TYPE DESIGN INFORMATION PAGE last updated on Fri Apr 18 00:57:19 EDT 2014

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Books on type design

Luc Devroye
McGill University
Montreal, Canada
lucdevroye@gmail.com
http://luc.devroye.org
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ABC3D

A 3d type book by Marion Bataille, Roaring Brook Press, 2008. Video. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Abebooks

Excellent source for finding old books on typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ada Yardeni

Ada Yardeni received her Ph.D. in ancient Semitic languages, paleography and epigraphy from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She wrote The Book of Hebrew Script: History, Palaeography, Script Styles, Calligraphy and Design, 1997. 364pp. The second printing in 2002 was done by Oak Knoll Press. He also designs fonts at Masterfont in Israel. MyFonts link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Adobe black book

Adobe's Type 1 Font Format book in PDF format. Don't forget to get the Adobe Technical Note #5015, Type 1 Font Format Supplement as well, which discusses multiple master fonts and counter hints. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Adobe Type Catalogs

Contents of the Adobe Font Folio 9 collection of type 1 fonts. Their 145-page PDF catalog, with samples. The Adobe Type Collection OpenType Edition (ca. 2008) is here and here. The Adobe Type Library Reference Book is a printed specimen book, currently in its 3rd edition, and can be obtained from Amazon, Peachpit or Adobe Press, both in paper and PDF format. The cover price of the printed edition is about 45 US dolllars. [Google] [More]  ⦿

A.F. Johnson

Type specialist, and author of numerous books on type. A very nice historical account of the development of type can be found in Type Designs. Their History and Development (1934, Grafton and co., Coptic House, London; the 2nd edition appeared in 1959). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Afrikan Alphabets
[Saki Mafundikwa]

Saki Mafundikwa (Harare, Zimbabwe) gives a synposis of his book Afrikan Alphabets, the story of writing in Afrika (Mark Batty Publ., 2003). He covers all south of the Sahara, and divides things as follows:
A. Liberia and Sierra Leone:
a. The Vai syllabary---212 characters 1883
b. The Mende syllabary---195 characters 1921
c. The Loma syllabary---185 characters 1930
d. The Kpelle syllabary---88 characters 1930
e. The Bassa 'Vah' alphabet---30 characters, 5 diacritics 1920
f. The Gola alphabet---30 characters 1930

B. Guinea, Senegal and Mali,
a. The Mandingo alphabet---25 characters, 8 diacritics 1950
b. Bambara "Ma-sa-ba" script 1930
c. The Wolof alphabet---25 characters, 7 diacritics 1960
d. The Fula (Dita) alphabet---39 characters 1958
e. The Fula (Ba) alphabet
f. The Gerze script

C. Cote d'Ivoire
a. The Bete syllabary---401 characters 1956
b. The Guro script

D. Cameroon and Nigeria
a. The Bamum syllabary---80 characters 1895
b. The Bagam or Eghap syllabary---100 plus characters 1917
c. The Ibibio-Efik alphabet---34 characters 1930
d. The Yoruba holy alphabet
e. Nsibidi
f. A syllabary found among the Djuka of Suriname

[Google] [More]  ⦿

Agenturtschi
[Ralf Turtschi]

Ralf Turtschi's Swiss site that specializes in type publications. A must-buy book for type classification: Schrift vergleichen, Schrift auswählen, Schrift erkennen, Schrift finden (Verlag Hermann Schmidt, Mainz, 1991): 430 pages! Author of TypoTuning (2006) and of Praktische Typografie (1999, Verlag Niggli AG). In 2004, Anatina Blaser made a handwritten style font called Rooster (after Peter Rooster's handwriting), which can be had for free with any order over 59 dollars. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Agenturtschi Buchtipps

Nice list of German language books on typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

AIAP

Associazione Italiana Progettazione per la Communicazione Visiva, located in Italy. It has a publishing branch. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Akademie der bildenden Künste Stuttgart

Description of the main type work at the Academy of Graphic Arts in Stuttgart. The big names there were Walter Brudi, J.V. Cissarz, F.H.E. Schneidler and Walter Veit. From 1920-1948, F.H.E. Schneidler was head of the graphics division of the Akademie der bildenden Künste Stuttgart.

Some stencil alphabet by them (ca. 1930), and later digitized by "Mindofone" as free art deco stencil typeface Glas Deco (2012). Other examples [taken from the book Handsatzschriften des Instituts für Buchgestaltung an der Staatlichen Akademie der bildenden Künste Stuttgart von Walter Brudi, J.V. Cissarz F.H.E. Schneidler und Walter Veit include Veit Antiqua (Walter Veit), Brudi Mediaeval, Brudi Kursiv and Pan (Walter Brudi), Cissarz-Latein.

The following typefaces are by F.H.E. Schneidler: Amalthea, Bayreuth, Buchdeutsch Zierbuchstaben, Buchdeutsch, Deutsch Roemisch Fett, Deutsch Roemisch Kursiv, Deutsch Roemisch, Die Zierde, Ganz Grobe Gotisch, Graphik, Halbfette Buchdeutsch, Halbfette Deutsch, Halbfette Schneidler Schwabacher, Juniperus Antiqua, Kontrast, Legende, Schmalfetten Gotisch, Schneidler Antiqua, Schneidler Fraktur Zierbuchstaben, Schneidler Mediaeval Halbfett, Schneidler Mediaeval Kursiv, Schneidler Mediaeval, Schneidler Schwabacher Initialen, SSchneidler Untergrund, Schneidler Werk Latein, Schneidler Zierat, Schneidler, Suevia Fraktur Initialen, Zentenar Fraktur Halbfett, Zentenar Fraktur, Zentenar. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Akke Ragnar Kumlien

Swedish painter, poet, scholar, publisher, typographer and type designer (b. Stockholm, 1884, d. Stockholm, 1949) who designed fonts at Klingspor such as Kumlien (1943), Kumlien Bold and Kumlien Antiqua. Tjörbjörn Olsson created interpretations such as KumlienMM (1993) and Kumlien-Initialer (1994). The fist major digital revival and extension came in 2011 at Canada Type, where Patrick Griffin and Kevin King designed the Kumlien Pro family.

Bror Zachrisson penned Akke Kumlien: 1884-1949 in PAGA, volume 1, number 3, pp. 45-56, 1953. Kumlien studied the history of arts and literature at Uppsala University, which later bestowed on him an honorary doctorate. He was also the founder of the Institute for Research of Materials at the Royal Academy of Arts in Stockholm, the head of the Thiel Gallery's well-known art collection, and the main artistic consultant at P. A. Norstedt&Sons, the royal printing house. His Kumlien transitional face was the first major Swedish-designed typeface in over a hundred years. Specimen.

Author of Bokstav och ande (The Letter and the Spirit: 1948), and Kunstneren og bokkunsten (Artist and Book Art).

MyFonts link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Albert Anklam

German type designer. He created Mönchs-Gotisch (or: Mediaeval-Gotisch) in 1877 (Schnelle says 1881) at Genzsch & Heyse. In 1876, he made Neue Schwabacher (normal and halbfett) at Genzsch & Heyse (and Klinkhardt). That same type can also be found at J. John&Söhne and at JG Shelter&Giesecke.

Author/editor of Kunstwerke der Schrift Bund für deutsche Sprache und Schrift (Großenkneten 1994).

Digital revivals include Schwabacher Mager Gross and Möncgs-Gotisch, both by Gerhard Helzel.

Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Albert Corbeto

Type historian at Reial Academia de Bones Lletres in Barcelona. Born in Barcelona in 1971, Corbeto is responsible for all the publishing activities of the Real Academia de Buenas Letras de Barcelona and the Asociación de Bibliófilos de Barcelona. His field of investigation is the history of printing types and, in particular, the work of Spanish punchcutters throughout the second half of the eighteenth century. At ATypI 2006 in Lisbon, he spoke about the efforts around 1750-1770 to set up the Royal Library type foundry by Juan de Santander and Gerónimo A. Gil. Speaker at ATypI 2009 in Mexico City, where he talked about the punches from the Spanish Royal Printing House. Soon he will publish a specimen and text book on all this.

Interview by Unostiposduros. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Albert Kapr

German type designer, typographer, calligrapher, author and educator, b. Stuttgart (1918), d. 1995. He was art director at the Dresden type foundry VEB Typoart from 1964 until 1977. He founded and led the Institut für Buchgestaltung at the Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst at Leipzig from 1956 until 1978. Obituary by Harald Suess. Page at Klingspor. MyFonts page. Catalog of Albert Kapr's typefaces

He designed Faust-Antiqua (1958; this inspired Nick Curtis to design Kaprice NF (2010); in 1993, Steve Jackaman revived it as Faust RR), Leipzig (with Otto Erler in 1963: large x-height), Leipziger-Antiqua (1959, revived by Tim Ahrens in 2004 as JAF Lapture, also digitized--close to the original and under the original name--by Ralph Unger at URW in 2005; and shamelessly digitized by Linotype and sold as Hawkhurst without mentioning the Leipziger Antiqua source, in fact claiming that Hawkhurst is an original), Calendon-Antiqua (1965), Prillwitz-Antiqua (1971), and Magna Kyrillisch (1975). Circa 1975, he created Garamond Cyrillic at Typoart.

A specialist of blackletter, he was passionate about Gotische Bastarda. Author of Fraktur: Form und Geschichte der gebrochenen Schriften (1993, H. Schmidt, Mainz). Max Caflisch, Albert Kapr, Antonia Weiss and Hans Peter Willberg published F.H.Ernst Schneidler Schriftentwerfer, Lehrer, Kalligraph (SchumacherGebler a.o., München, 2002). Author of The art of lettering; The history, anatomy, and aesthetics of the roman letterforms (München, K.G. Saur, 1983, original edition in German by VEB Verlag: Dresden, 1971). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Albert-Jan Pool

Dutch writer and designer, b. 1960, Amsterdam, who currently lives in Hamburg. He studied at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague. From 1987 until 1991 he was the type director at Scangraphic, and from 1991-1994, he was the type manager at URW in Hamburg, at which time he completed URW Imperial, URW Linear, and URW Mauritius.

In 1994 he started his own studio Dutch Design in Hamburg, and finally he co-founded FarbTon Konzept+Design with Jörn Iken, Birgit Hartmann and Klaus-Peter Staudinger, a professor at the University of Weimar, but Pool, Iken anf Hartmann left FarbTon in 2005. Their corporate partners were DTL (Frank Blokland), URW++ (mainly for hinting), and Fontshop International. They also got freelance help from Nicolay Gogol and Gisela Will. Up until today, FarbTon has made about ten corporate types. He has worked at URW++ as a freelancer, contributing text and classification expertise to the book URW++ FontCollection.

He has been teaching typeface design at the Muthesius Kunsthochschule in Kiel between 1995 and 1998 and has taken up that job again in 2005.

Fonts done by Pool include FF DIN (DIN-Mittelschrift is used on German highway signs, 1995; image, another image: for more images, see FF DIN Round at issuu.com), FF DIN Round (2010; +Cyrillic; in use; sample), FF DIN Web (2010), Jet Set Sans (for JET/Conoco gas stations), DTL Hein Gas (for Hamburger Gaswerke GmbH), Regenbogen Bold (for a radical left party in Hamburg, a roughened version of Letter Gothic), and Syndicate Sans (2012, for Syndicate Design). He also made FF OCR-F.

Together with type-consultant Stefan Rugener of AdFinder GmbH and copywriter Ursula Packhauser he wrote and designed a book on the effects of type on brand image entitled Branding with Type (Adobe Press). An expert on DIN typefaces, he spoke about DIN 16 and DIN 1451 at ATypI 2007 in Brighton, and wrote an article entitled FF DIN, the history of a contemporary typeface in the book Made with FontFont. Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam: Legibility according to DIN 1450.

Pic.

Interview. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Albrecht Seemann

Author of Handbuch der Schriftarten (Leipzig, 1926), a nearly comprehensive listing of all types at all German type foundries at that time. Just the name index of the types takes 38 pages. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aldo Novarese

Italian designer, 1920-1995, who designed most of his faces at Nebiolo in Turin. Until 1975, he made about 30 families at Nebiolo, and after 1975, he produced about 70 further families of fonts. With weights included, he created about 300 fonts. Biography by Sergio Polano. He was very influential, and wrote two important books, Alfa Beta: Lo Studio e il Disegno del Carattere, a study on font design and history (1964), and Il Segno Alfabetico (1971). Essay by Sergio Polano on Novarese. The list of fonts done at Nebiolo:

  • Landi Linear (1942). This was revived in digital form in 2011 by toto as K22 Landi Linear.
  • Etruria (1940-42)
  • Express (1940-43)
  • Normandia (1946-49, with Butti, and 1952)
  • Athenaeum Initials (with A. Butti, 1945-1947)
  • Fluidum (+Bold) (1951, script). Revived by Ralph Unger as Butti (2011).
  • Fontanesi (1951-54, a rococo font)
  • Microgramma (1952, with A. Butti; available at URW++). This was done as an alternative to Bank Gothic, and is identical to Eurostile Bold Extended.
  • Nova Augustea (1951, ITC Augustea Open)
  • Egizio (1953-57), a slab serif [see E710 Roman on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, 2002, or Egizio URW (2009, quite complete family with 5 styles) or Egizio EF (2001), or Thierry Gouttenègre's Aldogizio (2013)]. For a specimen, see here.
  • Cigno (1954). This script face was revived an extended as P22 Cigno (2008, Colin Kahn, P22).
  • Swan (1954), aka Cigogna (with A. Butti).
  • Juliet (1954-55). For a superb revival and extension of this copperplate script, see Canada Type's Ambassador Script (2007).
  • Ritmo (1955)
  • Rhythm (1955)
  • Garaldus (1956-ff). Digitally revived in 2012 as Garaldus by Flanker.
  • Slogan (1957). Digital revival by Terry Wudenbachs in 2010 called P22 Slogan.
  • Recta (1958-1961). This is a large sans family. Canada Type published an 18-font revival in 2011, also called Recta.
  • Estro (1961)
  • Fancy (1961)
  • Exempla (1961)
  • The Eurostile family (1952: caps, with Alessandro Butti; 1962: lower case). This is carried by many foundries such as Adobe, Linotype, and URW++. Eurostile lookalike include Aldostile (Autologic), ES (Itek), Eurasia (SoftMaker), Eurogothic, Eurostar (MGI Software), Eurostyle, Eurostile Next (Akira Kobayashi), Gamma, Jura (Daniel Johnson), Microgramma, MicroSquare (SoftMaker), Microstyle (Compugraphic), NuevoSolStile (Cayo Navarro), SD Eurostile Elite (Justin Rotkowitz), Square 721 (Bitstream), Waltham.
  • Patrizia
  • Magister (1966)
  • Forma (1966). Alessandro Colizzi explains: From 1965, following a marketing-oriented approach focused on the user, the management set a research group of graphic designers to work on a new typeface design. Headed by Novarese, who provided the basic alphabet, the team included Franco Grignani, Giancarlo Iliprandi, Till Neuburg, Ilio Negri, Pino Tovaglia, Luigi Oriani, and Bruno Munari. The collective design process was based on an analysis of contemporary sanserif typefaces and legibility tests, to develop a more mature, humane interpretation of the Swiss sanserif trend. The process was quite laborious with monthly meetings spanning across over two years. In 1968, Forma was eventually released as lead type. As its name implies, Forma aimed at representing the ideal letterform of its time, equally appealing to designers, printers and the general public. The typeface was favourably received by the design community (it won a special mention at Compasso d’oro in 1970), but although initial sales were encouraging, it could not really compete in a market already saturated by Univers, Helvetica and the like. .
  • Oscar (1966)
  • Lambert (Compacta lookalike)
  • Exempla (VGC, 1966, Third Prize in the 1966 VGC National Type Face Design Competition)
  • Metropol (1967). This gaspipe typeface was digitized by Patrick Griffin at Canada Type in 2007 as Press Gothic. Originally, it was meant as an alternative to Geoffrey Lee's Impact at Stephenson Blake.
  • Elite (1968, a boring linear script, digitized in 2005 by Canada Type as Fontella)
  • Fenice
  • Stop (1971; available at Linotype, URW++, Elsner&Flake)
  • Dattilo (1974, an Egyptian face) (1974): his last creature for Nebiolo, a typewriter type. It was considered as a slab serif companion of Forma.
His post-Nebiolo fonts:
  • Sintex 1 (VGC, 1973). A revival and expansion of this funky nightclub face was done in 2008 by Patrick Griffin at Canada Type as Stretto.
  • Bloc (1974, VGC)
  • Mixage (1977 Haas, a lineal font, now ITC Mixage) 1985?
  • Novarese Book (1978, now ITC Novarese Book)
  • Lapidar (1977)
  • Andromeda (1978, VGC)
  • Global (1978, VGC)
  • Fenice (1977-80; now ITC Fenice)
  • Expert (1983)
  • Colossal (1984); see Colossalis at Berthold, a slab serif sports lettering family)
  • Symbol (1982-1984, now ITC Symbol)
  • Arbiter (1989, Berthold)

View Aldo Novarese's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Aldo Novarese: Alfa Beta (1964)

Alfa Beta is a text book written by Aldo Novarese in 1964. It is especially useful to learn for the first time about the differences between typefaces and about type classification. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alejandro Fauré

Chilean illustrator and designer from the art nouveau era, 1865-1912. Check Alejandro Fauré Obre Gráfica (Mariana Muñoz and Fernanda Villalobos, 2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aleksandra Korolkova

Graduate of Moscow University of Printing Arts in 2006 where she studied under Alexander Tarbeev. She teaches type design and typography there. In 2007, her book for Russian students on typography was published (English title: Alive Typography). She received many awards for her work and is a frequent speaker at type design conferences. In particular, she received the prestigious Prix Charles Peignot in 2013.

Designer of the beautiful Cyrillic serif family Leksa (a winner at Paratype K2009) and the accompanying Leksa Sans family from 2004-2007. This was followed by equally gorgeous families such as Fence (2009, an ultra-fat artistic beauty). Skoropix is an experimental pixel face done with FontStruct.

She also made Belladonna (2008, a stunning modern face for Latin and Cyrillic; a winner at Paratype K2009 and Grand Prize winner at Granshan 2011), Skoropix (with FontStruct), and the experimental face Cless (2009). She spoke about Cyrillic at ATypI 2008 in St. Petersburg. She received a TypeArt 05 award for the display family Fourty-nine face. Alternate URL.

At MyFonts, one can buy Gorodets [2009: a Russian decoration face based on traditional wood-painting style from the town Gorodets on the Volga river, Russia], Leksa and Leksa Sans], Blonde Fraktur (2010: written with a quill by Alexandra Korolkova and prepared in digital form by Alexandra Pushkova), Airy (2010, a curly script), Airy Pictures (2010, animal and plant dingbats), Bowman (2010: a blackboard children's script), PT Serif (2011, Paratype's superfamily of 38 fonts, codesigned with Vladimir Yefimov and Olga Umpeleva), PT Circe (2011, a geometric sans family with a neat Thin weight; Third Prize for Cyrillic text faces at Granshan 2011), and Cless (2010: ultra fat and counterless).

Together with Isabella Chaeva, she made PT Mono (2012, Google Web Fonts).

In 2012, Vasiliy Biryukov and Alexandra Korolkova codesigned the Christmas dingbat font Gingerbread House, together with a plump display face, Gingerbread.

In 2013, Vasily Biryukov and Alexandra Korolkova codesigned the soft roundish sans typeface Kiddy Kitty (link).

MyFonts interview. Kernest link. Klingspor link.

View Alexandra Korolkova's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alessio Leonardi
[BuyMyFonts (or: BMF)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alexander W. White

New York-based designer of the revival fonts Preissig Antikva, Preissig Italika, Menhart Italika and Menhart Manuscript, which won awards at the TDC2 2001 competition (Type Directors Club). He is a professor of graphic design at the Hartford Art School at the University of Hartford, specializes in publication design. Author of the bestseller "How to Spec Type", he lives in New York City. He also wrote "Type In Use", "The Elements of Graphic Design" (2002, Allworth Press), and Thinking in Type (2005). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Allan Haley

From the TDC site: Allan Haley is the principal of Resolution, a consulting firm with expertise in type; his clients include Apple, Adobe, Linotype, Xerox, IBM, and Agfa Monotype. He is also currently the Chairman of the Advisory Board of the Goudy International Center at RIT. Allan was executive vice president of ITC, and before that was in charge of typographic development at Compugraphic Corp. (now Agfa Monotype). He writes for publications such as U&lc, How, Dynamic Graphics, and Step-by-Step Graphics. He is highly regarded as an educator, and he is a frequently requested speaker. He has written five books on type and graphic communication.

At ATypI in Rome in 2002, he spoke about the development of ITC Bodoni. His books:

  • ABCs of Type : A Guide to Contemporary Typefaces, A Step-by-Step Publishing Book (1990).
  • Alphabet : The History, Evolution,&Design of the Letters We Use Today (1995).
  • Type : Hot Designers Make Cool Fonts (1998).
  • Typographic Milestones (Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1992).
  • Phototypography: A Guide to In-House Typesetting and Design (Charles Scribner's Sons, 1980). He also writes many essays---one I like in particular is about Bodoni. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alpha Beta

A 320-page book about the origins of the Latin alphabet, by John Man. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alphabetum
[Juan-José Marcos García]

Juan-José Marcos García (b. Salamanca, Spain, 1963) is a professor of classics at the University of Plasencia in Spain. He has developed one of the most complete Unicode fonts named ALPHABETUM Unicode for linguistics and classical languages (classical&medieval Latin, ancient Greek, Etruscan, Oscan, Umbrian, Faliscan, Messapic, Picene, Iberic, Celtiberic, Gothic, Runic, Modern Greek, Cyrillic, Devanagari-based languages, Old&Middle English, Hebrew, Sanskrit, IPA, Ogham, Ugaritic, Old Persian, Old Church Slavonic, Brahmi, Glagolitic, Ogham, ancient Greek Avestan, Kharoshti, Old Norse, Old Icelandic, Old Danish and Old Nordic in general, Bengali, Hindi, Marathi, Phoenician, Cypriot, Linear B with plans for Glagolitic). This font has over 5000 glyphs, and contains most characters that concern classicists (rare symbols, signs for metrics, epigraphical symbols, "Saxon" typeface for Old English, etcetera). A demo font can be downloaded [see also Lucius Hartmann's place]. His Greek font Grammata (2002) is now called Ellenike.

