Slab, Sans and Ionic. Commercial Type writes: Christian Schwartz wanted to see what the result would be if he tried to draw Antique Olive from memory. He was curious whether this could be a route to something that felt contemporary and original, or if the result would be a pale imitation of the original. Most of all, he wanted to see what he would remember correctly and what he would get wrong, and what relationship this would create between the inspiration and the result. Though it shares some structural similarities with Antique Olive and a handful of details, like the shape of the lowercase a, Duplicate Sans is not a revival, but rather a thoroughly contemporary homage to Excoffon. Duplicate Sans was finally finished at the request of Florian Bachleda for his 2011 redesign of Fast Company. Bachleda wanted a slab companion for the sans, so Schwartz decided to take the most direct route: he simply added slabs to the sans in a straightforward manner, doing as little as he could to alter the proportions, contrast, and stylistic details in the process. The bracketed serifs and ball terminals that define the Clarendon genre (also known as Ionic) first emerged in Britain in the middle of the 19th century. While combining these structures with a contemporary interpretation of a mid-20th century French sans serif seems counterintutive, the final result feels suprisingly natural. The romans are a collaboration between Christian Schwartz and Miguel Reyes, but the italic is fully Reyes?~@~Ys creation, departing from the sloped romans seen in Duplicate Sans and Slab with a true cursive. Mark Porter and Simon Esterson were the first to use the family, in their 2013 redesign of the Neue Züricher Zeitung am Sonntag. Beecause the Ionic genre has ll ong been a common choice for text in newspapers, Duplicate Ionic is a natural choice for long texts.

    The crew in 2012 includes Paul Barnes (Principal), Christian Schwartz (Principal), Vincent Chan (type designer), Berton Hasebe (type designer) and Mark Record (font technician). Miguel Reyes joined in 2013.

    View Christian schwartz's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

  • ConnieG

    UK-based FontStructor (student at UWE) who made the all-caps texture face In My Mind (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Connor McKay

    British designer of the angular typeface Jiggly Duo (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Connor Spink

    Graphic design student in Leeds, UK, who created the textured typeface Skateface (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Conor Dorsett

    Graphic design student at Falmouth University in Falmouth, UK. He used lines only to construct, as a bridge, the glyphs of Frequency (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Conor Green

    UK-based creator (b. 1992) of the modular typeface Curvada.

    Dafont link. Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Conor Mangat

    British designer (b. 1968, South East London) of Platelet (1993, inspired by California license plate systems---organic and dysfunctional, and in my view an eyesore) and Boks (1994) at Emigre. A graduate from CalArts in 1994, he returned to London in 1999 for a Masters in Typeface Design at Reading University. He is also a freelance typographic designer whose latest font project is called Protocol, which he originally developed Protocol (2001) as a student at the University of Reading. He works in San Francisco. At ATypI in Rome in 2002, he spoke about the Euro currency symbol. FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Corey J. Dixon

    British creator of Molecular (2011), an experimental typeface in which glyphs represent parts of organic chemical compounds. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Cos Ryan

    Creator (b. 1985, based in Worcester, UK) of Dead Ends Lettering (2011, handprinted).

    Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    countzeero

    The pixel font countzeero4own (2008) was created through FontStruct. Alternate URL of this designer in the UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Coventry University Font Foundry

    Coventry University Font Foundry is a group of students that design and sell fonts. It is used as a learning aid, where students learn about typography and the final outcome is a working font. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Craig Cummings

    UK-based designer in 2008-2009 of the free fonts ABC (using arcs of circles), UNC (2008, gorgeous multiline headline face), Getting Blocky (geometric, abstract), London 2012 (based on the font of the Olympic Games), Fox Font (extremely simple monoline sans), Artree (2008, hairline geometric monoline sans), myfoxhandwritenItalic (2008, sic), Moraz (2008, experimental titling font), WeWant (2008, handprinted), Kylie Baker (2009, soft techno avant garde face), My Handwriting, Contempory (2008, elegant avant-garde sans), Alta (2008, hand-printed geometric sans experiment), GettingBlocky (2008, experimental), MyFox (2008, simp0le sans), and Everyone (aka London2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Craig Melvin

    Craig Melvin (Reading, UK) created Stencil (2013) during his studies. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Craig Munro

    Cartoonist in the UK who created the hand-printed Marker Fumes (2009, FontCapture). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Craig Oldham

    Manchester, UK-based retired football player, book addict, and graphic designer. He made a "nudist" typeface (jpg only). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Craig Stainton
    [SelfBuild Type Foundry]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Craig Ward

    Designer who was based in London but now works in New York. Creator of nice typographic examples, such as his Hairy Futura (2008). He designed the fat didone display face Lovechild (2009) and the spurred typeface Killer (2013). Other typefaces: Go Vote (2012, a brush poster and modular typeface for the American elections), Dark White (didone), Epitaph (alchemic).

    Home page. Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Crave
    [Lyndon Povey]

    Crave Ltd is a foundry in London that is run by Lyndon Povey, the Ingoldisthorpe, Norfolk, UK-based designer who specializes in labels for whiskey, vodka and gin bottles. Povey designed the nearly Victorian font family Boatbuilder (2012), which has a nautical look. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Crazy Diamond Design Historical Fonts
    [Alex Moseley]

    Wonderful 16-th century (commercial) fonts from this Manchester, UK-based foundry, including the Formal Text Hand package, Written Square Capitals (2005: roman inscriptional caps), Rustic Capitals (2005), Chancery Hand, Italic Hand, Bastard Secretary Hand, Secretary Hand, Hand of the Court of the Common Pleas, 17th Century Print, 17th Century Italic. Most fonts by Alex Moseley. For a fee, get the fonts used in the Harry Potter film, globally called Wizardings: The Wizard Hand, Black Cat Letter (blackletter), Parchment Print&Italic, Wizard Runes, Wizardings. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Createdvoid

    Student at UWE Bristol in the UK. FontStructor who made the squarish minimalist faces Litewerk, Slitewerk, and Heavywerk in 2010. About these, he says: Roughly based on the structure of the London underground designed by Harry Beck. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Creative Goats
    [Michael Gills]

    Michael Gills is a British calligrapher and graphic and type designer. He founded Creative Goats in Ipswich, Suffolk, UK. He worked first at Letraset (1988-1995) where he made faces such as Charlotte and Charlotte Sans, Elysium, Gilgamesh, Fling, Forkbeard, Frances Uncial, Isis, Katfish, Prague and Type Embellishments. He is currently an art director at The Folio Society: Book publishers, London. His fonts:

    • Elyseum Book (1992), originally at Letraset, now sold by ITC.
    • Charlotte Book (1992), originally at Letraset, now sold by ITC.
    • Figural Book (1992; art direction by Colin Brignall; based on a face of Oldrich Menhart), originally at Letraset, now sold by ITC.
    • Isis (1990, Letraset).
    • Katfish (1994, Letraset).
    • Prague (1991, Letraset, sold by ITC; based on a face of Oldrich Menhart).
    • Fling (1995), an upright connected script originally published at Letraset, but now an ITC font. Recently used for Martha Stewart's Blueprint magazine.
    • Gilgamesh Book (1994), Gilgamesh Book Italic, Gilgamesh Medium, Gilgamesh Bold, all originally at Letraset, now sold by ITC. Plus Gilgamesh Titling (Fontek).
    • Spidercave (Fontek).
    • Type Embellishments Three (with Martin Wait, 1994, originally at Letraset). With Colin Brignall, Type Embellishments One (1993) and Type Embellishments Two (1993).
    • Forkbeard (Letraset).
    • Frances Uncial (1995, Letraset).
    • Avalanche Script (originally from Letraset).

    FontShop link. Klingspor link.

    View Michael Gills's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Creative Truetype Font Service

    Truetype font service based in the UK: signature fonts for 29 pounds. Font matching for 39 pounds. Company logos. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Cristina Pais

    Gorgeous web page. UK-based designer of the free fonts Fely (2007, script), Opalo (2007, artsy), Camomile (2007, orthogonal cut) and Unruly (2007). Dafont link. She also made the artsy sans family Lua (2007). Alternate URL. Fontsy link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    CTR Font Foundry
    [Carl Thomas Redfern]

    Carl Thomas Redfern is a British type designer, b. 1993, Shrewsbury. He set up CTR Font Foundry in Oswestry, UK. CTR's first typeface is the squarish military typeface Alpha (2012). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Curtis White

    Graphic designer at BMT London.

    In 2014, Ricardo Martins, Filipe Almeida and Curtis White codesigned the ray-lit 3d Balloon typeface (2014), which must have been a technical tour de force. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    C.W. Shortt

    Type foundry in the early 20th century in London. Gravure (1929), an engraved old style face by them, was digitally revived in 2007 by Nick Curtis as Lateral Incised NF (2007). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Cy King

    London, UK-based illustrator (b. 1985). Blog on design. Creator of True Love's Kiss (2008), after the official logo of the Disney movie Enchanted. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Cybertype (was: Western Commercial Arts Company (WCA Co))
    [Kevin Simpson]

    Cybertype is Kevin Simpson's web presence. He used to run a site called the Western Commercial Arts Company (WCA Co). Kevin is a freelance designer in the East Berkshire, U.K. He used to do custom type design. His fonts include Dead Oak, Emphive, Stainless Steel, Faux, Fiftyfour, Jonathan, Optika, MrJones, Remington, Shel, Stewart, diGriz, Shel, Optika (hoowee!), Obscura (great target vision font), Stewart, Swiss92, Chatham, Eadwy, Jonathan, Hoopy Frood.

    Agfa-Monotype, he published Aitos (2000), a beautiful fat lettering display font. Portobello is a connected children's educational font. Kevin offers a host of type services.

    Home page. FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Cypriote metafont
    [Alan M. Stanier]

    From Essex University, Alan M. Stanier's metafont for Cypriot. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    D. Busson
    [DF667 (or: DiagnostiK foundation; was: Oblong Design)]

    [More]  ⦿

    Daisy Hill

    Graphic designer in Leeds, UK. Her typeface Block Life (2012) consists of transparent cubes in which letters are carved by straight edges. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dalton Maag
    [Bruno Maag]

    Swiss designer Bruno Maag (b. Zürich) founded Dalton Maag in 1991, and set up shop in Brixton, South London. He serves the corporate market with innovative type designs, but also has a retail font line. Ex-Monotype designer Ron Carpenter designs type for the foundry. In the past, type designers Veronika Burian and fabio Luiz Haag have worked for Dalton Maag. A graduate of the Basel School of Design, who worked at Stempel and was invitedd by Rene Kerfante to Join Monotype to start up a custom type department. After that, he set up Dalton Maag with his wife Liz Dalton. He has built the company into a 40-employee enterprise with offices in London, Boston, Brazil, Vienna and Hong Kong.

    Bruno Maag designed these commercial fonts:

    • Aktiv Grotesk (2010) was published as an alternative to Helvetica, a face Bruno hates with a passion.
    • Co (2007): a rounded monoline minimalist sans codesigned by Bruno Maag and Ron Carpenter.
    • Cordale: a text family.
    • Dedica (2007): a didone face.
    • Effra and Effra Italic (2007-2009): sans family by Jonas Schudel and Fabio Luiz Haag. Followed in 2013 by Effra Corp.
    • Fargo (2004): a humanist sans in 6 weights.
    • Foco: sans family.
    • Grueber (2008): a slab serif.
    • InterFace (2007): an extensive sans family; one weight is free (2001). See also InterFace Corporate (2007).
    • King's Caslon
    • Lexia (1999, Ron Carpenter and Dalton Maag): a slab serif family.
    • Magpie (2008) is a serifed family---Dalton Maag was able to trademark the name Magpie despite the fact that Vincent Connare had created a face by that name in 2000. Well, as with so many of Maag's announcements, it took siome time before he gave credit to Connare---in fact, Magpie isConnare's font.
    • Pan (1996). A text family at 1500 US dollars per style.
    • Plume (2004): a display face inspired by calligraphy, co-designed with Ron Carpenter.
    • Royalty (1999): a stunning art deco display family.
    • Southampton.
    • Stroudley (2007): a sturdy large counter condensed sans by Bruno Maag, Ron Carpenter and Veronika Burian.
    • Tephra (2008): a collaboration with Hamish Muir. This is an experimental multi-layered LED-inspired family.
    • Tondo Corp (2007, at Dalton Maag): a rounded information design sans family designed by Veronika Burian for Dalton Maag.
    • Ubuntu (2010): this is a team effort---a set of four styles of a free font called Ubuntu. This font supports the Indian rupee symbol. Some work for the Ubuntu Font Family was done by Rodrigo Rivas Costa in 2010. Download via Fontspace.
    • Viato: a simple sans family co-designed by Bruno Maag and Ron Carpenter in 2007. This tapered terminal sans family includes Viato Corp (2007) and Viato Hebrew (2013).

    Fonts sold at Fontworks, and through the Bitstream Type Odyssey CD (2001). At the ATypI in 2001 in Copenhagen, he stunned the audience by announcing that he would never again make fonts for the general public. From now on, he would just do custom fonts out of his office in London. And then he delighted us with the world premiere of two custom font families, one for BMW (BMWType, 2000, a softer version of Helvetica, with a more virile "a"; some fonts are called BMWHelvetica), and one for the BMW Mini in 2001 (called MINIType: this family comprises MINITypeRegular-Bold, MINITypeHeadline-Regular, MINITypeHeadline-Bold, MINITypeRegular-Regular).

    Other custom faces: Tottenham Hotspur (2006), Teletext Signature (by Basten Greenhill Andrews and Dalton Maag), Skoda (Skoda Sans CE by Dalton Maag is based on Skoda Formata by Bernd Möllenstädt and MetaDesign London), UPC Digital, BT (for British Telecommunications), Coop Switzerland (for Coop Schweiz), eircom, Lambeth Council, Tesco (2002), PPP Healthcare, ThyssenKrup (Dalton Maag sold his soul to these notorious arms dealers; TK Type is the name of the house font), Co Headline (2006), Co Text (2006, now a commercial font), Telewest Broadband, Toyota Text and Display (2008), TUIType, HPSans (for Hewlett-Packard, 1997). His custom Vodafone family (sans) (2005) is based on InterFace. In 2011, Dalton Maag created Nokia Pure for Nokia's identity and cellphones, to replace Erik Spiekermann's Nokia Sans (2002). The Nokia Pure typeface has rounder letters, and is simultaneously more legible and more rhythmic.

    In 2010, the Dalton Maag team consisted of Bruno Maag and David Marshall as managing and operations directors, and Vincent Connare as production manager. The type designers are Amélie Bonet, Ron Carpenter, Fabio Haag, Lukas Paltram and Malcolm Wooden.

    Typefaces at Dalton Maag from 2014 include Soleto (a simple sans) and Prometo (an organic stressed sans). Soleto (Bruno Mello, Fabio Haag, Fernando Caro, Rafael Saraiva and Ron Carpenter) won an award at Tipos Latinos 2014.

    Interview in 2012 in which he stresses that typefaces should above all be functional.

    View the Dalton Maag typeface library. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Damian Flores

    Spanish graphic designer who works in London. Creator of the bubblegum typeface Moruna (2013). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Damian Kidd

    Damian Kidd (UK) created the optical effect font Nucleus (2011). Each letter is created from 360 seperate spikes that all link to the centre. Printing at different sizes causes distortion so that the type face always seems different. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Damien Collot

    A 2011 graduate of École supérieure d'art et de design in Amiens, France, where he was supervised by Titus Nemeth. His type family, called Milosz, won the Type Design International Student Competition Milosz 2011. His thesis on the origins of italic script.

    In 2013, he joined Dalton Maag in London to work as a junior font designer. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Damien Guard
    [Envy Technologies Ltd]

    [More]  ⦿

    Dan

    UK-based creator of Dan's Hands (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dan Atkinson

    Sunderland, UK-based designer of the minimalist rounded sans face Modello (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dan Bryant

    UK-based designer of Deebee (2010, hand-printed font made with iFontMaker). Aka Binary Dental. [Google] [More]  ⦿


    [Hamish McWhirter]

    Halo Media (Hamish McWhirter) has designed a custom typeface for Beauty UK Cosmetics called You Beauty (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dan Erik Rønnbäck

    Dan Erik Rønnbäck (Noob Design, Kragerø, Norway) is a Norwegian designer who has a Bachelors degree in Multimedia Arts from John Moores University Liverpool, UK. He created an octagonal display face and a multiline art deco face in 2011.

    In 2013, while studying at IAD at Hyper Island in Stockholm, he created onezero Display, a large sans family.

    Behance link. Devian tart link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dan Heron

    Dan Heron (Manchester, UK) explains his experimental typeface Kittinger (2013): Inspired by Colonel Joseph Kittinger and his record-breaking skydive from 31,300m in 1960. The letter forms are based on the outlines of buildings seen from above, referencing the view Kittinger had as he fell to earth.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dan Hoopert

    Dan Hoopert (UK) created the Wire typeface in 2012, a 3d type project. While not a digital font, it is nevertheless a feat to be able to fit wires in three dimensional space to make these letters. What we need now is digital font technology to follow up on his idea so that we can rotate and turn 3d letters at will. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dan Howells

    UK-based designer of the freeware fonts Buttmunch, SwedishBird, ScruffyBuggerNormalII. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dan Jones
    [Nice Type]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Dan Penn

    During his studies at Birmingham City University, Dan Penn (Stourbridge, UK) created the piano key typeface WarFair (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dan Rhatigan
    [Ultrasparky]

    [More]  ⦿

    Dan Sayers

    Dan Sayers (aka iotic) is an app developer and software engineer, who studied mathematics at Oxford from 1994-1998, and evoluionary systems at Sussex from 2008-2010.

    He designed La Avería en El Ordenador (2011, OFL), an average of all 725 fonts on his computer. The fontfamily was split into Avería, Avería Sans and Avería Serif. Now, this may seem like a simple thing, but it is not! He took almost a year to complete this task, giving it a lot of thought. In the process, he created Font Path Viewer, a free web app for viewing the font outlines (with control points) of all fonts on one's system. He did the following clever thing: each font contour was split into 500 equal pieces (a serious exercise for Bezier fanatics), numbered from 1 to 500, and all 500 positions were averaged (over the fonts on his system) to obtain Avería. Interpolations between fonts have been attempted before (see Superpolator, or Font Remix), but to have it automated in this way is quite another achievement. More images of Avería: i, ii, iii.

    Averia Serif Libre (2012) exists in six styles, and there are also the Averia Libre, Averia Sans Libre and Averia Gruesa Libre families. These are available from Google Web Fonts.

    So, here is my small request for Dan: build an on-line tool, based on the Bezier outline cutting principle you pioneered, for interpolating between two typefaces. The user would submit two fonts, and the interpolation would be shown on the screen after a couple of seconds. I am sure you can do it!

    Abstract Fonts link. Google Plus link. Dafont link. Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dan Speer

    Designer (b. 1988) of Mashed Potato (2011).

    Dafont link. Dan lives in Winchester, UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dan Uwe

    Student at UWE in Bristol. Called Dan Uwe... ahem. During his studies at UWE, he used FontStruct to create the pipe font Pipeography (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dancers
    [Alan M. Stanier]

    From Essex University, Alan M. Stanier's metafont for stick figures dancing. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dane Beasley

    Illustrator and designer at Deletion Design in Sittingbourne, UK. Creator of a few techno faces like Techno Funk and Roun Da Funk. At Behance, one can find his fat counterless face Humain (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dane Wilson

    Graphic designer who published the ten-style elliptical sans family Synergy in 2012 at T26 and the techno face ITC Sportbet at ITC in 2009. He founded the design studio dane Design in London.

    Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Cassidy

    British software specialist and gamer. FontStructor who made several typefaces meant to be legible at extremely small sizes. In 2011, he made Three By Five (+AllCaps). In 2011, he designed Albach. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Ensor

    Designer in East Sussex, London. Creator of the grungy face Lino-set (2010, free at Dafont). In 2012, he started his own commercial foundry via MyFonts.

    Home page. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Gellatley

    British designer of the free sports font Nike 2002-04 (2012) and of Total 90 (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Harding

    London-based graphic designer who created an unnamed modular typeface in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Harper

    During his studies in Birmingham, UK, in 2012, Daniel Harper created a modular typeface just by using two shapes, an arc and a straight line segment. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Hudson
    [Substance]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Johnston

    Web and logo designer in Bristol, UK, b. 1993. Creator of Silly Pixel (2012, a pixel face).

    Dafont link. Aka designmoth. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Jones
    [Type Union]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Lehrke

    Designer in London who created the counterless typeface Hidden Meanings (2013). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel McShee

    Graphic designer (b. 1991) from Gloucestershire, UK, who has a BA in graphic design from Hereford College of Art. Creator of the (free) tall condensed sans typeface Gabba All Caps (2012), the geometric caps face Subversion Display (2012) and the Egyptian typeface Chremsel Serif (2012).

    Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Nielsen

    Daniel K. Nielsen (Sheffield, UK) designed his first font in 2013. Called Hydra Grotesque, it was inspired by Bauhaus and art deco styles. Its low x-height makes it stylish---its rounded corners cry out "made after 2010".

    Daniel was born in Copenhagen and graduated from DMJX Danish School of Media and Journalism in 2013.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Normington

    Cartoonist in Kent, UK (b. 1984), who created Tengwar of Fëanor (2006) and Angerthas Runes (2006). Home page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Ralph

    London-based illustrator and graphic designer. Creator of Fred Fredburger (2011), the Cartoon Network type family, which covers Latin, Greek, Cyrillic, Arabic and Hebrew. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Reed

    Sheffield, UK-based creator of Paper Cut (2012, a geometric typeface). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Ryves

    British designer of the multiline labyrinthine font Maze (2008), and of Boo (2009). He runs Dlight Graphics. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Seex

    Britrish creator of the inky hand-printed typeface Experimental Seex (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Stuffins

    Typographer and graphic designer in Norwich, UK. In 2010, he created a geometric typeface. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Tomlinson

    Student at Southampton Solent University, who lives in Portsmouth, UK. He created the experimental typeface Tube (2012) based on parts of the London subway system map. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Ty Wong

    UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who created the grungy face Twisting Vines (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniel Westwood
    [A-D Foundry]

    [More]  ⦿

    Daniela Benitez

    Daniela Benitez (Bogota, Colombia) created a set of numbers useing a compass and ruler in 2014. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniela do Prado Fre

    During her graphic design studies in Basingstoke, UK, Daniela do Prado Fre created Modular Typeface (2013), an experimental typeface that consists entirely of circles, triangles and squares. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daniella Martini

    Designer in London of the experimental typeface PP Type (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Danny Dawson
    [Zap Studio]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Daren Newman

    Manchester, UK-based illustrator and graphic designer who has some nice typographic posters. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Darius Gardner

    Boston, UK-based designer (b. 1996) of the children's hand Darius Gardner (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dariusz Nowacki

    London-based designer (b. 1979) who created the free font Inkable Case 1979 (2011).

    Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Darklight Systems
    [Lady Dark Bane]

    Eoweniel (aka Lady Dark Bane, and aka Darklight Systems) is the British designer of the African theme font DreamWalker (2001) and of the handwriting font Stray Cat (2007). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Darren Hammond

    During his studies at Southend-on-Sea, UK, Darren Hammond created a custom typeface for a poster to celebrate World war II pianist Myra Hess in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Darren Hewitson

    UK-based designer of a sans font called Iris. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Darren O'Driscoll

    Graduate of the National College of Art and Design in Dublin. In 2013, he obtained an MDes from the Glasgow School of Art, specializing in animation. Now based in London, he designed Newer Alphabet (2013), which was inspired by Wim Crouwel's unicase proposal New Alphabet (1967). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Darren Raven

    Type designer from the UK. Darren Raven and John Critchley designed the FF Bokka dingbat cum comic book letters family (116USD per family; all of FF Bokka for 464USD). Phil's Fonts link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Darren Scott
    [Darren Scott Typographics (was: Truth Design)]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Darren Scott Typographics (was: Truth Design)
    [Darren Scott]

    Darren Scott Typographics (was: Truth Design) is Darren Scott's design firm in Manchester, UK. Darren Scott graduated from Salford University in Manchester with a Design Practice Degree in 1996. Formerly the Senior Designer and Typographic Consultant at McCann-Erickson Manchester, Darren now runs his own consultancy, Truth Design. Their type design includes faces such as Aggregate, Amplifier (hairline geometric), Berliner, Como (artsy display), Imprimitur (serif), Mechanic (influenced by the poster types found in advertising during the industrial revolution), Nitrogen (hookish sans), Press On (grunge), Rivo (stencil), Rub On, Sodium. All faces available from FontWorks. Before Truth Design, which started in 2007, Darren Scott sold and licensed his typefaces through various firms:

    • [T-26]: BadAngel, Berliner, Circuit, Mechanic Gothic (1997), Polymer (1997), Retoric, Petrol Medium, Rub-On, Launderette Rinse.
    • TSi Font Foundry: TSI Aggregate.
    • ITC: Mechanic Gothic and Petrol.
    • FUSE 15 collection: Berliner (1996).
    • Atomic Type: Aggregate, Mechanic Gothic and Hydrate.
    • Red Rooster Type: Mechanic Gothic.