He also created a package of fonts for Latin paleography (medieval handwriting on parchments): Capitalis Elegans, Capitalis Rustica, Uncialis, Insularis Minuscula, Carolingia Minuscula, Gothica Textura Quadrata and Humanistica Antiqua. PDf entitled Fonts For Latin Palaeography (2008-2011), in which Marcos gives an enjoyable historic overview.

Alphabetum is not Marcos's only excursion into type design. In 2011, he created two simulation fonts called Sefarad and Al Andalus which imitate Hebrew and Arabic calligraphy, respectively.

Cyrillic OCS (2012) is a pair of Latin fonts that emulate Old Church Slavonic (old Cyrillic).

In 2013, he created Cuneus, a cuneiform simulation typeface.

Paleographic fonts for Greek has ten fonts designed by Marcos: Angular Uncial, Biblical Uncial, Coptic Uncial, Papyrus Uncial, Round Uncial, Slavonic Uncial, Sloping Uncial, Minuscule IX, Minuscule XI and Minuscule XV. These fonts are representative of the main styles of Greek handwriting used during the Classical World and Middle Ages on papyrus and parchments. There is also a short manual of Greek Paleography (71 pages) which explains the development of Greek handwriting from the fourth century B.C. to the invention of printing with movable type in the middle of the fifteenth A.D. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Alphonso Edwin Tripp

Unconventional artist of the 1930s (b. 1889), who is credited with the art deco face Dignity Roman, which was digitized by Nick Curtis in 2002, and called Day Tripper NF, and also in 2000, when it was called Odalisque NF. He also has it as Heavy Tripp.

Author of Modern lettering&design (1929, Chicago: Frederick J. Drake&Co. n.).

The alphabets shown in his 1929 book: Poster Headline, Poster Strong, Roman Heavy Poster, Speedball Classic, Dignity Roman, Classic Roman, Roman Bold, Forty-five Degree. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Alston W. Purvis

Author of various books on design and/or typefaces, including History of Graphic Design (Philip B. Meggs, Alston W. Purvis), Creative Type: A Sourcebook of Classic and Contemporary Letterforms (2005, Thames&Hudson, NY; by Cees De Jong, Alston Purvis and Friedrich Friedl), Type: A Visual History of Typefaces and Graphic Styles, Vol. 1 (2009, Taschen; uthors Jan Tholenaar and Alston W. Purvis, edited by Cees De Jong), and Type: A Visual History of Typefaces&Graphic Styles, 1901-1938 (v. 2) (2010, Taschen; edited by Cees De Jong). The latter book features works by type designers including William Caslon, Fritz Helmuth Ehmcke, Peter Behrens, Rudolf Koch, Eric Gill, Jan van Krimpen, Paul Renner, Jan Tschichold, A. M. Cassandre, Aldo Novarese, and Adrian Frutiger. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Amazon.com

Typography books at Amazon. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ambroise Firmin Didot

Member of the famous French printers family, 1790-1876. Author of Essai sur la Typographie. Paris, typographie de Firmin Didot frère (1851). Bigmore & Wyman mention that This work, an excerpt from the "Encylopédie Moderne," contains the result of the author's lengthened experience, and of his vast theoretical and practical knowledge of the subject. The early history of printing is treated with great clearness and a thorough acquaintance with the best authorities. [Google] [More]  ⦿

American Type Founders Company: Handy Specimen Book, 1897

A free PDF version of ATF's Handy Specimen Book: Specimens of Type Borders and Ornaments, Brass Rules, Wood Type, etc. (Buffalo, NY, 1897). Alternate download URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

American Type Founders Company: Specimen Book And Catalogue 1923

The famous ATF catalog from 1923 is available, free to download. [Google] [More]  ⦿

American Type Founders (or: ATF)

In 1892, twenty-three type foundries joined together to compete with the new typesetting machine, the Linotype [and later, the Monotype], to form ATF, which consolidated its type manufacturing facilities in a new plant in Jersey City in 1903. They were the dominant foundry in America until 1933, when ATF went bankrupt. Its collection remains intact at the American Type Founders Company Library&Museum at Columbia University in New York. The Smithsonian possesses most of the original type drawings and many of the matrices, and a number of other institutions and private individuals own matrices. Interestingly, despite the bankruptcy, it continued in operation until 1993, when the Elizabeth, NJ plant was finally liquidated. It was Kingsley's bankruptcy in 1993 that forced the final closure of ATF. In the early part of the 20th century, ATF was the dominant American foundry.

Their specimen books are classics:

MyFonts link.

A brief history of ATF by Carol Van Houten. Reference books.

View the digital typefaces that are based (fully, or in part) on ATF's typefaces. See also here, here, and here. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

American Wood Type Manufacturing Company

Wood type company that was located in Manhattan. Their catalogs include Wood Type Printers Equipment and Supplies (1938) and Printers Supplies Wood Type Metal Type (1960s). [Google] [More]  ⦿

An exploration of the Latin Modern fonts
[Will Robertson]

Article in The PracTeX Journal, 2006, no. 1, by Will Robertson, a PhD student in Mechanical/Mechatronic Engineering in the University of Adelaide, South Australia. The Latin Modern family was originally designed by Jackowski and Nowacki to cover as many languages as possible: it has over 69,000 glyphs. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrea Brugiotti

Publisher of "Spécimen des caractères de l'imprimerie du Vatican" (Stampa Vaticana e camerale, 1628). Republished as The type specimen of Vatican Press with an introduction and notes by H.D.L. Vervliet at Menho Hertzberger, Amsterdam, in 1967. See also here for this 49-page book. Some pages: * | * | * | * | * | * | * | * | * | * | * | *. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andrea Schweiger

Coauthor with André Gürtler of Die Handschrift, Comedia, edition 02-4, 2002. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Andreas Stötzner
[SIAS (or: Signographical Institute Andreas Stötzner)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Andreu Balius Planelles

Born in Barcelona in 1962, Andreu Balius studied Sociology in the Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, and graphic design at the IDEP School. He founded Garcia Fonts&Co in Barcelona in 1993 to show his experimental designs. He cofounded Typerware in 1996 with Joancarles P. Casasín. Typerware existed until 2001 and was based in Santa Maria de Martorelles, a village near Barcelona. He cofounded Type Republic (see also here), and ran Andreu Balius (tipo)graphic design. He is presently an associate professor at Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona.

Balius won a Bukvaraz 2001 award for Pradell. Pradell also won an award at the TDC2 Type Directors Club's Type Design Competition 2002. SuperVeloz (codesigned with Alex Trochut) won an award at the TDC2 2005 type competition.

At ATypI 2005 in Helsinki, he spoke on Pradell and Super-Veloz. Speaker at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon. At ATypI 2009 in Mexico City, he spoke about the Imprenta Real.

Author of Type at work. The use of Type in Editorial Design, published in English by BIS (Amsterdam, 2003).

FontFont link. Linotype link. Behance link.

His production:

  • Garcia/Typerware offers about 50 fonts, including some very artsy faces, such as Fabrique (Andreu Balius), Futuda, Garcia Bodoni (Typerware), Alkimia (Estudi Xarop), Ariadna (pixel font, 1988-1989), Garcia Bitmap (1993), Playtext (Andreu Balius, 1995), Matilde Script (Andreu Balius, 1994: an embroidery face), Fabrique (1993, Andreu Balius) and Dinamo (1993, Balius and Casasin at Typerware), Helvetica Fondue (1993-1994), Futuda (1993), Ozo Type (1994), Tiparracus (1994, dingbats), Mi mama Me Soba Script (1994), Parkinson (1994), Garcia Bodoni (1995), Garcia snack's (1993-1995), Juan Castillo Script (1995, irregular handwriting), and Vizente Fuster (1995), all by Andreu Balius and Joancarles Casasin, 1993-1995; Water Knife (Laudelino L.Q., 1995); Alquimia (Estudi Xarop, 1995); Jam Jamie (Malcolm Webb, 1996); Network (Alex Gifreu, 1996); Panxo-Pinxo (David Molins, 1996); Euroface 80 mph (Peter Bilak, 1996); Inmaculatta (Roberto Saenz Maguregui, 1997); Proceso Sans (by Argentinan Pablo Cosgaya, 1996); Afligidos deudos (Adria Gual, 1996); Route 66 (Francesc Vidal, 1997); Popular (Sergi Ibanez, 1997); Visible (handwriting by Fabrice Trovato, 1997); SoundFile (Reto Brunner, 1998); Ninja type (kana-lookalike alphabet by Charly Brown, 1995); Vertigo (Charly Brown, 1996); Loop UltraNormal (Franco and Sven, 1996); Inercia (Inigo Jerez, 1996).
  • Fontshop: FF Fontsoup.
  • ITC: ITC Temble (1996, a great subdued ghoulish face). With Joancarles P. Casasin, he created ITC Belter (1996) and ITC Belter Mega Outline (1996).
  • Typerware: Czeska was developed from Vojtech Preissig's woodtype faces. Andreu Balius completed the design and included an italic version and a large variety of ligatures (both for regular and italic).
  • Type Republic: Pradell, Trochut, SuperVeloz, SV Marfil Caps (2004), SV Fauno Caps. Pradell was freely inspired from punches cut by catalan punchcutter Eudald Pradell (1721-1788), and is considered to be Balius' main work. Trochut is based on specimens from the 1940s by Joan Trochut. SuperVeloz is a collection of the type modules designed by Joan Trochut and produced at José Iranzo foundry in the beginning of the 40's, in Barcelona. Digitized and recovered by Andreu Balius and Alex Trochut in 2004. Example of such composition of modules include the great art nouveau faces SV Fauno Caps and SV Marfil Caps. In 2007, he added Taüll, a blackletter type. Still in 2007, he did the revival Elizabeth ND, which was based on an old type of Elizabeth Friedlander.
  • In 2008, he created the Vogue mag like family Carmen (Display, Fiesta, Regular), which are rooted in the didone style. Carmen, and its flirtatious companion Carmen Fiesta, were both reviewed by Typographica.
  • Barna (2011) and Barna Stencil (2011).
  • In 2012, Trochut was published as a free font family at Google Web Fonts. It was based on Joan Trochut-Blanchard's Bisonte.
  • Lladro (2012) is a custom sans typeface done for the Lladro company.
  • Rioja (2013) is a grotesque typeface that was custom-designed for Universidad de La Rioja.
[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Andrew Haslam

Phil Baines and Andrew Haslam wrote Type&Typography (2002, with Phil baines) [German version: Lust auf Schrift! Basiswissen Typografie, Verlag Hermann Schmidt Mainz], a crash course in typography that is generally well received. Speaker at ATypI 2007 in Brighton. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Angus Duggan's home page

Contains a bibliography on type. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ann Camp

Author of Pen Lettering (1958), an interesting penmanship book. The construction of an alphabet as presented by Ian Taylor on his blog, based on Ann Camp's book, is fascinating. It all starts with a square, and within it, an inscribed circle and an oblong rectangle of area equal to the circle. All letters relate, as Ann Camp shows, to that basic structure. Ann's all caps skeleton alphabet obtained in this manner predates Avant Garde and Herb Lubalin by almost twenty years! [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anne Cuneo

Author of "Le maître de Garamond" (Editions Stock, 2002), a beautiful book on the life and death of Antoine Augereau, who was Claude Garamond's teacher and mentor. Anne Cuneo was born in 1936 in Italy and lives in Zürich. Comment by Guy Schockaert: Le 24 décembre 1534, place Maubert, accusé d'hérésie, Antoine Augereau est pendu, son corps et ses mains brûlées. Homme de lettres, érudit, théologien, Antoine Augereau était un grand imprimeur, éditeur et graveur de caractères typographiques. Il modela ceux dont nous nous servons encore aujourd'hui, et avec Clément Marot, inventa l'usage des accents et de la cédille. La publication du Miroir de l'âme de Marguerite de Navarre lui coûtera la vie. La Sorbonne, gardienne jalouse d'une orthodoxie figée, désapprouve la pensée de la soeur de François Ier, mais ne peut la condamner. Antoine Augereau paiera pour elle. Racontée par le plus célèbre de ses disciples, l'histoire passionnante et émouvante d'un humaniste prêt à mourir pour défendre ses idées. UN livre à lire absolument et à offrir. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anthon Beeke

Author of Body Type (1969), reedited in 2011 by Spinhex, Amsterdam, with the help of René Knip. Nijhof and Lee write: Body Type is a re-edition of the legendary naked-women alphabet by Anthon Beeke originally published in 1969. This alphabet, which was published in the famous Kwadraadblad serie by Pieter Brattinga, is a carefully composed representation of the letters of the alphabet using naked women. Beeke made the alphabet as a 'tongue in cheek'response to Wim Crouwel's New Alphabet published in the same serie a year earlier. This new edition which is in colour, is complimented and enlarged with the numbers modelled by naked men all on individual sheets. It also contains a cahier with the history of the alphabet and a block containing the letters which can be used to make a streamer. Creator of the "Nude Alphabet" in Kwadraat (Steendrukkerij De Jong&Co, Hilversum, The Netherlands, 1970), using twelve nude women. This is not a font, but could be the basis for one. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Anthony DiVivo

Anthony hails from Northern New Jersey and studied design at the School of Visual Arts in New York, where he earned an MFA in 2001. He has worked as a designer in New York (where he currently lives), San Francisco and Miami. Author of Devil Type, a headline type specimen book. He designed many custom typefaces, which are showcased at his Behance site. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Antikvariat Morris

Swedish bookstore offering many valuable historical books on typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Antiquariaat A. Kok&Zn.

Great old type book store in Amsterdam. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Antiquariaat Adr. van den Bemt

Dutch antique book seller specializing in typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Aon Celtic Art
[Cari Buziak]

Cari Buziak (Calgary, Canada) is the author of Calligraphy Magic---How to Create Lettering, Knotwork, Coloring and More (North Light, 2011).

She also created the beautiful freeware Celtic font family Aon Cari (1998, a modern pseudo-Gaelic uncial).

Dafont link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Archive.org: Type and Typefounding

Copyright-free type and typefounding books. Several type specimen books from the University of California Library Collection have been scanned in by Microsoft. Other libraries are participating as well. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ari Davidow

Hebrew type designer. He now runs a nice Hebrew type blog and news page. This has a great Hebrew Typography Annotated Bibliography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Arne Freytag

German type designer in Hamburg (b. 1967) who designed Arne Freytag (1998) and Linotype Freytag Regular (2002). Linotype Freytag Pro was published in 2012. Manometer (2014) is a pneumatic ultra-black slab serif typeface with soft corners and fine counters.

Author of Toward a new typeface A type design project (Comedia, 2005, vol. 2).

Linotype link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Art Deco Display Alphabets

A book by Dan X. Solo that shows 100 alphabets. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Atelier Perrousseaux

Interesting font links. In French, by Yves Perrousseaux. Jef Tombeur describes this as follows: "The Atelier Perrousseaux is a small publishing house having on its catalogue the founder's books but also books, essays, studies by the late Gérard Blanchard, Adrian Frutiger, Ladislas Mandel, François Richaudeau (a linguist) and, soon, René Ponot." [Google] [More]  ⦿

Atelier Plumereau

Author of Publicité-Vignettes-Lettres-Chiffres-Monogrammes et Rehauts Modernes (1930s). That book shows these art deco alhpabets: La Romane, Les Filets (multilined). [Google] [More]  ⦿

ATF: Online books

The American Type Founders specimen books are virtually all on-line now. Here are the main links:

[Google] [More]  ⦿

Auguste Vitu

Author of Petite histoire de la typographie (1886, Librairie Ch. Delagrave, Paris). This delightful book contains great historic accounts from the fifteenth century, including a section in which he "deals with" the myth of Coster. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Austin Norman Palmer
[Portfolio of Ornate Penmanship]

[More]  ⦿

Azerty requiem

Book on typewriter type (edited by Philippe Ernotte&Claude Stassart) with contributions by Fernand Baudin, Hubert Nyssen, Patrick Rogiers, Marcel Moreau, Jean-Pierre Verhegen, Pierre Bergounioux, Nicolas Ancion, Daniel De Bruycker, Veronika Mabardi, François Bon, François Clarinval, and Serge Kribus. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bapurao S. Naik

Author of Typography of Devanagari in three volumes, Bombay, Directorate of Languages (1971). This is a very useful set of books for Indic typeface design. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Barbara Brownie

Author of Type Image (2011). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Barnhart Bros. Spindler Type Founders: Book of Type Specimens, 1907

Trying to fit this 1000-page book into one web page, with discussion of many types. It's impossible, but I tried it. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Beat Stamm

Swiss typography expert at Microsoft who wrote Visual TrueType, a truetype font hinting program, and who helped out with Cleartype. He is also the author of The Raster Tragedy (1997, updated in 2011). Beat Stamm has a Ph.D. in Computer Science. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Beatrice L. Warde

Born in New York in 1900, she died in London in 1969. A typographer, writer, and art historian, she worked for the British Monotype Corporation for most of her life, and was famous for her energy, enthusiasm and speeches. Collaborator of Stanley Morison. She created a face called Arrighi. She is famous for The Crystal Goblet or Printing Should be Invisible (The Crystal Goblet, Sixteen Essays on Typography, Cleveland, 1956, and Sylvan Press, London, 1955), which is also reproduced here and here. The text was originally printed in London in 1932, under the pseudonym Paul Beaujon. Here are two passages:

  • Imagine that you have before you a flagon of wine. You may choose your own favorite vintage for this imaginary demonstration, so that it be a deep shimmering crimson in colour. You have two goblets before you. One is of solid gold, wrought in the most exquisite patterns. The other is of crystal-clear glass, thin as a bubble, and as transparent. Pour and drink; and according to your choice of goblet, I shall know whether or not you are a connoisseur of wine. For if you have no feelings about wine one way or the other, you will want the sensation of drinking the stuff out of a vessel that may have cost thousands of pounds; but if you are a member of that vanishing tribe, the amateurs of fine vintages, you will choose the crystal, because everything about it is calculated to reveal rather than to hide the beautiful thing which it was meant to contain.
  • Bear with me in this long-winded and fragrant metaphor; for you will find that almost all the virtues of the perfect wine-glass have a parallel in typography. There is the long, thin stem that obviates fingerprints on the bowl. Why? Because no cloud must come between your eyes and the fiery heart of the liquid. Are not the margins on book pages similarly meant to obviate the necessity of fingering the type-page? Again: the glass is colourless or at the most only faintly tinged in the bowl, because the connoisseur judges wine partly by its colour and is impatient of anything that alters it. There are a thousand mannerisms in typography that are as impudent and arbitrary as putting port in tumblers of red or green glass! When a goblet has a base that looks too small for security, it does not matter how cleverly it is weighted; you feel nervous lest it should tip over. There are ways of setting lines of type which may work well enough, and yet keep the reader subconsciously worried by the fear of 'doubling' lines, reading three words as one, and so forth.

Drawing of her by Eric Gill. Life story.

Beatrice Warde was educated at Barnard College, Columbia, where she studied calligraphy and letterforms. From 1921-1925, she was the assistant librarian at American Type Founders. In 1925, she married the book and type designer Frederic Warde, who was Director of Printing at the Princeton University Press. Together, they moved to Europe, where Beatrice worked on The Fleuron: A Journal of Typography (Cambridge, England: At the University Press, and New York: Doubleday Doran, 1923-1930), which was at that time edited by Stanley Morison. As explained above, she is best known for an article she published in the 1926 issue of The Fleuron, written under the pseudonym Paul Beaujon, which traced types mistakenly attributed to Garamond back to Jean Jannon. In 1927, she became editor of The Monotype Recorder in London. Rebecca Davidson of the Princeton University Library wrote in 2004: Beatrice Warde was a believer in the power of the printed word to defend freedom, and she designed and printed her famous manifesto, This Is A Printing Office, in 1932, using Eric Gill's Perpetua typeface. She rejected the avant-garde in typography, believing that classical forms provided a "clearly polished window" through which ideas could be communicated. The Crystal Goblet: Sixteen Essays on Typography (1955) is an anthology of her writings. Wood engraved portrait of Warde by Bernard Brussel-Smith (1950). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Benedikt Gröndal
[Handwriting Models]

[More]  ⦿

Bengt Bengtsson

Swedish art historian whose 1956 PhD dissertation was entitled Svenskt stilgjuteri före âr 1700 (Typefounding in Sweden before 1700). In 1950 he published an 18-page booklet entitled Det äldsta Svenska Stilprovet Tryckt at Skolan for Bokhant verk. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin, Typefounder (1925, Douglas C. McMurtie, New York) describes Benjamin Franklin as typefounder. McGrew writes about Franklin: Prior to 1722 English typefounding was at a low ebb, and most printers in that country used Dutch types. But in that year William Caslon completed the first sizes of his new style, which quickly gained dominance over the Dutch types. This new English style was also extensively exported to other countries, including the American Colonies, where it was popular before the Revolution. In fact, the Declaration of Independence of the new United States was first printed in Caslon's types. Benjamin Franklin met Caslon in London, admired and recommended his types, and used them extensively in his printshop. F. Kerdijk penned the Dutch book Benjamin Franklin. Drukker - Postmeester - Uitvinder en Gezant, 1706-1790 (1956, Drukkerij Trio, 's-Gravenhage), a 16-page booklet that further explains Franklin's multidimensional persona. Further books on Franklin's sideline include Typophiles Chapbook: B. Franklin, 1706-1790 . Franklin's interests in typography and as a printer have caused a number of typefaces to be named after him, such as the famous Franklin Gothic, but also Ben Franklin, Ben Franklin Condensed and Ben Franklin Open (metal types at Keystone Type Foundry. 1919), Franklin's Caslon (2006, P22), Poor Richard RR (named after Benjamin Franklin's "Poor Richard Almanack"), Poor Richard (1994, Projective Solutions: a free font), and Benjamin Franklin Antique (free font by Dieter Steffmann). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bernard Stein

In 1998, Frederich Friedl, Nicholas Ott and Bernard Stein wrote the voluminous book, Typography: An Encyclopedic Survey of Type Design and Techniques Through History (Black Dog & Leventhal). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bernd Holthusen

Type director and manager at Scangraphic in the 1980s and 1990s. Author of a number of thick specimaen volumes including Scangraphic Digital Type Collection A-F (1985), Scangraphic Digital Type Collection G-Z (1985), Scangraphic Digital Type Collection Index (1988), Scangraphic Digital Type Collection Supplement 1 (1988), and Scangraphic Digital Type Collection Supplement 2 A-Z Body types (1988). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bert Bos

Bert Bos studied Mathematics in Groningen (1982-1987), and wrote a thesis about Graphic User Interfaces (1987-1993). He worked on an Internet browser and the surrounding infrastructure for the Faculty of Arts in Groningen and is now working for The World Wide Web Consortium on style sheets and math. He lives in Sophia Antipolis near Nice in France.