    Interview.

    FontShop link. Klingspor link.

    View the typefaces of Darren Scott. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Darren Walters

    London-based designer of the fat outline face Rounds (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Darryl Fordham

    Designer in Portsmouth, UK. He created the experimental circle-based typeface Rotoid (2012) and the squarish typeface I-Foid (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Daryl Roske

    Daryl Roske is a British and German national studying and working in Montreux, Switzerland and Hamburg, Germany. He studied visual arts at the College Voltaire in Geneva, graduating in 1991. He has carried out identity designs for Buitoni, The Art Center (Europe), the IDRH, and the Federal Office of Civil Aviation. Fobia is his first typeface (Font Bureau). A fun and exciting font, it is also in Robin Williams' book "A Blip in the Continuum" (Peachpit Press). Bauklotz (2010) are letters made from building blocks. Behance link. shr communication GmbH is his art direction and graphic design business in Hamburg. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Datascan

    British font service company located in London. They have barcodes, a handwriting and signature font service, and sell all famous font families. As an example, from 1992-1994, they made Garamond-No-100-Bold, Garamond-No-100-Italic, Garamond-No-100, Garamond-No-49-Bold-Italic, Garamond-No-49-Bold, Garamond-No-49-Italic, Garamond-No-49. One source claims that this Garamond family was made by Compugraphic and that Datascan merely changed the name in the font information field. Maybe that is the way its collection grew so mysteriously and quickly to thousands of fonts. And here is the beauty: each font is priced at 320 US dollars for a single user. There are 30,000 fonts listed. Their collection, on paper, can be had for 9.6 million US dollars. For five users, cost doubles. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dave Crossland
    [Abattis]

    [More]  ⦿

    Dave Ellis

    British designer of the hand-printed typeface Dickie (2014).Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dave Elmes

    Typographic experimenter in London who made Street View Font (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dave Kellam
    [Eightface (was Dave Kellam.com)]

    [More]  ⦿

    Dave Lawless
    [Fontmill Foundry (or: Studio Liddell Ltd Graphic Design)]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Dave Lawless
    [Tealeaf Digital Type Foundry]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Dave Rowland
    [Schizotype]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Dave Towers

    British graphic designer. Towers Type (2012) is an ornamental typeface inspired by the stained glass windows of the Saint-Rémy Church in Baccarat, France. He also made Creative Circle Headline Font (2012), and Shot (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dave Williams

    UK-based designer of the large pixel fonts in the Haeccity DW family (2007). From the web site: There are all the basic Latin characters with standard punctuation, most extended Latin (accented), spacing and (common) combining diacritics, Greek and extended Greek, Cyrillic, a sort of a bash at Armenian, a sort of a bash at Glagolitic, Ogham, Runic, Gothic, mathematical and logic operators, most arrows, miscellaneous letter-like and currency symbols, box-drawing and OCR characters, astrological symbols, dingbats (I got fed up about three-quarters of the way through the stars, but most of them are there), common ligatures (ff, fi, fl, ffi, ffl, st), fractions, IPA symbols, openface and monospace characters. Also small caps for the basic Latin and Greek alphabets. Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Davey D. Doodlebug

    Bleching, Wompfordshire-based designer (b. 1991) of the fat finger typeface Daveys Doodleface (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Armstrong

    Based in the north west of England, David Armstrong designed the dot matrix all caps typeface Fernando (2012).

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Bird

    London-based creator of the free fonts Modo (2012, logotype) and Oomix (2012, monoline sans).

    Home page. Devian tart link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Bohn

    London-based designer of two blocky typefaces in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Brady

    David Brady (The Creative Rebellion, London, UK) is an advertising designer. He created the experimental face Nokia (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Brodie

    UK-based designer of the hand-printed poster typeface Eightball (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Brooks

    Freelance designer in Birmingham, UK. During his studies at Birmingham Institue of Art and Design, david Brooks created of the slab serif typeface B42 (2013), about which he writes: Can a typeface really represent a place, it's community, it's heritage? B42 is a typeface that tries to achieve this, it is a typeface for Perry Barr, an inner city area in north Birmingham. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Casey

    Nottingham, UK-based graphic design student who dabbled in experimental typefaces in 2010. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Clegg

    Founder of Atelier Zero Ltd in London. In 2012, he designed the squarish typeface Voona 1. He also drew several beautiful caps typefaces including the frilly Age of Decadence.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Cooper

    Plymouth, UK-based creator of the free modular typeface Pinophyta (2013, FontStruct). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Crow

    Scottish designer (b. Galashiels, Scotland, 1962). He studied Graphic Design in Manchester and moved to London where he worked for eight years. He headed the Graphic Arts Department at Liverpool School of Art and Design. A professor now, he is head of the School of Design at Manchester Metropolitan University. Designer in the FUSE 16 collection (1997) of Mega and in the FUSE 8 collection of Creation 6, mechanical-looking dingbats. Designer of the Alphapeg family (2001) and Dialogue (1999, a Hebrew simulation font done with Yaki Moicho). Designer of FF Beadmap (2002, with Ian Wright). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Farey

    Type designer ho was born in London in 1943. Dave Farey runs Housestyle Graphics with Richard Dawson in London. He was well-known for running the successful auctions at many ATypI meetings. Biography at Agfa. His typefaces for various foundries:

    • Panache Typography: the artsy face Cupid, Azbuka (sans family).
    • ITC: ITC Beesknees (1991), the sans-serif family ITC Highlander (1993), ITC Ozwald (1992, a beautiful fat face), ITC Johnston, and ITC Golden Cockerel family (1996, with Richard Dawson, an Eric Gill revival). The former three are part of the Linotype library. ITC Beesknees has been remade and extended by Nick Curtis as Arbuckle Remix (2008).
    • Agfa: Zemestro (2003, a 4-weight sans). His Creative Alliance faces: Abacus (art nouveau), Blackfriar, Bodoni Unique, Breadline Normal, Cachet, Cavalier, Classic, Cupid, Font Outline, Gabardine, ITC Golden Cockerel, Greyhound Script, ITC Johnston, Little Louis, Longfellow, Maigret (art nouveau), Revolution Normal, Stanley, Stellar, Virgin Roman Normal (art nouveau), Warlock.
    • Galapagos: Ersatz (2002, with Richard Dawson, at Galapagos, originally done at Panache).
    • HouseStyle Graphics: ClassicFranklin family (2000-2001).
    • FontHaus: Aries (1995), a font designed by Eric Gill (1932).
    • Monotype: Azbuka (2008-2009): a 20-style sans family by Richard Dawson and David Farey.
    • Elsner&Flake: Caslon EF Black.
    • OEM work: TimesClassic (2000-2001) for The London Times.
    View David Farey's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Gasi

    Designer in Leeds, UK. Behance link. In 2010, he created Uniblock Ultra (fat and counterless), Neo Georgia (based on Georgia), Neo Calibri (based on Calibri) and Emira (an avant-garde face). In 2011, on commission for Ben Bowser, he created the geometric "coded message" family Theory (2011). Digital Delay (2011) is an angular face. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Gibbons

    British comic book artist. Codesigner with John Roshell at Comicraft of some comic book style typefaces such as Belly Laugh (2001), Dave Gibbons (2001), Dave Gibbons Journal (2009), Gibbons Gazette (2009). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Gogarty

    Graphic designer in London who created DG (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Graham

    During his studies at the University of Southampton, David Graham created the experimental squarish typeface Step (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Harris

    British lettering artist who designed Chromium One (1983, Letraset: decorative neon-light caps), Becka Script (1985, ITC) and Julia Script (1983, psychedelic). Author of Art of Calligraphy.

    FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Hinga

    David Hinga, a fashion photographer, created the thin octagonal typeface Dungeness (2012), which is based on and inspired by the highland village Dungeness in Kent, England. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Hughes

    Illustrator ad typographer in London. Behance link. Creator of a few typefaces for a comic strip called Lars The Last Viking. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David James

    David James met Gareth Hague in 1990, and worked together designing record sleeves for bands such as Soul II Soul (Club Classics Volume 1), Neneh Cherry (Buffalo Stance) and Boy George (Tense Nervous Headache). Increasingly their designs featured custom designed typefaces and logos (System 7, Wynton Marsalis, One Dove). Projects for independent magazines Road and A Be Sea also combined art directed photography and custom type design. They formed Alias in 1996 to design and market their typefaces. Alias also undertakes commissions for custom typeface and logotype design, services include designing custom type and digitising and amending existing typefaces.

    With Garrett Hague, [T-26] co-designer of AES, August. At Alias (a company he founded with Garrett Hague in London), he made Enabler (1995), also available from [T-26], which later evolved into Progress (2003). Designer of FatZZHandwriting (2002, his own free handwriting font). Identifont link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Johnson-Davies
    [Fontscape]

    [More]  ⦿

    David Johnson-Davies
    [Identifont]

    [More]  ⦿

    David Kindersley

    English stonecutter (b. Codicote, 1915; d. Cambridge, 1995). An ex-apprentice of Eric Gill, he set up his own shop in Cambridge in 1939. His carved plaques and inscriptions in stone and slate can be seen on many churches and public buildings in the United Kingdom. He and his third wife Lida Lopes Cardozo, also a stonecutter, designed the main gates of the British Library.

    In 1952 Kindersley submitted MoT Serif to the British Ministry of Transport, which required new lettering to use on United Kingdom road signs. The Road Research Laboratory found Kindersley's design more legible than Transport, a design by Jock Kinneir and Margaret Calvert, but nevertheless chose Transport. Many of the street signs in England, especially in Cambridge use Kindersley's fonts.

    The book face Octavian was designed by Will Carter and David Kindersley for the Monotype Corporation in 1961. He also created Itek Bookface.

    Kindersley was known for his letterspacing system. Author of Optical Letter Spacing for New Printing Systems (Wynkyn de Worde Society/Lund Humphries Publishers Ltd, 1976) and Computer-Aided Letter Design (with Neil E. Wiseman).

    The Cardozo Kindersley workshop, which Kindersley founded and was later continued by Cardozo, publishes a number of typefaces based on Kindersley's work. They include Kindersley Street (2005, aka Kindersley Grand Arcade) which is based on Kindersley Mot Serif (1952). It was designed for the Grand Arcade, Cambridge.

    London street signs that were designed by David Kindersley served as the basis of a complete lapidary typeface by Boris Kochan and Robert Strauch of Lazydogs Type Foundry, called Streets of London (2013).

    Image: Stone cut alphabet from 1979 displayed in the University of Amsterdam' Special collections.

    Linotype link. FontShop link. MyFonts link. Wikipedia. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Lyttleton

    British illustrator who drew the dingbats for P22 Way Out West Critters and the characters for the Western font P22 Way Out West. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Manthey

    For The Practical Surveyor, a reprint of the classical 1725 text by Samuel Wyld, David Manthey created a font, Wyld (2001, +Italic), that was developed to explicitly match the original text, which was set in Caslon. The free typeface contains glyphs for several ligatures commonly used in printing during the early 18th century. It does not include a bold weight. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Marshall

    North Yarmouth, UK-based designer (b. 1985) of The Dave Font (2005, handwriting face created with Fontifier). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Marshall

    Designer of Biffo Script (Monotype, 1964) [The revival at Softmaker is called Bonito]. Currently employed by Dalton Maag in London as a technologist and in-house software and support engineer.

    Linotype link. FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Martin
    [David Pustansky (was: 24hourbauer.co.uk)]

    [More]  ⦿

    David McCreight

    Typefoundry set up in the UK in 2013. David McCreight created the geometric monoline logotype face LongYouLongTime in 2013. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Millhouse
    [defalign]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Nott

    As a design student in the UK, David Nott created SemiSerif (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Ottley
    [Graphic Workman]

    [More]  ⦿

    David Palmer

    Sheffield, UK-based designer of the thin headline sans typeface Basal (2012).

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Pustansky (was: 24hourbauer.co.uk)
    [David Martin]

    David Pustansky (b. 1985) is a UK-based type designer who was active in 2005-2006, when he operated as David Martin and his web site was called 24hourbauer.co.uk. He published many free fonts, but then became inactive ca. 2007. In 2014, he resurrected as David Pustansky.

    Creator of the picture-derived faces Eye Spy (2006), Batman The Dark Knight (2006, scanbats), Simpsons Mmmm...Font (2006), Pokemon Pixels (2006), Silent Hill Nightmares (2006), Mario and Luigi (2006), Final Fantasy Elements (2006), Lara Croft Tombraider (2006), Superman Last Son of Krypton (2005), The Ultimate Lance Hoyt font (2005), Harry Potter and the Dingbats (2005), TNA Bound for Glory (2005), tna wrestling (2005), Doctor Who 2006 (2005), Futurama Dingbats (2005), Red Dwarf Characters (2005), Evil Characters (2005), and 24hourbauer (2005, scanbats), Simpsons Treehouse of Horror (2007), Split Splat Splodge (2006, ink slpatter), Splish Splash Splosh (commercial), TNA Lockdown (2007), Splis (2007), Donkey Kong World (2006), SonicMegaFont (2006), Doodlebears (2006), Tetris Blocks (2006), twentyfour, WWE, residentevilcharacters, wrestlinglogos.

    In 2014, he created retro Shakespeare First Folio (after the lettering in the 1623 collection of Shakespeare's plays), Brush Stroke of Genius, Wilson (after the baseball in the movie), Eye Am Confused Optical Illusions, Game Logos, Retro Hasbro WWF Figures, Doom and Gloom, Nato Phonetic Alphabet, Shakespeare To Be Or Not To Be (ornamental caps), Super Street Fighter Hyper Fonting (scanbats)m), An Apple A Day Fruit Font, Secret Diary (hand-printed), Balls Balls and more Balls (scanbats), Legend of Zelda TriFont (scanbats), Crushed Candy (scanbats), A Work of Art (scanbats), Console Wars Console Yourself, Futurama All Hail the Hypnotoad, Family Guy Giggity (cartoon character font), and American Dad Good Morning USA (cartoon dingbats).

    Abstract Fonts link. Home page of David Pustansky. Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Quay

    British type and graphic designer (b. 1948, London) who graduated from Ravensbourne College of Art&Design in 1968, and after working as a graphic designer in London, founded Quay&Gray Lettering with Paul Gray in 1983. David Quay Design started in 1987, and finally, in 1990, he co-founded The Foundry with Freda Sack and Mike Daines in London. The Foundry also develops custom typefaces, marks and logotypes for companies inernationally these include a special typeface to be readable at very small sizes for Yellow pages, corporate fonts for BGplc (British Gas) NatWest Bank, and signage typefaces for both RailTrack in the UK and the Lisbon Metro system in Portugal. He taught typography and design at the Academie St. Joost, Hogeschool Brabant from 2001-2003. He now teaches one month a year at IDEP in Barcelona. He lives and works in Amsterdam. Linotype link. In 2009, he started selling his fonts at MyFonts. Pic. His fonts, in chronological order:

    • Custom lettering and type for the Penthouse calendar.
    • 1983: Santa Fe (monoline script), Agincourt (1983, ITC, blackletter), Blackmoor (1983, ITC, English-style blackletter).
    • 1984: Titus, Vegas.
    • 1985: Quay, Milano.
    • 1986: Bronx.
    • 1987: Bordeaux, Bordeaux Script.
    • 1988: Latino Elongated, Mekanik.
    • 1989: Aquinas, Robotik, Helicon (1989, Berthold).
    • 1990: Quay Sans, Digitek, Teknik.
    • 1991: Letraset Arta.
    • 1992: Coptek, La Bamba, Lambada (1992, Victorian; Letraset), Scriptek (angular design, ITC).
    • 1993: Marguerita.
    • 2010: Kade (Re-Type---it is a display/semi display sans family of fonts based on vernacular lettering photographed around the harbours of Amsterdam and Rotterdam).
    • 2011: Bath (2010-2011), a typeface developed with Ramiro Espinoza for the the signage and orientation of the city of Bath. It comes in Bath Serif and Bath Sans versions.
    [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    David Rudnick

    Born in 1986, David Rudnick is a graphic designer in the UK. He created quite a number of typefaces ca. 2013. These include:

    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Sokan

    Digital designer in London, who created the fat counterless typeface Cuvared (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    David Wilson

    British teacher with a research interest in foreign cursive handwriting fonts. He wrote this "doc" document on the topic. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dawn Lewandowski
    [Partnrz]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Day & Collins

    Wood type foundry in Fann Street, London. Publishers of Wood Type, Printing and Bookbinding Materials (1904, London).

    Revivals of their work include MPI Atlas (2013, MPress Interactive). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    dBarcode v5.51

    Barcode program by the UK-based DLSoft company. Single user Standard: 5803875303 Single user Professional: 1301732101 Multi-user Standard: 3904256154 Multi-user Professional: 8702721102 [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Deadcat Dreaming

    British creator of the scratchy typeface Light Scribe (2012) and the rectangular strip face Ripstone (2013).

    Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dean Rivers

    UK-based designer of the handwriting font Dean's Hand (2002-2004). Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Deep Blue

    UK-based designer of the pixel font 3DBoxes (2005), which is just a bunch of empty rectangles. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Deep Brown

    Youngster from the UK, b. 1992. Designer of the minimalist geometric font Stark Tech (2007). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Deep Creative

    British outfit only tangentially into type creation. Nevertheless, their commercial pixel fonts, Deep 101 and 102 are superb. They also created a more futuristic face, Egocentric. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    defalign
    [David Millhouse]

    David operates the UK-based graphic design office Defalign. His typefaces include: Solit, DCapital, Obiter, Turing, Gottlieb, DInterf.

    Klingspor link. Volcano Type link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Delancy Wong

    English-born Malaysian designer of the hand-printed typefaces ZX Script (2014) and Delancy (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Delittle

    Wood type foundry in York, England, est. 1888. Face Photosetting published Specimens of Delittle's wood type, Face book of faces, Type catalogue (1976). Robert Lee shows part of Delittle's Wood Type Specimens (1967).

    Revivals of their work include MPI Delittle (2013, MPressInteractive). Matt Griifin is also planning a revival. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dennis Shinobi

    Type designer. He created the slightly grungy Uni Magnetic (2007, Substance). MyFonts says that he also designed the fat brush face Ardy Mass (2010). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Department of Transport, UK

    Drawings made in 2004 (PDF files) for the lettering to be used on Britain's highways: TM1 Transport medium alphabet (upper case letters), TM2 Transport medium alphabet (lower case letters), TM3 Transport medium alphabet (numerals and arrows), TH1 Transport heavy alphabet (upper case letters), TH2 Transport heavy alphabet (lower case letters), TH3 Transport heavy alphabet (numerals and arrows), MW1 Motorway alphabet (permanent), MB1 Motorway alphabet (temporary). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Derek Revenge
    [Tre2 (was: mural division, or: Casa Phunk Phonts)]

    [More]  ⦿

    Derval Font Solutions

    British firm that markets FontMaker, a partial truetype font editor developed by Derek Floyd. Handles TrueType, type 1 and bitmaps. It can import type 1 fonts, and thus should be able to transform type 1 into truetype and vice versa. Between 140 and 630 USD. Also sells special hinting software, as well as foreign language fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Descender fonts (was: Asshole)
    [Jacob Moreno]

    Descender fonts is run by Josh (Jacob Moreno). The site is also called "Josh On", and in an earlier life, "Asshole". It is located in the UK. Downloadable fonts include Wormy, Romanj2, BlockNormal, SimpleNormal and (earlier) Zosh On. All fonts are "liquid" and/or techno. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Design Division

    Graphic design studio in London. Creator of Urban Font (2013). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Designers Talk
    [Oli Dale]

    Oli Dale is the Manchester, UK-based designer of the futuristic sans face Busby Sans (2004). He also runs the Designers Talk type discussion page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Device Fonts
    [Rian Hughes]

    Rian Hughes studied at the LCP in London before working for an advertising agency, i-D magazine, and a series of record sleeve design companies. Under the name Device he now provides design and illustration for the advertising, entertainment, publishing, and media industries. He works from Richmond, UK, as a comic book artist, letterer and typefounder---his foundry is called Device. He creates mostly display type. List of fonts. Interview. Review by Yves Peters. Monotype Imaging page. Interview by Die Gestalten. Various (overlapping) font listings, still unorganized.

    • Dingbats: Pic_Format, Mastertext Symbols, MacDings, RiansDingbats, Autofont.
    • FontFont fonts: Identification (1993), Revolver, Rian's Dingbats, LustaOneSixtySans, Knobcheese, CrashBangWallop, and Outlander.
    • [T-26] fonts: English Grotesque (1998), Data90 (2003; a free FontStruct face that is virtually identical to Data90 is Bitrate by Kummaeno (2010)), Flak Heavy (2003, stencil), Flak (2003, stencil), Freeman (2003), Klaxon (2003, kitchen tile font), Cordite, Substation (2003), September (2003), West Way (2003), Egret (2003), Paralucent Complete (2003), Paralucent Condensed, Paralucent Stencil (2003), Mercano Empire (2003), Iconics (2003), Cantaloupe (2003), Gravel (2003), Acton (blocky screen font, 2002), Ainsdale, Amorpheus, Anytime Now (alarm dingbats), Bingo, Blackcurrant (Blackcurrant Cameo (1997) is free), Bordello, Elektron, Haulage (U-Haul lettering, 2002), WexfordOakley, Telecast, Terrazzo, Transit, Untitled, Scrotnig, Skylab (2002), Silesia (1993), SlackCasual, Ritafurey, Reasonist-Medium, Regulator, GameOver, Novak, Quagmire, PicFormat, Jakita Wide (2000, techno font), Metropol-Noir, Motorcity, Mastertext, Mystique (2002), MacDings, Lusta, Laydeez, Sinclair, Paralucent (sans serif), Judgement, Bullroller, Zinger (a fifties font), Citrus (2002), Popgod (2003), Range (2000, a futuristic font), Hounslow, Jemima, Griffin, GranTurismo, Gargoyle, Foonky, DoomPlatoon, Darkside ("remixed" by FontStructor Kummaeno in his Ubangi (2011)), Cyberdelic, Contour, and the very original Stadia Outline family (Stadia is a kitchen tile font).
    • List of all fonts by Rian Hughes, as of 2004: Acton, Ainsdale, Amorpheus, Anytime Now, Bingo, Blackcurrant, Bordello, Bull Roller, Chascarillo, Contour, Cottingley (1992), FF CrashBangWallop, Cyberdelic, Darkside, Data90, Doom Platoon (1996), Elektron, English Grotesque, Flak, Foonky, Freeman, Game Over, Gargoyle, Gran Turismo, Griffin, Haulage, Hounslow, Iconics, FF Identification, Jakita, Jemima, Judgement, FF Knobcheese, Laydeez Nite, Lusta (big family), Mac Dings, Mastertext, Men Swear, Metropol Noir, Motorcity, Mystique, Novak, FF Outlander, Paralucent, Pic Format, Platinum, Quagmire, Range, Reasonist, Register (A and B), Regulator, FF Revolver, FF Rian's Dingbats, Ritafurey, Scrotnig, September, Silesia, Sinclair, Skylab, Slack Casual, Space Cadet, Stadia, Substation, Telecast, Terrazzo, Transmat, Untitled One, Vertex, Westway, Wexford Oakley, Why Two Kay, Zinger.
    • At Veer, in 2005, these Device fonts were published: Gentry, Gridlocker, Valise Montreal, Custard, Box Office (moviemaking letters), Sparrowhawk, Monitor, Moonstone, Miserichordia, Yolanda (a great playful medieval text face in three styles: Duchess, Princess, Countess), Gusto, Dauphine, Rogue, Ritafurey, Dynasty, Radiogram, Xenotype, Roadkill (grunge), Payload (stencil family comprising Regular, Outline, Spraycan, Narrow, Narrow Outline, Wide, Wide Outline), Catseye, Electrasonic, Absinthe (psychedelic style), Straker, and Chantal (brush).
    • In 2006, Veer added these: Profumo, Ironbridge, Cheapside, Battery Park (grunge), Forge, Shenzhen Industrial, Hawksmoor (grunge), Coldharbour Gothic, Wormwood Gothic (grunge), Chase (grunge), Diecast, Roadkill Heavy, Tinderbox (fuzzy blackletter), Dazzle (multiline face), Nightclubber (art deco), Klickclack (comic book face), Vanilla (art deco), Wear it's at (grunge), Diecast, Drexler, Box Office (movie icon font).
    • Fonts from 2007: DF Conselheiro (2007, grunge), DF Glitterati (2007), Indy Italic (script), DF Apocrypha (2006, rough outline), DF Quartertone (2007), DF Lagos (2007, rough stencil), DF Pulp Action, DF Reliquary #17 (2006, grunge didone), DF Dukane (2007, octagonal grunge), DF Strand (2007, striped stencil), DF Rocketship from Infinity (2006, futuristic), DF Appointment with Danger (2006), DF Las Perdidas (2006, grunge stencil), DF Kelly Twenty (2007, grunge stencil), DF Heretic, DF Roadkill, DF Ironbridge, DF Forge, DF Shenzhen Industrial, DF Hawksmoor, DF Cheapside, DF Battery Park, DF Saintbride, DF Profumo, DF Coldharbour Gothic, DF Wormwood Gothic, DF Tinderbox, DF Flickclack, DF Vanilla (multiline art deco face), DF Chase, DF Nighclubber (art deco jazz club face), DF Diecast, DF Dazzla, DF Zond Diktat (grunge), DF Yellow Perforated, DF Mulgrave (grunge), DF Ministry B, DF Ministry A (with a hairline weight), DF Gridlocker, DF Gentry, DF Valise Montréal (grunge), DF Custard, DF Box Office, DF Roadkill, DF Payload Wide, DF Payload Narrow, DF Catseye Narrow, DF Catseye, DF Yolanda, DF Xenotype, DF Telstar, DF Straker, DF Sparrowhawk, DF Rogue Serif, DF Rogue Sans Extended, DF Rogue Sans Condensed, DF Rogue Sans, DF Ritafurey B, DF Ritafurey A, DF Radiogram, DF Pitshanger, DF Payload (stencil), DF Outlander Nova, DF Moonstone, DF Monitor, DF Miserichordia, DF Interceptor, DF Gusto, DF Glitterati, DF Galicia (2004), DF Galaxie, DF Electrasonic, DF Dynasty B, DF Dynasty A, DF Drexler, DF Dauphine, DF Chantal, DF Absinthe, DF Register Wide B, DF Register Wide A, DF Register B, DF Register A, DF Quagmire B, DF Cordoba (2007, grunge), Mellotron (2004, stencil), Seabright Monument (2007), Charger (2007, grunge).
    • T-26 releases in 2007: Klickclack, Hawksmoor (grunge), Heretic, Ironbridge (old letter simulation), Battery Park (grunge), Chase (grunge), Cheapside (grunge), Dazzle (multiline art deco), Diecast (grunge), and Forge (grunge).
    • T-26 releases in 2008: Automoto (fat multiline deco face), Straker (organic). Also from 2008: Mission Sinister (grunge), Gonzalez (grunge).
    • FontBros release in 2009: Filmotype Modern. Other Filmotype series fonts include Filmotype Miner (2012), Filmotype Manchester (2012), Filmotype Meredith (2012), Filmotype Marlette (2012), Filmotype Mansfield (2012), Filmotype Power (2012) and Filmotype Major (2012: this is based on a typeface used as the titling font for the popular children's book by Dr. Seuss entitled One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, 1960). Other 2009 fonts: Degradation (grunge).
    • Creations in 2010: Pod (2010, fat round stencil), Korolev (2010, a 20-style monoline sans family based on communist propaganda from 1937), DF Agent of the Uncanny (2010, brush face), DF Destination Unknown (2010, Kafkaesque brush), DF Maraschino Black (a sleek, sophisticated high-contrast swash capital font).
    • Creations in 2011: DF Capitol Skyline, DF Capitol Skyline Underline and DF Capitol Skyline Capitals (a multi-weight all-caps pair that epitomizes Streamline Moderne), DF Korolev (a 20-weight sans serif family based on lettering by an anonymous Soviet graphic designer who did the propaganda displays at the Communist Red Square parade in 1937. Named in honor of Sergey Pavlovich Korolyov, or Korolev, considered to be the father of practical astronomics).
    • Typefaces from 2012: Ember (informal script), Kane (based on the Batman logo), Glimmer Glossy, Glimmer Mate, Galleria (avant-garde caps), Clique (flared sans).
    • Typefaces from 2013: Filmotype Melon (after a 1959 original, this is an offbeat Googie era doo-wop typeface), Filmotype Melody (similar to Melon), Filmotype Mellow (also similar to Melon), Raw (worn wood type), Cadogan (a rhythmic connected script), Whiphand (brush face), Steed (heavy codensed masculine sans inspired by the titles of the Avengers TV show), State Stencil (Clean and Rough: in the style of Futura Black), Korolev Military Stencil (named after Sergei Korolev, father of Soviet astronautics, and based on signs from the Red Army parade of 1932), Armstrong (a 1950s automobile font).
    • Other: Customised Foonky Starred, Altoona, DfAncestorITC, DfAttitudesPlain, HotRod (2002).

    FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Devillo Devianti

    Manchester, UK-based artist (b. 1984) who created Daggarland (2004, a scratchy handwriting face). No downloads. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    DF667 (or: DiagnostiK foundation; was: Oblong Design)
    [D. Busson]

    D. Busson (DiagnostiK foundation, or Oblong Design, UK) DF Temple Heavy (1997, a futuristic typeface), Plastic Jesus, New Kinder (1998), and Chlorine (1998, organic).

    Old URL. Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dharmesh Mistry

    Creator of the pixelish typeface A Mistry Font (2013) and the textured typeface family Population (2013), in which the textures are related to the cities---London, London Crowd, Blackburn, Blackpool, Preston, Manchester, Nottingham. Dharmesh is based in Manchester, UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dick Jones

    British designer of the techno family Crillee (Letraset, 1980-1981) and the athletic lettering font Princetown (Letraset, 1981; Linotype version; the ITC version is here). Princetown is revived as Allstar (Softmaker), Indiana (Corel), Indira (Primafont) and Principal (Softmaker).

    Linotype bio. Klingspor link. FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Dieu et mon droit
    [Jas Rewkiewicz]

    Jas Rewkiewicz ("Dieu et mon droit") was a Swiss graphic design student at ECAL (Lausanne) who made Armstrong (a revival of Letraset Neil Bold), Didot MAT (serifless Didot tailored for Man About Town magazine), Didot Builder, Eugenie (a didone), LOL (a clean sans), Miranda Sans, Miranda Serif and Roma 1560. He lived in Lausanne but is now in London, where he works as a graphic designer. Normandia Bold (2007) is in the spirit of the extra-black high contrast Didot caps faces. Fournier RD (2007) is his interpretation of the famous Fournier typeface. Doop (2007) is a basic sans made for a client in London. Ultra (2007) is based on a Clarendon, inspired by Beton and finally its borrowing certain details from more extreme fonts like the Gill Sans Ultra Bold and the Maple from Process Type Foundry. Bonbon (2009) is a stylized headline font designed for the unique typographic style of Bon magazine. Industria (2009, Light Italic, Light, and Medium) is a corporate font family of the Saturday Group. Neo Futura Book (2009, in progress) is a contemporary interpretation of Paul Renner's classic. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dinah Merhej

    Student at Central Saint Martins College, Lonodon, who created Wadi for Arabic and Latin in 2011. This face is loosely based on the Naskh style of writing. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dingbats UK

    UK-based archove for lost dingbats. Very useful. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Disastergraphics
    [Jamie Dean]

    Cambrideshire, UK-based surreal artist, b. 1992. Creator of the futuristic face Cyborn (2008). Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Diti Katona

    Founding partner and creative director of Toronto-based Concrete Design Communications Inc. She has lectured at the Ontario College of Art and Design and the design department of York University. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ditzy DM

    British creator of Aquis (2010, FontStruct). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    dLSoft barcode fonts

    UK-based barcode font seller. Full product list. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    DM Founts
    [Drew Maughan]

    DM Founts is Drew Maughan (b. London, 1982), an artist and web developer. He created the fat counterless modular mechanical face STKR (2009) and the squarish face DM Unarmed (2010). The pixelish Project D (2013) is a font inspired by the infamous graffiti atop the Heygate Estate in South London.

    Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    DogStar Fonts
    [Gavin Lawson]

    DogStar (Gavin Lawson, UK) offers shareware handwritten and comic book fonts in 1998-1999: Chinacat, ChinacatThin, Dupree, DupreeLight, Fennario, FennarioLight, Hooteroll, HooterollJam, HooterollLight, Mcgannahan.

    See also here and here. Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dois Debe
    [Typofabric]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Dominic Gambetta

    Dominic Gambetta (Dog Designs, Worcester, UK) created a Circle typeface in 2011. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dominic Gerry

    Dominic Gerry has a degree In BA Graphic Communication, from the Cardiff Metropolitan University. Plymouth, UK-based creator of the hybrid typeface Ludo (2012), which is based on Aldo Semi Bold and Lucida Calligraphy Italic.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dominic Le-Hair

    A resident of Peterborough, UK, graphic designer Dominic Le-Hair created Ribbon (2009, multiline caps), Tribbon (2009, a free layered font family that can be tested here), Frankenface (2009) and Clipper (2009, experimental). Spykado (2009) is an electric-discharge-meets-Luc's-hair font. Hyaline (2010) is a bicolored affair---letters only appear after overlaying colored glyphs. Gas Alphabet (2013) emulates a gas furnace.

    Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dominic Martin-Manning

    London-based designer of a calligraphic alphabet called Hybrid (2012).

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dominic Pegg

    Dominic Pegg uses nothing but geometric shapes in the creation of the origami typeface Crazy Dreamer (2013). This typeface was made while Domic was studying in London. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Donald Jackson

    Calligrapher from Lancashire, b. 1938. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    DonkeyWorx

    Foundry based in Warwick, UK. They sell Flacrobats (2006: shapes and strange creatures) and Buttoneer (2006: symbols for media controls). MyFonts location. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Donna Hall

    Graduate of York College, UK, who lives in York. She created a psychedelic lettering cat poster called Gilmore in 2013. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dorchester Script

    Script, issued in 1938 by Monotype, based on a Grover Foundry script found in Ichabod Dawkes's News Letter from 1698. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dorota Hosovska

    London-based creator of the display typeface Peckham (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Doves Type
    [Thomas James Cobden-Sanderson]

    Doves Type was from Doves Press, founded in 1900 by Thomas J. Cobden-Sanderson (a disciple of William Morris) and Emery Walker. They had type based on Jenson. Thomas J. Cobden-Sanderson threw the typefaces in the Thames when the press closed in 1916 to prevent anyone from using it again. The Doves Type face was revived by Tjörbjörn Olsson at T-Type. Ben Archer writes: although William Morris's Golden Type predated this design, it is thought that the Doves Type was more faithful to the design of the original Venetian type of the fifteenth century. Punches were cut by Edward Prince on the instructions of Walker and Cobden Sanderson in a single size and weight only, and used for printing the Doves Press edition of the Bible. This celebrated type was used privately for sixteen years and never released to the general trade. It was lost to history forever when Cobden Sanderson threw the entire font into the Thames river, provoking a bitter argument with his business partner, the master printer Emery Walker.

    Cobden-Sanderson was born in 1840 in Alnwick, Northumberland, and died in London in 1922. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Drew Maughan
    [DM Founts]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    DTPTypes Limited
    [Malcolm Wooden]

    DTP Types Ltd was started in 1989 by Malcolm Wooden (b. London, 1956) from Crawley, West Sussex, England. Wooden worked at Monotype for over 20 years just before that. Malcolm Wooden joined Dalton Maag early 2008 to work on font engineering and production. DTP Types does/did custom font work, and sells hundreds of retail fonts.

    In the Headline Font Collection (50 fonts), we find reworked and extended designs (Apollo, New Bodoni Black, Camile, Engravers, and so forth), as well as fresh faces (Hellene handwriting, Finalia Condensed, Birac, Delargo Black, Delargo DT Rounded (comic book family), Dawn Calligraphy).

    In the Elite Typeface Library, there are type 1 and truetype faces for Western and East-European languages. For example, Elisar DT (1996, see also elisar DT Infant) is a humanist sans family made by Malcolm and Lisa Wooden. Fuller Sans DT (1996) is a grotesk family by Malcolm Wooden. Greek and Cyrillic included. Other typefaces: Garamond 96, Pen Tip (Tekton-like).

    Fonts distributed by ITF and MyFonts.com: Berstrom DT, Beverley Sans DT (2007, comic book style face), Birac DT, Century Schoolbook DT, Convex DT, Delargo DTInformal, Delargo DT Infant, Engravers DT (1990), Finalia DT Condensed, Garamond DT, Garamond Nine Six DT, Goudy Old Style DT, Graphicus DT (1992, a 24-style geometric sans family), Kabel DTCondensed, Leiden DT, Macarena DT, Modus DT (2007), New Bodoni DT (1992), Newhouse DT (1992, a large neo-grotesque family), Office Script DT (1994, copperplate script), Pelham DT, Pen Tip DT, Pen Tip DT Infant, Pretorian DT (a revival of an old Edwardian font by P.M. Shanks done by Ron Carpenter and Malcolm Wooden in 1992; for a free version, see Vivian by Dieter Steffman), Solaire DT, Triest DT, Vigor DT (2000---a slab serif family).

    Discussion: Something I don't get is that Vecta DT (2006) is based on Vecta (2005, Wilton Foundry)---same name, same sans family, what gives? Duet DT (2006, a calligraphic script) is by Robbie de Villiers of Wilton, based on his own Duet (2004). MyFonts page. The typophiles reserve harsh judgment: I recognize these designs by their original names. Slightly manipulating Times Roman, Optima, Icone, Franklin Gothic, Sabon, Tekton, does not make them new or original. Many of the designs are identical to the originals they're derived from (Carl Crossgrove), The DTP Types outfit sells the usual rip-off fonts under new and old names (e.g. Century Schoolbook DT, Engravers DT, Goudy Old Style DT, Kabel DT, etc.) (Uli Stiehl).

  • Typefaces from 2007: Rustikalis DT, Appeal DT, Fatbrush DT, Kardanal DT, Pamela DT (semi-blackletter).

    In 2008, DTP announced a new newspaper and magazine text family, Arbesco DT (PDF), based on a 1980s photolettering family (see also here), and a simple 24-style architectural sans family called Sentico Sans DT (elliptical). They also published the marker family Pen Tip DT Lefty in 2008.

    In 2009, the calligraphic Trissino DT was published: it was named after Gian Giorgio Trissino (1478-1550) the Italian Renaissance humanist, poet, dramatist, diplomat and grammarian who was the first to explicitly distinguish I and J as seperate letter sounds.

    View the DTP Types typeface library. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

  • Duncan Rogers
    [Image Daddy]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Dylan Johnston

    During his studies in Farnham, UK, Dylan Johnston created the pixelish ornamental caps typeface Modular (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Dylan Taylor

    New Zealand-born designer who now works in London. He drew his bilined curly caps face Guillotine (2012) in Illustrator. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Éamonn Hanratty
    [MDTA Design -- Green Dragon]

    [More]  ⦿

    E&F Gyles

    London-based foundry at the end of the 19th century. Creators of Quill Pen Script, an art nouveau signage face. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eastern Language Systems of Vazhe Negar

    Vazhe Negar is a registered trade mark of Eastern Languages (UK-based). Contact Habib Yosri. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ed Baptist

    Happy graphic desugner in Manchester, UK, who created a number of typefaces in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ed Crane

    For a school project at Reading, UK, Ed Crane removed the serifs of a Didot, and designed Newax (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ed Jones

    During his studies at Staffordshire University, this Stoke-on-Trent, UK-based graphic designer created the condensed wood type titling face Maritime Museum (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ed Merritt
    [tenbytwenty]

    [More]  ⦿

    Edd Harrington
    [Colophon Foundry]

    [More]  ⦿

    Edit

    Design studio in Leicester, UK. Designers of ED Stencil Rund (2012).

    Home page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Edmund Fry

    British typefounder, d. 1835. Son of Joseph Fry, the founder of the Fry Letter Foundry in Bristol. Quoted from MyFonts: In 1784 he introduced a raised roman letter for the blind, and was awarded a prize by the Edinburgh Society of Arts. Louis Braille's system of lines and dots ultimately proved better. In 1787, he and his brother Henry took over the Fry Letter Foundry from their father. Credited with many great faces, including Fry's Baskerville (1768) and Fry Moxon (or Graisberry), a Gaelic typeface, Fry A Gothic Capitals (ca. 1819), an angular transitional Gaelic face, and Fry B Gaelic Capitals, a transitional Gaelic face (Everson mentions the date 1836, but that would be one year after his death...) and Priory Text.

    Mac McGrew writes: Priory Text was the blackletter of the Fry Foundry in England, with some sizes dating back to about 1600, and most sizes shown in 1785. It was revived by Talbot Baines Reed for his History of the Old English Letterfoundries in 1887, and DeVinne used it for his edition of Philobiblon in 1889. The Dickinson foundry, a forerunner of ATF, issued it as Priory Text about that time. It is very similar to Caslon Text (q.v.). BB&S made a near-duplicate type, originally called Reed Text, but later shown as Priory Black Text. Although the latter was shown as late as 1925, these faces had generally been replaced earlier by Cloister Black (q. v.) and other Old English faces with more refined draftsmanship.

    About the Gaelic types, Brendan Leen writes: In 1819, Edmund Fry cut a type once again commissioned by the British and Foreign Bible Society. The design of the Fry type signifies a departure from the angular minuscule toward the more rounded form of the half-uncial, a characteristic of Irish typography in the nineteenth century. Sample of Fry Irish type from The Two First Books of the Pentateuch.

    Author of Pantographia (1799, Cooper&Wilson, London), a work that shows the scripts of many languages [a careful digitization of some can be found in the font family Pantographia (2010) by Intellecta Design]. The full title is Pantographia; Containing Accurate Copies of All the Known Alphabets in the World; Together with an English Explanation of the Peculiar Force or Power of Each Letter: To Which Are Added, Specimens of All Well-Authenticated Oral Languages; Forming a Comprehensive Digest of Phonology. Examples from that book: Bastard, Bengallee and Berryan, Bulgarian and Bullantic, Chaldean.

    FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Edouard de Pelleport

    During his graphic design and photography studies at ECV Lille, France, French Londoner Edouard de Pelleport created an untitled cursive typeface (2013). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eduardo Camacho

    London-based designer of XYZ (2012), an experimental modular typeface. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Edward Cocker

    English author of Writing Book (1660), in which we can find wonderful flourish work. Other books include The Pen's Transcendency : or Fair Writings Store-house Fur- nished with examples of all the Curious Hands practised in England and the Nations adjacent (London, 1660) and Magnum in Parvo or the Pen's Perfection (probably 1675). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Edward Detyna
    [Electronic Font Foundry]

    [More]  ⦿

    Edward Everett

    London-based painter (b. 1980) who designed this slab serif face, called Answer (2005). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Edward Johnston

    Born in Uruguay in 1872, he died in the UK in 1944. A medical doctor, he taught all his life at the Central School of Arts and Crafts in London and at the Royal College of Art in London. From 1910-1930, he designed fonts for the Cranach-Presse in Weimar, which was owned by Count Harry Kessler.

    In 1916, he makes a typeface for the London Underground (helped by Eric Gill). Johnston's London Transport type is reworked by Colin Banks in his New Johnston (1979). His fonts show a strong influence by Eric Gill: Hamlet-Type (1912-27, designed for a Shakespeare edition, Cranach Press, 1929), Imprint-Antiqua (with Gerard Meynell and J. H. Mason, 1913; +Imprint Shadow; digital forms exist at Monotype [Imprint MT], URW [Imprint URW, preferred over the MT version by some of my correspondents], SoftMaker [I771], and Bitstream [Dutch 766]), Johnston Sans Serif (1916).

    A version of the London Underground typeface (1997) was digitized by P22 foundry. In 2007, P22 extended that typeface to a 21-style multilingual collection called P22 Underground Pro. At ITC, Dave Farey and Richard Dawson recreated a Johnston sans serif family with 3 weights, aptly called ITC Johnston. Nick Curtis created Underground NF in 1999. Many other designers aped Johnston's Underground as well. Hamlet, the almost-blackletter script, was revived by Manfred Klein and Petra Heidorn as HamletOrNot. In 2012, Greg Fleming published Railway Sans as a free open source font at OFL. It is based upon Johnston's original drawings and work started by Justin Howes just before his death.

    Edward Johnston is a book published by Priscilla Johnston (London, 1959). Author of Writing&illuminating,&lettering (1917, J. Hogg, London; original done in 1906). Writing Illuminating Lettering at Amazon.

    Scans of some lettering by him: illuminations (1917), modernized half uncial (1906), Calligraphy by Johnston. Digital fonts based on alphabets from the 1906 book include Edward's Uncial 1904 (2011, David Kettlewell).

    Links: Linotype, FontShop, Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Edward Johnston
    [Johnston's Underground Type]

    [More]  ⦿

    Edward Philip Prince

    English punchcutter active from 1862 to 1923, associated with seemingly the whole of the blossoming private press movement in England and America, b. 1841, Kennington, d. 1923, North London. His type creations include Tudor Black (1878, Miller&Richard), a face codesigned by Frederick Tarrant. Notable work was for the Kelmscott Press of William Morris, and the Doves Press of Emery Walker&Thomas Cobden-Sanderson. For the Doves Press he cut the revivals of Jenson's type that stimulated an interest in 15th century printing in the wider printing industry. (This Doves type was later thrown into the River Thames by an upset Cobden-Sanderson, over a protracted argument about its authorship). Prince's major design failure is worth noting. He was commissioned by Emery Walker to design type for Count Harry Kessler's Cranach Presse. The roman design was not a problem, for Prince had cut similar designs for the Kelmscott and Doves presses. The italic presented a new challenge though. Based on a type used in a 1525 work of Tagliente, this was the first attempt to recut a chancery italic. Despite help from Edward Johnston, Prince was seemingly unable to do interpret the design, and demanded finished drawings from Johnston, which the Englishman - in accordance with his views on the nature of craftsmanship - was not inclined to provide. It is instructive to note a confession Prince made to Kessler, characterizing himself as "a craftsman carrying out other men's designs". For Kelmscott Press, William Morris (a founder of the Arts and Crafts movement and a forerunner of the influential private press movement in Europe) and Edward Prince (master engraver) designed Golden Type (1890), a robust typeface made after the 1469 roman by Nicolas Jenson [Charles Leonard: The Golden Type was one of the most influential of the 19th century, but doesn't hold a candle to the Venetian revival faces that quickly followed.]. See also ATF Jenson Recut, and the digital Linotype ITC Golden Type. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Edward Townend

    Creator of the outline face HelvetidoodlebyEdT (2009). Edward is located in South Yorkshire, UK. Home page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eelee Design
    [Lee Mullen]

    Designer in Newcastle, UK. Creator of the beautiful mechanical / octagonal typeface Ball Breaker (2012) and of the free experimental typeface Brailler (2012).

    Behance link. Fontspace link. Old URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Effek-Tive
    [Greig Anderson]

    Effektive (Greig Anderson) practices graphic design and communication in the UK. Among its many creations are some experimental typefaces such as Circul8 (2009) and Pixel8 (2009). Behance link. Originally from Aberdeen, Scotland, Greig graduated with a BA (Hons) Graphic Design degree in 2004 and previously spent 4 years working withinn the Scottish/UK design industry at multi disciplinary agency Curious (Previously CuriousOranj) based in Glasgow. Greig spent the academic year 2008-2009 in Sydney. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Egils Grikis

    Stirling, UK-based graphic designer and typographer. Originally from Latvia, he cooked up some exquisite corporate identities. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eightface (was Dave Kellam.com)
    [Dave Kellam]

    Eightface had free truetype fonts by Dave Kellam who was a student at Queen's University. He currently lives in England. David's fonts were mostly made in 1998: Cof, Plastic Tomato (thick round letters), dawgbox (grunge), Stay Clear (sloppy paint-- nice !), Pigment 08 (artsy), Dimestore Hooker (great eroded font), Niner, After Shok, and Eau de Toilet. Plus Discount Inferno (double vision font), Millionair, Nineteen 77, Adlock, Grade, Issac. Dave Kellam was born in Brockville, Ontario in 1981. He joined Fontmonster, where he (re)published Stay Clear, Adlock, DawgBox, DimestoreHooker, DiscountInferno, and PlasticTomato.