Author of Cascading Style Sheets---designing for the Web (3rd ed.) (2005, Hakon Wium Lie & Bert Bos).

He also created a free transitional family in metafont and opentype for use with TeX, Gladiator and Gladiator Sans (1991).

Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Berthold Wolpe

German type designer (b. Offenbach, 1905, d. London 1989), who studied under Rudolf Koch from 1924-27 at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Offenbach. He emigrated to England in 1935 because of his Jewish background. Wolpe taught at the Camberwell College of Art (1948-53), at the Royal College of Art in London (1956-75) and at the City&Guilds of London School of Art (from 1975 onwards). From 1941-1978, he worked as a book designer for Faber&Faber in London, designing over 1500 book jackets. He published Schriftvorlagen (Kassel 1934), Marken und Schmuckstücke (Frankfurt am Main, 1937), A Book of Fanfare Ornaments (London, 1939), Renaissance Handwriting (with A. Fairbanks, London 1959), and Architectural Alphabet. J. D. Steingruber (London, 1972). Designer of

  • Albertus (Monotype, 1932-1940) is a famous lapidary roman with thickened terminals. Images: graphic by Andrew Henderson, image by Anna Morena. The Bitstream version is called Flareserif 821. The Ghostscript/URW free version is called A028 (2000). The Softmaker and Infinitype versions are both called Adelon. The original Monotype version is Albertus MT. The letters are flared and chiseled, and the upper case U looks like a lower case u. The northeast part of the e is too anorexic to make this typeface suitable for most work. Some say that it is great for headlines. It is reminiscent of World War II.
  • Cyclone (Fanfare Press).
  • Hyperion (1931, Bauersche Giesserei). Now available at Berthold, 1952.
  • Pegasus (1938, Monotype).
  • Tempest (1936).
  • The blackletter face Sachsenwald-Gotisch (1936-1937, Monotype).
  • The blackletter face Deutschmeister (1934, Wagner&Schmidt, Ludwig Wagner).
  • Decorata (1950).
  • Johnston's Sans Serif Italic (1973).
Bio at Klingspor. FontShop link. Wiki page. Linotype page.

View Berthold Wolpe's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Bertrand Galimard Flavigny.

Author of La Chronique du bibliophile: La typographie des Didot. [Google] [More]  ⦿

B.G. Teubner

Benedictus Gotthelf Teubner was a publisher in Leipzig, Germany. One of their typographic oeuvres was Schrift- und Polytypen-Proben (1846), a model book aimed at printers that contains some fonts, decorative borders, printer's ornaments, emblems, and clip-art motifs. Additional link with some images. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Biblio@BoyBeaver

List of well-known typographers, with biographies of people such as Nicolas Jenson, Aldus Manutius, William Caslon, John Day, Johann Froben, William Caxton, and Christophe Plantin. Plus a list of typography books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

BibliOdyssey

Great pages with exquisite images taken from old books and manuscripts. On occasion, one finds interesting alphabets and wonderful typographic examples. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bibliograhy on type, fonts and postscript

Rather sloppily compiled by Luc Devroye. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bibliographie typo

List of type books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bibliographies on typesetting

[More]  ⦿

Bibliographies on typesetting

Computer science bibliographies on the topic of (mathematical and other) typesetting [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bibliography on typographic fonts

Nelson Beebe's computer science bibliography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bibliothèque de l'école Estienne

As part of the Ecole Supérieure Estienne (18, boulevard Auguste-Blanqui, 75013 Paris, Tél : 01 55 43 47 47: subway Place d'Italie), this library has many books on typography. Free, 9-12 and 1-5, Monday to Friday, except Wednesdays and during the school holidays. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bibliothèque virtuelle de livres de typographie
[Jacques André]

Jacques André (IRISA-INRIA, Rennes, France) has compiled a great bibliography of type. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Binny&Ronaldson
[James Ronaldson]

In 1796, Archibald Binny (ca. 1762-1838) and James Ronaldson (1769-1841 or 1842) (some say 1768-1842) started the first permanent American type foundry in Philadelphia in 1796, called Binny&Ronaldson. James, a business man from Edinburgh was the financial fhalf of the pair. In 1809 and 1812, they published America's first specimen book. The only complete copy of this book is at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library of Columbia University, and is entitled "A Specimen of Metal Ornaments" (Philadelphia, Fry and Kammerer, 1809). MyFonts page.

MyFonts sells Isabella, a font by ATF/Kingsley that can be traced back to Binny&Ronaldson. It also offers Really Big Shoe NF (Nick Curtis, 2009), which is based on Ronaldson's Oxford. Dick Pape published the free fonts Binny & Ronaldson English Two Line Orn (2010), Binny & Ronaldson Great Primer Two Pica (2010), and Binny & Ronaldson Primer Two Line Orn (2010).

James Ronaldson published Specimen of Printing Type, from the Letter Foundry of James Ronaldson, Successor to Binny&Ronaldson; Cedar, Between Ninth and Tenth Streets, Philadelphia (Philadelphia: J. Ronaldson, 1822). Acquired by Johnson&Smith in 1833, it became L. Johnson&Co. in 1843, and finally MacKellar, Smiths&Jordan in 1867. The latter company was the largest typefounder in America when in 1892 it was amalgamated with many others into ATF. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Bjoern Karnebogen

Author of the (German) thesis Type and Image (2003). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bob Gordon

Author of "Making Digital Type Look Good" (London, 2001), tauted as a comprehensive analysis of the current state of font technology, preceeded by a history of type development and an exploration of the changes that the digital revolution has brought about. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bodoni's books

Adam Koster from Oak Knoll in Delaware describes three of Bodoni's publications:

  • "FREGI E MAJUSCOLE INCISE E FUSE DA GIAMBATTISTA BODONI, DIRETTORE DELLA STAMPOERIA REALE". Parma, Italy: 1771. First edition of Bodoni's first type specimen book. It contains a preface by Bodoni describing the types and ornaments used in the earlier part of his career showing his admiration for the rococo style of Fournier, whom he copied in a flattering manner. "Granted that the most agreeable features of the book are copied, this "specimen" of 1771 is one of the most tasteful and charming volumes of its kind in existence.  Each page is surrounded with borders, of which scarcely one is bad, or scarcely two alilke.  The types are old style, but their delicacy shows current tendencies, being especially true of the italic.  The book is enormously instructive to compare with Bodoni's great, chilly masterpieces, the "Oratio Dominica" and the "Manuale Tipografico" of 1818"  (Updike, Printing Types, Vol. I, p.184). Illustrated with more than 400 type ornaments and several pages of capitals...Majuscole ornate e CARATTERI Moderni.  Giambattista Bodoni (1740-1813) had recently (1768) been appointed director of the Duke of Parma's private press, the Stamperia Reale,  on his way to becoming the most celebrated printer in Europe, and a leader in the development of the modern letter form. " If (Bodoni) was careful in his choice of paper, he relied still more on his type and from 1771 onwards issued a series of typographic manuals, which show the love and labour that he was continuously lavishing on the fashioning and perfecting of this weapon...there is something peculiarly satisfying in the thought of this man through all the vicissitudes of one of the most stormy periods of European history, heedless of changes of regime, cheerfully, unswervingly and successfully pursuing his artistic ideals (Brooks, preface, xi)."  With the Borghese family coat of arms gilt-stamped on front boards. The Borghese family, originally from Siena and later from Rome, produced one pope, Paul V, several cardinals, many prominent citizens, and were noted patrons of the arts and letters.
  • "Epithalamia exoticis linguis reddita. Parmae Ex Regio Typographeo", 1775. With engraved title page vignette, head- and tail-pieces and historiated initals after Ferrari. Considered one of Bodoni's finest type specimen books, it contains the alphabets of twenty-five exotic languages, including Tibetan, Phoenician and Coptic. Has a poem by Conte Della Torre di Rezzonico.
  • "MANUALE TIPOGRAFICO." Two volumes. Parma, Italy: 1818. Bodoni's most substantial and famous type specimen. (Brooks 1216, Updike, Printing Types, II, pp. 169-171). This last specimen to be issued by Bodoni, "with a Discorso by his widow and Prefazione by Bodoni, appeared in 1818, five years after his death. It was completed under the care of his widow and Luigi Orsi, who was for twenty years foreman to Bodoni. Signora Bodoni, writing to M. Durand, of Metz, from Parma (November 14, 1817), says: 'The Manuale Tipografico in two volumes on papier-velin-the only kind of paper used for it-is not yet completed, but it will be, without fail, at the beginning of the coming year. I dare to believe that book-lovers will thank me for having published a volume which is so very important to Typography. The reception which it will have, will make up for the trouble it has cost me (although Bodoni has left the blocks or models for it) and the considerable expense which I shall have had to incur before it is finished. Also, in view of the fact that but 290 copies are struck off, I cannot dispose of them at less than 120 francs, without any reduction. M. Rosaspina has engraved au burin the portrait after one which the celebrated Appiani... painted in oils, which is a striking likeness.'" (Updike II, p.169) The first volume contains a discourse by Vendova Bodoni and a preface by G.B. Bodoni and is followed by the Latin type specimens. Twenty-six separate faces are described, each displayed in several different point sizes and most with specimens in Roman and italic. The display of the individual specimens in so many variations is particularly dramatic, the specimens for majuscole alone comprise 108 variations. The second volume displays thirty-four non-Latin type specimens including: Greek, Hebrew, Arabic, Armenian, Cyrillic, Tibetan, and many others. Many of these span multiple pages and present type in varying sizes. The Greek and Russian faces are the most comprehensive, with many pages devoted to large and impressive variations. This section is followed by specimens of 1036 decorative borders (Fregi), each designed to work with specific Bodoni faces, specimens of ornaments and rules, and specimens symbols for algebra, chemistry, astronomy, and music notation. Several of these are contained on large folding plates.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

BookLook

USA service for searching out-of-print books. This page has a list with books on printing. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Books by Dan X. Solo

Dan Solo's list of books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Books Jumpstation: Typography

Book list compiled by Fred Showker. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Books on letterforms for sale

Gunnlaugur Briem is selling his own lettering book collection. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Books on Wood Type

Books on Wood Type, as listed by the Design Division of the Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin:

  • 1963 / American Wood Type. Design Quarterly, No 56. Minneapolis: Walker Arts Center.
  • 1964 / American Wood Types, 1828-1900, Volume One. Limited edition folio.
  • 1965 / Wood Letters in the 20th Century. Matrix 7. Rochester, NY: Office of Educational Research, Rochester Institute of Technology.
  • 1969 / American Wood Type, 1828-1900: Notes on the Evolution of Decorated and Large Types and Comments on Related Trades of the Period. 1st ed. New York: Van Nostrand.
  • 1977 / American Wood Type, 1828-1900: Notes on the Evolution of Decorated and Large Types and Comments on Related Trades of the Period. 1st Paperback Printing New York: Da Capo Press.
  • 1977 / Wood Type Alphabets: 100 Fonts. New York: Dover Publications. Edited by Rob Roy Kelly.
  • 1990 / Adobe Wood Type, Vol 1. Moutain View, California: Adobe Systems. Introduction by Rob Roy Kelly.
  • 1999 / Specimen Book of Wood Type. Madison: Silver Buckle Press.
A sublist of specimen books held by Columbia University (CU), the Newberry Library in Chicago (NL), the New York Public Library (NYPL) and the Hamilton Wood Type&Printing Museum (HAM) is quite impressive. Here we go:
  • 1828 / CU    Darius Wells: Darius Wells, Letter Cutter.
  • 1838 / CU    George Nesbitt (Edwin Allen): First Premium Wood Types Cut by Machinery.
  • 1838 / NYPL    J.M. Debow (William Leavenworth): Leavenworth's Patent Wood Type.
  • 1840 / CU    Wells&Webb Specimens of Plain and Ornamental Wood Type.
  • 1841 / CU    George Nesbitt (Edwin Allen): Nesbitt's Fourth Specimen of Machinery Cut Wood Type.
  • 1846 / CU    L. Johnson (Wells&Webb): Specimens of Wood-Letter.
  • 1849 / CU    Wells&Webb: Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1853 / CU    Bill, Stark&Co.: Specimens of Machinery Cut Wood Type.
  • 1854 / CU    W.&H. Hagar (Wells&Webb): Specimens of Printing Types.
  • 1854 / CU / NL    Wells&Webb: Specimens of Wood Type. (NL copy is gift from Hamilton Mfg. Co.)
  • 1858 / NL    D. Knox&Co.: Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1859 / CU / NL    William H. Page&Co.: Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1859 / NL    J.G. Cooley&Co.: Specimens of Wood Type. (NL copy also contains parts of two smaller undated specimens: J.G. Cooley&Co. Cooley's Wood Type and Vanderburgh, Wells&Co.)
  • 1860 / NL    William H. Page&Co.: Supplementary Specimens of Wood Type Rules&Borders, Etc..
  • 1865 / CU    William H. Page&Co.: Price List for Wood Type, Borders, Reglet, Etc.. (Affixed to 1859 Page specimen)
  • 1870 / NYPL    William H. Page&Co.: Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1870 / CU    William H. Page&Co.: German Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1872 / CU / NL / NYPL    William H. Page&Co.: Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1872 / NL    Marder, Luce (Page): Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1872 / CU    Dauchy&Co. (Page): Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1873 / CU    William H. Page&Co.: Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1874 / CU / NL    William H. Page&Co. Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type, Borders, Etc.. (CU copy is gift from Rob Roy Kelly)
  • 1876 / CU    William H. Page Wood Type Co.: Specimens of Wood Type. (CU copy is gift from Rob Roy Kelly)
  • 1876 / CU / NL    William H. Page Wood Type Co.: Poster Specimens. (NL copy is gift from Hamilton Mfg. Co.)
  • 1877 / CU    Vanderburgh Wells&Co. Specimens of Wood Type, Borders, Rules, Etc..
  • 1878 / CU / NYPL    William H. Page Wood Type Co.: Specimens of Wood Type. (CU copy is gift from Rob Roy Kelly, NYPL copy contains one additional page showing Aetna Extra Condensed and Egyptian)
  • 1879 / NL    Vanderburgh Wells&Co. Specimens of Wood Type, Borders, Rules, Etc..
  • 1879 / CU    William H. Page Wood Type Co.: Page's Wood Type Album, Vol 1, No 1. (CU copy is gift from Hamilton Mfg. Co.)
  • 1879 / CU    William H. Page Wood Type Co.: Page's Wood Type Album, Vol 1, No 2. (CU copy is gift from Hamilton Mfg. Co.)
  • 1879 / NL    William H. Page Wood Type Co.: Page's Wood Type Album, Vol 1, No 3.
  • 1880 / NYPL    William H. Page Wood Type Co.: Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1881 / CU    Hamilton&Katz: Specimens of Holly Wood Type.
  • 1881 / CU    Morgans&Wilcox Mfg. Co.: Specimens of Wood Type, Printing Materials, Presses, Paper Cutters, Etc..
  • 1882 / CU    William H. Page Wood Type Co.: Specimens of Wood Type&Borders. (CU copy is gift from Hamilton Mfg. Co.)
  • 1883 / NL    American Wood Type Co.: Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1883 / CU    Shniedewend&Lee: Specimens of Page's Wood Type&Borders. (CU copy is gift from Hamilton Mfg. Co.)
  • 1884 / NL [microfilm]    Hamilton&Katz: Specimens of Holly Wood Type.
  • 1884 / CU / NL    Morgans&Wilcox Mfg. Co.: Condensed Specimen Book of Wood Type. (NL copy is gift from Hamilton Mfg. Co.)
  • 1886 / NL [microfilm]    Hamilton&Baker: Specimens of Holly Wood Type .
  • 1887 / NL    National Printers' Materials Co.: Specimens of Enameled Wood Type.
  • 1887 / NL    William H. Page Wood Type Co.: Specimens of Page's Wood Type.
  • 1887 / CU    Hamilton&Baker: Specimens of Holly Wood Type. (CU copy is gift from Rob Roy Kelly)
  • 1888 / CU    William H. Page Wood Type Co.: Specimens of Machine Cut Wood Type. (A facsimile was produced by David W. Peat in 2002)
  • 1888 / CU    Hamilton&Baker: Specimens of Wood Type&Borders. (CU copy is gift from Hamilton Mfg. Co.)
  • 1889 / CU    The Hamilton Manufacturing Co.: Specimens of Wood Type&Borders. (CU copy is gift from Hamilton Mfg. Co.)
  • 1889 / CU    The Hamilton Manufacturing Co.: Specimens of Wood Type&Borders. (CU copy is gift from Hamilton Mfg. Co.)
  • 1889 / CU    The Hamilton Manufacturing Co.: Calendar Sets.
  • 1889 / NL    Vanderburgh Wells&Co.: Specimens of Wood Type, Borders, Rules, Etc..
  • 1890 / CU    Morgans&Wilcox Mfg. Co.: Condensed Specimen Book of Wood Type.
  • 1890 / CU / NL    William H. Page Wood Type Co.: Page's New Process Wood Type. (Reprinted by American Life Foundation in 1983)
  • 1890 / CU    Vanderburgh Wells&Co.: New Styles Wood Letter. (3-color Broadside)
  • 1890 / CU    Heber Wells: Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1891 / NL    Heber Wells: Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1892 / CU    Heber Wells: Specimen Book of Wood Letter.
  • 1892 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: New Process Wood Type Manufactured by Page.
  • 1892 / CU / NYPL    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Wood Type&Borders (Oversized). (Front matter indicates that there was an 1891 catalog)
  • 1893 / NL    Nelson&Chessman&Co. (Hamilton): New Process Wood Type. (NL copy is gift from Hamilton Mfg. Co.)
  • 1893 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Specimens of Wood Pointers (Broadside).
  • 1894 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Perpetual Calendar Sets (Broadside).
  • 1895 / CU    Heber Wells Specimens of Wood Type. (Front matter indicates there was an 1893 catalog)
  • 1895 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: DeVinne Series Specimens.
  • 1899 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Specimens of Wood Type (No 14).
  • 1900 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co. Specimens of Wood Type (No 15).
  • 1904 / NL    Tubbs&Co.: Tubbs Wood Type.
  • 1906 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Specimens of Wood Type, With Ornaments, Fewer Issues, Dashes, Silhouettes, Catchwords, Corners, Fractions, Calendars&Borders (No 16).
  • 1908 / CU / NL    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Specimens of Wood Type (No 17).
  • 1918 / CU / NL    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Wood Type&Borders. (Hamilton re-used existing Tubbs Mfg. Co. specimen book)
  • 1927 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Unit Gothic&Hamilton's Series of Roman Borders (2 Broadsides).
  • 1927 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Cheltenham Faces.
  • 1927 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Specimens of Wood Type.
  • 1928 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: New Gothic Faces&Wood Type.
  • 1929 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Poster Cheltenham.
  • 1930 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Large Wood Type.
  • 1932 / CU    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Display Gothics.
  • 1938 / CU / NL    The Hamilton Mfg. Co.: Wood Type Catalog No 38.
  • 1957 / NL    American Wood Type Mfg. Co.: Interim Catalog 1957.
  • 1958 / NL    American Wood Type Mfg. Co.: Catalog 1958-1959.
  • 1961 / NL    American Wood Type Mfg. Co.: Catalog 1961-1962.
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Bowfin Printworks

List of type books useful for identifying fonts. Maintained by Mike Yanega. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Bram de Does

Bram de Does is a type designer born in Amsterdam in 1934. At Enschedé, which he joined in 1958, he designed Trinité (1978-1981) and Lexicon (1990-1991). Enschedé write-up. Author of Kaba Ornament Deel I - Vorm (De Spectatorpers, 2002). Trinité won him the prestigious H.N. WerkmanPrize in 1991. Mathieu Lommen and John A. Lane published Bram de Does Boektypograaf&Letterontwerper Book Typographer&Type Designer (Amsterdam, 2003). In 2003, a 53 minute Dutch documentary was made: Systematisch Slordig: Bram de Does - Letterontwerper&Typograaf (Coraline Korevaar/Otto de Fijter, Woudrichem). A collection of many of his drawings is at the University of Amsterdam. Part of this collection (e.g., the development of Lexicon) has been scanned in and placed on the web. Details on his fonts:

  • Lexicon is discussed in the book by Bram de Does and Mathieu Lommen, Letterproef Lexicon. The Enschedé Font Foundry (1997, Amsterdam). Lexicon was produced by Peter Matthias Noordzij. It was first used for the new edition of the Groot Woordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (the Standard Dutch Dictionary, or the Dikke Van Dale as we say in Belgium).
  • Trinité according to Wikipedia: Trinité was originally designed for phototypesetting machines. In 1978, the printing office Joh. Enschedé replaced their phototypesetting machines (with Autologic machines), for which they wanted to adapt Jan van Krimpen's typeface Romanée. The company consulted with De Does, who was against it. He feared that Romanée would lose its character in the translation from metal movable type to phototype, specifically because Romanée was not a single font but several versions for each pointsize, which would not be possible to preserve in phototype. He considered commissioning a new typeface, specifically designed for the new technology, a much better idea. Although it was not his intention, Enschedé invited him to design this new typeface. [...] Trinité was originally published as an Autologic typeface in 1982. However, at the end of that decade, when De Does had already left the firm, Enschedé once again switched typesetting machines (this time the digital Linotronic system) and only kept the old one because of Trinité. Being an important business asset for the firm, they commissioned De Does and Peter Matthias Noordzij (the designer of PMN Caecilia) to produce digital PostScript fonts of Trinité, using Ikarus M. To distribute the typeface, Noordzij proposed starting a small-scale digital type foundry, The Enschedé Font Foundry (TEFF), on which they released Trinité in 1992.
[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Bret Victor

Author of a book on data visualization, Magic Ink Information Software and the Graphical Interface (2006). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brigitte Schuster

Brigitte Schuster is a graphic designer, calligrapher and lettering artist who graduated in 2008 from Concordia University in Montreal (only one block away from Luc's house...). She writes about herself: I am an independent Art Director (Graphic Design), Print Artist and Photographer practicing in Montreal, Canada. I am currently teaching typography and photography courses in the Graphic Design department of a college in Montreal. After attending a three-year graphic design program in Munich, Germany, I spent a few years working there both as an employee for print and web agencies, and as a freelancer. In 2005, I completed a Bachelor in Fine Arts, with a specialization in painting from the Italian Academy of Fine Arts of Carrara, Italy. [...] I moved to Canada in 2005 where I continued working in and for the graphic design industry. In 2008 I completed the Graduate Certificate in Digital Technologies in Design Art Practice at Montreal's Concordia University. In my graphic design practice I ideally work in editorial design, also corporate branding, with a focus on typography. Over the last year or two, I developed a great interest in type, which I express in my calligraphy and lettering work and type design research. Graduate of the Masters program in type design at KABK, 2010. Author of Brush calligraphy with a tree branch (2009) and Book Designers from the Netherlands (2014). Her typefaces:

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Bruce Willen

2002 graduate from the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore. Rumored to be working on a typeface called Composite. Author of Lettering&Type: Creating Letters and Designing Typefaces (2009, with Nolen Strals). See also here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Brush Lettering

Brush Lettering is a tutorial book written by Eliza Holliday and Marilyn Reaves. [Google] [More]  ⦿

BuyMyFonts (or: BMF)
[Alessio Leonardi]

Alessio Leonardi (b. Florence, 1965) is an Italian designer and type designer who lives in Berlin since 1990. He worked in Berlin at MetaDesign of Erik Spiekermann and in Frankfurt at xplicit. In 1997, with Priska Wollein, he opened the office Leonardi Wollein Visuelle Konzepte in Berlin. His humor shows through his letters and his many dingbats.

In 2002 he founded Buy My Fonts that produces typefaces for corporate applications and also for standard use.

Speaker at ATypI in Rome in 2002. In 2004 he published his book From the Cow to the Typewriter: the (true) History of Writing. The Alberobanana project tries to suggest an alphabet that could have been. In 2007, he started the pixel font project BMF Elettriche. Available from MyFonts, it includes 648 styles. Speaker at ATypI 2007 in Brighton.

Linotype link. Typefaces.de site.

His fonts include

  • F2F Ale Ornaments (1994, +Rotato, +Spirato), Ale Signs, Ale Transport: all done at Linotype.
  • F2F Allineato (1995): grunge, part of the Face2Face project.
  • Alternativo Franklin Gothic
  • Aposto
  • F2F Al Retto (1995): grunge, part of the Face2Face project.
  • BMF Ale Pi Fonts
  • BMF Atypico (1994): organic.
  • FF Baukasten (1995): grungy pixel face.
  • BMF Bolbody, or Bolbodico.
  • Bodetica
  • BMF Brohan Black (2000)
  • BMF Bread Type.
  • BMF Brera.
  • FF Cavolfiore
  • FF Coltello (+Figure)
  • BMF Cratilo Poster (1996, +Signs): angular face.
  • Cool Wool
  • Cotton Club
  • Debaq Face
  • BMF Elleonora Dun Tondo, BMF Elleonora Dun Cane (1994): script faces.
  • Etica Temporale
  • Font Card (2000)
  • FF Forchetta (+figure)
  • BMF Fontcard (2000): Monospaced, modular.
  • FF Graffio (+Visivo) (1995): scratchy graffiti face.
  • Graffiti One, Two, Three and Four (1993): at AA International.
  • Ha Manga Irregular (+Pictures)
  • FF Handwriter (+Symbols)
  • Happy Days
  • BMF However
  • Kaos
  • BMF Imme Gothic (2001): made for the official communication of the wedding of Imme and Alessio.
  • BMF Just Do It Again (1999).
  • FF Letterine (+Archetipetti, +Esagerate, +Teatro): kid font family.
  • BMF Love and Hate Pie (2010)
  • F2F Madame Butterfly (1995)
  • FF Matto, FF Matto Porco, FF Matto Sans, matto Sans Porco: blotchy.
  • Metadoni
  • F2F Metamorfosi (1995): experimental, part of the Face2Face project.
  • FF Mulinex
  • BMF Mekanikamente
  • F2F Mekkaso Tomanik
  • BMF Objects Pi (2010)
  • Omegalo
  • BMF Planets Pi (2010)
  • F2F Poison Flowers (1994).
  • FF Priska Serif (+Little Creatures)
  • F2F Prototipa Multipla
  • F2F Provinciali
  • BMF Quaderno
  • Samuele
  • Schering type family (2000): done for a pharmaceutical company headquartered in Berlin. Includes Sans, Serif, Letter.
  • BMF Serbatoio (1991): Pixel face, originally called This Is Not (My Beautiful Wife). Includes Pieno, Vuoto, Prospettico.
  • F2F Simbolico
  • BMF Sicily (1991): grungy ransom note face.
  • Stone Washed
  • F2F Tagliatelle Sugo
  • Tagliatelle Poster, Tagliatelle Grazie, Tagliatelle Tagliate
  • Tempore
  • BMF Testuale, BMF Testuale Sans, BMF Testuale Cornici (1994): angular family.
  • BMF Zazi.
  • BMF Zodiac Pi (2010)

FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Cade Type Foundry
[Philip Cade]

Cade Type Foundry is the private foundry of Philip Cade. He cut his first (metal) typeface in 1972. Cade published a Specimen book Type Borders Ornaments and Bras Rule in 1976 (Juniper Press, 24 GinnRoad, Winchester, MA).

Typefaces include Jenson Old Style No. 58, Goudy Lanston No. 279, and Caslon Old Style Italic 3371. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Calligraphy and Penmanship in History 42 Books

Alternate URL. Alternate URL. These files haver 42 e-books on penmanship, for a total of 300MB. The list:

  • 1.Ames, Daniel T., 1884, Ames' Guide to Self-Instruction in Practical and Artistic Penmanship
  • 2.Ames, Daniel T., The Daniel T. Ames Notebook, A wonderful collection of penmanship from the early 1860s from one of America's preeminent penmen and teachers
  • 3.Behrensmeyer, H.P, Lessons in Practical Penmanship
  • 4.Barnett, C.A., J.T. Henderson and J.N. Yocom, 1901, Oberlin Business College - Compendium of Penmanship.
  • 5.Bloser, P.Z. (Copies by E.A. Lupfer), 1948, Lessons in Ornamental Penmanship.
  • 6.Canan/Zanerian College, 1921, C.C. Canan Collection of Penmanship - The Canan Book, Copyright by Zaner-Bloser, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved.
  • 7.Champion, Mary L., Champion Method of Practical Business Writing
  • 8.Charles, A.A.S., 1983, Steel Pen Trade 1930-1980 Used with permission. All rights reserved.
  • 9.Clark, Clinton H., The Clinton Clark Scrapbook Part One, Part Two, Part Three.
  • 10.Comer, George and Oliver Linton, 1864, Penmanship Made Easy
  • 11.Courtney, F.B., The Francis B. Courtney Scrapbook, courtesy of Bob Hurford
  • 12.D'Avignon, L'ecriture Americaine, "Writing American" by D'Avignon, circa 1840
  • 13.Dennis, W.E., 1914, Studies in Pen Art
  • 14.Gaskell, G.A., 1883, Gaskell's Compendium of Forms (the section on writing)
  • 15.Huntington, Eleazer, 1821, Art of Penmanship
  • 16.IAMPETH Scrapbooks - A remarkable collection of Golden Age penmanship, PDF Number 1, PDF Number 2.
  • 17.Jenkins, John, 1813, The Art of Writing
  • 18.Jones, C.W., editor, 1914, Lessons in Engraver's Script
  • 19.Jones, C.W., editor, 1914, Ninety-five Lessons in Ornamental Penmanship
  • 20.Kelchner, L.M., 1901, Complete Compendium of Plain Practical Penmanship
  • 21.Knowles and Maxim, publisher, 1881, Real Pen Work - Self Instructor in Penmanship
  • 22.Madarasz, Louis, Lessons in Advanced Engraver's Script, published by C.W. Jones
  • 23.Madarasz/Zanerian College, 1911, The Madarasz Book - The Secret of the Skill of Madarasz, Copyright by Zaner-Bloser, Inc. Used with permission.All rights reserved.
  • 24.McDonald Business Academy, 1894, Penman's Leisure Hour
  • 25.Meyrat, P., circa 1920's, Recueil Methodique de Principes d' Ecriture ("A Methodical Collection of Principles of Writing"
  • 26.Mills, Edward C., 1903, Modern Business Penmanship
  • 27.Noyes, Enoch, 1839, Noyes's Penmanship
  • 28.Palmer, A.N., 1935, The Palmer Method of Business Writing
  • 29.Palmer, A.N., 1919, Palmer's Penmanship Budget
  • 30.Palmer Company, The A.N., Portfolio of Ornate Penmanship
  • 31.Real Pen-Work Publishing, 1867, Bible Pearls of Promise
  • 32.Spencer Authors, 1874, Theory of Spencerian Penmanship
  • 33.Spencer Brothers, 1881, New Standard Practical Penmanship
  • 34.Spencer, Platt Rogers, Sr., 1866, Compendium of Spencerian or Semi-Angular Penmanship
  • 35.Spencerian Authors, 1879, New Spencerian Compendium
  • 36.Stacy, L.E., 1907 (compiled by), The Blue Book
  • 37.Sull, Michael R., 1989, Spencerian Script and Ornamental Penmanship, Volume I, Chapters 1,2 and 8.
  • 38.Sykes, circa 1885, Sykes's Manual of Penmanship
  • 39.Williams, J.D. and S.S. Packard, 1867, Gems of Penmanship
  • 40.Zaner, C.P., 1888, Gems of Flourishing
  • 41.Zaner, C.P., 1920, Lessons in Ornamental Penmanship
  • 42.Zaner, C.P., 1900, The New Zanerian Alphabets
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Campgràfic

Spanish publisher carrying Spanish translations of many popular typography books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Caratteri Nebiolo

John Berry discusses this wonderful Nebiolo specimen book from the 1950s. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cari Buziak
[Aon Celtic Art]

[More]  ⦿

Carl Dair

Renowned Canadian type designer and designer (b. Welland, Ontario, 1912, d. 1968). His typefaces:

  • Raleigh, published by Bitstream (1977), codesigned with Robert Norton, David Anderson, and Adrian Williams.
  • The garalde face Cartier (1967, VGC), designed as a gift to Canada on the occasion of its centennial. Cartier was unfinished when he died. Rod McDonald finished it, to become a working typeface family in 2000.

Author of Design with Type (1952, revised and expanded in 1967). John Berry discusses Dair's seven different kinds of contrast, size, weight, form, structure, texture, color and direction.

FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Carl Faulmann

Viennese author of Das Buch der Schrift enthaltend die Schriftzeichen und Alphabete aller Zeiten und Völker des Erdkreises (1878, Vienna), which has now been reprinted. It contains a goldmine of symbols. Discussion (in Russian). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carl G. Liungman

Swedish author (b. Stockholm, 1938) in 1974 of a book about Western ideograms. Its title was the Swedish equivalent of "Symbols - Western ideograms". This book is an encyclopedia and has for each new edition been revised and substantially enlarged. Its first English language edition was published in 1991 in the US under the title Dictionary of Symbols (ABC-CLIO, 1991, 596 pages). The latest published revised and much enlarged English language edition appeared in 1995 under the new title Thought Signs The semiotics of symbols - Western non-pictorial ideograms. Review. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carl Gustav Naumann

C.G. Naumann is Carl Gustav Naumann, who ran a family printing business in Leipzig. In 1901, he published Schriftproben der Firma C.G. Naumann. Sample pages of that book are shown in the link. Poster by Naumann. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carl Hermann Anklam

Author/editor of Kunstwerke der Schrift Bund für deutsche Sprache und Schrift (Großenkneten 1994). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carl Hrachowina

In the late 19th century, Dr. Carl Hrachowina (1845-1896) taught at the Arts and Crafts School in Vienna. Among his students were Franz von Matsch and Gustav Klimt. He selected and published a series of study aids. Author of Initialen, Alphabete und Randleisten verschiedener Kunstepochen (1897, Carl Graeser, Vienna), and of Vorlagen für das Kunstgewerbe 1. Band. Künstliches Alphabet von J. Th. de Bry (1886, Carl Graeser, Vienna). Example of his lettering. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carol Belanger Grafton

In 1981, Carol Belanger Grafton published Bizarre & Ornamental Alphabets (Dover).

Dick Pape digitized these ornamental caps faces, naming them by page number: BizarreAlphabets-Page108, BizarreAlphabets-Page112, BizarreAlphabets-Page114, BizarreAlphabets-Page116a, BizarreAlphabets-Page116b, BizarreAlphabets-Page117a, BizarreAlphabets-Page117b, BizarreAlphabets-Page121, BizarreAlphabets-Page14, BizarreAlphabets-Page22, BizarreAlphabets-Page24, BizarreAlphabets-Page62, BizarreAlphabets-Page66, BizarreAlphabets-Page74, BizarreAlphabets-Page76, BizarreAlphabets-Page78, BizarreAlphabets-Page92, BizarreAlphabets-Page93Bold, BizarreAlphabets-Page94, BizarreAlphabets-Page95, BizarreAlphabets-Page96-Dusty, BizarreAlphabets-Page98, BizarreAlphabets-Page99.

Download here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Carolina de Bartolo
[Explorations in Typography]

[More]  ⦿

Catherine Dixon

Catherine Dixon is a freelance designer, writer, and Senior Lecturer in Typography at Central Saint Martins College of Art&Design, London. She completed her PhD, A description framework for typeforms: an applied study at Central Saint Martins in 2001. She has worked together with Phil Baines on book designs for Phaidon Press; Laurence King; and for the award-winning Penguin Books Great Ideas series. She is a frequent contributor to Eye. Other writing includes a web site and the book Signs: lettering in the environment (Laurence King 2003). Speaker at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon on the topic of Nicolete Gray's Lisbon (with Phil Baines). At ATypI 2009 in Mexico City, she spoke on Lambe-lambe letters: Grafica Fidalga, São Paulo a project she undertook with Henrique Nardi (Tipocracia). Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin, where she dealt with a lettering project for the Pozza Palace in Dubrovnik, and took people on a lettering walk of Dublin. Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cecil A. Wade

British lettering (b. 1896) artist who wrote Manual of Lettering (1952, Blandford Press, London) and Modern Lettering from A to Z (1932), a book which shows many alphabets. We also find a 1934 edition: Ed. Pitman Isaac & Sons LTD - London.Example. There are several art deco alphabets. Another example (scanned by Sam Judge). His books provided inspiration for several digital typefaces:

  • Nick Curtis: Slapdash Deco NF (2005, based on a showcard alphabet presented by Cecil Wade in his Manual of Lettering), Block Party NF (2008).
  • Jim Parkinson: Wigwag (2003, a display family inspired by Ross George as well as the work of Samuel Welo and Cecil Wade).
  • Richard Dawson: Letraset Comedy (with Dave Farey).
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Cees W. De Jong

Editor of the two-volume book A Visual History of Typefaces and Graphic Styles 1901-1939, and A Visual History of Typefaces and Graphic Styles 1628-1900. Both volumes were published by Taschen. Cees is located in Almere, The Netherlands. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charles Hasler

Author of A Show of Hands (Typographica, 1953, pp. 4-11). The journal Typographica was edited by Herbert Spencer and published sporadically between 1949 and 1967. This article has many images of printer's fists and pointing hands. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charles Nix: Books on typography

Type Directors Club President in 2009, Charles Nix, has compiled a long list of books on typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charles P. Bluemlein

American designer, famous for his scripts, active in the 1940s. Modern revivals of his scripts include

Author of Script and Manuscript Lettering (1947, Higgins Ink Co, Brooklyn). Earlier editions are from 1943 and 1944 and have Bertram Cholet and Dorothy Sara (1943 edition only) as co-authors. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Charles Paxton Zaner

Famous American teacher of penmanship. Author of Lessons in Ornamental Penmanship (1920), Gems of Flourishing (1888), and The New Zanerian Alphabets (1900, Zaner & Bloser, Columbus, OH). This site describes his story: In 1888, Charles Paxton Zaner founded the Zanerian, College of Penmanship, in Columbus, Ohio. The schools curriculum included courses that prepared students for careers as penmen who, at that time, wrote by hand most of the documents used by business and industry. The school also trained students to become teachers of penmanship, illustrators, engravers, and engrossersspecialists in the kind of ornamental writing used for diplomas and certificates. In 1891, Zaner sold a share of the Zanerian to Elmer Ward Bloser, whom he met in 1883 while the two men were students at Michaels Pen Art Hall. Bloser, who had been working as an instructor at the Spencerian Business College in Cleveland, was a superb penman, and he had accumulated the capital necessary to sustain the college in its early days (when its three instructors had only three pupils). By 1895, the Zanerian College of Penmanship had become the Zaner-Bloser Company, an institution that offered courses in penmanship, published professional materials about handwriting and illustration, and sold handwriting supplies. In 1904, Zaner-Bloser published The Zaner Method of Arm Movement, a landmark text that taught the simplified style of writing learned by students at the Zanerian to children in elementary schools all over the United States. This book also applied the findings of psychologists who had discovered that young children completed manual tasks more easily if allowed to use the large arm movements that were natural to them at their early stage of motor skills development.

In 2006, Paul Hunt designed a set of connected calligraphic scripts, called P22 Zaner.

Link to some of his books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Charles Pearce

Calligrapher and painter, b. 1943, Birmingham, UK. He made several calligraphic fonts: Cantabria (first developed at Camberwell School of Art and loosely based on the work of poet and artist, David Jones), Daniel, Fiorentina, Helena, Penkridge, Ullswater (brush script), Umbria (classic calligraphy). Corporate/custom typefaces: RKO Century Warner, Guinness (Cranks Health Foods font redesign). Author of these books:

  • Calligraphy, The Art Of Fine Writing (1975). Published by Cumberland Graphics division of British Pens as part of the Penstyle Calligraphy Set.
  • Lettering, The Art Of Calligraphy (1978). Published by Platignum as part of their Lettering Set.
  • Italic Writing (1979). Published by Platignum as part of their Italic Handwriting Set.
  • A Young Person's Guide to Calligraphy (1980). Published by Pentalic as part of A Young Person's Calligraphy Starter Set.
  • A Little Manual of Calligraphy (1981). Published by Wm. Collins (worldwide) and Taplinger (USA).
  • A Calligraphy Manual for the Beginner (1981). Published by Pentalic as part of the Pentalic Introductory Calligraphy Course.
  • The Calligraphy Sampler (1985). Published by Wm. Collins.
  • The Anatomy of Letters (1987). Published by Taplinger.
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Charlotte Rivers

Author of Type Specific: Designing Custom Fonts for Function and Identity (2005, RotoVision). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christer Hellmark

Swedish author (b. 1946) of Typografisk håndbok (1998, Ordfront & Ytterlids; see also Ordfront/Ordfront Galago, Sweden, 2004), and of Bokstaven, ordet, texten, andra utgåvan, första tryckningen (Ordfront förlag, 1998). Old URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christian Axel-Nilsson

Author of Type Studies The Norstedt Collection of Matrices in the Typefoundry of the Royal Printing Office (Norstedt Tryckeri, Stockholm, 1983), in which we find reproductions of all metal typefaces in the collection of the Norstedt foundry. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christian Laucou-Soulignac

Or just Christian Laucou, b. 1951, ex-graduate of and professor at Ecole Estienne in Paris. Typographer who worked with lead. He strated Les Editions du Fourneau, later renamed Fornax. In 2000, he founded l'Ouvroir de typographie potentielle.