    Direct download [now dead]. His type blog. Klingspor link. Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eiichi Kono

    Japanese type designer. He started out in the photo optical industry in Tokyo with Carl Zeiss and American Optical. He studied type design at the London College of Printing and the Royal College of Art. From 1979-1985 he worked at the graphic design firm Banks&Miles in London. There he redesigned Johnston Underground Sans for text setting as well as display use, now known as New Johnston, and carried out a feasibility study for space saving and legibility for the BT telephone directory, proving that Matthew Carter's Bell Centennial was the best suited typeface for the purpose. He also taught typography at Middlesex Polytechnic between 1980 and 1988. With Matthew Carter, he developed the full Roman and kanji OpenType font family Meiryo (2005), as part of Microsoft's ClearType project. Other participants on this project included Takeharu Suzuki of C&G and Yukiko Ueda. Meiryo won the Tokyo TDC 2007 award. He is currently a senior research fellow at University of Brighton, leading research into Edward Johnston's legacy.

    At ATypI 2007 in Brighton, he spoke about Sustainability and typography.

    In 2012, he designed CC Art Sans for CCA Kitakyushu.

    With Lida Lopes Cardozo, he designed Kindersley Street Italic, a typeface created to accompany Kindersley Street (2005), which in turn is a revival of David Kindersley's MoT Serif (1952). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eilidh Berry Fraser

    London-based creator of the sans typeface Vulpini (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    El Lozareth

    UK-based designer of the rough hand-printed faces Scribulous Scrawlin (2009) and Spaceman Spiff (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eleanor Ridsdale

    London-based graphic designer who graduated from Glasgow School of Art and the Royal College of Art. Creator of the inline caps face Betsy Works (2011). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eleanor Russell-Jones

    Bournemouth, UK-based designer of a bike-themed font in 2014. She also made Speed (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Electronic Font Foundry
    [Edward Detyna]

    The Electronic Font Foundry (EFF) in Ascot, Berkshire, UK, sells most classical fonts at about 15 dollars per weight, and makes custom fonts. Established in 1984, the foundry had 1300 fonts by 2012.

    The font designer is Edward Detyna.

    On July 4, 2002, Apostrophe wrote this: I'm currently having a difficult time trying to predict the past of EFF LondonA, EFF Liz, EFF Eric and EFF Formal, to name a few. I have a feeling that these folks just happen to be twins with entities that are currently across the Atlantic from them, namely Adobe Garamond, Cooper Black, Gill Sans and Copperplate Gothic. A friend of Detyna's writes this: When I met him at least twenty years ago, Edward and his associates had a font design studio based in Ascot, near London. He is a mathematician/statistician turned typographer, and was really on top of type design at the time. There are academic articles published on mathematical subjects on the internet. He's an old man now, but still a very smart guy. When he started, with fonts for Acorn RISC-OS (now defunct, but leading-edge British computer of mid-eighties to -nineties), he had very advanced and sophisticated algorithms for anti-aliasing and hinting, and his hand-hinting is still better than almost any other fonts I have used for screen work. He still sells fonts and adapts to user requirements promptly. I recently asked him to adjust the hinting on a font and he turns it around in a day.

    Closed captioning fonts for TV, made according to the EIA 708-B specifications, include EFF Sans Serif CC, EFF Serif CC, EFF Sans Serif Mono CC, EFF Serif Mono CC, EFF Casual CC, EFF Script CC, EFF Small Caps CC.

    EFF also has fonts for Vietnamese, Greek, Hebrew, and Cyrillic.

    EFF Primary is a large family of educational fonts.

    EFF Utamaru is an oriental simulation font. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eleisha Pechey

    British type designer at Stephenson Blake, 1831 (Bury St. Edmunds)-1902 (London). Designer of Windsor at Stephenson Blake (cut by William Kirkwood in 1905, digital versions now available at Bitstream and URW), of Booklet Italic (punches cut in 1904 by William Kirkwood; this face is used in the titles of many Woody Allen movies), of Long Imperial Script (punches cut in 1906 by Karl Gomer), and of Grotesque No 9 (1906). Question: How can Pechey have designed a font four years after passing away? I got the date 1906 from the Scangraphic site, but either that is wrong, or Myfonts.com erred--still researching this. Charlemagne (1886, ornamantal) is supposed to be a Photoscript font according to Berthold Headlines E3---again a mistake. In 2009, Göran Söderström (Autodidakt) and Peter Bruhn (Fountain) published Trailering Heroine, which was inspired by Windsor. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Elena Andrijauskaite

    Graphic designer in London, who created the modular high-contrast typeface Flare (2013). Elena graduated from Shillington College in London. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Elena Andrijauskaite

    London-based designer of the curvy modular tyeface Flare (2014). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Elena Papassissa

    Italian graduate of ISIA Urbino, Italy (M.Sc. in Communication and Design for Publishing and a Bachelor's in Graphic Design and Visual Communication). Graduate of the MATD program at the University of Reading in 2012. Elena lives in the UK. Her graduation typeface at Reading was the multi-script Dr. Jekyll and Miss Hyde (2012), created for Latin, Greek and Armenian. My first reaction is that the curviness and roundness of the Latin part is due to the desire to harmonize with the two other scripts. All styles are flared out near the top, which gives the result a comic book feel. In fact, Elena mentions that children's books was one of the main motivations.

    At ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam, she discusses the current state of Armenian type design. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eliabetta Giordana

    Italian graphic designer and illustrator in London. She created Feather Sans (2011), a sans family with calligraphic influences. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Elizabeth Clemence

    Student at the University of Western England in 2011. Creator of the ornamental caps face Decay (2011, FontStruct). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Elizabeth Parkin

    Sheffield, UK-based graphic design student who created a typographic skeleton in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Elli Egilsson

    Elli Egilsson (b. Reykjavik, Iceland) runs the AC Bananas studio in London. His typefaces include Splatter (2012) and Cactus (2012, spiky). All typefaces are free. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ellie

    Brighton, UK-based youngster (b. 1992) who created the spiky display face Ella Spike Garden (2006). Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ellie Cobb

    Ellie Cobb (London) created an untitled decorative textured caps typeface in 2013. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ellie Lanham

    Student at UWE in Bristol. During her studies at UWE, she used FontStruct to create the extured typeface Over Tile (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Elliot Jay Stocks
    [8 Faces]

    [More]  ⦿

    Elliott Mariess

    Guernsey, UK-based designer of the constructivist face Bigntall (2010, iFontMaker). He also made the hand-printed Notebook Scribble (2010) and SoozieQS (2011). Homepage. He also created this font with iFontMaker on the iPad: Elliotts Comic Gill (2010). In 2010, he started the commercial foundry Mariess, where one can now buy Notebook Scribble. That must be the first iFontMaker font that hits the market. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Elliott Pearson

    Graphic and motion graphics designer in Liverpool, UK. He created the grungy thematic typeface Rain (2010).

    Behance link. Another Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ellis Hudson

    During his studies at University of the Creative Arts Farnham in the UK, Ellis Hudson designed the modular typeface Duns Hollies (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eloïse Parrack

    Éloïse Parrack was born in 1977 in Bethesda, MD, Parrack graduated in 2006 from the University of Brighton, UK. She still lives in the UK. Since 2007, she co-manages Defalign with David Millhouse. Raeling (2010, Volcano Type) is a curvy light inline face.

    Klingspor link. Volcano Type link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Elvira Arkanov

    Designer and illustrator based in Liverpool, UK. Creator of the hipster typeface Concept (2014). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Elvn Seet

    London-based creator of the wavy prismatic typeface Rhythm (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emanuele Catena

    Italian designer who has an MA from the London College of Communication. He created the sheared grid typeface Trius (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emery Walker

    Born in London in 1851, Emery Walker died also in London in 1933. He was a printer who worked with William Morris at the Kelmscott Press. In 1900 he co-founded Doves Press with Thomas J. Cobden-Sanderson. Walker drew the revival of Jenson's types, which were later cut by Edward Prince. One of his types there (made with Cobden-Sanderson) is known as Doves Roman (1900). He left the Doves Press in 1909. He was engaged by Harry Kessler to produce type for the Cranach Presse in Weimar. Walker commissioned Percy Tiffin and the highly-regarded Prince. With the accompanying Tagliente-based italic, the project ran into serious difficulties and the mediocre design remained unfinished until after Prince's death. Ben Archer writes: Although William Morris's Golden Type predated this design, it is thought that the Doves Type was more faithful to the design of the original Venetian type of the fifteenth century. Punches were cut by Edward Prince on the instructions of Walker and Cobden Sanderson in a single size and weight only, and used for printing the Doves Press edition of the Bible. This celebrated type was used privately for sixteen years and never released to the general trade. It was lost to history forever when Cobden Sanderson threw the entire font into the Thames river, provoking a bitter argument with his business partner, the master printer Emery Walker.

    Bio. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Emil Kozole

    Emil Kozole (Ljubljana, Slovenia) s currently studying communication design at Central Saint Martins London. He created the slab serif typeface Sarajevo (2012), Icons Night Out (2012), the artsy art deco typeface Typometry (2012, Ten Dollar Fonts) and the information design typeface family Signalia (2012). Free download.

    Attitude (2013) is a 7-style semi-alchemic typeface family. Ten Dollar Fonts link. Cargocollective link. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emily Goater

    Birmingham, UK-based graphic designer who created the high-contrast display typeface Senses (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emily King

    London-based designer who wrote a Ph.D. thesis on typeface design of the late 1980s and early 1990s (at Kingston University, 199): "New Faces: type design in the first decade of device-independent digital typesetting (1987-1997)". Her thesis is on-line. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emily Lodge

    During her studies at the Leeds College of Art and Design in Leeds, UK, Emily Lodge created the futuristic hexagonal typeface Houston (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emily Mahon
    [FreshComFonts]

    [More]  ⦿

    Emily Neal

    Devon, UK-based creator (b. 1995) of the hand-printed typefaces Neds Writing (2014), Girly Graffiti (2013), LC Look With Your Heart (2013), LC Selena (2013), La Carmella (2013), LC Daisy (2012), LC Simple (2012), LC Scribbles (2012) and La Carmella (2012).

    Dafont link. Fontspace link. Home page. Aka La Carmella. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emily Picken

    During her studies at the University of Northampton, UK, Emily Picken created the shadowed typeface Doodle Sans (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emily Sutcliffe

    Leeds, UK-based designer of an unnamed decorative caps alphabet (2013). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emily Waddecar

    Manchester, UK-based designer and student there in 2012 at the University of Salford. Creator of the ornamental caps typeface Early Bird (2012). This typeface was published at Salford Type Foundry in 2012.

    In 2013, she published the paperclip and circle-based typeface Continuous.

    Blog. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emma

    Graduate of Leeds College of Art and Design. Creator of the stocking-themed typeface Legs (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emma Bowey

    Emma Bowey is the Manchester, UK-based designer (b. 1990, London) of the spindly handwriting face Alphasplat (2012, Treefrog style) and of Mancitecture (2013), Chippy Handwriting (2012), Bond Me (2012, a piano key face), Sponge (2012, a fat poster font), and Tickle Me Elmo (2012).

    Aka Girl with the AWOL muse.

    University of Salford link, where she participates in Salford Type Foundry.

    Fontspace link. Dafont link. Behance link. Aka Chippy Bowey. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emma Brown

    Student at UWE (Bristol, UK). FontStructor who made the textured outline face Structured Lace (2011). Other Fontstructions include Ribbon and Flourish. Aka emmer06. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emma Richards

    Emma Richards (London, UK) is a graphic designer who experimented with two sahpes and created an entire alphabet with it in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emma Webb

    London-based designer who created BikeType and a paperclip font in 2009. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emma Williams

    London-based British type designer who obtained an MA in typeface design from the University of Reading in 2008. Her graduation typeface is the oldstyle face Milvus, created specifically for periodicals and books.

    Other typefaces include Hepworth (2011: for a gallery in Wakefield called Hepworth), Christoffel (2010, with Paulus M. Dreibholz), Rowse (2010), APFEL (2010), COSTA (2010), Virgin Galactic (2006, sci-fi), and John Lewis (2006).

    Typecache link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Emraan Mayow

    Graduate of Birmingham Metropolitan College. Birmingham, UK-based designer of Kronen (a free monospaced typeface family), Bolde (2013), a sans titling face. The octagonal typeface Ontwerp (2013) was a school project at Birmingham Metropolitan College. Emraan also designed the hairline sans caps face Ava (2013, avant-garde) and Sanotra (2013, an alchemic typeface). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Envy Technologies Ltd
    [Damien Guard]

    Damien Guard (Envy Technologies Ltd) resides in the parish of St. Peter Port, capital of an island called Guernsey that sits just off the coast of France in the English Channel. He created the screen font families Envy Code A, Envy Code R and Envy Code B (2006). FON and/or truetype formats. See also here. Typedia link.

    He used iFontMaker to draw the fat face Damien Typewriter (2011) and Damien Vertical (2011).

    FontStructor of Curvature (2008-2011), Atari ST (2011), Amstrad CPC (2011), Lickable 5 (2011), Magic 5 (2008), Magic 5 Bold (2008), Subpixel5 (2011), Tiny (2008). Most of these are screen or pixel fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eray Feyzi

    London, UK-based creator of the free fat finger typefaces Erays Writing (2013) and Little Envy (2013). Eray also designed Karabey (2013).

    Dafont link. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Erem Avni

    Graphic designer in London who created the squarish typeface Towering Blocks (2014). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eric Gill

    Eric Gill was born in Brighton, England, 1882-1940. British stone carver, wood engraver, essayist and type designer. Student of Johnston. Influential British type designer who for a while worked for the Golden Cockerell Press in London. Read about Gill at Graphion. Image. Eric Gill (Fiona McCarthy, Faber and Faber Ltd) describes his life. Publishers Weekly writes: An English artist-craftsman in the tradition of William Morris, Eric Gill (1882-1940) exemplifies the search for a lifestyle to heal the split between work and leisure, art and industry. He is remembered today for his fine engravings and stone carvings, his legendary typefaces and book designs for the Golden Cockerel Press. Yet there was another side to the man, downplayed by previous biographers: a fervent convert to Catholicism and leader of three Catholic arts-and-crafts communes, Gill had a hyperactive libido which extended to incest with his sisters and daughters, as well as numerous extramarital affairs, according to British writer MacCarthy. He rationalized his penile acrobatics by inventing a bizarre pseudoreligious theory. In MacCarthy's candid portrait, Gill, who preserved the outward image of a devout father-figure, was neither saint nor humbug, but a highly sexed creative artist trapped by his Victorian concept of masculinity. This charismatic firebrand was a renegade Fabian socialist, a bohemian friend of Augustus John and Bertrand Russell. His adventurous life, as re-created in this beautifully written, absorbing biography, is disturbingly relevant to our time. A follow-up article by McCarthy in The Guardian, 2006. Canicopulus Script (1989, Barry Deck) is a font named to remember one of Eric Gill's favorite extracurricular activities. Quote: There are now about as many different varieties of letters as there are different kinds of fools. FontShop link. Linotype link.

    Author of An Essay on Typography (1931, revised in 1936). For a French edition, see Eric Gill Un Essai sur la Typographie (Boris Donné and Patricia Menay, Ypsilon Editeur, 2011).

    His typefaces include

    Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Eric Kindel

    Eric Kindel is a designer, writer and Lecturer in the Department of Typography&Graphic Communication at The University of Reading. He lives in London. Eric Kindel's project at Central Saint Martins College of Art&Design (London) includes an on-line survey of typeforms.

    At ATypI in Rome in 2002, he spoke about stencil letters ca. 1700. This talk was followed by a talk on the same topic at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon (with Fred Smeijers). His research (jointly with Fred Smeijers, James Mosley and Andrew Gillmore) involves stencil making, ca. 1700 according to an apparatus escribed in a late seventeenth-century text compiled by Gilles Filleau des Billettes for the French Royal Academy of Sciences. He also researches the Parisian stencil maker Gabriel Bery, from whom Benjamin Franklin purchased a large set of letter stencils and decorative borders in 1781. The stencil set survives in the collections of the American Philosophical Society (APS) in Philadelphia, and was first examined in 2001 as part of the project described above. Editor of Typeform dialogues: a comparative survey of typeform history and description, compiled at Central Saint Martins College of Art&Design (Hyphen Press, 2004), which has articles by himself and Catherine Dixon (who writes on type classification). He describes his research on stencil letters at Reading as follows: The period under consideration begins in the sixteenth century and ends in the present day. The intention is to recover, if possible, a relatively continuous history of stencil letters and stencilling (in the Americas and Europe) by drawing together artefacts and practices that are in many cases now largely forgotten. In addition to forming a broad view of how stencil letters have been designed, made and used over the past five centuries, specific practices will also be examined through an on-going series of articles and papers. The first, `Marked by time', was published in issue 40 of Eye magazine: it offered two contrasting instances of stencil letter-making in Germany and the United States in the mid-twentieth century. Another, `Stencil work in America, 1850-1900', was published in Baseline 38 and unearths innovations in the manufacture and use of stencils in America in the second half of the nineteenth century, and the stories of some of their makers. The article also draws on the writings of Mark Twain for whom stencils served as a literary device on several occasions. And a third, longer, article `Recollecting stencil letters' has been published in Typography papers 5. It discusses the many forms stencil letters take, and how their form is influenced by a number of factors. The article is based on the study of period writings and MSS., patent specifications, collected artefacts and other primary documents and materials. See also Patents progress: the Adjustable Stencil (Journal of the Printing Historical Society, no. 9, 2006). In Typography papers 7, he wrote about another stencil method in a paper entitled The Plaque Découpée Universelle: a geometric sanserif in 1870s Paris (2010).

    Speaker at ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik on the topic of stencils. Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam: Futura Black, circa 1860. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Erik Spiekermann

    German type designer and graphic designer par excellence, born in 1947 in Stadthagen. He set up MetaDesign in Berlin in 1979. In 1988 he set up FontShop, home of the FontFont collection. He holds an honorary professorship at the Academy of Arts in Bremen, is board member of ATypI and the German Design Council, and president of the ISTD (International Society of Typographic Designers). In July 2000, Erik left MetaDesign Berlin. He now lives and works in Berlin, London and San Francisco, designing publications, complex design systems and more typefaces. He collaborated on the publication of the comprehensive FontBook. Author of Stop Stealing Sheep & Find Out How Type Works (2nd Edition) (Adobe Press, Second Edition, 2002, First Edition, 1993). He taught typography at the Art Academy in Bremen, and is guest-lecturer at several schools around the world.

    In October 2003, he received the third Gerrit Noordzij Prize, which is given every other year to a designer who has played an important role in the field of type design and typography. It is an initiative of the postgraduate course in Type&Media at the Hague Royal Academy of Art with the Meermanno Museum (The Hague).

    His essay on information design.

    Biography. Bio at Linotype. Laudatio by John Walters of Eye Magazine. Blog.

    Presentation at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon. Presentation at ATypI 2008 in St. Petersburg. Interviewed in 2006 by Rob Forbes. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin.

    He made the following typefaces and type families:

    • Lo-Type (1913, Louis Oppenheim) was digitally adapted by Spiekermann for Berthold in 1979-1980. BERTLib sells it as Adlon Serif ST.
    • PT 55 (1986), the precursor of FF Meta.
    • Berthold Block
    • Berliner Grotesk (1979-1980, Berthold): based on an old Berthold AG face from 1923.
    • FF Govan
    • The huge families FF Meta1, FF Meta2, FF Meta3 (2003), FF Meta Condensed (1998) and FFMetaCorrespondence. The FF Meta families (1985) were originally designed for Bundespost, which did not use it--it stayed with Helvetica for a while and now uses Frutiger. Meta comes with CE, Cyrillic, Greek and Turkish sets as well. Weights like Meta Light (Thin, Hairline) Greek are available too. Spiekermann is a bit upset that Linotype's Textra (2002, a face by Jochen Schuss and Jörg Herz) looks like it was cloned off Meta.
    • Meta Serif (2007) by Christian Schwartz, Kris Sowersby and Erik Spiekermann, promised for May 2007. Kris Sowersby will also help, but the 2007 deadline seems to have been optimistic.
    • ITC Officina in versions Sans Book (1989-1990) and Serif Book (1989-1990).
    • Boehringer Sans and Antiqua (1996): custom types.
    • Grid, which appeared in FUSE 3.
    • Codesigner with Ole Schaefer (FontShop, 2000) of FF InfoDisplay and FF InfoText in 1997 and of FF InfoOffice in 2000.
    • NokiaSans and NokiaSerif (2002, company identity family). This was in cooperation with Jelle Bosma. Before Nokia Sans and Serif, Nokia used Rotis. Nokia Sans and Serif were replaced by Nokia Pure (Bruno Maag) in 2011.
    • Glasgow Type (1999), for the city of Glasgow, taking inspiration from the Rennie Macintosh types.
    • Heidelberg Gothic (1999).
    • Symantec Sans and Serif (2003): custom types.
    • FF Unit (2003-2004; see also here), another sans family, which won an award at TDC2 2004. This was followed by FF Unit Rounded. And FF Unit Rounded started according to Erik as Gravis, the largest Apple dealer in Germany. FF Unit Slab (2009) is the product of a cooperation between Kris Sowersby, Christian Schwartz, and Erik Spiekermann.
    • ITC Officina Display (2001).
    • FF Meta Thin Light and Hairline (2003) and FF Meta Headline (2005).
    • Bosch Sans and Bosch Serif (2004).
    • The SeatMeta family (2003) for Seat.
    • DB Type in six styles (Serif, Sans, Head, Condensed, Compressed, News): designed in 2005 in collaboration with Christian Schwartz for the Deutsche Bahn (train system in Germany). Some typohiles say that it reminds them of Bell Gothic and Vesta.
    • A Volkswagen company family based on a correction of Futura.
    • The DWR House Numbers Series (2006): four fonts with numerals for house numbers: Contemporary House Numbers, Tech House Numbers, Classic House Numbers (based on Bodoni), Industrial House Numbers (stencil). DWR stands for Design Within Reach.
    • Tech (2008, FontStruct), a rounded squarish headline face.
    • Axel (2009): developed jointly with Erik van Blokland and Ralph du Carrois, it is a system font with these features:
      • Similar letters and numbers are clearly distinguishable (l, i, I, 1, 7; 0, O; e, c #).
      • Increased contrast between regular and bold.
      • High legibility on the monitor via Clear Type support.
      • Seems to outperform Courier New, Verdana, Lucida Sans, Georgia, Arial and Calibri, according to their tests (although I would rank Calibri at or above Axel for many criteria).
    • In 2012-2013, Ralph du Carrois and Erik Spiekermann co-designed Fira Sans and Fira Mono for Firefox / Mozilla. This typeface will be free for everyone. It is specially designed for small screens, and seems to do a good job at that. I am not a particular fan of a g with an aerodynamic wing and the bipolar l of Fira Mono, though. Mozilla download page.

    Picture of Eric Spiekermann shot by Chris Lozos at Typo SF in 2012.

    FontShop link.

    View Erik Spiekermann's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Erik Winterburn

    Student at UWE in Bristol. During his studies at UWE, he used FontStruct to create the shadow face Janet (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Erin Welch

    Illustrator Erin Welch (London, UK) drew som all caps alphabets in 2013. I am not certain that these were made into digital fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Erith&Crayford Scouts

    Scouting font archive: UKPatrolBadges, Baden-Powell-Patrol-Animals, ScoutingUKDings, Twig. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Esteve Padilla

    London-based graphic designer who made the custom avant-garde face Nowadays (2009). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ethan Bennett

    During his studies at Oaklands College in St Albans, UK, Ethan Bennett (London) designed the techno typeface Xenon (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eurico Sá Fernandes

    Portuguese student of graphic design at London College of Communication. His typefaces include Rounded Regular (2011), Mariana (2011, wavy), London Fields (2011), Pontocruz Smallcaps (2011), Colher V3 (2011) and Colher Rounded (2011).

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Europa Type
    [Fabian Leuenberger]

    Fabian Leuenberger's foundry is called Europa Type. It is located in Zurich and London. Their typefaces include:

    Personal link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eva Angelova

    British creator of the curly hand-printed typeface Angelova (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eva Karapidaki

    Eva Karapidaki holds a Bachelor of Arts in Graphic Design from Middlesex University /AKTO. She often writes for +Design magazine and works for Tsevis Visual Design. Her first commercial typeface is PF Hardkore (2007, Parachute). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Eva Yarza Hilario

    London-based designer of the minimalist monoline sans typeface Plastic Crowds (2013): Inspired by old cinema marquees and by the 60s advertisements of NASA, we created this unique upper case typeface for the art collective Plastic Crowds. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Exeter College

    Part of the University of Plymouth, UK. One of only two schools in the UK that offer exclusively typographic degrees. The University of Reading is the other one. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    F. Ernest Jackson

    Journal publisher and editor from United Kingdom, b. 1872, Yorkshire, d. 1945. FontShop link. MyFonts: In 1912 Gerard Meynell, with J.H. Mason, Ernest Jackson and Edward Johnston, commissioned this large x-height typeface [i.e., Imprint] modelled on Caslon's designs from Pierpont and the Monotype Corporation as the text face for The Imprint, a short-lived magazine about fine printing and typography. It was finished in 1913. Digital version now called Imprint MT. There is also a version called Imprint URW. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    F. Rey

    London-based foundry. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    F37 (or: Face37)
    [Rick Banks]

    Rick Banks (b. 1985, Manchester) established F37 (Face37) in 2010 in London, UK. He created F37 Xan (2010, a counterless geometric face based on a geometric solid typeface from 1925 by André Vlaanderen) and F37 Form (2010, a mimimalist circular experimental (Bauhaus?) font). He writes about Form: After looking at Armin Hoffman's Die Gute Form poster and Herbert Bayer's universal typeface I constructed an alphabet based on their letterforms. Inspired by Wim Crouwel's Soft Alphabet, I constructed a grid to create the modular alphabet and programmed very tight letterspacing into the font lending itself to the style of Die Gute Form.

    Type Trumps are playing cards that feature the main typefaces.

    Bella (2011) is an extremely contrasted didone display face, available as F37 Bella at Hype For Type. He says that he was influenced not only by Didot, but also by Pistilli and by Tschichold's Saskia. F37 Bella won an award at TDC Tokyo 2012.

    Other typefaces include Ginger (2013, a Swiss sans inspired by the work of Herb Lubalin, Jan Tschichold and Paul Renner.), F37 Neue Grotesque (2013), F37 Stencil Bella (2013).

    In 2014, he published F37 Ginger (a geometric sans family).

    Behance link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fabian Leuenberger
    [Europa Type]

    [More]  ⦿

    Fabrikken

    Multimedia artist in East Sussex, UK, b. 1988. He created the stitching font Block Plus (2009, FontStruct) and the ocagonal Grated (2009, FontStruct). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Face Photosetting

    Photo era foundry set up in the 1960s by John McConnell and Chris Dubber in London. I could only find Pluto Outline, the art nouveau face Desdemona (a digital version was created in 1992 by David Berlow at Font Bureau and in 1994 by Richard Beatty; Letraset showed Desdemona in its 1981 and 1986 catalogs; the original is from the late 19th century by Karl Brendler&Soehne, Vienna), Stack, and Oxford (a multiline face) on-line. Steve Jackaman worked in the studio in Newman Street and Hanway Place, and recalled El Paso (a Western/Mexican simulation face) when he created El Paso Pro (2011, Red Rooster).

    According to Wes Wilson, Face Photosetting led the way by launching a number of Art Nouveau revivals which were taken from Ludwig Petzendorfer's "A Treasury of Authentic Art Nouveau Alphabets". A selection of these, which included Arnold Böcklin, Edel Gotisch and Eckmann Schrift, were made more widely available when Letraset produced them for their dry transfer product. They published a number of books and catalogs, ca. 1976-1977: Face headline catalogue [1981/82] (1977), Specimens of Delittle's wood type, Face book of faces, Type catalogue (1976). Some of the faces were Cyrillicized, such as Bullion Shadow (1970; Cyrillic version by Victor Kharyk, 1978). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Faces

    British font vendor which deals with over one hundred foundries. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Falko Grentrup
    [Transfer Studio]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fann Street Foundry

    Defunct London-based foundry, started by Robert Thorne in 1794. It specialized in display types. The foundry was bought by William Thorowgood in 1820, by Robert Besley in 1849, became Reed&Fox in 1866 and closed in 1906. Its designs passed to Stephenson Blake.

    Fann Street Foundry Reed&Fox (1873, London) is one of their specimen books. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fanny Wacklin Nilsson

    UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who created the grungy texture face Mouldy Strawberries (2010), which was obtained after letting fruit cut in the shape of letters decay on a sheet of paper. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fatchair
    [Alan Rimmer]

    Fatchair is Alan Rimmer's company in Chessington, Surrey, UK. MyFonts catalog. He has made corporate type such as Kingston Gill Sans (for Kingston University), and Contact. Other type families: Naranja (2012, a nice rounded sans family), Reon Sans (2012), Vasarely Light (2002), Deep Fried (1996), Drug (1998), Illuminati (2000, monospaced, sans serif), Informatic (2002, 20-style sans family marketed as friendly alternative to DIN), Mizar Grotesk (2002), San Jaime (2002), WSK (2002, a modern family), Ozone Inline (free dot matrix font, 2002).

    Commercial fonts include Boeotian (2004), DeepFried (2005, 28 members in this multiline typographical experiment), Drug (2004, eroded face), Friday (2004), Illuminati (2004), Informatic (2004, 20-weight sans family), Mizar Grotesk (2004, 10 weights), Procyon (2004), San Jaime (2004), Stranski (2004), Venkmann (2004) and WSK (2004, a 4-weight serif).

    Klingspor link.

    View Alan Rimmer's typefaces.

    View Fatchair's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fatfonts
    [Uta Hinrichs]

    FatFonts is a graphical technique conceived and developed in 2012 by Miguel Nacenta (a lecturer in human-computer interaction at the School of Computer Science, University of St Andrews, Scotland), Uta Hinrichs (originally from Lübeck in Germany, she is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Calgary in Canada), and Sheelagh Carpendale (a computer science professor at the University of Calgary).

    Numerals in vector fonts developed by the team have a thickness that is proportional to their value. Numerals can also be nested. The (free) fonts were converted to opentype by Richard Wheeler (a PhD student at The Sir William Dunn School of Pathology of Oxford). Uta Hinrichs designed Gracilia, Cubica, and Rotunda. She codesigned Miguta with Miguel Nacenta. Finally, Richard Wheeler himself created the LED face 7Segments. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fathom Creative
    [Anthony Roberts]

    Anthony "Ant" Roberts is the former director of the Manchester design agency, Fathom. Between 2001 and 2003, he created some commercial techno, Playstation, manga and motor racing fonts such as Baja (Medium, Bold), Fraudster, Keet Heavy, Shooter Bold, Soon Black and Zedd Bold.

    Fontworks link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fatima Verissimo

    London-based graphic designer who created Nailed (2011, experimental). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Faye Gibbon

    During her studies at Loughborough University, faye Gibbon designed the display typeface Chili Pepper (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Faye Lloyd

    During her studies in Cheltenham, UK, Faye Lloyd created an unnamed all caps typeface (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    F.C. Herrick

    British poster artist who drew a roman capital alphabet (maybe even a typeface) for the Empire Exhibition in Wembley in 1924. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Femiir

    UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who made the nice ornamental caps face Royally Struct (2010), allegedly inspired by the word pompous (in his/her own words). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fergus O'Donoghue

    Norwich, UK-based graphic designer, b. 1961. He created Handergus (2012, hand-printed), Baby Pirate (2008), Boneyard Army (2010) and Aztec Bouffon (2008).

    In 2013, he added Clown Town.

    Home page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Ferran Milan Oliveras

    Graduate of the University of Reading in 2011 who lives in Catalunya and/or the UK. He created the Latin / Arabic face Bubblegum (2011) during his studies there. Bubblegum is soft and rounded, but is remarkably well-suited for small text thanks the careful use of inktraps.

    In 2012, he won the Bronze Prize in the Latin category of the Morisawa Type Design Competition for Baldufa. Baldufa was also crowned at TDC 2013. Its angular and stocky design makes it ideal for use in catalogs and magazines.

    In 2013, Pilar Cano and Ferran Milan codesigned the text typeface Quars, which was published at Letterjuice. It was influenced by Scotch Roman and classical Dutch typefaces. In addition, it offers a generous glyph set with many ligatures specially crafted for titling and ornaments based on anonymous metal types found in the drawers of an old printing workshop in a coast town near Barcelona. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fewell Foundry
    [Martin Fewell]

    Martin Fewell is the type designer who started the Fewell foundry in London, and who runs MartinFewell.com and Yolo in Manchester. Martin is also a part time Lecturer at The University of Salford and Chelsea School of Art and Design. His techno fonts are available from [T-26]: Assembler (2004, a paperclip face), Mechwar (2002), Techstep (2002), Sushi (2002), Synthesis (2002, a techno font family) and Turbo (2002).

    And now also from MyFonts.com: Memory (a sensational techno font, 2003), Exhaust (2002), Kanister (2003), Datastream (2003, an octagonal font) and the military octagonal stencil font Airbrake (2003). At Union Fonts, he published Memory, Airbrake (octagonal stencil font), Exhaust, Datastream and Kanister in 2003. At Yolo, one can ogle and buy his typefaces: Airbrake (mecahical face), Airframe, Assembler, Datastream (octagonal), Delicious, Exhaust, Insatiable, Kenister (octagonal), Lovebeing, Mechwar, Memory (experimental, techno), Newart, Nova, Rapture, Sushi, Synthesis (techno), Techstep, Turbo.

    Klingspor link.

    View Martin Fewell's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Feyi Debo-Aina

    Student at UWE in Bristol. During his studies at UWE, he used FontStruct to create the sketchy font Flexing (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fifth Annual Conference of the Friends of St. Bride

    The Fifth Annual Conference of the Friends of St. Bride took place from October 16-18, 2006 at the Custard Factory, Birmingham. Its theme was Fast Type, Slow Type. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Filipe Almeida

    Graphic designer at BMT London.

    In 2014, Ricardo Martins, Filipe Almeida and Curtis White codesigned the ray-lit 3d Balloon typeface (2014), which must have been a technical tour de force. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Filthymedia

    British studio located in Brighton. Behance link. Creators of the oily display face Filthy Black Italic (2011). Hype For Type link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Finbar Lenahan

    UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who made the broken marble face Kalkutta (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fine Fonts

    A new foundry in Cheltenham, UK, started by Michael Harvey and Andy Benedek in 2001. Their output was sold through Faces, but is now marketed via MyFonts. The fonts: Aesop (calligraphic writing), Tisdall Script, the spectacular Songlines, Fine Gothic (blackletter), Marceta (uncial), Braff, Balthasar, Mentor Roman, Mentor Italic. Also sold at Fonts.com. A type designer close to me said: The Mentor and Mentor Sans superfamilies were released last February by Monotype, and nobody even mentioned them. To me they look Michael Harvey's best ever masterpiece, and probably the best new superset to be released this millenium, but nobody's paying attention. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Finlay Margrie

    Blandford, Dorset, UK-based photographer, b. 1991, aka Finn Margrie. Creator of the simple handwriting font Finn's Script (2006). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fiona Clarke
    [Bonez Designz]

    [More]  ⦿

    Fiona G.E. Ross

    Dr Fiona Ross, is a typographic consultant, typeface designer, lecturer and author, specializing in non-Latin scripts. From 1978 to 1989, Fiona Ross worked for the British arm of Linotype, Linotype Limited, where she was responsible for the design of their non-Latin fonts and typesetting schemes, notably those using Arabic and Indic scripts such as Devanagari. Since 1989 she has worked as a consultant, author, lecturer, and type designer. In 2003 Fiona joined the Department of Typography and Graphic Communication at the University of Reading, England as a part-time sessional lecturer on non-Latin type. The Adobe Thai typefaces were commissioned to from Tiro Typeworks and collaboratively designed by Fiona Ross, John Hudson and Tim Holloway in 2004-2005 for use with Adobe Acrobat (production by Tiro Typeworks). Vodafone Hindi (2007, with Tim Holloway and John Hudson) won an award at TDC2 2008. Fiona holds a BA in German; a Postgraduate Diploma in Sanskrit and Pali; and a PhD in Indian Palaeography from SOAS (London University). Bio at ATypI. Her books and/or essays:

    • The printed Bengali character and its evolution (1999, Curzon Press, Richmond, UK), reviewed by John Hudson.
    • Fiona's essay on Non-Latin Type Design at Linotype (2002).
    • Coauthor with Robert Banham of Non-Latin Typefaces at St Bride Library, London and Department of Typography&Graphic Communication, University of Reading (2008, London: St Bride Library).
    Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. Typographic picture by TDC.

    Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    First Annual Conference of the Friends of St. Bride

    The First Annual Conference of the Friends of St. Bride took place on September 24-25, 2002 at the St. Bride Library in London. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Flava Fonts (was Flava Fontz)
    [Leigh Taylor]

    Fonts by Leigh Taylor (UK), who wrote on his (now defunct) web site: My Creations, Blurmix, Hoodlum, The Sauce, Thompson, House of Fun and Fingerpop find their real home, along with numerous other creations including Isomer, Hawk, Frostbitten Again and all my future creations (10 currently on the Drawing Board!). Watch out for Alfred E. Neuman, Ren&Stimpy and Manga Dingbats coming your way! Also a Tribute to Don Martin Dingbat!.

    Spy vs Spy is a gorgeous dingbat font. House of Fun is a bouncy comic book typeface.

    Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Florian Philipp Martin Runge

    Designer in London, who was born in Flensburg (Germany) and studied for four years in Aarhus (Denmark).

    He made the contemporary informal typeface Jula (2012).

    Asgaard was created during the one-week typeface design workshop tipoRenesansa in Trenta, Slovenia (February 2012). It is specially designed for street signage. Runge writes: To achieve great legibility the design paid much attention to features such as: large x-height, open counters, tiny serifs, slightly rounded corners, square terminals as well as inktraps. Research leading to asgaard is described in Runge's paper The echo of architecture in Danish type design of the 20. century.

    In 2013, Florian graduated from the Nomad.

    Behance link. Cargo collective link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Flotsam Typography
    [Gary Clarke]

    Flotsam is the Manchester, UK-based home of free futuristic fonts created by Gary Clarke: Smart (1993), Carnage (1994), Performance (1994), Coming Up (1994), Motorway (1995), Astronaut (1995), Stiff Upper (1995).

    Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fluid +
    [Lee Basford]

    Graphic designer, born in 1973 in Birmingham, UK. Lee Basford (Fluid +) is the [T-26] designer of FungFoo (1996, with James Glover, an oriental simulation font), Euphoric (1996, with James Glover, a paperclip style font).

    At Fountain, you can buy his techno font Nuephoric.

    At his Fluid + studio, you can find Euphoric, Fungfoo, Haircut Sir? (1999), Ultra and Death, mostly grunge fonts.

    FontShop link. Home page and blog. Klingspor link. Fountain Type link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fluid Fonts
    [James Glover]

    Fluid Fonts sells custom fonts and design by James Glover (Birmingham, UK). Amberjack, Big Foot Ultra Bold and Ultra are all grunge fonts. F-one, Euphoric (a futuristic font done in 1996 with Lee Basford; available from T-26), and Wheel of Death are techno/futuristic, and Fufanu and FungFoo (a T-26 font done in 1996, with Lee Basford) are Chinese/Japanese lookalikes. MyFonts sells Euphoric and Fung Foo. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fly Fonts
    [Lee Henry]

    Foundry based in London, UK, set up by Lee Henry (b. 1982, Gateshead, UK). Lee studied Graphic Design in Newcastle and first got involved in font design when he designed GOTHFEST for a magazine project. He now works in London as a newspaper designer and continues to produce new and original font designs. Creations include Modernist (2006, a MICR style family), Arctic Chunky (2006), Gothfest (2006), Bogus (2006, in the style of Toolego), Bad Azz (2006, grid-based), Cubist (2006, thin octagonal family), and React (2006, also grid-based), Modernist (2006, monoline sans), 1up (pixel face), Allstar (2009, constructivist), Ole (2009, fat and squarish). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Flyerzone
    [Jamie Gillham]

    British designer of the free rounded sans font SciFly-Sans (2012, with Tomi Haaparanta).

    Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Font Factory
    [Andy Benedek]

    Andy Benedek's (b. Manchester, UK, 1945) Cotswolds-based outfit for "custom fonts and lettering of distinction", founded by him in 1988. Andy (András) made corporate faces for Umbro, QZERO, Bowater, Lloyds Bank, Royal Free Hospital, Liptons teas, Gordons gin, Marlboro cigarettes, as well as faces for magazines (Royal Academy of Arts, Elle, Blueprint) and for newspapers (The Scotsman). All this was done under the label of The Font Factory. With Michael Johnson and Mike Pratley, he created a font for BT Cellnet. A braille typeface has been developed to aid the production of signage for the blind. In 2001, he co-founded Fine Fonts with Michael Harvey. CV. Typefaces:

    • Aesop (2000, with Michael Harvey): developed from book jacket lettering drawn by Michael Harvey for an edition of Aesops Fables.
    • Balthasar (2002, with Michael Harvey): a serifed stencil font.
    • Braff (2002, with Michael Harvey, for Monotype Imaging): an outline face.
    • Fine Gothic (2002, a blackletter typeface codesigned with Michael Harvey): a blackletter family with a Basque A.
    • Marceta (2003, with Michael Harvey): an eighth-century uncial.
    • Mentor (2004, with Michael Harvey, for Monotype Imaging): a Times-Roman style family.
    • Mentor Sans (2004, with Michael Harvey, for Monotype Imaging): a sans family.
    • Songlines (2001, with Michael Harvey): based upon a pen-drawn script drawn by Michael Harvey to illustrate a poem by Johannes Thurman.
    • Tisdall Script (2002, with Michael Harvey): based upon the brush-drawn script lettering of Hans Tisdall, who was the designer of many distinctive lettered book jackets for Jonathan Cape in the 1950s.

    FontShop link.

    View Andy Benedek's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fontastic

    British foundry selling fonts at about 1USD a shot. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    FontBlast
    [Jamie Place]

    Jamie Place (aka FontBlast, b. 2002) is a UK-based FontStructor, allegedly born in 2002 (?), who made these typefaces in 2012: Microstruct (gridded, kitchen tile face), FontStrukt Soft, FontSrukt Clean Soft, Kombinationsschrift, Gridder (a kitchen tile family: +Soft, +Box, +Bold), Skyber, Diabolo (piano key stencil genre), fb Catbop, Hangar Shot, Hangar (army stencil), FontStrukt (+Soft), Braille Full, fb Symbols, Imagine More FB, fb Atarian, Imagine FB, Barkode, Fontstruction No1 (+Extended), Tetraminos, Structurosa Fill, fb Karakter, Minimal Export, Barkode, fb Scoreboard (dot matrix face for Latin and Cyrillic), Wenlock, Small Fonts, Fat Largo, Largo, Kerr, Kerr Bold, fb Mixture Unstable, Freehand, Structurosa Refined, fb Switch, fb Mixture, Vado, NES Forever, Retrotype Dot Matrix, Avant Pixel, fb Tall, Fast Money Clean, Retrotype, Retrotype Too (pixelish), Retrotype Sliced, Braille Caps, Tiger Sans (horizontally striped), Pixelface (smilie face), Karmink (star dingbats), Cofmugg (+Gap: piano key faces).

    Typefaces from 2013: Slink, Tuning Fork, Dicey (dice font), Septober, Pico Pop (kitchen tile), Plano (kitchen tile), Dolphin Sans (hairline), New English (stencil), Gadget, Curvaceous Script, Avant Pixel, Barkode, Brailled, Haus (counterless), Zapadni, Curvaceous Script, Metric (a piano key Futura-like stencil face), Mocha, Mocha Book, dm FB Solidis, Tapedeck, Gridder Bold (kitchen tile face), Modulator, Turning Fork, Zapadni (Western), FontStrukt2, Metric (piano key face), Monaco (pixel face), Blackfoot (Pac-Man style), FB Catbop, Peach Condensed, Noodle, Peach Squared, Vaquero, Haus, fb Academy Sans, Peach, Rider.

    Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fontdeli (or: LF Design, or: 83grafik)
    [Leigh Flurry]

    UK-based foundry, est. 2005 by freelance designer Leigh Flurry, with some free and some pay fonts, specializing in the techno look. Creators of the techno face FDshogun (2005). Free: FD Acorn (paino kaey face), FD Shogun, FD Hunterseeker, FD Spank, FD Tounge, FD Twinpines. Pay fonts: FD Bughug, FD Calibre, FD Childsplay, FD Dieselpower, FD Formula One, FD Knukledusta, FD Locust, FD Lungbutter, FD MrMajestic, FD Skylarking, FD Wolfglove, FD Flurry (paperclip font). In 2006, he added FDnaturesfinest, FDNaturesshadows, FDKubi, FDJazzclouds, FD Tek9, FD Xavier (fat, counterless) and FD Insight. Fonts made in 2009: FD Hustla (brush), FD Southbron (graffiti face), FD Parkway (rounded stencil). Fonts from 2010: FD Necromancer (octagonal, dark, and counterless), FD 57RMX, FD Gridlock, FD Jawbreaker, FD Noir, FD Optimus, FD Rainpaper (multiline face), FD Richtea, FD Skylarkdog, FD Warlord. Alternate URL. Behance link. Dafont link. Another Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fontico
    [Peter Cubbin]

    Fontico is a foundry est. in 2009 in Wallasey, in the north of England by Peter Cubbin (b. Wallasey). Its first font is the grungy aachoo! (2009). In 2010, he made the Comic Sans-style Dabo family, Fabulous Felt Pen, and Each Reflected. Before going commercial, Peter had some free fonts such as Stoobs (2009), a font in which he tried to provide a good alternative for Comic Sans (in his own words). Caballero (2009) is a macho bold sans. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fontifier

    Fontifier is a 9USD handwriting font service (was free for its first month only) by David Johnson-Davies, who runs Human-Computer Interface Ltd in Cambridge, UK. One submits a GIF-format scan of a properly filled out template. Fontifier then analyzes a sample of each letter of the GIF version of the template, and constructs a character outline. The result is a standard truetype font. Comments at Typographica. Heinrich Lipschka reports that it made a grunge font from Noga. It sure looks like the low dpi requested (75 to 100) leads to jaggies and a severe loss of information. List of fonts made with this software. Fontifier tips. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fontmill Foundry (or: Studio Liddell Ltd Graphic Design)
    [Dave Lawless]

    Fontmill is the Manchester, UK-based foundry run by Dave Lawless (b. Liverpool, 1974). MyFonts sells David's typefaces.

    Designs include ABC (techno), Loop (2004, techno), Train (kitchen tile), Bubble Wrap, Suredog (sans), Emmie (2014), Bomb, Flat Pack (2007, at T-26), Imaginer (2006, paperclip style techno family), Train, Bloxed Rounded, 3D Bloxed, British Rail, Orcin Sans (2006, 6 styles), Invaded 2600 (2006: based on the Atari 2600 arcade classic Space Invaders).

    Before Fontmill and Studio Liddell, Dave Lawless ran Tealeaf Digital Type Foundry (also called Little Red Circles). The Tealeaf fonts, created by a number of designers included: 3DBloxed, Architext, AU79, BaskerSans4, Bitmapbreakfast, breathe, Bubblewrap, Bull, Butter, Calliglession, Calligruffy, CarlSeal, Chewy, Crushedtalc, DuoGypsy, EasyLino, Forma, Geek, Grivant, Growbag, Gypsy, Inbreed, Index, Instamatik, Kyleaged5, Kyleaged5half, Ladyboy, Leavingglassvegas, Litrecs, Matrix, Mend, Metis Rota, Mr.fish, Munch, Next, NuChina, Nudgeashak, NuEngland, NuJapan, Number, Optimistic, Passion, Phobia (by Mark Bradley), Print is dead, Raygun, Reop-sans, Rupture, Scritch, Shakasonik, Shati, SheMale, Skript, Something, Stamp, Synsis, Timig, Tweak, Typeone, Underworld, Unruly Cucumber, Unstuklino, Untitled, User-unknown, Whanted, Yatta, Yuleo (Tony Howell). Free demos. Some were entirely free, such as Yatta, Tweak, Synsis, Skript, RepoSans, MrFish, Leavingglassvegas, Kyleaged5, Instamatik, Grivant, Geek, Crushedtalc. Working on ES811 (2006, a sans).

    Behance link.