Designer of Zarbres (2004), a typeface used in the book Nouvelles des arbres, by Gérard Bialestowski. This is a private face, as he explained to Jef Tombeur: Quelques mots sur le Zarbres. Je ne trouvais pas ce qui me plaisait ni en plomb, ni en fonte informatique. Alors je l'ai créé, mais avec un cahier des charges bien précis. Il devait s'approcher du résultat qu'on obtient en gravant dans du bois ou du lino pour s'harmoniser avec les illustrations. Pour cela, il devait être gras, d'un dessin un peu maladroit (taillé à la serpe), quelques lettres hors norme (avec une e bdc à la barre trop oblique, la u bdc un peu onciale, etc.), comme dessiné par un amateur qui ne connaît pas la typo et qui cherche à imiter, à obtenir une hauteur d' assez importante pour réaliser, sans interlignage, des compositions d'un gris très foncé. J'ai fait ainsi un romain, un italique et les deux polices expertes correspondantes (petites capitales et ligatures). Pour l'instant le Zarbres est reste une police exclusive qui ne sort pas de mon ordinateur.

Author of Histoire de l'écriture typographique: Le XIXe siècle français (2013, with Jacques André). From the blurb: Pour montrer toute la richesse de cette période, les auteurs ont choisi d'en raconter les aventures successives: les Anglais avec l'invention des caractères gras, des égyptiennes et des sans-sérifs; la fonderie Gill?é qui devient celle de Balzac puis de De Berny et qui rejoindra, à l'aube du XXe siècle, celle des Peignot; la saga des Didot, de la rigueur de Firmin à l'extravagance de Jules; l'Imprimerie royale, puis impériale ou nationale, ses caractères orientaux et ceux de labeur, qui perdureront tant qu'il y aura du plomb; Louis Perrin, qui réinvente les elzévirs; les grandes fonderies françaises, qui rivalisent d'invention et de copies, et, enfin, les évolutions techniques de tout le siècle. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christian Paput

From MyFonts: Punchcutter for the Imprimerie Nationale, Paris, where he works with Nelly Gable. Author of La Lettre - La Gravure du Poinçon typographique / The Punchcutting (Wissous, 1998). He works at the Cabinet des poinçons. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Christine Hartmann

Author (b. 1938) of Kalligraphie. Die Kunst des schönen Schreibens (1986-1989, with Christian Scheffler). In that book, she drew several alphabets, including an Antiqua Versalien, a Fraktur, a Humanistische Kursiv, a Schwabacher, and a Schwung Kursiv. She studied with Karlgeorg Hoefer at the Offenbacher Kunsthochschule. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christine Thompson

Coauthor with Steven Heller in 2000 of "Letterforms: Bawdy, Bad and Beautiful: The Evolution of Hand-Drawn, Humorous, Vernacular, and Experimental Type", Watson-Guptill, New York. Christine Thompson, designer at the New York Times on the Web since the site's inception in 1995, has won multiple awards for her work in interactive media. She lives in New York. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Christoph Schwedhelm

Author of Rekonstruiert (2013, Dortmund, Germany), which served as a Diploma Arbeit at the Fachhochschule Dortmund. This book has contributions by Friedrich Forssmann, Albert Rahmer and Bernhard Schnelle. It describes the process of reconstruction of some blackletter fonts, and discussions blackletter typography in general. The four revived blackletter typefaces showcased in the book are

[Google] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Burke
[Hibernia Type]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Christopher Dean

Graduate of the Master of Design program (MDes) at NSCAD University, 2010, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he was born and still lives. Typographer and enthusiastic supporter of open source projects. He says: I conduct experimental research designed to support or refute typographic conventions in accordance with objective measures of human performance and empirical data. Useful subpage on type literature. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Círculo de Tipógrafos

A select dynamic group of type design specialists in Mexico, est. 2007. Their goals are to educate, research and publish. For example, in 2009, they published Jan van Krimpen Modernidad y Tradición, with text provided by Jan Middendorp. Their grandest project to date is the research on book cover designer Boudewijn Ietswaart, which led them to develop the Balduino type family, which was unveiled at ATypI 2009 in Mexico City. The group consists of Rebeca Durán, Raul García Plancarte, Cristóbal Henestrosa, Noemí Hernández, Feike de Jong, David Kimura, Alejandro Lo Celso, Isaías Loaiza, Nadia Méndez, David Ortíz, Mauricio Rivera, and Óscar Yáñez. Logo. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cláudio Rocha
[NOW Type]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Clarence Pearson Hornung
[Dick Pape]

Prolific author, b. 1899. His books include the typographically magnificent Handbook of Early Advertising Art, Mainly from American Sources (Dover, 2 volumes). The typeface Lexington is attributed to him, as Mac McGraw writes: Lexington is a font of shaded and decorated letters and figures, drawn for ATF by Wadsworth A. Parker in 1926, from a design by Clarence P. Hornung. It is an ornamental form of roman letter, with curly serifs, and tendrils at the ends of light strokes. It was recast in 1954, and copied in one size by Los Angeles Type.

The book Early Advertising Alphabets, Initials and Typographic Ornaments (1956), edited by Clarence P. Hornung, led Dick Pape to creates these digital fonts in 2008: AltDeutsch, Amorette1889, ArabesqueDesign, BreiteEgyptienne (2008), BreiteverzierteClarendon, ChiswickPressGothicInitials, EarlyScrollAlphabet, EarlySignboards, EnglandInitials1880, ErhardDatdolt, FlorentineInitials, FlorentineInitialsReverse (2008), GothicChancery1880s, GothicClosedLetter (2009-2010, Lombardic), Hollandisch-Gothic (2010), JudendstilAlphabet (2009), LilyoftheValley, Papillon 1760 [First shown in Paris in 1760, and reprinted by Clarence P Hornung in Dover Pictorial Archive Series: Early Advertising Alphabets, Initials a nd Typographic Ornaments (1956, Dover Publications). Hornung's images inspired Pape's typeface], Phantasie (2009-2010), RomaineMidolline (2010), RomanPrintShaded (2010, ornamental roman caps), RusticAlphabet, SilhouetteInitials1880, TheTerrorsofNightLife, VerzierteAltGothic, VerzierteGothic, VictoriaGingerbread1890 (2007).

Klingspor link.

Download here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Claude Lamesle

Parisian printer, whose 1742 book Épreuves générales des caractères qui se trouvent chez Lamesle is at the Rochester Institute of Technology. A facsimile was published by A.F. Johnston in 1965 at Menno Hertzberger&Co, Holland: The Type specimens of Claude Lamesle, a facsimile of the 1st edition printed at Paris in 1742. Among many other types, this book has a Civilité. The Capsa family (2008, Dino dos Santos) was inspired by, but is not a revival of the Claude Lamesle types Gros Romain Ordinaire and Saint Augustin Gros Oeil. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Claude Médiavilla

French type designer (b. 1948) who was born in the South of France. He studied typography, calligraphy and painting at the School of Fine Arts in Toulouse. He received the Prix Charles Peignot in 1982. In 1992, the President of France invited him to design the inscriptions for the royal tombs in the Basilique Saint Denis in Paris. He published Calligraphie (Imprimerie Nationale, 1993). Author of Calligraphy (Wommelgem, Belgium, 1996) and Histoire de la calligraphie française (Albin Michel, 2006; examples here). In 2009, with the help of Atelier des Signes, he created a typeface for the signage at Chateau de Fontainebleau. Additional URL. In 2010, Mediavilla cofounded Media type Foundry with Sonia Da Rocha and Joel Vilas Boas in Paris.

His typefaces:

  • Galba: an elegant roman face, done at Mecanorma in 1987.
  • Media Script (Mecanorma, 1985).
  • Mediavilla (CCT, 1976).
  • Mediavilla Script (Graphitel, 1986).
  • Palazzo (Mecanorma, 1984).
  • Tory (1991).

Examples of calligraphic alphabets drawn by him and shown in his Histoire de la calligraphie française (2006): Bastarda, Cancellaresca, Carolingian, Cursive gothic 1410, Luxeuil, Roman Capitals, Roman cursive 1st century, Roman cursive 4th century, Rustica 1st century, Textura 14th century, Textura 15th century, , Tourneure 15th century, Uncial 4th century.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Claudia Walde

Author of Street Fonts: Graffiti Alphabet From Around The World (Thomas & Hudson). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Claudia Walde

In 2012, Claudia Walde (Germany) published Street Fonts. Graffiti fonts from around the world. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Clemens De Wolf

Coauthor with John Lane in 1993 of " Proef van Letteren, welke gegooten worden in de Nieuwe Haerlemsche Lettergietery van J.Enschedé 1768". An Enschedé specimen book with a companion volume with notes by John Lane. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Colgate Collection

The Colgate Collection at McGill University is Canada's finest type book and specimen collection. It probably rivals any collection in North America as well. The link leads you to just the first half of the type specimen collection (Text format for most of that list). Part of the collection on typography. Part of the collection on typefounding and type-cutting. I know that there are fine books at Harvard and other Ivy League libraries, but none (!!!) allows the use of scanners or digital cameras in the rare books divisions. Duplication is possible at a cost well above the purchase price of the (rare) book if you need a reasonable number of copies. But McGill is open for business. Free, democratic, accessible to "the people", even the poor, the way it should be. Cameras and scanners are allowed. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Colin Banks

Born in Ruislip, Middlesex, in 1932, Colin Banks has been involved in graphic design, corporate identity and typography since 1958 through the London-based partnership Banks&Miles (1958-1998), with John Miles.

Author of London's handwriting (London Transport Museum, 1994) about the development of Edward Johnston's Underground Railway Block-Letter. CV. He died in March 2002 in Blackheath. Obituary by James Alexander.

Banks&Miles had offices in London, Amsterdam, Hamburg and Bruxelles. Their clients included the British Council (it is unclear if he helped design British Council Sans at Agfa Monotype in 2002: a major controversy erupted in the UK when it was learned that the British Council had paid 50k pounds for British Council Sans), English National Opera, the European Parliament Election campaigns, producing corporate identities for the Post Office, Royal Mail, British Telecom, the Institute of Mechanical Engineers, Fondation Roi Baudouin, City and Guilds, Commission for Racial Equality, United Nations University, and major publications etc for UNHCR Geneva. He was consultant to London Transport for over thirty years, then Mott Macdonald engineers and Oxford University Press.

The Royal Mail font is called Post Office Double Line, and was designed by Colin Banks in the 1970s.

The British Council Sans family (2002, Agfa Monotype) is now available for free download here. Included is support for Arabic (Boutros British Council Arabic), Khazak, Greek, Cyrillic, and Azerbaijani.

Other typefaces with Colin Banks's name on it include New Johnston (1979, after Edward Johnston's typeface for the London subway) and the sharp-serifed Gill Facia (Monotype: based on letters drawn by Eric Gill in 1906 for use by the stationers, W. H. Smith) [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Colin Clair

Author of Christopher Plantin (1960, Cassell and Co, London). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Convention typographique

Jef Tombeur's site on orthotypography (in French). One can buy at this site the comprehensive book by Jean Meron entitled Orthotypographie : recherches bibliographiques (2002), which has a preface by Fernand Baudin. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cornelis Dirckszoon Boissens

Dutch letterer and calligrapher, 1568-1634 (or 1635). He published the calligraphic masterpiece Gramato graphices in Amsterdam in 1605. This book has several blackletter and chancery alphabets proposed by Boissens. Teaser web site by yours truly. [Google] [More]  ⦿

CRA list of books

List of books compiled by Jay Vegso at the Computing Research Association regarding the advantages and disadvantages of copyright. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cristóbal Henestrosa
[Estudio CH]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Curwen Press

The Curwen Press founded in 1863 by the Reverend John Curwen concentrated on printing music for the tonic sol-fa method, but when his grandson Harold (d. 1955) joined in 1908, he broadened their output to include limited edition books of high quality. It published a nice specimen book: A Specimen Book of Types & Ornaments in Use at the Curwen Press, Plaistow, London (1928). In the 1980s, it went under. Colin Kahn designed P22 Curwen in 2005 and says: P22 Curwen Poster is a digitized version of a rare wood type used by the Curwen Press in England in the early 20th Century for poster work. P22 Curwen Maxima is a new hyper-stylized re-interpretation of Curwen Poster.

Ari Rafaeli designed the delicate caps face Curwen Initials based on drawing by Jan van Krimpen in 1925 for the Curwen Press. [Google] [More]  ⦿

C.W. Jones

Author of Lessons in Engraver's Script (1914) and Ninety-five Lessons in Ornamental Penmanship (1914). Jones lived in Brockton, MA. The former book contains one full formal calligraphic alphabet by Jones himself. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Cyrus Highsmith

Senior designer at Font Bureau since 1997, after graduating that year from the Rhode Island School of Design. Born in Milwaukee, WI, he now is a faculty member at RISD, where he teaches typography in the department of Graphic Design. He regularly offers a summer course on Digital Type Design, Summer Institute of Graphic Design, Rhode Island School of Design. His sketchbooks are now on line.

Author of Inside Paragraphs, written for a foundational typography course. Matthew Carter writes: Cyrus Highsmith takes the lid off a paragraph of type and shows its inner workings. There is nothing you need to understand about using type that's not in this book. Cyrus explains the correct terms for the typographic components of form and space that make a letter, a word, a line, a paragraph, and he does it with clear drawings, simple language, and a legible typeface for the text.

Interview at MyFonts.

Cyrus created wonderful typefaces such as Loupot (1997, with Laurie Rosenwald, based on the lettering on Loupot's St. Raphael poster), Eggwhite (2001, for comics), Relay (2002, a somewhat art deco sans serif family that will be in vogue for years to come!), Benton Sans (1995-2003, with Tobias Frere-Jones, a revival of Benton's 1903 family, News Gothic; see also Benton Sans Wide, 2013), Occupant Gothic (2000, angular), Prensa (2003, a simple 24-style serif family), Prensa Display (2012), Dispatch (1999-2000), Halo (2003), the 12-weight Stainless family (2001), and Daleys Gothic (1998). The Wall Street Journal uses his D4ScotchD4Scotch family (2001). He made a modified Palatino for the newspaper El Mercurio, and designed Zocalo or El Universal for the newspaper El Universal. He won Bukvaraz 2001 awards for Prensa and Relay.

His Amira (Font Bureau) and (Spanish-feeling) Zocalo (Font Bureau) won awards at TDC2 2004.

At ATypI 2004 in Prague, he spoke about the wealth of typefaces. In 2006, Escrow (Font Bureau) was published, an out-of-this-world 44-style subdued Scotch family that is used by The Wall Street Journal. In 2007, still at Font Bureau, he created Antenna, a 56-style sans family, as well as Biscotti, a delicate connected (wedding) script commissioned in 2004 by Gretchen Smelter and Donna Agajanian for Brides magazine.

His calligraphic copperplate script Novia (2007, Font Bureau) was commissioned to grace the pages of Martha Stewart Weddings.

Still in 2007, he won an award for his newspaper type family Quiosco (Font Bureau). Font Bureau writes: With Quiosco, Cyrus Highsmith continues an examination of themes and possibilities which he first explored in Prensa, inspired by the work of W. A. Dwiggins---specifically a dynamic tension between inner and outer contours. However, the crackling, electrical energy of Prensa here gives way to a more fluid, mercurial muscularity in Quiosco.

In 2008, he designed Scout for Geraldine Hessler's redesign of Entertainment Weekly, under the influence of DIN, Venus and Cairoli.

In 2010, at Font Bureau, he published the extensive families Ibis Text and Ibis Display, which he says were influenced by Walbaum (1919) and Melior (1952). The Webtype version IbisRE is poorly kerned / displayed in my browser though. From 2007-2010, he developed Salvo Sans (slabby) and Salvo Serif (Font Bureau), which were originally called Boomer Sans and Serif.

In 2012, he published Serge (an angular script family in three styles: a frisky, acrobatic face that dashes off decorative blurbs, signs, and headlines with a lively, angular zest), Heron Sans and Heron Serif at Font Bureau, which writes: Heron Serif and Sans are born of hard iron and steel, but galvanized with Cyrus Highsmith's warmth and energy.

Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam: Don't design web fonts Its theme is: The successful type series of the future will be the ones that can move between media. He says that new typefaces should be smarter than the devices that use them.

View Cyrus Highsmith's typefaces.

Klingspor link. FontShop link. MyFonts interview. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

D. Duvillé

Author of Art du tracé rationnel de la lettre (1934, Société Française d'Éditions Littéraires et Techniques, Paris). The text shows how to trace letters in different styles. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Dagmar Welle

Author of "Deutsche Schriftgiessereien und die künstlerichen Schriften zwischen 1900 und 1930" (1997, S. Roderer Verlag, Regensburg). Graduate from the University of Leipzig. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Dan X. Solo
[Solotype]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Dan X. Solo
[Dan X. Solo: Art Deco Display Alphabets]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Dan X. Solo
[Dan X. Solo: His books]

[More]  ⦿

Dan X. Solo: Art Deco Display Alphabets
[Dan X. Solo]

Dan Solo wrote Art Deco Display Alphabets (1982, Dover Pictorial Archives). The images of the book were scanned in by Google. View them here [large web page warning]. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Dan X. Solo: His books
[Dan X. Solo]

Dan Solo's books contain a series called "Ready-to-use...". These are not included in the chronological list given here.

[Google] [More]  ⦿

Daniel Berkeley Updike

Born in Providence, 1860, he died in Boston in 1941. Typographer, printer, historian and author, best known for his classic book Printing Types: their History, Forms and Use" (1922, Harvard University Press) which is based on a lecture series he gave at Harvard University from 1910 to 1916. The second edition isd from 1937.

He designed the Montallegro typeface.

Britannica entry. Abebooks link.

Volume 1 and Volume 2 of his book have been scanned in. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Daniel Mellis

Daniel Mellis (Chicago) printed a small book in 2010 based on 19th century ornamented metal typefaces from the collection at Wells College. These include Tinted, Tasso, Banquet, Antique Extra Condensed, Aquatint, Dandy, Modoc, Columbus, Art Gothic, Rubens, Yukon Pointed, Tuscan Stellar, Halftone, Obelisk, Alpine, Gothic Shade, Ruskin, Condensed Roman, Ray Shade, Tuscan Floral, Souvenir and Aurora Uncial (Victor Hammer, ATF---never produced, but rediscovered by Theo Rehak). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Daniel Sauthoff

Author with Gilmar Wendt and Hans Peter Willberg of Schriften erkennen: eine Typologie der Satzschriften für Studenten, Grafiker, Setzer, Kunsterzieher und alle PC-User (1997, Verlag Hermann Schmidt, Mainz). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Daniel T. Ames

American penman. Author of Ames' Guide to Self-Instruction in Practical and Artistic Penmanship (1884). His book contains some explicit alphabets: Roman, Italic Roman, Gothic, German text, Old English, Church Text, Medieval, Egyptian, German Round Hand, Marking and Rustic (elaborate caps). One of the initial caps in that text led Robert Fauver to create the free font Dirty Ames (2006). Handdrawn portrait of Ames found in "Real Pen Work" (1881, knowles and Maxim). [Google] [More]  ⦿

David Bergsland
[Hackberry Font Foundry (Was: NuevoDeco Typography, or: Bergsland Design)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

David Consuegra

Author of American Type Design&Designers (Allworth Communications, Inc., 2004). Google has a free preview of the entire book. [Google] [More]  ⦿

David Covington

Author of Legibility: Techniques of Investigation (1998) and Type on the Screen. [Google] [More]  ⦿

David Earls

Author of "Designing Typefaces" (2002), a book that profiles some current typographers (Jonathan Hoefler, Jonathan Barnbrook, Akira Kobayashi, Zuzana Licko, Jean-François Porchez, Rian Hughes, Carlos Segura, Erik Spiekermann, Jeremy Tankard, Matthew Carter, Erik van Blokland), and has a 12-page type tutorial and a glossary. [Google] [More]  ⦿

David Harris

British lettering artist who designed Chromium One (1983, Letraset: decorative neon-light caps), Becka Script (1985, ITC) and Julia Script (1983, psychedelic). Author of Art of Calligraphy.

FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

David Kindersley

English stonecutter (b. Codicote, 1915; d. Cambridge, 1995). An ex-apprentice of Eric Gill, he set up his own shop in Cambridge in 1939. His carved plaques and inscriptions in stone and slate can be seen on many churches and public buildings in the United Kingdom. He and his third wife Lida Lopes Cardozo, also a stonecutter, designed the main gates of the British Library.

In 1952 Kindersley submitted MoT Serif to the British Ministry of Transport, which required new lettering to use on United Kingdom road signs. The Road Research Laboratory found Kindersley's design more legible than Transport, a design by Jock Kinneir and Margaret Calvert, but nevertheless chose Transport. Many of the street signs in England, especially in Cambridge use Kindersley's fonts.

The book face Octavian was designed by Will Carter and David Kindersley for the Monotype Corporation in 1961. He also created Itek Bookface.

Kindersley was known for his letterspacing system. Author of Optical Letter Spacing for New Printing Systems (Wynkyn de Worde Society/Lund Humphries Publishers Ltd, 1976) and Computer-Aided Letter Design (with Neil E. Wiseman).

The Cardozo Kindersley workshop, which Kindersley founded and was later continued by Cardozo, publishes a number of typefaces based on Kindersley's work. They include Kindersley Street (2005, aka Kindersley Grand Arcade) which is based on Kindersley Mot Serif (1952). It was designed for the Grand Arcade, Cambridge.

London street signs that were designed by David Kindersley served as the basis of a complete lapidary typeface by Boris Kochan and Robert Strauch of Lazydogs Type Foundry, called Streets of London (2013).

Image: Stone cut alphabet from 1979 displayed in the University of Amsterdam' Special collections.