    View David Lawless's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    FontNet

    From the UK, Neville Brody's site. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fontron
    [Ronald Underwood]

    Foundry, est. 2005 by Ronald Underwood in Surbiton, Surrey, UK, specializing in display type. Fonts made in 2005: Acron (2005), Foldron (2005, bubbly extra fat), Halfron (2005, extra fat with a horizontal line spliiting the glyphs), Sideron (2005, LED-inspired). In 2007, these were added: Ronsect (stencil), Ronsten (stencil), Runsect and Runsten. Designed in 2008: Herron (a rounded octagonal monoline face), Roncial Untra (ultra fat rounded mechanical face), Squaron Extra Black (ultra fat beauty), Sabron, Phatron, Triron (a futuristic horizontally-striped headline family). Novelties in 2009: Zebron (art deco stripes).

    Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fontscape
    [David Johnson-Davies]

    David Johnson-Davies (Human-Computer Interface Ltd, Cambridge, UK) lists and classifies commercial fonts to make font selection easier. The same people also run Fontifier and Identifont. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fontsmith
    [Jason Smith]

    Jason Smith is the British corporate typeface designer who founded Fontsmith in 1999, where he retails his own designs from his office in London. He has created a typographic identity for the Post Office in the UK. His fonts include FS Sinclair (2008, octagonal), Casey, Seat, Tractebel, PPP Healthcare, Powergen, Allied Irish Bank, UUnet, Channel 4, FS Ingrid, FS Rome, FS Albert (2002, a soft-cornered sans family), and Saudi Aramco. Of these, only FS Albert (2002), FS Rome and FS Ingrid can be purchased.

    Newer fonts include Champions (Regular, Bold, Headline; done in 2009 for the UEAFA Champions League), FS Rufus (a slab serif by Mitja Miklavcic, Jason Smith and Emanuela Conidi), FS Sophie (2004, sans), FS Rigsby (2005, sans), FS Clerkenwell (2004, with Phil Garnham, slab serif), FS Pele (2007, ultra fat), FS Kitty (2007), FS Sinclair (2007, rounded octagonal), FS Alver (2007), FS Dillon (influenced by the Bauhaus quest for simplicity), FS Lola (2006, for Wechsler Ross&Portet; done with Phil Garnham, it is advertised by Fontsmith as a transgender type).

    In 2007, he made the custom face Xerox Sans as a modification of his FS Albert, to which Greek and Cyrillic alphabets were added as well. Mencap, a British company that works with people with a learning disability, asked Smith to design a font, FS Mencap (also known as FS Me), for the learning disabled---easy to read, yet elegant.

    Custom typefaces include More4 (2005, for the Channel 4 Adult Entertainment channel), ITV (2006, for the ITV network), BBC ONE (2006, for the BBC), Post Office Sans (2003), FS Conrad (2009, a multiline display face). Vernon Adams and Fontsmith got into a quarrel about Vernon's Mako, which was submitted and rejected by Fontsmith, which published its own similar face Lurpak a few weeks later.

    In 2012, Jason Smith and Fernando Mello codesigned the sans typeface family FS Truman at Fontsmith.

    Klingspor link">Jason Smith [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    FontsUK

    Outfit that made DVLA 2001 (2003). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fontware Limited

    Company located in Fareham, Hampshire, UK, and (possibly) run by David Gibbins. 150 truetype-font collection: go here, here, here, here, here, and here. The 150 fonts have no copyright information other than the date, 2001. Here are the names of this collection: Aston-Italic, Aston, AstonPoster, Barker, Bentine, Brancusi-Italic, Brancusi, Burns, ButlerCaps, Cambridge-Bold, Cambridge-BoldItalic, Cambridge-Italic, Cambridge, CambridgeOpen, Chaplin, Charterhouse-Bold, Charterhouse, Cleese, Constable, Cooke, Corbett, CorpusChristi-Bold, CorpusChristi-Italic, CorpusChristi, Crosby, DaVinci, Dali, Degas, Dodd, Donnatello, Durham-Bold, Durham-Italic, Durham, DurhamPoster-Bold, DurhamPoster-Italic, Edinburgh-Bold, Edinburgh-BoldItalic, Edinburgh-Italic, Edinburgh, Epstein, EpsteinFat, Eton-Italic, Eton, Exeter-Bold, Exeter-Italic, Exeter, Formby, Gainsborough, Gauguin, Gilbert, Gordonstoun-Bold, Gordonstoun-Italic, Gordonstoun, Hancock, Hardy, Harrow-Bold, Harrow-BoldItalic, Harrow-Italic, Harrow, Harvard-Bold, Harvard, Hepworth-Bold, Hepworth, Hope, Keaton, KebleBlack, KebleBoldOutline, KebleCondensed, KebleCondensedBlack, KebleCondensedLight, Keele-Bold, Keele, KingsCollege-Bold, KingsCollege-Italic, KingsCollege, Laurel, Leighton, LeightonCondensed, LeightonExtended, Lloyd, Manet, Marceau, Marlborough-Bold, Marlborough, Matisse, Michaelangelo, Miller, Millfield, Milligan-Bold, Milligan-BoldItalic, Milligan-Italic, Milligan, Miro, Monet, Moore, Morecambe, Peterhouse-Bold, Peterhouse-BoldItalic, Peterhouse-Italic, Peterhouse, Picasso, PicassoLite, Pollock, Pryor, QueensCollege-Bold, QueensCollege-BoldItalic, QueensCollege-Italic, QueensCollege, Raphael, Rembrandt, Rodin, Roedean-Bold, Roedean, Rubens, Secombe, Sellers, Seurat, Sorbonne-Bold, Sorbonne-BoldItalic, Sorbonne-Italic, Sorbonne, StAnnes-Italic, StAnnes, StPauls-Bold, StPauls, Stowe, Sykes, ToulouseLautrec, Turner, Upminster-Bold, Upminster, VanGogh, Verrochio, Warhol, WarholHeavy, WarholLight, Warwick-Bold, Warwick-BoldItalic, Warwick-Italic, Warwick, Wellington, WellingtonHeavy, Winchester-Bold, Winchester-Italic, Winchester, Wisdom, Wise, Yale-Bold, Yale-Italic, Yale. This free font collection may or may not be produced in agreement with Qualitype. Commercial font services, including barcode solutions (about 500 USD for Barcode2000, which includes 3 of 9, Code 93, Interleaved 2 of 5, EAN/UPC, MSI/Plessey, Code 128, Codabar, MICR/E13B, CMC-7&USPS Barcode, and OCR A, OCR B, Letter Gothic, Line Draw&the Euro Currency Symbol) and TrueType logo and signature fonts (200 USD per font in 6 weights). Sells Barcode Assistant. Free barcode demo fonts. Free copy of Fontaware (Windows 3.1 font management). Free font recognition service. Font vendor for Bitstream. Barcodes sold:

    • 1-Dimensional (Linear) Barcodes: Code 128, EAN 128, UCC 128, GS1 128, Code 39, Code 39 Extended, Code 93, EAN-8, EAN-13, ISBN, ISSN, 2 of 5, Interleaved 2 of 5, Industrial 2 of 5, ITF14, Codabar, MSI, DUN14, Logmars, HIBC, Bookland, IATA.
    • Postal Barcodes: Royal Mail 4 State, PostNet, USZIP, KIX, French Postal, German Postal, Australian 4 State, Singapore 4 State.
    • 2-Dimensional Barcodes: PDF417, Datamatrix, Aztec, QR Code, Maxicode, GS1 Databar, RSS-14, Codablock-F.
    • OCR&MICR Fonts: OCR-A, OCR-B, CMC-7, MICR (E13B), OMR Marks.
    [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fontworks

    Older font vendor and occasional font developer. From their 2008 web page: type.co.uk is the online arm of Fontworks UK Ltd, part of the Creative Publishing Solutions (CPS) Group who own the Fontshop brand in the UK. With an online presence since 1994 we represent over 100 foundries worldwide, offering a huge range from industry favourites (Adobe, Linotype, Monotype, Berthold, ITC, Bitstream), leading independents (Emigre, Font Bureau, T-26) and cutting edge collections such as Virus, Alias, ACMEFONTS, ShinnType, G-Type, and Device. We are a leading provider of custom fonts and type design services to the corporate, advertising and design sectors. Their foundries. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    FontWorks (main page)

    UK. FontShop, FUSE, FontFonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fontyoufonts.com
    [Henrik Kubel]

    Nearly all (Mac only) fonts at Fontyoufonts.com are made by Henrik Kubel, who works at the London-based design studio A2-GRAPHICS/SW/HK in London, which was founded in 2000 by Royal College of Art graduates Scott Williams and Henrik Kubel. Henrik Kubel is visiting lecturer at Royal College of Art since 2009. In 2010, Kubel and Williams set up A2 Typwe. Kubel's text fonts include FY-Battersea, FY-Klampenborg, FY-Neon, FY-ParsonsGreen, FY-M.Carpenter, FY-Gt.Eastern, FY-Stencil, FY-Typewriter, FY-Centera, FY-Cubitt Fax, FY-S.Staton. The display fonts include FY-Grot-7, FY-Boing, FY-Army, FY-Woodblock, FY-Rodeo, FY-Ornamenta, FY-Italic One, FY-Signsystem, FY-Black, FY-Stencil. There are grid-based/pixel fonts such as FY-Lego-Logo, FY-Bauhaus (a kitchen tile font), FY-Link, FY-Optic, FY-Graduate, FY-MeSoHungry, FY-Buckminster, FY-3D (2001), FY-Dictate, FY-Angel, FY-DotZero, FY-Square. Finally, there are the dingbat fonts FY-Pictogrammes, FY-Early Learning Dingbats. Kubel is also the designer at ACME of 4590, AF-Battersea (1999, a grotesque family), AF-CENTERA, AF-Copenhagen, AF-Klampenborg (1997-1999, grotesque sans, done with Scott Williams), CPH-ArabicNumbers, CPH-Medium, Grot-25. With Margaret Calvert, he updated the British Rail fonts in 2009, adding East European characters, for example. At ATypI 2010 in Dublin, he spoke about New Rail Alphabet, a revival of that typeface, still with Margaret Calvert. During the Expert Type Design Class (2011, Plantin Genootschap, Antwerp), he created the text family called Antwerp. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Formation Type Foundry
    [Ian Clewett]

    Ian Clewett (Leicester, UK) founded Formation Type Foundry in 2013. His first typeface, Pebl (2013) is based on forms found in nature.

    Behance link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Formula Solutions

    TrueType logos, symbols, signatures and handwriting fonts, all custom designed. 145 British pounds per font. UK-based. Plus a free demo font. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Formula Studio

    Formula Studio (Leeds, UK) created the sans typefaces Sasquatch (2013, with Joe Warburton) and Vernacular Sans (2013).

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Founders' London

    Detailed listing of all addresses of all historical foundries in London. Research by Justin Howell and Nigel Roche for The Friends of the St. Bride Printing Library, 1998. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Foundry Studio

    Graphic design studio in London. They created the bespoke typeface Constellation (2012). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fourth Annual Conference of the Friends of St. Bride

    The Fourth Annual Conference of the Friends of St. Bride took place on October 10-12, 2005 at the St. Bride Library in London. Its theme was ``temporary type''. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Frame of Thoughts

    Graphic designer from the UK who made the hand-printed face Jitter (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fran Board
    [Frans Font (was: Siren Fonts)]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Frances Wakeman Books

    Vendor of old type books, based in Nottingham, UK. Type specimen books. Books on typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Francesca Bolognini

    Graduate of the KABK in Den Haag in 2008. Originally from Italy, she was at Spiekermann Partners in Berlin for two years, working closely with Erik Spiekermann for clients such as Birkhauser, Bosch, Messe Frankfurt, and FontShop. After Den Haag, she moved to London where she works as a graphic and type designer. She created the heavily serifed Kina family as a student at KABK. That was followed by the quite original alphabet Python, the feminine transitional family Duchesse. The last face is a revival of this typeface from a French book dating from 1908. About this mysterious face, Hrant Papazian writes: That font looked familiar to me, and I immediately looked at my copies of Audin's books, since that's such a singular repository for funky old French stuff. The roman is shown in figure 125 of volume 3 as "Type Beaudoire" #2 (the #1 is actually even more fascinating). The italic is a few pages down in figure 141, shown as the font "XXe Siècle" by Mayeur. I remember from the time I translated Ponot's article about Perrin that there's a connection between Perrin, Beaudoire and Mayeur (and Marquet). IIRC one of them swiped a design from one other, with the help of another, or something.

    In 2011, she and Miles Newlyn created Frank, a 5-style humanist sans family. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Francesca Sterpone

    Graduate of the London College of Communication, class of 2013. London-based designer (b. 1989, Alba, Italy) of the fat-stroke rounded stencil typeface MyVoice (2013). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Francis Meynell

    British book designer (b. London, 1891, d. Lavenham, Suffolk, 1975). He ran Nonesuch Press (founded in 1923) using Monotype machines. Coauthor with Herbet Simon of Fleuron Anthology (1973, London: Ernest Ben Limited), which contains many of the journal The Fleuron's best articles. [Note: Stanley Morison edited The Fleuron, which appeared as a series in the 1920s.] [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Francisco Fernandes

    London-based digital artist, who created a font in 2010.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Franck Trebillac

    Designer in London. In 2011, he designed the free Victorian era advertizing face Absinthe.

    In 2013, he published the ornamental display typeface Rasputin. I agree with what he says: Rasputin is one sexy beast of a display font. Holy Motors (2013) is a retro style display font with perspective and shading effect. He says about his retro 3d shaded caps face Little Fatty (2013): You can be short and fat and still look sexy.

    Klingspor link. Dafont link. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Francois Schlebusch

    Illustrator and branding artist in London. He made the ultra-fat counterless face Fattoush (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Frank Hinman Pierpont

    American type designer, b. 1860, New Haven, CT, d. 1937, London. In 1894 he started working at Loewe AG in Berlin. In 1899, he became president of Monotype in England. His typefaces:

    • Plantin, a transitional typeface created under Pierpont's direction at Monotype in 1913-1914. Plantin Bold followed in 1925-1927 and Plantin Titling in 1936. It is based on a Gros Cicero face cut in the 16th century by Robert Granjon. Digitizations include Plantin (Monotype), Plantin Schoolbook (Phil's Fonts), Placid and Placid Osf (Softmaker), P761 Roman (Softmaker), Francisco Serial (Softmaker), Platus (URW), Aldine 721 (Bitstream). Stanley Morison and Victor Larent based their Times New Roman design on Plantin. Plantain (2002, Jason Castle) is a digital version and extension of Plantin Adweight. Quoting wikipedia on the name Plantin: Pierpont was inspired to use Granjon's designs by a visit to the Plantin-Moretus Museum in Antwerp, Belgium, which had them on display. The Granjon font on which Pierpont's design was based was listed as one of the types used by the Plantin-Moretus Press beginning in the 17th century, long after Plantin had died and his press had been inherited by the Moretus family, but Plantin himself had used a few letters of the font to supplement another font, a Garamond. The design for Plantin preserved the large x-height of Granjon's designs, but shortened the ascenders and descenders and enlarged the counters of the lowercase letters a and e.
    • Horley Old Style (Agfa Monotype, 1925). In 2009, Tania Raposo did a revival of Horley Old Style.
    • Monotype Grotesque (1926, Monotype) is usually attributed to Pierpont, at least as project supervisor. It goes back to Thorowgood's Grotesque (1832). MyFonts mentions that it was originally an update of Berthold's Ideal Grotesque. It served as a model for Arial.
    • Rockwell is a famous slab serif typeface developed by Monotype in 1934 under the guidance of Pierpont. It was no secret that it was created in reaction to Rudolf Wolf's slab serif Memphis (1929-1936) done for Stempel. Litho Antique (1910, Inland Type Foundry) served as a model for it, leading first to Rockwell Antique and then Rockwell. Despite Rockwell's atrocious lower case k, Rockwell would go on to become more popular than Memphis. Rockwell poster by Cedrik Ferrer. Rockwell poster by Jonathan Messina. Images by Viktoria Smykova: i ii, iii, iv. Digital remakes include Bitstream's Geometric Slabserif 712, and L850 Slab, Rambault and Stafford at SoftMaker.
    • Rodeo (1934).
    Klingspor link. Linotype link.

    View digital typefaces related to Frank Hinman Pierpont's work. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Frank Spinatra

    Manchester, UK-based designer of a a comic book face (2004). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Frans Font (was: Siren Fonts)
    [Fran Board]

    Frans Font (or: Siren Fonts) is a foundry, est. in 2009 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom, by British designer Fran Board. Their fonts include Rounded Two (2009), Manic (2009, grunge), Rooky Hand (2009, irregular hand), and Mesh Stitch (2009, a stitching font). All are free for personal use and pay fonts for commercial use. In an earlier life at Dafont, one could download the hand-printed 3d font Decade 3d (2008), the stitching face Mesh Stitch (2009), the thin sans faceRound (2009), RoundNormal (2009, an avant garde face), Bloc Regular (2009, pixel face), Pixel Regular (2009), Zuben (2009, classy sans), Manic (2009, an angular face), Rounded Two (2009) and the squarish Blablabla (2009, FontStruct). Another URL. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Fraser Crick

    Poole, UK-based designer of a great typographic numerals poster called Elsie Jane (2014). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fraser Davidson

    British designer of the futuristic face Rezland (2005). Dafont link. Fontspace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fraser Muggeridge

    Fraser Muggeridge is a typographic designer based in Clerkenwell, London. He has run Fraser Muggeridge studio since 2001 producing books, catalogues, posters and other material for mainly cultural and arts organisations. He studied Typography & Graphic Communication at the University of Reading (1991-1995) where he now teaches in the MA book design program. He also teaches at Camberwell College of Art. He founded and runs Typography Summer School, a week-long programme of typographic study in London for recent graduates and professionals in London and New York.

    Together with Andrew Osman, he designed the wedge-serifed all caps typeface Dalston Waste (2013).

    At ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam, he speaks on the emotion in typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Frazer Sparham

    Leeds, UK-based designer of an experimental neon alphabet (2014). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Frédéric Tracer

    Born in 1984, Tracer graduated from the National College of Arts and Design Olivier de Serres in Paris. He is now based in London, where he is a freelance graphic and type designer. His typefaces include Ray Bartok (2008-2009, experimental), Gordan (2008), Pizza (2007), Cotyle (2007, all segments are circle arcs---type named after a pelvic bone he broke), and Vurt (2007). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fred Birdsall
    [Imprint Foundry]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Freda Sack

    Prolific British type designer (b. 1951). Fonts: Proteus EF (1983), University EF Roman (1984), Paddington (1977), Jenson Old Style EF (with Colin Brignall, 1982, at Letraset), Victorian EF (with Colin Brignall, 1976). Co-founded The Foundry with David Quay. Other designs: Foundry Architype Bayer (unicase font, The Foundry, 1996), Ignatius (1987), Caslon 540 Italic with Swashes (1981), Orlando (1986), University Roman Italic (1984), Promotor (1983), and Vermont (1987).

    FontShop link. Linotype link.

    Catalog of some of her digitized typefaces. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Frederic Bourgoin

    British creator of these typefaces in 2012: Untitled, Jacqueline (Peignotian), Clinah (prismatic). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Frederic Wesselhoeft
    [Frederic Wesselhoeft Ltd]

    [More]  ⦿

    Frederic Wesselhoeft Ltd
    [Frederic Wesselhoeft]

    London-based foundry, which published typefaces such as Thor (1930). Thor was digitized in 2006 by Nick Curtis as Munchkin Land NF. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Free X11 6x13 ISO 10646-1 font

    "My project of extending the xterm default font "6x13" or "fixed" to the around 2500 character subset of Unicode and ISO 10646-1 that can adequately be represented in such a small cell size is now pretty much completed." By Markus G. Kuhn, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    FreeFontConverter
    [J. Bench]

    A free on-line font converter between these font formats: pfa, pfb, pt3, sfd, ttf, otf, otb, t42, cef, cff, gsf, ttc, svg, ik, mf, dfont, bin, suit and bdf. By J. Bench in the UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Freeman Gage Delamotte

    Author, artist, photographer and wood engraver, b. Sandhurst, 1814, d. London, 1862. He published The Book of Ornamental Alphabets, Ancient and Mediaeval (1879, Crosby Lockwood and Co., London), which has plenty of 8th to 11th century alphabets and initials. See also here, here, and here. Another book is Examples of Modern Alphabets, Ornamental and Plain (1864, C. Lockwood and Co, London), which was scanned in and can now be downloaded for free. Further texts: The book of ornamental alphabets, ancient and modern, from the eighth to the nineteenth century, with numerals (1859, E. and F.N. Spon), Medieval alphabets and intials for illuminators (1861, E. and F.N. Spon), and A primer of the art of illumination for the use of beginners (1860, E. and F.N. Spon). Most of his lettering is typical of the Victorian tradition that adds ornament to simple silhouettes. Example: 16th century wood engaving. An Italian alphabet (1864).

    Digital typefaces based on his work include Museum Initials (2007, John B. Wundes) and Bad Situation (Intellecta Design, 2007: based on an 1864 design called Example Alphabet). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    FreshComFonts
    [Emily Mahon]

    Font vendor in the UK. Initial designers in 2013 include Emily Mahon herself (second in command at FreshComFonts), but also Vanessa Bays, Alex Tomlinson, Ray Meadows, Jack Fisher, Nermin Kahrimanovic, Spider Rays Fonts, William Suckling, Andrew McCluskey and Cat Neligan.

    Emily Mahon created a number of typefaces with FontStruct such as Maybell's and Maybell's Hollow, and Stitched Bold.

    FontStruct link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Fry
    [Joseph Fry]

    Founded in 1764 in Bristol by Joseph Fry and Isaac Moore who interpreted the work of Baskerville and Caslon. Joseph retired in 1787 and left the company to his sons Edmund and Henry. The foundry moved to Type Street (now Moore Street) in London. Joseph's son Edmund sold up to the Fann Street Foundry in 1828. The foundry no longer exists. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Future Fonts
    [Jonathan Edwards]

    Future Fonts is the Liverpool-based company run by Jonathan Edwards, the UK-based designer of GF Cappuccino (1999, at GarageFonts), Nemesis (2003, brushy handwriting), Nemesis Shareware, CherryCoke (a dadaist face) and Expresso (2000, Linotype).

    Other commercial fonts: Ameticana (handwriting), Bjork (a 2000 update of a 1998 font by Animus), Dragon, Nightingale, Scrooge.

    Free fonts: Aftermath, Cherry Coke, Da Bomb, OverExpose, Tribal Funk. They used to have Oberon, Broken, Coca Kola, Willo the Wisp, Not-so-free fonts Santa-Claus, Bitched, and the beautiful Ginseng.

    Alternate URL. FontShop link. Dafont link. Alternate site for Cherry Coke. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Gabrielle Leighton

    During her studies in Middlesbrough, UK, Gabrielle Leighton made the ornamental caps typeface Sense of Place (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gabrielle Reith

    Gabrielle Reith and Philip Thompson are British artists. Gabrielle graduated from Gray's School of Art in 1998. Philip is a professionally trained graphic / new media designer, who later chose to pursue a career in fine art, and he obtained his Masters Degree from Gray's School of Art. Their site Type7 shows free fonts made by them: Blether, Atatat, Inevitable Alphabet, Maple, Perspex, Handwrought, and so forth. No downloads or sales. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gabrielle Tanguay

    Student at Chelsea College of Art and Design in London. Creator of Springs (2012, a coiled typeface). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gaia Di Gregorio

    London-based designer of the connect-the-dots typeface Tirodm (2014). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Galit Zadok

    UK-based type designer. At Masterfont, he published the Hebrew typefaces Addam MF (1994), Arava MF (1993), Galit (1994), Woodstock MF (1995), Ronni MF (1993), Lolla MF (1993), Dimona MF (1994) and Florentin MF (1994). Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Ganey

    Michael is the UK-based designer of My_Handwriting_by_Ganey (2008). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gareth Attrill

    Designer in 2002 of UKNumberPlate.

    Fontspace link. Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gareth Hague

    British type designer. With David James, [T-26] co-designer of AES, August. At Alias (a company he founded with David James in London), he made Asperity (2012), Asphalt (2012), Aspic (2012), Caustic and Caustic Web (2012, chiseled), Lily (2012), Oban (2011, a gorgeous high-contrast didone family influenced by Thorowgood; with blackboard bold styles included), Ano (2012, a simple monoline sans family), Cactus (2004, a condensed typeface family), Aspic (2011, a signage script), Asphalt (2011, signage script), Perla and Perla Outline (2004, an elegant artdeco unicase didone with teardrop terminals), Klute (Black, Capitals, White: an ugly and useless octagonal family that could be used for gnawing German expressionist pieces), Anomoly (2004), Key, Elephant, Harbour (2008: a medieval, broken look, with wedge serifs), Civility (2002, connected handwriting), Factory, Aminta, Granite (1995), Intimo, Jackdaw, Progress, Progress Two (2012), Sylvia, Jude (1999, a big text family), Mantis, Metropolitan, Metsys (1997), Pop (triline font), Sister (1995), Text.

    In 2009, he designed 2012 Headline for the London Olympics---typophiles are generally disappointed with this daring design in the general angular category, and refer to better representatives of this genre such as Cyrus Highsmith's Occupant Gothic, Emigre's Elektrix, Hubert Jocham's Keks, and Chris Lozos's Dez Sans Script.

    With David James, he designed Noah Text (2013).

    Fontworks interview. Catalog of Gareth Hague's typefaces. FontShop link. Klingspor link. MyFonts interview. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Gareth Hague
    [Alias]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Gareth Sanger

    Bournemouth, UK-based graphic and type designer who made some bling type posters, and created a rounded blackletter alphabet and a heavy slab serif font, both nameless, and viewable at Behance. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Garrett Reil

    Garrett Reil (Rain Design, Ireland) is a graduate of Limerick School of Art and Design and the National College of Art&Design (MA). He has worked in London and Dublin with leading international design consultancies. He founded Rain design partners in 1998 with Clíona Geary. Garrett lives in the picturesque twin towns of Ballina-Killaloe and does much of his work in Dublin and around Ireland. Garrett designed the size-specific New Johnston Book typeface for London Transport with Colin Banks and John Miles at Banks&Miles London; he co-designed signing manuals for Bass Plc and created a number of their retail brands; with Landor Associates he led the implementation of a new identity for Delta Air Lines. In 2008-2009, he got involved in the design of road signs for Ireland, and his proposal is Turas (2009). It deals with matters such as halation (the effect of headlights hitting a highly reflective material used in modern signs. This causes an overglow, which can make the sign difficult to read), bilingual time delay, and the longer Irish names. Ireland adopted the Transport type designed for UK roads by Jock Kinneir, a design lecturer at the Royal College of Art, and Margaret Calvert, his assistant, in the late 1950's and early 1960s. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gary Clarke
    [Flotsam Typography]

    [More]  ⦿

    Gary Gillot

    Chairman at Gillot Images Ltd, Wycombe Marsh, Buckinghamshire, UK, which is involved in marketing and advertising. Designer of Carousel (1966), a high-contrast black didone titling face, which was published by ITC, Elsner&Flake, and Linotype. The Carousel typeface was used as a titling typeface in a wonderful set of children's books by Alain Grée published by Casterman in the 1960s.

    Linotype link. FontShop link. Linkedin link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Gary Greenall
    [XLN Telecom]

    [More]  ⦿

    Gary Swindell

    Freelance graphic designer in the UK. Behance link. He created Aquila (2011), a hip sans titling face. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gary Tennant

    British designer at T26 of the Urbanite family (2000, octagonal, techno) and of Linotype Submerge One (2002), Linotype Submerge Two (2002) and Linotype Sharquefin (2004, a destructionist face).

    Linotyper link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Gavin Boorman

    UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who made the grungy face Ghost Signs (2010), which was based on decaying advertising signs in Bristol. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gavin Downey

    Graphic designer in Newcastle upon Tyne (UK), who created the display face Awkward (2004) and a very thin sans face (2004). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gavin Lawson
    [DogStar Fonts]

    [More]  ⦿

    Gavin Murray

    Southampton-based designer in 1999 of the font Kontainer. He also runs a logo and signature font service, at about 15 USd per signature/logo. Old URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gaynor Goffe

    British calligrapher. Designer (with the help of Akira Kobayashi) of the OpenType calligraphic script Hamada (2007, Linotype). This typeface has multiple variants for all letters. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    GE

    GE Inspira (2004, free under conditions spelled out in an EULA) is a face designed for GE's brand based on ideas of Patrick Giasson (who worked at Wolff Olins and is now with Agfa Monotype UK). Giasson writes: A number of people were involved. I did the initial typographic development on the regular Latin weight, with Adam Throup (London) and Douglas Sellers (NYC) art directing the project. Further development was subsequently done by Mike Abbink (SF). Agfa Monotype US was then involved to create additional weights, and expand the family to cover roughly the WGL4 character set and finalize the fonts. [Note: the Agfa team consisted of Jim Wasco, Carl Crossgrove and others.] Mike Abbink writes: I actually spent over a year working on the design of Inspira. It was Patrick's [Patrick Giasson] early concept that GE was drawn to, but at that time, it was way too funky and more display like then they wanted. I then took patricks original thoughts and spent several months refining the roman and created an italic (which Patrick did not do) which was then handed to monotype to create more weights and refine a bit. What you see in Inspira now, is quit different from Patrick's original concept. However, the more unique forms from Inspira are indeed driven by patricks original drawings and are the interesting forms of the font (v, x, z, y). I was also involved with art directing and working with the Monotype team (for over a year) in developing all the other iterations of inspira. All told, there were many people involved in the refinement of the Inspira font family, but I must say i would have to take a large credit in the design of inspira along with Patrick. I believe Patrick's designs and my designs created a nice balance that has made Inspira what it is today and of course let's not forget the hard work of monotype in really taking the font to the next level with all the weights, the condensed version, and exotics (Greek, Cyrillic, Turkish, etc.). Mike now works at Wolff Olins in New York. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Geetika Alok

    Geetika Alok is a graphic designer and works on projects in London and India. She graduated from the Royal College of Art with an MA in Communication, Art&Design and had previously completed her Bachelor's degree from the National Institute of Design with specialisation in Graphic Design. With Henrik Kubel, she designed the typeface India (2011).

    In 2011, she created the absolutely fantastic ornamental caps face Saudade, which consists of overlapping circles. She writes: Poster for a talk of Marina Willer. Saudade is the most beautiful word in Brazilian Portuguese. It means something a bit like nostalgia. Typeface: In collaboration with Henrik Kubel.

    Maya (2011) and Sea Shells (2011) are typefaces that were inspired by Indian architecture.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gem Hart

    UK-based creator of an alphabet made up of old iron bits (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gemma Wilson

    Gemma Wilson (Thatcham, UK) created a modular typeface in 2012 during her studies. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Geoffrey Halpin
    [Halpin Hand]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Geoffrey L. Lee

    English designer (b. Wimbledon, 1929, d. 2005) of Impact (1965, Stephenson Blake: an extra bold sans now available from many companies, including Agfa/Monotype, Ascender [image], Linotype, Monotype [image], Adobe, URW++ [image] and Microsoft), Stephenson Blake's penultimate metal typeface, produced while Lee was Type Director and Design Group Head of Pembertons Advertising.

    Impact wide (2002) was developed from the designer's original drawings for the production of Impact metal type, with many detail changes because of the density of the letters. These include the restoration of the bevelled i and j dots of the original.

    Digital remakes of Impact abound. The SoftMaker font I770 Sans is certainly not bad. One can also check Dekas (2012, Qalib Abassov, Open Font Library: this is a strange case, as the site attributes this free face to Geoffrey Lee).

    He also made Camden (1999, with Michael Lynch) for specific use in the Long Melford Millennium Book. It was based on the types used in Camden's Remaines concerning Britaine published in London in 1638. It became a well-known Microsoft core font.

    FontShop link. Linotype link. Klingspor link.

    View some digital versions of Impact. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    George Bickham

    UK engraver and penman, 1684-1769, who wrote the manual The Universal Penman (published in parts from 1733 to 1741, reprinted complete in 1743). The full title is The Universal Penman Or the Art of Writing Made Useful To the Gentleman and Scholar, as well As the Man of Business . . . Written With the friendly Assistance of several of the most EminentMastersAndEngravedbyGeo.Bickham. That book also contains work by Bickham's collaborators, such as Joseph Champion, Wellington Clark, Nathaniel Dove, Gabriel Brooks, and William Leckey. Book cover. A free interpretation of the copperplate script styles of The Universal Penman can be seen in the monumental font Penabico (2010, Intellecta Design). Images: From The Universal Penman, Roundhand Script (ca. 1740), Greek Writing (1743).

    Digital typefaces based on Bickham's scripts include 1739 Bickham (2010) and 1741 Bickham (2013) by Klaus-Peter Schäffel, Bickham Script (1997, Richard Lipton), Penabico (Intellecta Design), and interpretations such as Poem Script (Sudtipos). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    George Charlton

    UK-based graphic designer, who created the custom bold snas caps typeface Ookami (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    George Chislett

    George Chislett is an illustrator based in Bristol, UK, who graduated from UWE Bristol. He drew a mechanical caps alphabet called Mech Type (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    George Daniel

    George Daniel (London, UK) created nice typographic work for the Montana Film Project in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    George Everall

    Greek-English type designer (b. 1980, London) who works in Amsterdam. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    George Horton

    Author from Northallerton, UK, who played a bit with Bitstream Aldine 721 and applied some of the principles of Fleischmann 65 in the creation of his Aldine 65 (2006). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    George Lavender

    Student at the Winchester School of Art, UK. Creator of the oblique constructivist face Propaganda (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    George Marshall

    George Marshall (Northampton, UK) created a barbed wire typeface in 2013 that was inspired by the film One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    George R. Streten

    British creator of the hand-printed typeface Georges Notes (2012).

    Fontspace link. Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    George Russell
    [Bouma Type Foundry]

    [More]  ⦿

    George Shelley

    English writing master, 1666 (?)-1736 (?).

    Author/editor of The Penmans Magazine. Author of Natural Writing in all the Hands, with Variety of Ornament (1709) and Alphabets in All the Hands (1715).

    In 1730, he wrote several pages for Bickham's Universal Penman. English writing masters including George Bickham, George Shelley and George Snell helped to propagate Round Hand's popularity, so that by the mid-18th century the Round Hand style had spread across Europe and crossed the Atlantic to North America. The typefaces Snell Roundhand and Kuenstler Script are based on this style of handwriting. The famous Shelley Script is named after him. Linotype's version was implemented by Matthew Carter in 1972 at Letraset and was split into Allegro, Andante and Volante styles. The Bitstream "copy" is called English 111.

    Sample of a copperplate alphabet done in London in 1709. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    George Stapleton

    UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who created Times New Georgian (2009) on the theme of pompous for a class. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    George William Jones

    British printer and typographer (born 1860 in Upton-on-Severn, died 1942 in Worcestershire). From 1921 until his retirement in 1938, he was "printing adviser" to Linotype&Machinery Ltd in Britain. He was director of typography for the British Printer, and reached the acme of his career as Printer to the King and Queen of Belgium. All his typefaces except Venezia are Linotype faces. His typographic work includes these faces:

    • About 1913, when at the press "At the Sign of the Dolphin" located in Gough Square off Fleet Street, he developed Venezia, a new typeface exclusive to his press. He retained Edward Prince to cut the punches and based his design on a Jenson precedent found in Caesar's "Commentaries" printed around 1470. Jones had the matching italic designed by Frederic Goudy. He sold the punches and matrices to Stephenson Blake in 1927. MacMcGrew: Venezia was produced by Keystone Type Foundry and first shown in 1899. It appears to have been inspired by the same models as Jenson Oldstyle, but features more generously bracketed serifs and a generally more pleasing appearance. Except for the unusual link between the bowls of the g, it is very agreeable. For a later modification of this design, see Laureate.
    • Granjon Old Face, first shown in the British trade press of December 1924. He based this on books produced by the Parisian printers Jacques Dupuys in 1554 and Jean Poupy in 1582 (according to Lawrence Wallis). Its roman is a true Garamond. Linotype states that it was based on the typeface sample of the Frankfurt font foundry Egenolff from the year 1592, with the romans by Claude Garamond and the italics by Robert Granjon. Linotype's Granjon gets a date of 1928, and is attributed jointly to George W. Jones and Chauncey H. Griffith. Image of Linotype Granjon.
    • Estienne (1928-1929).
    • Drawings for Linotype Baskerville are dated 1930 and the first public showing occurred in The London Mercury of November 1931. Jones wanted this to be a true revival, as close to the original as possible. Also, see ITC New Baskerville.
    • (Linotype) Georgian (1931-1932) goes back to 18th century type by Alexander Wilson in Scotland. It was probably never digitized.
    • Early on in his career, he designed a number of decorative caps alphabets, including the art nouveau style Grange and Dorothy.
    Adobe write-up. Bio by Lawrence Wallis. Klingspor link.

    View typefaces designed by George William Jones. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Georgi Georgiev
    [Jore]

    [More]  ⦿

    Georgia Jane Chipchase

    During her graphic design studies at the University of Huddersfield, UK, Georgia Chipchase created the foliate typeface Petal (2013) for which she took inspiration from artist Claes Oldenburg. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Georgia Roussos

    Graphic designer in Plymouth, UK, who designed Primary Sans (2013). She writes about this single-weight tweetware font which was developed during her studies: The font is inspired by geometric forms and designed to appeal to children in Primary School aged six to nine years. Created from perfect circles to enhance legibility the face was made for use of headlines, visual identities and short sentences.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Georgia Somary

    London-based designer of the experimental typeface Hybrid (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Geraint Franklin

    British designer of Playford (2003), a geometric sans with varying stroke width. Geraint works at Network Archaeology Ltd., a company registered in England and Wales. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gerald Cinamon

    ATypI writes: Gerald Cinamon was born in Boston, received his MFA Degree in Design at the School of Art and Architecture, Yale University, and has lived in London since 1961. He freelanced for numerous publishers and eventually became Chief Designer at Penguin Books for almost 20 years. His books regularly were chosen for the Best Books of the Year shows. He has written studies of designers and is now especially interested in lettering and design history.

    He wrote Rudolf Koch: Letterer, Type Designer, Teacher (2000, Oak Knoll Press and The British Library) and E.R. Weiss: The Typography of an Artist, Oldham: Incline Press, 201 and E.R. Weiss: The Typography of an Artist, Oldham: Incline Press, 2011. Speaker at ATypI 2003 in Vancouver on Koch's work. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Geraldo Gallace

    Graphic designer in Norwich, UK, who used the burberry pattern in the deisgn of his Modula typeface in 2012. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gerard Tuke Meynell

    British designer (b. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1877, d. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1942) of Imprint (1913; +Imprint Shadow), now available at Agfa-Monotype and URW++. It is a 10-weight transitional family, codesigned by J.H. Mason, Ernest Jackson and Edward Johnston, who commissioned this typeface modelled on Caslon's designs from Pierpont and the Monotype Corporation as the text face for The Imprint, a magazine about fine printing and typography. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Gergely Kókai

    Hungarian graphic design student studying and living in the UK. He created the themed face Watch My Shoes (2011, experimental). He also made the fat blocky Quadrata series in 2011, with styles called Child, Hippie, Light, Origin, and Scrib. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gerry Leonidas

    Gerry Leonidas is a Lecturer and Course Director of the MA in Type Design in the Department of Typography&Graphic Communication at the University of Reading, England. He is a practicing designer of Greek and Latin typefaces, and a regular consultant on typography and type design.

    Brief CV. Site with the list of his graduates. Speaker at ATypI 2008 in St. Petersburg. Speaker at ATypI 2009 in Mexico City. Speaker at ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik and at Typecon 2012 in Milwaukee.

    Speaker at ATypI 2012 Hong Kong: Digging into the ATypI Archive.

    Old URL. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Gerry Powell

    Typographer and industrial designer, b. 1899. A sample of Gerry Powell's work from 1937 for the Lettergieterij Amsterdam, now on the URW CD-ROMs: Arsis (or Onyx (ATF, 1937, now available at Bitstream; the URW version is called Arsis)}, Stymie (ATF, 1931, with Sol Hess; now available at Bitstream), Stencil (ATF, 1937; versions at Bitstream, Adobe and Elsner&Flake), Daily News Gothic and the Spartan Series. Onyx is a condensed elongated fat "modern" face. Cyrillic version of Stencil by A. Chekulaev at ParaType (1997). About Onyx versus Arsis, there has been some discussion by type lovers. Apparently, both were released in 1937, Onyx by ATF and Arsis by Tetterode. It is believed both foundries had a deal on the exchange of some typefaces. Lanston Monotype had a metal Onyx that was probably copied from the ATF version, and the Monotype UK metal Onyx was probably a copy of Lanston Monotype. The current digital version of Monotype seems to be made after the Monotype UK metal version. The Bitstream digital version was copied from the ATF Onyx typeface.

    FontShop link. Klingspor link.

    View Gerry Powell's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Gert Schoeman

    Oxford, UK-based creator of the hairy custom typeface Blow Out (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gilbert Van Citters

    Gilbert Van Citters (Seattle, WA) an illustrator, printer and graphic designer who is curreently working in the UK. He has a BA in graphic design from Western Washington (2011). Behance link. His work includes the ball-themed geometrically constructed display face Nexus (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Giles Edkins
    [Blahfonts]

    [More]  ⦿

    Giles Edwards

    Type Designer from York, North Yorkshire, UK, b. 1973 in York. He created Vernon (2011, a slightly humanist sans). MyFonts link to his foundry. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Giles Greenwood

    UK-based designer who designed a nice handwriting font called Giles (1999). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Giles Peyton-Nicoll

    Giles is a senior creative director, consultant, designer and illustrator in London. Behance link. In 2010, he created a very original 3d blocky face called 40Four that he used as decoration on walls of homes. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gill Sans alternatives

    Stephen Coles, based on article by Ben Archer, lists the alternatives for Gill Sans (1932, Monotype), a typeface they both find lacking. Here is the list:

    • Granby by Stephenson Blake (metal in 1930). Closer to Johnston and highly recommended by Coles. Tankard's Wayfarer was influenced by Granby.
    • Bliss by Jeremy Tankard (1996): very complete and legible.
    • Foundry Sterling by David Quay and Freda Sack (The Foundry). Coles thinks that it is overpowered by its predecessor, Bliss.
    • Agenda by Greg Thompson (Font Bureau, 1993-2000).
    • P22 London Underground (Richard Kegler, P22, 1997).
    • ITC Johnston by David Farey (ITC, 1999-2002). One of the best digital versions of Johnston's Underground.
    • English Grotesque (1998, Rian Hughes): an exaggerated interpretation.
    • Tschichold by Jan Tschichold (1933, metal) and Thierry Puyfoulhoux (2001, digital).
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gill Sans DRK

    Eric Gill would turn in his grave if he saw the monstrosity Monotype sold to the German Red Cross (DRK: Deutsches Rotes Kreuz) for their branding: Gill Sans DRK (1996). And why did the DRK give the job to the British anyway? [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gillian Ludlow

    Graphic design student in Liverpool, UK. Creator of Bubbleman Type (2012, experimental) and My London Underground Typeface (2014---a typeface family derived from the logo of the London Underground). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gillian Riley

    Typographer and food historian who lives in London. She is the author of the National Gallery cookbook, and is currently working on the Oxford Companion to Italian Food. At ATypI in Rome in 2002, she spoke about the connection between the works of Renaissance Humanist scholars and the food they enjoyed eating. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Giulia Santopadre

    London-based designer and illustrator who has some nice type posters such as Sticky (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Glenn Cahill

    London-based graphic designer, b. 1987. At Dafont, one can download his handwriting font Glenns Hand (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gloomnshloom
    [Annsley G. Flood]

    From the UK, Annsley G. Flood's free fonts: Between my Ears (dingbats), Do I Lie? (dingbat), Water (handwriting), WhatWasTheCooking Show (handwriting), HappyOffspringOfPlankton (dingbat), I am nervous, Unusual suspects (dingbats). Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Glyn Adgie

    Electronics engineer from Birmingham, UK, who created Clarissa (2005) in regular and bold weights as a sans body family. No downloads. Continued here. In 2005, he started the serif face Ledbury. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Golova

    Golova is a community of graphic designers, illustrators and art directors in the UK. Behance link. Creators of the hand-drawn Lefthand (2009) and interesting type-based logos such as Gagra and Bulkas Makom. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gonul Damla Guven

    London-based designer who studied (MA) at Leeds University. She created the aquarel-themed Happy Typeface (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gordon Watt

    British designer of the handwriting font Handwrought (2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Grace Palmer

    London-based creator of an untitled Bembo revival in 2014. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Graeme Kqwerty

    British FontStructor who made Pixur (2010, pixel font). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Graham Bowes

    University of Salford (Manchester, UK) graduate who created Illuminati (2012, octagonal), and Potato (2012, potato printing). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Graham David Blakelock
    [Grummedia]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Graham Morley

    Newcastle, UK-based designer of the pixel font Gray Sans (2005). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Graham Moulding

    London-based artust and designer who created the hacker font Virus Vujade (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Graham Smith

    Seaford, UK-based logo, identity and brand designer. He created the blocky experimental face Prone in 2009. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Graham Taylor

    London-based designer for Runner's Magazine. He is working on this serif face (2007). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Grant Killoran

    Illustrator at the Winchester School of Art in the UK. He created an ornamental all caps alphabet called Discovery (2011). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Grant Milne

    Leicester, UK-based designer of the ISTD logotype in 2012. ISTD stands for International Society of Typographic Designers. Also in 2012, he created the ornamental didone typeface GCM22 (HypeForType): GCM22 is also based on the letterforms of typographers; John Pistilli, Herb Lubalin and Si Scott. The ornate letterforms are based around the art of Turkish Ebru marbling, which is painting on water to create decorative patterns. His portfolio also contains several beautiful ornate typographic pieces.

    In 2013, he created the lachrymal typeface Pluvia (2013).

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Graphic Nothing

    Graphics outfit in Manchester, UK, which has produced some outstanding typographic examples, such as In Rainbows (2009). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Graphic Type Limited

    Great (commercial) ornamental/fleuron/pattern type fonts for use in decorations. Check out GT-Piccoli to get an idea. Based in Somerset, UK. They also sell a software product, Graphic Type Designer. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Graphic Workman
    [David Ottley]

    David Ottley (the Graphic Workman) is a typographer and graphic designer in the UK. He created Erno (2011), introduced as follows: Erno is a humanist sans serif typeface inspired by the brutalist manifestos and architectural practice of the 1960's. Informed by a study of traditional English typefaces by designers such as William Caslon, Eric Gill and John Baskerville. The name for the typeface is taken from the Hungarian born brutalist architect, and inspiration for Bond villian, Erno Goldfinger.

    In 2010, he created the Stencil Book family. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Graphicinc

    UK-based creator of Chubby Checker (2009, gridded face). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Graphiquement Parlant

    London, UK-based designer of the art deco caps typeface Noizy (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Grayhaze
    [Kevin Purcell]

    Kevin Purcell (Grayhaze) is the London-based designer of the bitmap font Eden (2003). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Great Dane Designs
    [Stine Alberry]

    The typefoundry Great Dane Designs was established in 2012 by Stine Aelberry in Derby, UK.

    Zygon Regular (2012, unicase) was inspired by the 2012 Royal Diamond Jubilee and the notion that the Jubilee, as a multicultural event, would feature celebrations inclusive of all cultures. The typeface is based on the Panjabi syllabary alphabet (Gurmukhi script) combined with the Latin alphabet. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Greater Albion Typefounders (or: GATF)
    [Paul James Lloyd]

    Paul J. Lloyd's typefoundry in Western Australia, est. 2008. Lloyd (b. UK) made over 100 free truetype fonts before that. He writes: What we will offer is new designs, replete with Edwardian Fun, Victorian distinction, or any other piece of elegance we can manage.

    Edwardian creations from 2008-2010: Ark Wright (traditional shop signage), Adantine, Goldbarre, Brosse, Crewekerne, Crewekerne Magna and Crewekerne Magister (arts and crafts face), Larchmont, Brissard, Brossard (slab serif), Bonavia, Bonavia Blanc, Clementhorpe, Veneribe, Chiara Script, Howlett, Svengali Roman, Bonning and Bonnington (1920's style families with ideas from University Roman), Absinette, Bamberforth, Tumbletype, Vertrina, Bromwich, Great Bromwich, Fleete, Helenium. Chipping emulates the Edwardian 1920s. In 2012, he added the Bolton Commercial family (late Edwardian, early art nouveau).

    Art deco faces: Oakland (2011, multiline face gleaned from a 1930s French car ad), Zenia (2010, trilined), Plebe (Plebia, 2008: a grotesk emulating the 1930s), Whitehaven (2008, an extensive art deco family with several shadow weights), Merry Fleurons (2008, Christmas ornament dingbats), Braxia (2008), Keynsia (fifties style art deco family with Peignot influences).