Linotype link. FontShop link. MyFonts link. Wikipedia. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

David Lance Goines

Author of A Constructed Roman Alphabet, a Geometric Analysis of the Greek and Roman Capitals and of the Arabic Numerals (David R. Godine, Boston, 1982). Each character of his roman alphabet is described using compass and ruler in the style of the romain du roi. Wonderful! [Google] [More]  ⦿

David Pankow

Editor of American Proprietary typefaces (New York: American Printing History Association, 1998). This book has contributions by the following people:

  • Susan Otis Thompson: American Arts & Crafts Typefaces
  • Martin Hutner: Type of the Merrymount Press
  • Herbert Johnson: Montaigne and Centaur Types of Bruce Rogers
  • Cathleen Baker: Typefaces of Dard Hunter, Senior & Junior
  • Mark Argetsinger: Frederic Warde, Stanley Morison, and the Arrighi Type
  • Jerry Kelly: Joseph Blumenthal's Spiral/Emerson Type
  • Dwight Anger: Frederic Goudy's Kaatskill Type
  • W. Gay Reading: Victor Hammer's Uncial Types
  • John Kristensen: The Experimental Types of W.A. Dwiggins
  • Paul Hayden Duensing: Contemporary Private Types.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

David Rault

French graphic designer, journalist and photographer. In 2004, he started work in Istanbul for a branding company. Director of the collection Atelier Perrousseaux, and frequent speaker at design and type meetings.

Author of

Creator of a nice poster for a Turkish debate held in November 2011 on the theme of freedom of expression, entitled Ghetto. [Google] [More]  ⦿

David Ryan

Author of Letter Perfect The Art of Modernist Typography 1896-1953 (San Francisco, 2001). [Google] [More]  ⦿

David S. Rose

New York-born founder of the wireless publishing company AirMedia, who designed a character in the September 11 charity font done for FontAid II.

CV at MyFonts. Author of An Annotated Bibliography of Typography, Letterpress Printing & Other Arts of the Book (2003, Five Roses Press, New York), of Overviews of Printing Types, and of Introduction to Letterpress Printing. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

D'Avignon

Author of the penmanship and calligraphic script manual L'Écriture Américaine, published in Paris in the nineteenth century. [Google] [More]  ⦿

De Amsterdamse Krulletter
[Ramiro Espinoza]

In English, Amsterdam's curly letter. While doing a revival / interpretation of this style in his Krul typeface (2012), Ramiro Espinoza tells the story of this style, so I will reproduce excerpts:

Krul is a typographic interpretation of the lettering style created by Dutch letter painter Jan Willem Joseph Visser at the end of the 1940s, which decorated the traditional brown bars of Amsterdam. In the beginning, these letters were strongly associated with the pubs connected to the Amstel brewery, given that Visser was the company's official painter. As the years passed, the style became increasingly popular, and various business owners in Amsterdam and other Dutch and Belgian cities also commissioned its use. In the 1970s and 1980s, Leo Beukeboom, another talented letter painter, continued and expanded this lettering tradition while employed under the Heineken brand. Much of his work can still be found in the Jordaan and De Pijp neighborhoods in Amsterdam.

The Amsterdamse Krulletter, or Amsterdam's curly letter, is strongly inspired by the calligraphic works of the 17th century Dutch writing masters, of which Jan van den Velde was a central figure. However, distinct characteristics of this style, for example, its unusual and beautiful "g" originate from a model that was published by Johannes Heuvelman in 1659, which J. W. J. Visser referenced.

Typographic circles have somehow overlooked the Amsterdamse Krulletter and its heritage. The Dutch calligraphic hands preceded and influenced the formal English penmanship which has inspired numerous typefaces in the Copperplate style. In contrast, the models from van den Velde, Heuvelman, and Jean de la Chambre, among others, are a missing chapter in Dutch typographic history, and had never been turned into typefaces until now.

He continues about his own typeface Krul: Conscious of the cultural and identity issues that arise in reviving a unique style, and concerned about the speed with which the lettering style was disappearing, Ramiro Espinoza focused the project of designing Krul on digitally recreating the calligraphic complexity of these beautiful letters. Created through several years of research, Krul is not a direct digitization of the Amsterdamse Krulletter, but instead, an interpretation that incorporates numerous alternative characters absent in the original model, and improves upon details where necessary, resulting in an optimal performance on the printed page. The typeface is presented in Open Type format, with an abundance of intricate ligatures, fleurons, and swashes, which permit the creation of numerous calligraphic effects. The very high contrast and rhythm of the strokes in this typeface make it especially suited for media applications conveying a sense of elegance and sophistication. Designers of feminine magazines, advertisements, and corporate identities within the fragrance and fashion industries will find in this typeface to be an extremely useful and appropriate resource. The great Amsterdamse Krulletter is finally back, and we are proud to make it available to you. Krul can be purchased at ReType.

At ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam, Ramiro explained his work on the Krulletter. Still in 2013, Rob Becker and Ramiro Espinoza coauthored Amsterdamse Krulletter. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Dean Norman

He is about to publish a book on the letterers at Hallmark. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Deborah Littlejohn

Editor of "Metro Letters," (2003, a 144-page book, University of Minnesota Design Institute), which shows work by Peter Bilak (Peter Bilak, graphic design&typography/Typotheque), Erik van Blokland and Just van Rossum (LettError), Gilles Gavillet and David Rust (Optimo), Sybille Hagmann (Kontour), Conor Mangat (Inflection), and Eric Olson (Process Type Foundry), done in a design competition for the twin cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul, Minnesota, as part of the Twin Cities Design Celebration 2003. The LettError contribution is a type family called Twin. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Delve Fonts (was: Delve Media Arts)
[Delve Withrington]

Delve Withrington (Alameda, CA; b. 1970, Asheville, NC) studied at Savannah College of Art and Design, designed signage, print projects and web pages in addition to designing custom typefaces, worked for Fontshop, and in 2004, joined the type team at Agfa Monotype, which morphed into Monotype Imaging, Redwood City, CA. From Asheville, NC, he moved around and ended up in San Francisco. In 1996, he founded Delve Fonts in Berkeley, CA (in fact, Delve Media Arts, and later renamed Delve Fonts). He has collected a virtually complete list of books on typography. Author index. New books. One of the first places to consult, in my view. New type books. MyFonts link. Designer of these typefaces:

  • Blasphemy Initials: a free (and also commercial...) spooky font.
  • Blot Test (1999): a dingbat font inspired by the work of noted German psychologist Hermann Rorschach [1885-1922].
  • Cody (1999): an informal comic book face.
  • Continuo (1996): an all caps bilined outline face.
  • Cortina (2011). A futuristic family by Joachim Müller-Lancé.
  • Delve Hand (1996-2003).
  • Eucalyptus Regular.
  • Eulipia (1997-2003): organic.
  • Helfa (2011). Delve writes: Readability is baked in with a generous x-height, fine proportions that have a medium height to width ratio, and reasonable contrast in stroke weight variation.
  • Oktal Mono (2012, a rounded octagonal modular typeface by Joachim Müller-Lancé and Erik Adigard of MAD studio in Sausalito).
  • Peso (1999): an octagonal family inspired by a parking sign discovered in Guanajuato, Mexico.
  • Quara (2009): a techno sans.
  • Tilden Sans (2004-2009): low contrast, large x-height.
  • Uppercut Angle (2011). A signage face by Joachim Müller-Lancé. It was originally developed for the Krav Maga training center of San Francisco.
  • Ysobel (2009; winner of an award at TDC2 2010). Delve codesigned the newspaper type family Ysobel (Monotype) with type designers Robin Nicholas, head of type design at Monotype, and Alice Savoie (Frenchtype, Monotype). The sales pitch: According to Nicholas, the idea for the Ysobel faces started when he was asked to create a custom, updated version of the classic Century Schoolbook typeface, which was designed to be an extremely readable typeface - one that made its appearance in school textbooks beginning in the early 1900s. See also Ysobel eText Pro (2013).
His Art work often involves type. Bitstream's Type Odyssey 2 (2002) has Continuo, Blot Test, Peso, Peso Negative. In 2009, Steven Skaggs designed Rieven Uncial and Rieven Italic at Delve Fonts. Pic. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Delve Withrington
[Delve Fonts (was: Delve Media Arts)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Denis Diderot et Jean le Rond d'Alembert

Authors in 1751 of Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers (1751-1772), a wonderful 17-volume encyclopedia (in French), in which one can find lots of historical tidbits about early typography in France. The book is entirely on the web. Cover page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Dermot McGuinne

Researcher at the National Print Museum in Dublin, and one of the world's top experts on Irish type design. Author of Irish Type Design: a history of printing types in the Irish character (Blackrock: Irish Academic Press, 1992). He obtained a doctorate from Trinity College Dublin for work completed on the subject of the Irish Character in Print. He was Art Director of the University of Iowa Press for a number of years before returning to Ireland. He was a lecturer in design at the Dublin Institute of Technology, where he held the position of Head of the Departments of Visual Communication and Fine Art. At ATypI in 2003, he spoke about Irish type design: the Canadian connection. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. Speaker at ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Designing with Type
[James Craig]

Designing with Type is a growing resource for typography students and educators maintained by James Craig, author of Designing with Type (1999). Links to commercial foundries. Also check the student design subpage. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Designlinks.de

Recent type books in German. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Design:Technology:Society

The UIUC School of Art's annotated graphic design bibliography. Dead link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Detroit Type Foundry

Extinct type foundry, which published a Specimen Book in 1951. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Devanagari Linotype

Devanagari Linotype (1933, Mergenthaler Linotype Company, Brooklyn, NY) explains keyboard operations for composing Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati and other Indic scripts on the Devanagari Linotype machine. The PDF of this book was posted by John Hudson in 2013. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Dick Pape
[Clarence Pearson Hornung]

[More]  ⦿

Didot

Bios of the main members of the Didot family: François Didot (1689-1757), François-Ambroise Didot (1730-1804), his son, Pierre-François Didot (1731-1795), the second son, Pierre Didot (1761-1853), the oldest son of François-Ambroise, and Firmin Didot (1764-1836), the second oldest son of François-Ambroise. Belgians may be interested in Pierre, who used the fonts of his brother Firmin and had them improved by Vibert. Pierre Didot published Specimen des caractères and Specimen des nouveaux caractères in 1819. His son Jules (1794-1871), who succeeded him in 1822 in the Didot foundry, moves the foundry to Brussels in 1830 and sells it to the Belgian government to start its "imprimerie nationale". Jules returns to Paris, sets up a new printing shop, loses his mind in 1838, and sells all his material. The Didot family: extracted from the forthcoming "Bibliography of printing" (Bigmore, E. C. (Edward Clements), 1838?-1899; Wyman, C. W. H. (Charles William Henry), 1832-1909; book published by Wyman&Sons in 1878). Scan of the original Didot typeface. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Die Hochdeutschen Schriften aus dem 15ten bis zum 19ten Jahrhundert der Schriftgiesserei und Druckerei

Book in German published by enschedé en zonen in Haarlem in 1919. Now available on the web, it deals with blackletter type. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Digital Scriptorium

Housed at Columbia University, The Digital Scriptorium is a growing image database of medieval and renaissance manuscripts that unites scattered resources from many institutions into an international tool for teaching and scholarly research. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Digital Type Design Guide
[Sean Cavanaugh]

Book by Sean Cavanaugh and accompanying 220 font CD with most well-known families (TTF and T1). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Digital Typography (Don Knuth)

Don Knuth's 700-page book (1999) on typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

DigitalThread Fonthaus

Font links and discussions. Book discussions. [Google] [More]  ⦿

DIN specifications

DIN is a set of typeface norms set by the Deutsches Institut für Normung (The German Institute for Industrial Standards). In 1919, Germany had its first (Grotesk) typeface for technical drawings that followed strict norms, the DIN 16. This was followed in 1927 by DIN 1451. The latter set of raster-based specifications was developed under the guidance of Siemens engineer Ludwig Goller in 1926-1927. The DIN 1451 would be further developed and broadened over the years, leading to DIN Engschrift and DIN Mittelschrift. Various modifications led to DIN 1451 (1936), DIN 17 (1938) and the "new" DIN 16 (1934). The DIN was heavily used until the 1980s in stencils, sold by companies such as Faber-Castell, Rotring, Staedtler, and Standardgraph. Articles on DIN:

Poster by Federico Arguissein (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ditta Nebiolo&Comp.

This company published an unbelievable 900-page catalog in 1920 entitled "Campionario Caratteri e Fregi Tipografici". Gerald Lange on Typo-L wrote this: "Makes you weep. The decorative devices and ornamental initials are unbelievable, many of which I have never seen anywhere before. Almost 900 pages worth of salivating." [Google] [More]  ⦿

Dolphus Mieg (or Dollfus Mieg)

The Dollfus Mieg Company was founded in 1800 by Daniel Dollfus (1769-1818) and Anne-Marie Mieg (1770-1852). In the 1890s and again in 1901 it published Monograms and Alphabets for Combination, a book with alphabets and monograms for cross-stitching. This book served as example for several digital fonts. Paulo W (Intellecta Design) made Dolphus Mieg Monograms (2011) and Dolphus Mieg Alphabet (2011). There is also the interesting Victorian outline family Sappho Monogram (2010) by Brian J. Bonislawsky. MFC Baelon Monogram (2013, Brian J. Bonislawsky and Jim Lyles) is an 800-character monster font with outlined spurred letters from Dollfus Mieg's book. MFC also published MFC Capulet Monogram (2014) based on Dolfus's work. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Don Hosek's Essential Books on Type

[More]  ⦿

Donald E. Knuth

Professor of computer science at Stanford University, who by himself changed the world of mathematical and scientific typesetting when he developed TeX in the 1980s. That system needed fonts, so he developed a program called Metafont that permits a simple software description of a glyph. And with Metafont, and the help of Hermann Zapf, he created the Computer Modern type family. This is a tour de force, because each letter in the 72 original fonts has only one descriptive program that contains several parameters. Different parameter settings yield the typefaces, from italic to roman and bold, from 5pt to 10pt and 17pt optical settings, and from sans to serif and typewriter. Since a few years ago, he is Professor Emeritus of The Art of Computer Programming at Stanford University.

In 1983, Hermann Zapf and Donald Knuth headed a project to develop a font set called Euler. One implementation of that is AMS Euler Text.

Author in 1998 of Digital Typography (CSLI Publications). His METAFONT Book is free.

In 2013, he received the Peter Karow Award in typography. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Doug Clouse

Author of Mackellar, Smiths&Jordan: Typographic Tastemakers of the Late Nineteenth Century (Oak Knoll Press, New Castle, DE, 2008). Description by Oak Knoll Press: This is the first full-length study of the leading American type foundry of the nineteenth century. It is an interesting history of the foundry from both a business and a design point of view. The emphasis is on the design of the hundreds of typefaces that were produced by the foundry, from its inception in the 1860s until its merger with most other American foundries at the end of the century. The author describes (with many detailed photographic illustrations) how changing business conditions and technical improvements in typefounding interacted with changes in public taste to modify, over the decades, the appearance of the typefaces that Americans found in their publications. While this is a study of only one of many American foundries, in many ways MacKellar, Smiths&Jordan can stand as an exemplar of all the rest. It was the descendant of the first successful American type foundry, Binny and Ronaldson, started in Philadelphia in 1796. Extensive business records of the firm exist, as do scores of type specimen books and promotional publications of the foundry. All of these have been used extensively by the author. The scores of typefaces illustrated and described are considered as the ever-changing output of a corporation, with lesser emphasis on the individual creators of each typeface. At the turn of the twentieth century, taste turned away from the florid, ornamented style of the earlier decades. Mr. Clouse has shown in this well-written study that the earlier styles were very successful in their own time and should be judged on that basis. A completely illustrated appendix showing MS&J's patented typefaces is extremely helpful. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Douglas C. McMurtrie
[McMurtrie: A Memorandum on Early Printing on the Island of Malta]

[More]  ⦿

Douglas C. McMurtrie
[McMurtrie: The Didot Family of Typefounders]

[More]  ⦿

Douglas Crawford McMurtrie

Author (1888-1944) of over 400 books on printing and typography. His life story is told by Scott Bruntjen and Melissa L. Young in Douglas C. McMurtrie, bibliographer and historian of printing (Metuchen, N.J. : Scarecrow Press, 1979). A partial list of his books, limited to the history of typography:

His typefaces include McMurtrie Title, Ultra-Modern&Italic (1928, an art deco typeface published at Ludlow), and Vanity Fair Capitals. Jim Spiece's UltraModernClassicSG is based on Ultra-Modern. And so is Steve Jackaman's Ultra Modern RR (Red Rooster).

FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Dover Pictorial archive series

An inexpensive collection of books by Dover Press with mostly copyright-free drawings, bookplates, ornaments and illustrations. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Doyald Young
[Doyald Young: Logotypes and Letterforms]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Doyald Young: Logotypes and Letterforms
[Doyald Young]

Graphic designer, typographer, type designer, author, teacher and lecturer, born in 1926 in Holliday, TX. He died on February 28, 2011 due to complications following a recent heart operation. Picture. He attended Los Angeles City College, Los Angeles Trade Technical Jr. College, and Art Center College of Design where he has taught for 27 years and holds the honorary title Inaugural Master of the School. Doyald drew characters, often of a calligraphic or handlettered nature. He was deeply influenced by his mentor, Hermann Zapf.

Steve Heller writes: When digital programs like Fontographer made it easy for anyone with a computer to create typefaces, many of them purposefully inelegant, he advocated a high level of craftsmanship that he believed had been lost. In so doing, Mr. Young challenged a new generation to reject so-called grunge design in favor of precision. When the American Institute of Graphic Arts awarded Young its 2009 Medal for Lifetime Achievement, Marian Bantjes wrote Taste. Practicality. Formality. Understated prestige. The combination of those qualities forms as perfect a descriptor of Young's work as any you are likely to find, both in the process and the result. Although he is widely known for his elegant curves and scripts, he has never been a showy designer---there is not a trace of ego in his work. The range of letterforms able to flow at any time from his hand is great, and there is no way to particularly define Young's mark unless you have seen the hand-drawn comp. That is where his work is unmistakable: perfect letterforms drawn in pencil at a surprisingly small size without so much as a mark of hesitation or awkwardness. The style varies but the fluidity and perfection do not.

Links and media: Scott Erickson's movie on Doyald Young. FontShop link. Klingspor link. Short obituary and video. Longer video about his life. Steven Heller's obituary in the New York Times. Obituary by Marian Bantjes for AIGA.

He was adored and respected for his craft and gentleness. Portrait. Another portrait (credit: Louise Sandhaus). Author of several influential texts:

His typefaces include the extra bold condensed sports scripts fonts Home Run Sanscript (1999) and Home Run Script (1999, a connected bold retro signage script), Young Gallant (2010, a formal calligraphic script based on the alphabets his teacher, Leach, trained him on), ITC Eclat (1985, 1992, fat script face, which was used for titles by Comedy Central and the Queen Latifah movie Beauty Shop), Young Finesse (2003, an Optima-inspired thin headline face used in his book, Fonts&Logos), Young Finesse Italic (2006), Guts (1976, VGC), and Young Baroque (1984, 1992, Letraset; calligraphic Spencerian copperplate script). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Dr. Maurits Sabbe

Curator of the Plantin-Moretus Museum in the early part of the 20th century, and author of Antwerpsche Druckerye (Brussel, N. V. Standaard-Boekhandel, and Amsterdam, P. N. Van Kampen en Zoon, and Antwerpen, J. E. Buschmann, s. a.), a 153-page book on foundries and printers in Antwerp. Coauthor with Marius Audin of Die Civilité-Schriften des Robert Granjon in Lyon und die flämischen Drucker des 16 / Jahrhunderts (Wien, Bibliotheca Typographica, Herbert Reichner, 1929). That last book is a German version of Les caractères de civilité de Robert Granjon et les imprimeurs flamands (1921). Some of the findings in that beautiful book are reported here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

DRAIM
[Victor Miard]

Author of La Lettre dans le Décor et la Publicié Modernes (1930s). That book shows some unnamed art deco alphabets. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Duncan Glen

Author of Printing Type Designs - A New History from Gutenberg to 2000 (Akros Publications, Fife, Scotland, 2000). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Dunwich Type Founders
[James Walker Puckett]

Dunwich Type Founders (or: DTF) in New York City run by James Walker Puckett (b. 1978, Virginia), who graduated from the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, DC. Blog. Behance link. Fontspring link. Type Library. Typefaces:

  • Armitage (2010). A grotesque sans family.
  • The squarish signpainting family Downturn (2009).
  • He is working on a (nice!) revival of Fry's Baskerville, which is based on a scan of types cut in 1768 by Isaac Moore.
  • Lorimer (2011) is a gothic sans serif that was inspired by 19th century inscriptions in the yard of New York's St. Mark's Church. Some weights are free. In 2011, this was followed by Lorimer No. 2 and Lorimer No. 2 Condensed. In 2012, there was an announcement that Lorimer was no longer being distributed.
  • New Constructivist Beta (2007).
  • Recovery (2008, TypeTrust). The grunge version of Recovery is Black Monday (2009, with Silas Dilworth): it has several glyphs for randomization.
  • The 1829 specimen book of Alonzo W. Kinsley's Franklin Letter Foundry led James Puckett to develop the splendid ornamental didone fat face Sybarite (2011), which comes in many optical weights.
  • The friendly superelliptical black poster face Gigalypse (2012).
  • Becker Gothics (2013). A revival of five typefaces from Ornamental Penmanship (1854, George Becker): Egyptian, Egyptian Rounded, Stencil, Tuscan and Concave. All have Western and wood type influences.
  • Ironstrike and Ironstrike Stencil (2014). Ironstrike pays homage to industrial and constructivist lettering.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

E. Wetzig

Editor of Ausgewählte Druckschriften in Alphabeten, which was published in Leipzig by the Verein Leipziger Buchdruckereibesitzer as an educational aid. The Bund für deutsche Schrift has scanned in a third of the pages and put it on one of their CDs. [Google] [More]  ⦿

E.A. Ducompex

Author of Modèles de Lettres D'Art Nouveau (Imp. Firmin Didot & Cie, Paris). This book of art nouveau alphabets inspired several digital recreations, such as Dick Pape's Lettres Majuscules Fantasie and Lettres Minuscules Fantasie in 2013. Download Pape's fonts here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Eagle Reading Company

Publishers of a paperback of type specimen in 1931 called Specime Book Type Rules and Borders. Pictures here. Images: Cover, fists, typefaces, more typefaces, and more. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ed Cleary

Coauthor with Jürgen Siebert and Erik Spiekermann of The FontBook, published by FontShop International in 1998, with additions and updates in the following years. Robert Stacey situates Cleary in the history of Canadian design [because Cleary lived and died in Toronto], when he talks about the 1980s: Typographic design integrity continues to be defended, meanwhile, against trendiness and clutter by such private-press and fine-printing luminaries as Coach House Printing's Stan Bevington, Hemlock Press's David Clausen, Giampa Textware Corp.'s Gerald Giampa, Imprimerie Dromadaire's Glenn Goluska, Dreadnaught Design's Robert MacDonald, Canadian Art's John Ormsby, Aliquando Press's Will Rueter, and the late Ed Cleary, of the venerable Cooper&Beatty Typographers and the more recent Font Shop. As their work serves to remind us, the "democratization" of type and print through desktop publishing software and hardware, and the attendant access of thousands of typefaces, increases rather than decreases the need for taste, discernment and restraint to be brought to bear on the management of textual and visual materials. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Editions 205
[Quentin Margat]

French foundry, est. 2011 by Damien Gautier and Quentin Margat, and located in Villeurbanne. Their fonts:

There is also a publishing component to Editions 205. Works published by them include Tout le monde connaît Roger Excoffon (2011), which was written by Alan Marshall (director of the Musée de l'imprimerie, Lyon), Tony Simoes Relvas, and Thierry Chancogne. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Editions Alternatives

French publisher which has a nice series of books on writing. These include "Le Verbe géomètre Numérographies et écritures mathématiques" (Valère-Marie Marchand, 2004), "Lettres Latines Rencontre avec des formes remarquables" (Laurent Pflughaupt), "Les alphabets de l'oubli Signes et savoirs perdus" (Valère-Marie Marchand), "Le Bruissement du calame Histoire de l'écriture arabe" (Sophia Tazi-Sadeq), and "Entre Ciel et Terre Sur les traces de l'écriture chinoise" (Shi Bo). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Edmund Fry

British typefounder, d. 1835. Son of Joseph Fry, the founder of the Fry Letter Foundry in Bristol. Quoted from MyFonts: In 1784 he introduced a raised roman letter for the blind, and was awarded a prize by the Edinburgh Society of Arts. Louis Braille's system of lines and dots ultimately proved better. In 1787, he and his brother Henry took over the Fry Letter Foundry from their father. Credited with many great faces, including Fry's Baskerville (1768) and Fry Moxon (or Graisberry), a Gaelic typeface, Fry A Gothic Capitals (ca. 1819), an angular transitional Gaelic face, and Fry B Gaelic Capitals, a transitional Gaelic face (Everson mentions the date 1836, but that would be one year after his death...) and Priory Text.

Mac McGrew writes: Priory Text was the blackletter of the Fry Foundry in England, with some sizes dating back to about 1600, and most sizes shown in 1785. It was revived by Talbot Baines Reed for his History of the Old English Letterfoundries in 1887, and DeVinne used it for his edition of Philobiblon in 1889. The Dickinson foundry, a forerunner of ATF, issued it as Priory Text about that time. It is very similar to Caslon Text (q.v.). BB&S made a near-duplicate type, originally called Reed Text, but later shown as Priory Black Text. Although the latter was shown as late as 1925, these faces had generally been replaced earlier by Cloister Black (q. v.) and other Old English faces with more refined draftsmanship.

About the Gaelic types, Brendan Leen writes: In 1819, Edmund Fry cut a type once again commissioned by the British and Foreign Bible Society. The design of the Fry type signifies a departure from the angular minuscule toward the more rounded form of the half-uncial, a characteristic of Irish typography in the nineteenth century. Sample of Fry Irish type from The Two First Books of the Pentateuch.

Author of Pantographia (1799, Cooper&Wilson, London), a work that shows the scripts of many languages [a careful digitization of some can be found in the font family Pantographia (2010) by Intellecta Design]. The full title is Pantographia; Containing Accurate Copies of All the Known Alphabets in the World; Together with an English Explanation of the Peculiar Force or Power of Each Letter: To Which Are Added, Specimens of All Well-Authenticated Oral Languages; Forming a Comprehensive Digest of Phonology. Examples from that book: Bastard, Bengallee and Berryan, Bulgarian and Bullantic, Chaldean.

FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Edo Smitshuijzen

Author of the rather complete Arabic Font Specimen Book (De Buitenkant, Amsterdam, 2009). In 2013, he published Sculpting Type (Khatt Books), which deals with 3d type design. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Eduardo Herrera

Professor of typography at the Faculdad de Bellas Artes (FBA) of the Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV) in Bilboa. Eduardo Herrera and Leire Fernández (a colleague at FBA UPV) developed a Bastarda based on work of Juan de Yciar. They wrote about it in Recuperación y digitalización de la letra bastarda de Juan de Yciar (GFM Grafema, No. 1, April 2009). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Edward C. Mills

Author of Modern Business Penmanship (1903, American book Company). Image from that book. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Edward Johnston
[Johnston's Underground Type]

[More]  ⦿

Edward Johnston

Born in Uruguay in 1872, he died in the UK in 1944. A medical doctor, he taught all his life at the Central School of Arts and Crafts in London and at the Royal College of Art in London. From 1910-1930, he designed fonts for the Cranach-Presse in Weimar, which was owned by Count Harry Kessler.

In 1916, he makes a typeface for the London Underground (helped by Eric Gill). Johnston's London Transport type is reworked by Colin Banks in his New Johnston (1979). His fonts show a strong influence by Eric Gill: Hamlet-Type (1912-27, designed for a Shakespeare edition, Cranach Press, 1929), Imprint-Antiqua (with Gerard Meynell and J. H. Mason, 1913; +Imprint Shadow; digital forms exist at Monotype [Imprint MT], URW [Imprint URW, preferred over the MT version by some of my correspondents], SoftMaker [I771], and Bitstream [Dutch 766]), Johnston Sans Serif (1916).

A version of the London Underground typeface (1997) was digitized by P22 foundry. In 2007, P22 extended that typeface to a 21-style multilingual collection called P22 Underground Pro. At ITC, Dave Farey and Richard Dawson recreated a Johnston sans serif family with 3 weights, aptly called ITC Johnston. Nick Curtis created Underground NF in 1999. Many other designers aped Johnston's Underground as well. Hamlet, the almost-blackletter script, was revived by Manfred Klein and Petra Heidorn as HamletOrNot. In 2012, Greg Fleming published Railway Sans as a free open source font at OFL. It is based upon Johnston's original drawings and work started by Justin Howes just before his death.

Edward Johnston is a book published by Priscilla Johnston (London, 1959). Author of Writing&illuminating,&lettering (1917, J. Hogg, London; original done in 1906). Writing Illuminating Lettering at Amazon.

Scans of some lettering by him: illuminations (1917), modernized half uncial (1906), Calligraphy by Johnston. Digital fonts based on alphabets from the 1906 book include Edward's Uncial 1904 (2011, David Kettlewell).

Links: Linotype, FontShop, Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Edward Rondthaler

New Yorker, b. Bethlehem, PA, 1905. In 1928, Rondthaler and Harold Horman cofounded Photo-Lettering Inc in New York City---it started for real in 1936. An excellent typographer, he cofounded ITC in 1970 with with Herb Lubalin and Aaron Burns.

Editor/author of Life with Letters--As They Turned Photogenic , and Alphabet thesaurus; a treasury of letter designs (1960, Reinhold, NY). Volume 3 was published in 1971.

In 1975 he was awarded the TDC Medal, the award from the Type Directors Club. In 2007, House Industries made this funny clip. Sadly, Ed died in August 2009. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Edward Rowe Mores

Author of "A dissertation upon typographical founders and foundries" (1778) and "A catalogue and specimen of the typefoundry of John James" (1782). These were published in 1961 at Oxford University Press, edited with an introduction and notes by Harry Carter&Christopher Ricks. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Edward Tufte

Edward Tufte has written seven successful books, including Visual Explanations (1997), Envisioning Information, The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, and Data Analysis for Politics and Policy. He writes, designs, and self-publishes his books on information design. He is Professor Emeritus at Yale University, where he taught courses in statistical evidence, information design, and interface design. His current work includes digital video, sculpture, printmaking, and a new book, Beautiful Evidence.

Designer of ETBembo, about which he writes: ETBembo is a Bembo-like font for the computer designed by Dmitry Krasny, Bonnie Scranton, and myself. It will be used in my next book, Beautiful Evidence. My earlier books on analytical design were set in lead (!) in Monotype Bembo, an excellent book font. When converted to an electronic font, Monotype Bembo became thin and spindly (the computer people ignored "squeeze," the slight spreading of ink when the lead type hits the paper). So we made our own computer version and also made a few design changes (ligatures, several problems with the pi font, some letterforms, creation of a semibold). ETBembo is used in "The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint." It is just our house font and I'm not in the type business so it will not be commercially available. Tufte goes on to say that he thinks that Yale should make Matthew Carter's Yale font available for free to the whole world.

Funny poster by Mark Goetz related to Tufte's stance on the typographic and infographic "qualities" of Powerpoint. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Edward W. Lynam

Author of The Irish character in print, 1571-1923 (with an introduction by Alf MacLochlainn), New York: Barnes&Noble, 1924 (1969). The book was originally written in 1924. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Eldesign

A discussion of Russian typography books. In Russian. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Electronic Publishing

Nelson Beebe's bibliography of articles that appeared EPODD, the Electronic Publishing Journal. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Elisabeth Friedländer

German type designer (b. 1903, Berlin, d. 1984) at the Bauersche Giesserei who made Elisabeth (1934). Sometimes her name is spelled Friedlander, without an umlaut. Pauline Paucker's book, New Borders The Working Life of Elizabeth Friedlander (Incline Press, 11A Printer Street, Oldham OLI IPN England), describes her life, including the story of her flight from Nazi Germany in 1936 (she was Jewish), to Italy. She had studied in Berlin with E.R. Weiss at the Berlin Academy. She joined the German fashion magazine Die Dame. In 1933 George Hartmann asked her to design a typeface for Bauersche Giesserei. She designed Elizabeth in 1934---a Roman and Kursiv and a Bold that was never completed or produced---but she was unable to name the typeface Friedlander, as she had wished, because it was a recognizably Jewish name. She was associated for some time with the Bauer foundry. Her typeface was finally cut in 1939 but she had already left Germany because of the war. She went on to Italy and then later to London where she eventually worked with Jan Tschichold at Penguin Books doing covers for Penguin books, and became a celebrated graphic designer.

Jim Rimmer's RTF Isabelle (roman and italic), made in 2006, is based on two delicate serif faces by Friedlander.

Elisabeth-Antiqua, Elisabeth-Kursiv (and swash letters) and Linotype Friedlaender borders were revived in 2006 by Ari Rafaeli.

In 2005, Andreu Balius was commissioned to digitize the typeface now sold by Neufville Digital: Elizabeth ND (2007, 3 styles). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ellen Lupton

Ellen Lupton is a writer, curator, and graphic designer. She is director of the MFA program in graphic design at Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) in Baltimore. She also is curator of contemporary design at Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York City.

Author of Thinking with Type (Princeton Architectural Press, 2004). Visit also the interesting Thinking with type web page, which features a fun section on "crimes against typography", notes on type classification, a course outline, and tons of other educational material. See also here and here. Ellen Lupton was the keynote speaker at AypI2006 in Lisbon. In that talk, summarized here, Ellen Lupton discusses the benefits of truly free fonts (Perhaps the free font movement will continue to grow slowly, along the lines in which it is already taking shape: in the service of creating typefaces that sustain and encourage both the diversity and connectedness of humankind.) and provides key examples: Gaultney's Gentium, Poll's Linux Libertine, Peterlin's Freefont, Bitstream's Titus Cyberbit, and Jim Lyles' Vera family. She is the editor of D.I.Y.: Design It Yourself (2006).

In 2007, she received the AIGA Gold Medal. Her introduction to the major typefaces. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Elmar Schmitt

Author of Die Drucker der Wagnerschen Buchdruckerei in Ulm 1677-1804 Band II Vignetten Signete Initialen (Universitätsverlag Konstanz, Konstanz, 1984). A typical vignette. Vignette 142. Vignette depicting Silvanus. The Wagnerschen Buchdruckerei issued this Schreibschrift in 1765. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Emil Ruder

Swiss typographer (b. Zürich 1914, d. Basel, 1970), and type guru in the 50s and 60s. Taught at the Basel School of Design (Kunstgewerbeschule), and founded the International Center for the Typographic Arts in New York, 1962.

Author of Typographie: Ein Gestaltungslehrbuch - A Manual of Design - Un Manuel de Creation (Teufen: Niggli, 1967), and Typographie. Ein Gestaltungslehrbuch. Mit über 500 Beispielen (7th edition in 2001, Niggli). The Road to Basel (Helmut Schmid) is an homage to Emil Ruder by Helmut Schmid, one of Ruders students, who headed a group of other ex-students and organized their contributions. The former students who participated are Harry Boller, Roy Cole, Heini Fleischhacker, Fritz Gottschalk, André Gürtler, Hans-Jürg Hunziker, Hans-Rudolf Lutz, Fridolin Müller, Marcel Nebel, Åke Nilsson, Bruno Pfäffli, Will van Sambeek, Helmut Schmid, Peter Teubner, Wolfgang Weingart, and Yves Zimmermann. Karl Gerstner and Kurt Hauert also contributed. Paul Shaw reviews this book and Ruder's contributions.

Quotes from Shaw's piece:

  • It is clear that those lucky enough to study under Ruder found him as exciting and demanding as they had expected. With a few exceptions these former students quickly and permanently fell under the sway of the charismatic and ambitious Ruder.
  • Ruder promised a new functionalism derived from the Bauhaus. His was a new approach to typography that went beyond the technical fundamentals of metal type composition to embrace modern art (especially that of Paul Klee and Piet Mondrian). Ruder focused on the point, the line, the plane, and the way in which typography activated space. His article Die Flache (the plane or the space), following lessons he had learned from The Book of Tea by Kakuzo Okakura and from modern art, stressed the activation and destruction of space as the goal of typography as well as of art and architecture.
  • Ruders typography is defined by asymmetry and an emphasis on counter, shape, and negative space.
  • Harry Boller writes that Ruder and his students were Puritans on a mission, serious, humorless. We had been led to a morality, and strong convictions remain. Banality, lack of imagination, and swiping of ideas were all ridiculed, while sincerity of expression was encouraged. Gottschalk says that Ruder taught courtesy, ethics, and modesty as much as he taught typography.

IDEA Mag's special issue #332 entitled Ruder Typography Ruder Philosophy (2009), with articles by Leon Maillet (Tessin), Armin Hofmann (Lucerne), Karl Gerstner (Basel), Kurt Hauert (Basel), Lenz Klotz (Basel), Wim Crouwel (Amsterdam), Adrian Frutiger (Paris), Hans Rudolf Bosshard (Zurich), Andre Gutler (Basel), Juan Arrausi (Barcelona), Ake Nilsson (Uppsala), Fridolin Muller (Stein am Rhein), Harry Boller (Chicago), Maxim Zhukov (New York), Taro Yamamoto (Tokyo), Fjodor Gejko (Düsseldorf), Helmut Schmid (Osaka), and Susanne Ruder-Schwarz (Basel).

Article on Ruder by Shane Bzdok, 2008. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Emotional Digital

Great typography and design book by Alexander Branczyk, Jutta Nachtwey, Heike Nehl, Sibylle Schlaich, and Jürgen Siebert, Thames&Hudson, 1999. Now also on-line. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Encyclopedia Typographica

Book containing specimen of 6300 commercial digital typefaces, compiled by Paul Morency and josé Perez (2004). It comes with a handy on-line font database. Paul Morency has been in the advertising and printing field for more than 20 years. José Perez is a self-employed pre-press technician, providing services to printers, digital photography, page layout and printing services. Both are based in Montreal. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Enric Jardi

Born in Barcelona in 1964. Graphic design teacher at Elisava in Barcelona since 1988. Director of the Master on Advanced Typography at the Eina school of art and design, in collaboration with the Autonomous University of Barcelona. He also teaches a Master's course on art direction and advertising at Ramon Llull University. Author of Twenty-two tips on typography (that some designers will never reveal) and twenty-two things you should never do with typefaces (that some typographers will never tell you) (Actar).

At type-o-tones in Barcelona, Enric Jardi created Neeskens, Retòrica Buida (1995), Retòrica-Plena (1995), Deseada (1995), Escher, Magothic, Mayayo (great display font!), Peter Sellers (2007), Poca, Radiorama (1995), Verdaguera (1995), Wilma (1995-2007: a chromatic type system), Xiquets Forever (1995, dingbats).

Interview by MyFonts.

Klingspor link. Type-o-tones link. FontShop link. Type-o-tones link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Eric Gill

Eric Gill was born in Brighton, England, 1882-1940. British stone carver, wood engraver, essayist and type designer. Student of Johnston. Influential British type designer who for a while worked for the Golden Cockerell Press in London. Read about Gill at Graphion. Image. Eric Gill (Fiona McCarthy, Faber and Faber Ltd) describes his life. Publishers Weekly writes: An English artist-craftsman in the tradition of William Morris, Eric Gill (1882-1940) exemplifies the search for a lifestyle to heal the split between work and leisure, art and industry. He is remembered today for his fine engravings and stone carvings, his legendary typefaces and book designs for the Golden Cockerel Press. Yet there was another side to the man, downplayed by previous biographers: a fervent convert to Catholicism and leader of three Catholic arts-and-crafts communes, Gill had a hyperactive libido which extended to incest with his sisters and daughters, as well as numerous extramarital affairs, according to British writer MacCarthy. He rationalized his penile acrobatics by inventing a bizarre pseudoreligious theory. In MacCarthy's candid portrait, Gill, who preserved the outward image of a devout father-figure, was neither saint nor humbug, but a highly sexed creative artist trapped by his Victorian concept of masculinity. This charismatic firebrand was a renegade Fabian socialist, a bohemian friend of Augustus John and Bertrand Russell. His adventurous life, as re-created in this beautifully written, absorbing biography, is disturbingly relevant to our time. A follow-up article by McCarthy in The Guardian, 2006. Canicopulus Script (1989, Barry Deck) is a font named to remember one of Eric Gill's favorite extracurricular activities. Quote: There are now about as many different varieties of letters as there are different kinds of fools. FontShop link. Linotype link.

Author of An Essay on Typography (1931, revised in 1936). For a French edition, see Eric Gill Un Essai sur la Typographie (Boris Donné and Patricia Menay, Ypsilon Editeur, 2011).

His typefaces include

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Eric Kindel

Eric Kindel is a designer, writer and Lecturer in the Department of Typography&Graphic Communication at The University of Reading. He lives in London. Eric Kindel's project at Central Saint Martins College of Art&Design (London) includes an on-line survey of typeforms.

At ATypI in Rome in 2002, he spoke about stencil letters ca. 1700. This talk was followed by a talk on the same topic at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon (with Fred Smeijers). His research (jointly with Fred Smeijers, James Mosley and Andrew Gillmore) involves stencil making, ca. 1700 according to an apparatus escribed in a late seventeenth-century text compiled by Gilles Filleau des Billettes for the French Royal Academy of Sciences. He also researches the Parisian stencil maker Gabriel Bery, from whom Benjamin Franklin purchased a large set of letter stencils and decorative borders in 1781. The stencil set survives in the collections of the American Philosophical Society (APS) in Philadelphia, and was first examined in 2001 as part of the project described above. Editor of Typeform dialogues: a comparative survey of typeform history and description, compiled at Central Saint Martins College of Art&Design (Hyphen Press, 2004), which has articles by himself and Catherine Dixon (who writes on type classification). He describes his research on stencil letters at Reading as follows: The period under consideration begins in the sixteenth century and ends in the present day. The intention is to recover, if possible, a relatively continuous history of stencil letters and stencilling (in the Americas and Europe) by drawing together artefacts and practices that are in many cases now largely forgotten. In addition to forming a broad view of how stencil letters have been designed, made and used over the past five centuries, specific practices will also be examined through an on-going series of articles and papers. The first, `Marked by time', was published in issue 40 of Eye magazine: it offered two contrasting instances of stencil letter-making in Germany and the United States in the mid-twentieth century. Another, `Stencil work in America, 1850-1900', was published in Baseline 38 and unearths innovations in the manufacture and use of stencils in America in the second half of the nineteenth century, and the stories of some of their makers. The article also draws on the writings of Mark Twain for whom stencils served as a literary device on several occasions. And a third, longer, article `Recollecting stencil letters' has been published in Typography papers 5. It discusses the many forms stencil letters take, and how their form is influenced by a number of factors. The article is based on the study of period writings and MSS., patent specifications, collected artefacts and other primary documents and materials. See also Patents progress: the Adjustable Stencil (Journal of the Printing Historical Society, no. 9, 2006). In Typography papers 7, he wrote about another stencil method in a paper entitled The Plaque Découpée Universelle: a geometric sanserif in 1870s Paris (2010).