    Other faces: Haymer is a large sans family made in 2010. Clunic (2008) is a blackletter face. Tectura (2008) is a handwriting font. Eldridge is a slab serif family. Aliqua (2009), Chipperly (2009) and Syondola (2009) are Wild West families. Terazza Tilings (2009) and Valentine's Fleurons (2009) are dingbat faces. Additions in 2009 include Lowndes (soft blackletter), Christmas Fleurons, Merry Snowmen, Cherritt (described as a Victorian era Courier), DoodleBirds, Halloween Fleurons, ButtonFaces, Sabio (neither slab nor sans), Daub (brush graffiti font), Sabinard (a modern swash face), Cullions (futuristic blackletter), Coronard (blackletter / roman hybrid), Easter Fleurons, Chapter Initials, Paveline (19th century calligraphic script), Mellin Sans and Open, Gildersleeve (evoking the 1920s Arts and Crafts movement), Stannard (a 1920's advertising inspired small caps face), Slattery (a horizontally shaded fun face), Slatterine (2009, more retro futurism), Spillsbury (2010, Victorian family), Cirflex (2010, geometric display face based on arcs of circles), Oxonia (2010, a classic roman family) and Vectis (classic Roman elegance, another small caps face).

    Creations in 2010: Windevere, Albion's White Christmas, Paragon (a great didone display family with a wood type feel), Compton (slab serif family), Mexborough, Morover (Schwabacher family), Anavio (a classical roman family), Corvone (3d-effect font), Granville (Victorian), Corton (Victorian), Wellingborough (Victorian), Worthing (Victorian), Ark Wright (traditional shop signage), Bonaventure (art nouveau), Federal Streamliner (1950s feel techno face), Deva (classical roman), Crucis Ornaments (crosses), Bronzino (a roman with Arts and Crafts roots), Bertoni (2010, a didone family), Pardon Me Boy (train dingbats), Woodruff (Open Face fonts with a wood type look), Jonquin (based on a WWI poster; +Incised), Luscombe (1920s display family; +Parva), Movella (futuristic from the 1950s), Magdalena Sans (2010: a clear monoline sans), Endymion (2010: Tuscan), Paget (a Tuscan experimental all caps face), Portello (Victorian).

    Typefaces made in 2011: Admiral (art nouveau), Tuscaloosa (Tuscan face), Eccles (bombastic Victorian), Wolverhampton (pre-Victorian), Doncaster (Victorian family), Metropole (art nouveau family), Corsham (stone engraved lettering family), Leibix (casual), Albia Nova (an elegant futuristic organic face), Flapper (art nouveau face), Bertolessi (curly Victorian), Tulk's Victorian Banner (all caps banner face), Fitzgerald (Victorian all caps face), Cleveden (Victorian headline family), Spargo (an extensive set of early 20th century-look engraved faces for official documents and securities), Bettendorf (2011, based on a 1900s masthead typeface), Wolvercote (2011, similar to Bettendorf), Pittsburgh (2011, a Western-style engraved face), Chubbly (2011), Portmeirion No. 6 (2011, a Victorian / circus design), Bronzetti (2011; images: i, ii, iii, iv, v, vi), Sophie J (hanprinted), Dem Bones (2011, glyphs made from bones), Stout (2011), Birmingham New Street (a Victorian family inspired by the hand lettered title on a 19th century railway map), Beckinslade (ornamental blackletter).

    Production in 2012: Alfere Sans Stripes, Albion's Americana (Western stars and stripes face), Tudor Perpendicular (blackletter), Amici (rounded headline face), Amie (rounded sans), Wolverton Text (Edwardian family), Vinea (10-style display family), Par Avion (retro futuristic), AstroBats (retro sci-fi dingbats), Beeching (+Shadowed), Gondolieri (didone meets Tuscan), Penrose Slabserif (an Escher-like trompe l'oeuil 3d face), Haldane (art nouveau, Arabic look), Solidarius (chubby, fat felt-tip pen font), Bluebottle (angular display face), Merrivale (Victorian), Future Runes (runic simulation), Coliseo, Alfrere Sans (inspired by a 1950s television caption style), Tectura II (Lloyd's answer to Comic Sans), Secombe (Edwardian caps family), Milligan, London Court (Tudor-era caps family).

    Typefaces from 2013: Speedblur, Belhampton (Edwardian), Merry Baubles (Christmas tree dings), Merry Bauble Letters (Christmas alphadings), Wroxeter (blackletter), Thurbrooke (+Banner, +Initials, +Black, +Reverso, all based on 19th century banner headings and engraved lettering), Bourne (a rounded type system), Henrician (a set of eight Tudor style display faces), Belle Jardin (art deco marquee face), Lavery (Edwardian), Baldione (a stylized didone), Chequers (a vintage poster face), Turvy Topsy (fat finger face), Merrivaux (faux medieval), Blout (German expressionist typeface), Easter Egg Letters, Isometrica (a banner typeface family), Valentine's Letters, Imperial Granum (roman titling face), Brollo (chunky display face).

    Typefaces from 2014: Lanvier (1930s-style caps typeface family), Bonlivet (a hyper-decorative capitals alphabet from the late Victoian or early art nouveau era), Ames Text (a didone family with rounded brackets), Ames Roman (related to didones but with wedge serifs), Ames Weathered, Ames Shadow, Ames Shaded, Amersham (vintage signage family, 2013-2014).

    Type announcements. Behance link. Klingspor link. Abstract Fonts link. Font Squirrel link. Kernest link. Abstract Fonts link. Hellofont link.

    View all typefaces by Paul Lloyd. Images of Paul Lloyd's best-selling typefaces. Greater Albion Typefounders: typeface collection./ [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    greatvectors

    UK-based designer of the (free) distorted comic book style sans typeface Distorty (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Greenstreet Technologies (also: Greenstreet Software and GST Technologies)

    Cambridge, UK-based publisher of cheap font collections called 100 Fonts True Type, 500 Fantastic Fonts, 1000 Professional Fonts, 500 Fantastic Fonts, 500 Elegant Fonts, and 2000 Fonts Collection. They were sued in 2001 by Linotype for copyright infringement of their typefaces Arcadia, Duc de Berry, Herculanum and Neue Helvetica, and lost in September 2001, although there is no financial settlement. See also here. Ulrich Stiehl researched the matter and provides this pdf file describing the five CDs. He states: The forgery "Chanson" contained on the "500 Fantastic Fonts" CD and provided by the forgers in Cologne with the false copyright notice "(C) 1994 Brendel Informatik GmbH" is a forgery of the font "Arcadia" designed by Neville Brody in 1990. Note that all five Greenstreet CDs are still sold today in 2005 including the forgeries of "Arcadia" etc. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Greg Bland

    Horsham, UK-based designer who proposed the Kobi Serif typeface in 2014: I found the idea of Kobigraphs whilst researching methods of communication for the blind. The website dotlessbraille.org was the sole proprietor of the Kobigraph idea and it was virtually unknown outside of that website. Researching the website further I became curious about the idea of this typographic bridge between embossed braille for the blind and visual letterforms for sighted persons to read braille more easily. Braille is becoming something of a dying form even though it is extremely important for blind people to know some form of written communication. Fewer than 1% of the two million visually impaired people in the UK are users of Braille. Yet 66% of blind or partially sighted people of working age are unemployed as a result of a lack of some form of literacy. It seemed to me that helping to make braille as accessible as possible to everyone through using the Kobigraph would help raise awareness of the issues of blind literacy and encourage everyone to try learning braille. The Kobigraphs visual form can be read by sighted persons at a glance as opposed to braille - which is usually colourless dots printed on a page. And as the Kobigraph uses the same cell structure as braille, the dots could be raised to allow blind users to read too. The links between cell dots could also be raised to help users further guide their way around a letterform more easily if they have not built up the necessary tactile abilities needed to sense individual dots. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Greg Colley

    British designer of British Sign Language 3 at XRMX Software Solutions. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Greg Fleming

    British creator of the Open Font Library typeface family Railway Sans (2012), an open source version of Edward Johnston's typeface for the London Underground of 1916.

    Greg explains: Railway Sans is a previously unpublished work, originally digitised by my late friend and partner, the typographer Justin Howes, in 1994, some seventy-eight years after the first appearance of Johnston's Railway type in 1916. Using an old SPARC station, some bitmap-to-vector software which I'd written which output in ASCII Type 3 font format and a Crosfield drum scanner to initially capture the outlines, these were then converted from bitmaps into vector font data. Justin had wanted to capture and make an experimental font of this version, drawn directly from Johnston's original artwork of 1913-1915 as part of the book he was writing on Edward Johnston and other Johnston-related research, and later revisions and variations which were originally the only characters in the typeface in various samples and working proofs kindly lent by Andrew Johnston.

    He goes on: This version of the original Johnston typeface of 1916, in both TrueType and OpenType format, will work with Macs, Linux and Windows computers and will provide authenticity when recreating Underground signage. This is why I am making this version available for enthusiasts who seek an authentic-looking digital version of the original Underground type. It is not derived from the Banks's and Miles New Johnston Sans (so brilliantly realised by Eiichi Kono, 1979). Nor is it a copy or in any way a facsimile of any existing commercial typeface, such as P22's excellent version, Underground. It is rendered entirely from proofs done by Edward Johnston himself at the time the face was commissioned. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Greig Anderson
    [Effek-Tive]

    [More]  ⦿

    Grey Matter

    UK company selling barcode font packages (TrueType and PostScript in each package) for about 150 USD: for example, code 39 alone is 135 USD! It sells Fontographer for 400 USD. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Grilla

    Grilla is a young designer in London. He designed these typefaces in 2012: Grilla Font, Main Font, Fashion, Grill Font (3d outline face), Genno, Kan. No downloads. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Grosvenor Script 493

    A Monotype script, ca. 1939. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Grover Foundry
    [Thomas Grover]

    London-based foundry of James and Thomas Grover, active in the late 17th century. Quoting Stanley Morison (Fleuron, vol. 6): "In succession to the so-called Polyglot founders who worked under privilege during the period 1637-1667, the Grovers began business about 1674. The possessed types which came from Day, Wynkyn de Worde and others, also a fine Greek uncial, a number of scripts and the curious letter entitled "Double Pica Union Pearl". This elegant decorative script face, Union Pearl, the first known English decorated letter (ca. 1690), later became a Stephenson Blake typeface. Designers of a Greek typeface in 1894, based upon the Greek of the Complutensian Polyglot of 1514. According to "Fleuron", vol. 6, p. 231, this face was surpassed by Victor Scholderer's "New Hellenic" (1928). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Grummedia
    [Graham David Blakelock]

    Ilkley, UK-based foundry of Graham David Blakelock (b. 1947, York, England). MyFonts sells his fonts. These include faces used in role playing games, often with a medieval look, all published in 2005: Fifteen36 (Venetian with rough edges), Fourteen64 (Venetian with rough edges), High German (blackletter), ItalicHand (inspired by 11th or 12th century Carolingian hand drawn cursive), Old Russian (fake Cyrillic), Ye-As-Ta (rotated brush style caps), Good Taste (2006), Hieroglyph Informal (2006), Kanjur (2006, Indic simulation face), Mayan (2006, dingbats and Mayan-looking letters), Pepper (2006), Salt (2006).

    View Graham David Blakelock's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    GT Foundry
    [Michael Green]

    GT Foundry is run by Michael Green, an English designer in Seoul, Korea. In 2011, he created a custom typeface for the Southwark Community Fair. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    G-Type
    [Nick Cooke]

    Nick Cooke is a British type designer based in Otley, West Yorkshire, and/or Newent, UK, who has been at it since 1982 as a lettering artist. He founded G-Type in 1999. Nick started as a lettering artist in London in 1982 crafting type by hand for book jackets. His typefaces:

    Klingspor link. Behance link.

    View all typefaces by Nick Cooke (G-Type).

    View Nick Cooke's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Guillermo Torres

    Graduate of the London College of Communication. Multidisciplinary designer living and working in London. Creator of the alchemic caps typeface Realium (2013). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gummy Favorite

    British creator of Sandcastle (2013, hand-printed). Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gurpreet Bangar

    Illustrator and graphic designer in Birmingham, UK. He used road signs to construct his Motorway Madness alphabet in 2011. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Guy Mayger

    Mayger (from Felpham, UK) works at Ascender Corporation since 2004. His CV states that he has "probably hinted more italic fonts than any other hinter and has worked with a large range of customers including Barclays, British Airways, Hewlett-Packard, Ikea, Lexmark, Microsoft, Nokia, Opel and Waitrose." He has worked most of his life at Monotype, often alongside Tom Rickner. Guy has worked with an array of different tools to develop high quality fonts in nearly every production environment including TrueType, ClearType, PostScript Type 1, Multiple Master and a multitude of bitmap formats. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Gwyn Headley

    London-based larger than life Welsh bon vivant, and author of Encyclopaedia of Fonts (December 2005, Cassell Illustrated, London), a book that can be considered as a digital successor of Jaspert, Berry & Johnson. The coverage is up to the present. The fonts are classified in one of about 40 styles, and are shown in chronological order within each style. Gwyn has worked on it for four years. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Haaris Sheikh

    London-based creator of the eerie typeface Reaper (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Habib Khoury
    [AvanType]

    [More]  ⦿

    Hali

    Student at UWE in Bristol. FontStructor who made the ornamental caps face Atom Dynamics (2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Halo Media

    Halo Media (Hamish McWhirter) has designed a custom typeface for Beauty UK Cosmetics called You Beauty (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Halpin Hand
    [Geoffrey Halpin]

    MyFonts: Geoff Halpin has been a graphic designer and creative director in London for 40 years, working on music album covers, advertising campaigns, corporate identity and brand packaging. Has worked on album covers for The New York Dolls, Elton John, Paul McCartney and Mike Rutherford. He was creative Director of Identica London for 10 years. During this time he created the current Universal Studios identity and the Johnnie Walker whisky brand mark. Creating logos and bespoke letterforms has always been a major part of his work. He has created corporate fonts for Universal Studios, Chivas Regal Whisky and McDonalds. His foundry in Sutton, Surrey, UK, is Halpin Hand. In 2010, he created the organic display face Halpin Hand Roman. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Hamish Makgill

    Graphic designer in London. Creator of Central Avenue (2011, a strong display sans with hints of the Victorian era commissioned by the city of Birmingham), Pantograph (2009, Colophon Foundry: Pantograph is an authentic redraw of the typeface employed by the British pantograph etching process), The Lollipop Shoppe (2011, a stencil commissioned by The Lollipop Shoppe).

    Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hamish McWhirter
    [Gerd Leufert]

    [More]  ⦿

    Hamish Muir
    [MuirMcNeil Design Systems]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Han Lee
    [Haniboi]

    [More]  ⦿

    Handwriting font styles

    Jacci Howard Bear discusses the various styles of cursive and manuscript fonts used to teach handwriting:

    • D'Nealian
    • Getty-Dubay Italic
    • Harcourt Brace
    • McDougal, Littel
    • Palmer
    • Peterson Directed Handwriting
    • SSD
    • Zaner-Bloser (old style)
    • Zaner-Bloser (new style)
    • UK handwriting
    • Australian handwriting
    [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Handwriting Interest Group

    UK handwriting interest group. Links and information. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hani Abusamra

    London-based graphic designer and illustrator, who studied graphic design at London's Architecture and Visual Arts school. Behance link. Her typefaces include Valence (2011, blackletter/tattoo face). Also, starting in 2011, she decided to drawn one letter per day. Shapes (2011) is a geometric face. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Haniboi
    [Han Lee]

    Haniboi is London-based illustrator Han Lee, a graduate of Saint martins in London. Not surprisingly, his first entrance into th world of type design is an ornamental caps typeface, called Studio Rock (2012), which can be bought from The Type Foundry. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hanisha Amin

    While studying graphic design at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, Hanisha Amin (b. UK), who was raised in Arkansas, created an unnamed techno typeface in 2013.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hanna Donker

    Dutch freelance graphic designer who works as font designer at Dalton Maag in London since 2012. Behance link. Graduate of the University of Reading in 2011. Her graduation typeface, Foxhill (2011), was designed for small sizes. It has Greek and Latin styles and has the angularity necessary for agate faces. Foxhill won Third Prize in the Greek text typeface category at Granshan 2011. She wrote a dissertation about Dutch typeface designer Sjoerd Hendrik de Roos.

    Typecache link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hannah

    UK-based designer (b. 1987) of the handwriting face Hannah's Hand (2004). Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hannah Bird

    Shrewsbury, UK-based creator of the circle-based font Circles Are Round (2012) and of the hairline alchemic typeface Trifont (2012). She is associated with Burnt Button Design.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hannah Catchlove

    During her design studies at the University of Leeds in 2012, Hannah Catchlove created a city signage typeface for Boundary Wharf.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hannah Dossary

    Hannah Dossary (Nottingham, UK) created an Arabic type companion for the road sign family ClearviewHwy (2011) while studying communication at Loughborough University. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hannah Elaine

    Fontstructor who made the Tape Type (2011) and Protest (2011). Hannah is a student at UWE in Bristol, UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hannah Jackson

    Leeds, UK-based graphic designer. Behance link. Creator of the kitchen tile face Cakehole (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hannah Lloyd

    Graphic designer from Leeds, UK, who made the experimental typefaces Keep Dry and This Way Up in 2010. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hannah Matthews

    During her undergraduate work at the University of Reading (UK), Hannah Matthews created the dot matrix typeface Modular (2013) and the ball terminal typeface Adhesion (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hannah Thompson

    Graphic design student in Nottingham, UK, who created a bohemian all caps alphabet called Hallmark Doodles (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hannah Tomlinson

    Graphic designer in Manchester, UK, who created the custom alchemic Folk typeface (2012).

    Behance link. Cargo Collective link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Harrison Reilly

    In an interesting experiment, Harrison Reilly (UK) used Impact to make a grungy bouncy version called Impacted (2009, Fontcapture font). Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Harry Carter

    Father of Matthew Carter, typographic historian, and archivist of the Oxford University Press, who lived in the UK from 1901-1982. Author in 1969 of "A view of early typography: up to about 1600". This will be reissued by Hyphen Press in 2002 and is reviewed by Andy Crewdson. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Harry Lee

    During his studies at Falmouth University in the UK, Harry Lee created Average (2013), an experimental typeface obtained by overlays of twelve popular typefaces. Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Harry Poole

    Graphic designer in London. During his stiudies at UCA Farnham in Surrey, England, he created Aztec (2012, an outline face with a stone cut look), Minty Modular (2012), King Modular (2012) and Current Cut (2012, arc and circle-themed typeface). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Harry Rickard

    British youngster, b. 1997, who created the hand-printed Wizzo(2011) and Scawly Wawly (2012).

    Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Harry Sutherland-Hawes

    Design consultant in London who created the 1930's Cassandre (Alphonse Mouron)-style art deco sans typeface Mouillon (2014). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hayley Jenkins

    Graphic designer in Leeds, UK. Creator of Mania (2012), a modular typeface that was inspired by Ken Kesey's novel One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest.

    Hayley created the modular geometric typeface Dreieck in 2013.

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hayman

    Croydon, UK-based designer (b. 1982) of the beautiful stencil font Quarters (2007). Download here. All glyphs are made up from quarter circles and straight edges. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hazard One

    UK-based FontStructor (student at Bristol UWE) who created the crumbly smudgy face Diverge (2010) and Decay (2010, grunge). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    hazard one

    Student at The University of Western England (UWE) in Bristol who made the dusty texture face Diverge (2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Head:Line TypeDesign

    Custom type designers in the UK. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Head:Line Typedesign
    [Thomas Oldfield]

    UK's Tom Oldfield (b. Yorkshire) designed some free fonts and a few commercial ones: Bokken, Creole, Dimbaza, Extrema, Gasoline, Quorn, Litany, Whiplash, Hombre BT (2004, a sketched face done at Bitstream), Jerk Chicken BT (2007, blotty handwriting), Nostromo, Reaper BT Roman (2002, a font for cemeteries) and Chicken BT.

    150 UK pound custom font making service.

    In 2005, he reorganized things, and his catalog is as follows. Freeware fonts include Blotto, Incised, Chunk, JustFiveMins, all destructionist faces. Shareware faces: Shrivel, Shrapnel, Mello (stencil), Rabid. Commercial faces:

    • Antique style: Bootham, Rufford, Treasurer, Devizes, Sedbergh, Incognito.
    • Distressed: Peizli Claemaks, Litany, Bokken, USCSS Nostromo, USCSS Sulacco, Extema, Gasoline.
    • Cartoony: Creole, Snoogle, Mouse, Krattius, Lightyear, Disjoint.
    • Bizarre: Sifting, Moist Bendy, Invertebrate, Semoline, Clearly A Madman, Moist Moist Moist Moist.

    FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Heather Bradley

    Graphic Designer based in Leeds, UK. She is scheduled to obatin a BA in Graphic Design from the Leeds College of Art in 2011. behance link. Creator of the counterless face Squircle (2010) and the mini-serifed typeface Elegance (2013).

    Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Heather Kennedy

    Heather Kennedy, a fashion model in London, created a curly all-caps typeface in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Heather Marie Metcalfe

    Graphic designer in Manchester, UK, who created the linked ring typeface Linked (2014) in the context of a university project on Alan Turing. She also designed the multicolored typeface Eightbit (2014). Behance link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Heidi Summerbell

    Cornwall, UK-based creator of a school project typeface in 2014. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Heinemann

    Foundry whose fonts are sold via Fontworks UK, who write: The Heinemann fonts were initially developed by the in-house design team at Heinemann educational publishing out of the necessity to find the perfect font for use in early primary reading books and literacy products. Basic Heinemann is defined by longer ascenders and descenders which help children to distinguish between letters; rounded edges on all letterforms help focus the reader on the individual letter shape; and modified characters (e.g., a, g) ensure instant recognition of letterforms. Heinemann Special offers further modified characters and kerning pairs ideal for dyslexic or special needs use (eg a, d, b). The Heinemann fonts were developed in partnership with children, literacy advisors, teachers of special needs/dyslexia and primary school teachers, and are now released in response to hundreds of requests from publishers, designers and teachers to purchase them. They have been trialled in schools and learning institutions over an 8 year period, and are a favourite for use in both print and electronic product. Heinemann is a 12-style sans family. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Helen Atkinson

    University student in High Wycombe, UK, who created the experimental typeface Tube (2011) based on parts of the London subway system map. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Helena Lekka

    Ph.D. student at the University of Reading. Thesis topic: Linotype's early Greek phototypes. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Helena Lou

    British creator of the Helena Lou Script series of handwriting fonts (2009, Fontcapture). [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Henrik Kubel
    [A2 Type]

    [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

    Henrik Kubel
    [Fontyoufonts.com]

    [More]  ⦿

    Henry Caslon

    British typefounder from the famous Caslon family. Author of Specimen of Printing types (1841), which showcases the typefaces of Caslon, Son and Livermore. PDF file of that book. Excerpts: Albion No. 1, Double Pica No. 3, Five Line Pica Open, Four Line Pica Shaded, Italian [this is a famous Western face, dating from 1821, and entitled the Italian Monstrosity by James Clough (who considers it not a monstrosity at all---the title refers to bad reputation of Caslon's Italian in the eyes of type critics such as T.C. Hansard and Nicolete Grey)], Nine Line Pica, Ornament No. 113, Ornament No. 159, Seven Line Pica Italian, Sixteen Line Pica Compressed, Ten Line Pica Compressed, Two Line Letters No. 4, Two Line Pica Chessmen.

    Images of some type specimen from Henry Taylor Wyse's book of 1911: AngloSaxon, Antique Old Style, Baskerville, Black No. 4, Cheltenham, Cheltenham Bold Outline, Cheltenham Heavy Italic, Cheltenham Old Style, Cheltenham Old Style, Lining Carlton, Morland, Morland Italic, Old Face, Old Face Heavy, Old Face Italic, Original Black, Ornaments. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Henry Gummett

    British graphic designer and ale connoisseur. Creator of Flatland (2012, a Futura Stencil-like face influenced by the novel Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions by Edwin A. Abbot) and Staub (2012, a rounded logotype for the Staub company).

    Behnace link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Herbert Percy Horne

    A London-based designer of principally roman fonts, who lived from 1864-1916: Florence Press Type (Chatto and Windus, 1908), Montallegro Type (Merrymount Press, 1904), Riccardi Press Fount (Medici Societa, 1909). Montallegro is a Florentine style font that was designed by Horne at the request of Daniel Berkeley Updike for the Merrymount Press in Boston. Under Horne's direction, the punches were cut by E.P. Prince in 14 point roman only. [Google] [More]  ⦿

    Hey