Speaker at ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik on the topic of stencils. Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam: Futura Black, circa 1860. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Eric Olivares

Author of Caligrafia inglesa. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Erich Alb

Born in Zürich, 1945. Trained as compositor (lead) and as Monotype keyboard operator. Studied Typography and Type from 1969-1971 at the Basel Gewerbeschule under Robert Büchler (the director was Emil Ruder) and André Gürtler. Instructor for type apprentices in Basel, and free-lance book designer in Zürich and Cham/Zug since the 80s. Owner and publisher and editor at Syntax Press (which he founded in 1964) and later at Syndor Press Cham/Switzerland from 1996-2002. He sold Syndor Press in 2002 to Niggli Verlag Sulgen. Editor of several books by Adrian Frutiger, Hans Ed. Meier and René Groebli (a photographer). Author of "Adrian Frutiger Formen und Gegenformen/Forms and counterforms" (Cham, 1998), "Adrian Frutiger Lebenszyklus/Life cycle" (Cham, 2000), and An Introduction to the History of Printing Types (London, 1998; the original publication was in 1961). He continues to spend much of his time assisting Frutiger, Andrél Gürtler, H.E. Meier, Alfred Hoffmann and other important figures in Swiss typography who are also his close friends. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Erik Lindegren

Erik Lindegren (Swedish calligrapher and typographer, 1918-1996) ran the Erik Lindegren Grafisk studio in Askim, Sweden, and is the author of "ABC of Lettering and Printing Types". [Google] [More]  ⦿

Erik Spiekermann

German type designer and graphic designer par excellence, born in 1947 in Stadthagen. He set up MetaDesign in Berlin in 1979. In 1988 he set up FontShop, home of the FontFont collection. He holds an honorary professorship at the Academy of Arts in Bremen, is board member of ATypI and the German Design Council, and president of the ISTD (International Society of Typographic Designers). In July 2000, Erik left MetaDesign Berlin. He now lives and works in Berlin, London and San Francisco, designing publications, complex design systems and more typefaces. He collaborated on the publication of the comprehensive FontBook. Author of Stop Stealing Sheep & Find Out How Type Works (2nd Edition) (Adobe Press, Second Edition, 2002, First Edition, 1993). He taught typography at the Art Academy in Bremen, and is guest-lecturer at several schools around the world.

In October 2003, he received the third Gerrit Noordzij Prize, which is given every other year to a designer who has played an important role in the field of type design and typography. It is an initiative of the postgraduate course in Type&Media at the Hague Royal Academy of Art with the Meermanno Museum (The Hague).

His essay on information design.

Biography. Bio at Linotype. Laudatio by John Walters of Eye Magazine. Blog.

Presentation at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon. Presentation at ATypI 2008 in St. Petersburg. Interviewed in 2006 by Rob Forbes. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin.

He made the following typefaces and type families:

  • Lo-Type (1913, Louis Oppenheim) was digitally adapted by Spiekermann for Berthold in 1979-1980. BERTLib sells it as Adlon Serif ST.
  • PT 55 (1986), the precursor of FF Meta.
  • Berthold Block
  • Berliner Grotesk (1979-1980, Berthold): based on an old Berthold AG face from 1923.
  • FF Govan
  • The huge families FF Meta1, FF Meta2, FF Meta3 (2003), FF Meta Condensed (1998) and FFMetaCorrespondence. The FF Meta families (1985) were originally designed for Bundespost, which did not use it--it stayed with Helvetica for a while and now uses Frutiger. Meta comes with CE, Cyrillic, Greek and Turkish sets as well. Weights like Meta Light (Thin, Hairline) Greek are available too. Spiekermann is a bit upset that Linotype's Textra (2002, a face by Jochen Schuss and Jörg Herz) looks like it was cloned off Meta.
  • Meta Serif (2007) by Christian Schwartz, Kris Sowersby and Erik Spiekermann, promised for May 2007. Kris Sowersby will also help, but the 2007 deadline seems to have been optimistic.
  • ITC Officina in versions Sans Book (1989-1990) and Serif Book (1989-1990).
  • Boehringer Sans and Antiqua (1996): custom types.
  • Grid, which appeared in FUSE 3.
  • Codesigner with Ole Schaefer (FontShop, 2000) of FF InfoDisplay and FF InfoText in 1997 and of FF InfoOffice in 2000.
  • NokiaSans and NokiaSerif (2002, company identity family). This was in cooperation with Jelle Bosma. Before Nokia Sans and Serif, Nokia used Rotis. Nokia Sans and Serif were replaced by Nokia Pure (Bruno Maag) in 2011.
  • Glasgow Type (1999), for the city of Glasgow, taking inspiration from the Rennie Macintosh types.
  • Heidelberg Gothic (1999).
  • Symantec Sans and Serif (2003): custom types.
  • FF Unit (2003-2004; see also here), another sans family, which won an award at TDC2 2004. This was followed by FF Unit Rounded. And FF Unit Rounded started according to Erik as Gravis, the largest Apple dealer in Germany. FF Unit Slab (2009) is the product of a cooperation between Kris Sowersby, Christian Schwartz, and Erik Spiekermann.
  • ITC Officina Display (2001).
  • FF Meta Thin Light and Hairline (2003) and FF Meta Headline (2005).
  • Bosch Sans and Bosch Serif (2004).
  • The SeatMeta family (2003) for Seat.
  • DB Type in six styles (Serif, Sans, Head, Condensed, Compressed, News): designed in 2005 in collaboration with Christian Schwartz for the Deutsche Bahn (train system in Germany). Some typohiles say that it reminds them of Bell Gothic and Vesta.
  • A Volkswagen company family based on a correction of Futura.
  • The DWR House Numbers Series (2006): four fonts with numerals for house numbers: Contemporary House Numbers, Tech House Numbers, Classic House Numbers (based on Bodoni), Industrial House Numbers (stencil). DWR stands for Design Within Reach.
  • Tech (2008, FontStruct), a rounded squarish headline face.
  • Axel (2009): developed jointly with Erik van Blokland and Ralph du Carrois, it is a system font with these features:
    • Similar letters and numbers are clearly distinguishable (l, i, I, 1, 7; 0, O; e, c #).
    • Increased contrast between regular and bold.
    • High legibility on the monitor via Clear Type support.
    • Seems to outperform Courier New, Verdana, Lucida Sans, Georgia, Arial and Calibri, according to their tests (although I would rank Calibri at or above Axel for many criteria).
  • In 2012-2013, Ralph du Carrois and Erik Spiekermann co-designed Fira Sans and Fira Mono for Firefox / Mozilla. This typeface will be free for everyone. It is specially designed for small screens, and seems to do a good job at that. I am not a particular fan of a g with an aerodynamic wing and the bipolar l of Fira Mono, though. Mozilla download page.

Picture of Eric Spiekermann shot by Chris Lozos at Typo SF in 2012.

FontShop link.

View Erik Spiekermann's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Essential Books on Type

Don Hosek reviews the major books on typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Estudio CH
[Cristóbal Henestrosa]

Cristóbal Henestrosa (Estudio CH, Tlalpan, Mexico) is the Mexican designer (b. 1979, Mexico City) who co-founded Círculo de Tipógrafos in Mexico. He is professor at four universities in Mexico and an award-winning type designer [read on for details]. Henestrosa has a bachelor's degree in graphic communications from the National School of Plastic Arts (ENAP) of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), where his student project in 2003 was Espinosa, and a Master's degree in typographic design from the Center for Gestalt Studies, Veracruz, August 2009, where his thesis was entitled Fondo. La familia del Fondo de Cultura Económica. He has been a teacher at various institutions, including the UNAM and the National Fine Arts Institute's School of Design. He lives in Heroes de Padierna, Mexico.

Designer of Espinosa, mentioned here.

Author of Espinosa. Rescate de una tipografía novohispana (México, Designio, 2005), a book about Antonio de Espinosa, a 16th century Mexican typographer, who in all likelihood cut the Espinosa type.

The commissioned text family Fondo (2007) won an award in the TDC2 2008 competition and at Tipos Latinos 2008 (for extensive type family).

Creator of the angry hand-printed face Prejidenjia (2008, with Luis Novoa).

Speaker at ATypI 2009 in Mexico City, where he introduced the work of 16th century printer Antonio de Espinosa to the world. Espinosa Nova (2009) won an award at TDC2 2010 and a grand prize at Tipos Latinos 2010.

Guaca Rock (2009) is a stone chisel face based on the logotype of the rock band Botellita de Jerez.

Gandhi (jointly designed with Raul Plancarte) won an award at Tipos Latinos 2012.

Soberana Sans (Raúl Plancarte and Cristóbal Henestrosa), made for the Mexican Government in 2012-2013, won an award at Tipos Latinos 2014.

Fontsy link. Dafont link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Eugen Nerdinger

German type and graphic designer (b. 1910, Augsburg, d. 1991, Augsburg) who created this text family in 1945. Coauthor with Lisa Beck of Schriftschreiben Schriftzeichnen (1977, München) and Kalligraphie (1988, München). Older texts by him include Alphabete (1974, München), Zeichen, Schrift und Ornament (1960, Callwey, München), and Buchstabenbuch (1954, Callwey, München). Nerdinger was active in the German resistance against the Nazis and was arrested in 1942 by the Gestapo and conviced to three and a half years of prison and forced labor. After the war, he worked chiefdly at the Augsburger Kunstschule.

One of his alphabets led to Lola (2013, Laura Meseguer). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Excellence in Lettering&Typography

Lettering book edited by Kevin Horvath&Jerry Lobato (1988). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Explorations in Typography
[Carolina de Bartolo]

Explorations in Typography Mastering the Art of Fine Typesetting is both the title of a 2011 book and the name of a web site by Carolina de Bartolo and Erik Spiekermann. Carolina is located in San Francisco. The site is worth a visit, as users can "set" their own text. Their own blurb: [The book] is a vast collection of beautiful typesetting examples. Page after page, a brief article by Erik Spiekermann has been set in hundreds of different ways in hundreds of different typefaces, creating an extended visual taxonomy of typesetting that allows you to learn by looking. With complete type specifications on every page and examples set in hundreds of faces (many from the FontFont library), the aggregate effect is an ersatz type catalog as well as an extensive resource of typesetting ideas. [Google] [More]  ⦿

F.A. Duprat

French author of Histoire De L'imprimerie Impériale De France, Suivi Des Spécimens Des Types Étrangers et Français De CetÉtablissement (Paris, l'Imprimerie Impériale, 1861).

This 578 page tome is descrbed by Bigmore and Wyman as follows: An account of the different state printers of France from the time of Francis I, who instituted the distinction of Printer to the King. Robert Estienne was one of the first royal printers before he went to Geneva. The history of the printing establishment originally known as L'Imprimerie Royale is then detailed, and an account of its successive directors follows. To this succeeds an elaborate description of the present establishment, its system of business, its productions, machinery, materials etc, even to the associations for charitable or educational purposes which have been formed by the workpeople. In an appendix there is a statement of the French laws relating to printing and statistics as to the position of the art. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fabrizio Serra

Author of Regole editoriali, tipografiche & redazionali (Publishing, Typographical & Editorial Rules) (Istituti Editoriali e Poligrafici Internazionali, Pisa - Roma, 2004), with a Preface by Martino Mardersteig and a Postscript by Alessandro Olschki. Professor at the Istituti Editoriali e Poligrafici Internazionali, Pisa - Roma. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Face Photosetting

Photo era foundry set up in the 1960s by John McConnell and Chris Dubber in London. I could only find Pluto Outline, the art nouveau face Desdemona (a digital version was created in 1992 by David Berlow at Font Bureau and in 1994 by Richard Beatty; Letraset showed Desdemona in its 1981 and 1986 catalogs; the original is from the late 19th century by Karl Brendler&Soehne, Vienna), Stack, and Oxford (a multiline face) on-line. Steve Jackaman worked in the studio in Newman Street and Hanway Place, and recalled El Paso (a Western/Mexican simulation face) when he created El Paso Pro (2011, Red Rooster).

According to Wes Wilson, Face Photosetting led the way by launching a number of Art Nouveau revivals which were taken from Ludwig Petzendorfer's "A Treasury of Authentic Art Nouveau Alphabets". A selection of these, which included Arnold Böcklin, Edel Gotisch and Eckmann Schrift, were made more widely available when Letraset produced them for their dry transfer product. They published a number of books and catalogs, ca. 1976-1977: Face headline catalogue [1981/82] (1977), Specimens of Delittle's wood type, Face book of faces, Type catalogue (1976). Some of the faces were Cyrillicized, such as Bullion Shadow (1970; Cyrillic version by Victor Kharyk, 1978). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fachliteratur

Fraktur.de gives information on books on Fraktur writing. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fernand Baudin

Belgian typographic expert and writer (b. Bachte-Maria-Leerne, 1918, d. Grez-Doiceau, July 16, 2005), and author of "How Typography Works (and why it is important)" (New York: Design Press). This is a translation of La Typographie au Tableau Noir (Retz, Paris, 1984), a book entirely written by hand! Uitgeverij de Buitenkant published "Fernand Baudin, typograaf, typographiste, book designer". Baudin wrote "L'Effet Gutenberg" (1974, Editions du Cercle de la Librairie). He was active in the Rencontres de Lure, the ATypI, and was instrumental in the creation of the curriculum of the Plantin Genootschap in Antwerp. Another reference. Exposition Fernand Baudin from April 14 until May 27, 2000 at the Royal Library of Belgium. In 2004, he received the Laureate Honoris Causa award from the Plantin Society's Institute of Printing and Graphic Arts. CV (doc file in French). CV (txt file in French). Elly Cockx-Indestege et Georges Colin wrote Fernand Baudin ou La typographie au service du lecteur (2000, Bibliothèque royale de Belgique, Brussels). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Fine Art in Print

Books on graphic design and typography. This store is located in New York (159 Prince Street, Soho), and takes electronic orders (free shipping in the USA). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fiona G.E. Ross

Dr Fiona Ross, is a typographic consultant, typeface designer, lecturer and author, specializing in non-Latin scripts. From 1978 to 1989, Fiona Ross worked for the British arm of Linotype, Linotype Limited, where she was responsible for the design of their non-Latin fonts and typesetting schemes, notably those using Arabic and Indic scripts such as Devanagari. Since 1989 she has worked as a consultant, author, lecturer, and type designer. In 2003 Fiona joined the Department of Typography and Graphic Communication at the University of Reading, England as a part-time sessional lecturer on non-Latin type. The Adobe Thai typefaces were commissioned to from Tiro Typeworks and collaboratively designed by Fiona Ross, John Hudson and Tim Holloway in 2004-2005 for use with Adobe Acrobat (production by Tiro Typeworks). Vodafone Hindi (2007, with Tim Holloway and John Hudson) won an award at TDC2 2008. Fiona holds a BA in German; a Postgraduate Diploma in Sanskrit and Pali; and a PhD in Indian Palaeography from SOAS (London University). Bio at ATypI. Her books and/or essays:

  • The printed Bengali character and its evolution (1999, Curzon Press, Richmond, UK), reviewed by John Hudson.
  • Fiona's essay on Non-Latin Type Design at Linotype (2002).
  • Coauthor with Robert Banham of Non-Latin Typefaces at St Bride Library, London and Department of Typography&Graphic Communication, University of Reading (2008, London: St Bride Library).
Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. Typographic picture by TDC.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Flashfonts
[Leslie Cabarga]

Flashfonts is Leslie Cabarga's Los Angeles-based foundry. Leslie Cabarga is a baby boomer from New Jersey and author of The Lettering and Graphic Design of F.G. Cooper, the Illustrator/Fontographer/Fontlab resource book, Logo Font&Lettering Bible (2004), and Learn Fontlab Fast (2004, with Adam Twardoch). He runs Leslie Cabarga Design in Los Angeles. His lettering prowess is apparent in this drive-in sign for "Betty Boop's Drive-In" (which inspired Nick Curtis to make Drive-Thru NF), FontShop link. MyFonts link.

Leslie Cabarga's typefaces:

Abstract Fonts link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Flickriver: Nike's photosets

Scans and photographs of old type specimen books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fonderie Normale
[Jules Didot]

Foundry in Brussels, which published a specimen book entitled Specimen des caractères de la Fonderie Normale à Bruxelles, provenant de la fonderie de Jules Didot et de son père Pierre Didot (1819). Like so many printers in Belgium at the time, its foundry was heavily influenced by Didot.

In 1914, Enschedé republished it with a foreword that tells the story of the Fonderie Normale: i, ii, iii. Some sample pages from that book: Ecriture, Ecriture, Fantaisies, Gothique, Gothique Ornée No. 1489, Grec, Romain, Didot. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Font Book

A fantastic (and huge) book by Erik Spiekermann, J&uul;rgen Siebert&Mai-Linh Thi Truong, showing over 24,000 fonts. A must for every serious font person. Publisher: FontShop International [June 1998] ISBN: 3-930023-02-4. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fontbook
[Samvado Gunnar Kossatz]

Samvado Gunnar Kossatz collects over 2000 font families in a book. [Google] [More]  ⦿

FontBook online

Searching for a designer or a font? Look no further than the FontBook. It has over 25,000 fonts listed. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fontographer: Type by Design

MIS Press book by Stephen Moye: a complete guide on typeface design using Fontographer. ISBN 2-55828-447-8. July 1995. 30USD. Out of press, but since the entire book is on the web, who cares? [Google] [More]  ⦿

FontShop's new font book

Nice specimen book with hundreds of fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

fonts.info
[Ralf Hermann]

Ralf Hermann (Jena, Germany) is the designer of Agendia (2002), a free experimental Antiqua-Schrift (see also here), and Logotypia (2003, a face for logotype applications). Moderator of the typografie.info type forum (in German). Author of Index Schrift (2003). In 2004, he set up fonts.info to sell his fonts. Schriftgestaltung.de is a web site he runs with Georg Seifert. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Fontsite bookstore

Sean Cavanaugh's huge selection of books on fonts and typography, offered in cooperation with Amazon. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Formatting Font Formats

A research article published in 1993 by Luc Devroye at EuroTeX. [Google] [More]  ⦿

François Chastanet

François Chastanet (b. 1975, Bordeaux) is an architect and a graphic designer in Toulouse, France. He specializes in signage systems for transportation networks. Graduate of the École d'Architecture et de Paysage de Bordeaux, he pursued research in 2001 at the Atelier National de Recherche Typographique in Nancy, and completed a DEA in architectural&urban history at the École d'Architecture de Paris-Belleville in 2002. He currently teaches graphic design and typography at the École Supérieure des Beaux-arts de Toulouse. At ATypI 2006 in Lisbon, he spoke on Pixaçao letterforms, the shantytown graffiti letterforms found in the 1990s in Sao Paulo. In 2009, he and Alejandro Lo Celso cooperated with two students, Laure Afchain and Géraud Soulhiol, on an identity type for the city of Toulouse called Garonne. At ATypI 2009 in Mexico City, he and Catherine Dixon spoke on Cholo writing: The term cholo derives from an Aztec word xolotl meaning dog that was later turned on its head and used as a symbol of pride by the Mexican-American community in the context of the ethnic power movements of the 1960s from wich emerged the idea of La Raza or Chicano nationalism. Cholo writing originally constitues the vernacular handstyle created by the Latino gangs in Los Angeles as far back as the 1940s: it is probably the oldest form of the graffiti of names in the 20th century, with its own aesthetic, evident long before the explosion in the early 1970s in New York. Cholo writing can be seen as a cousin of the baroque gothic calligraphies typical of Mexico, as a genuine expression of a border culture between Mexico and the United States. This survey explores the genesis of these specific letterforms that paradoxically gave a visual identity to the LA infinite suburbia. For the first time ever a historical series of photographs from the early 1970s in LA is presented together with a contemporary collection, which gives a unique insight in the history of Cholo writing from an aesthetic point of view. See Placas in Los Angeles, the first suburban blackletters?, Baseline, vol. 55, 2008. In 2003-2004, he created Pontam Black: Pontam Black is a typographic project based on some letterforms observed on sewer plates destined for wordwide sidewalks, from Paris to Los Angeles, produced in Pont-a-Mousson, France. This idea was copied by Jack Usine in 2007 in his Trottoir typeface. Interview by Le Typographe.

Author of Pixaçao: Sãp Paulo Signature (2007, XGPress), and Cholo Writing: Latino Gang Graffiti in Los Angeles (2009, Dokument Press). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Frances Wakeman Books

Vendor of old type books, based in Nottingham, UK. Type specimen books. Books on typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Francis Meynell

British book designer (b. London, 1891, d. Lavenham, Suffolk, 1975). He ran Nonesuch Press (founded in 1923) using Monotype machines. Coauthor with Herbet Simon of Fleuron Anthology (1973, London: Ernest Ben Limited), which contains many of the journal The Fleuron's best articles. [Note: Stanley Morison edited The Fleuron, which appeared as a series in the 1920s.] [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Francisco Pizarro Gálvez

Graphic designer from IPEVE, Universidad Diego Portales, Chile. He teaches typography at Universidad Católica de Chile and Diego Portales University. He was a design consultant for Santiago de Chile public transport's information system (2003-2006) and author of the book Educación tipográfica, una introducción a la tipografía (published in Chile in 2004 and Argentina in 2005). He made his mark in the type design world in 2002 when his lively modern typeface Australis (see also here) won the gold medal at the Morisawa 2002 competition. Speaker at ATypI 2009 in Mexico City. His typefaces:

  • At tipografia.cl in Santiago de Chile: TCL Elemental Serif, TCL Elemental Sans (1997, launched in 2001), TCL Uniprint, TCL Llanquihue (gorgeous), TCL Deluxe.
  • Galvez Sans.
  • Kinetika Grotesk.
  • Metrotipo.
  • Australis (2002) is now available from Latinotype. Australis Pro was published in 2012. Australis Swash (2013) adds a cursive touch to this splendid typeface family.
  • Amster (2008) and Queltehue Regular won awards in the extensive text and text family categories at Tipos Latinos 2008.
  • He made font families for newspapers such as La Discusión (Chillán, 2008), and La Tercera in collaboration with Rodrigo Ramírez (Santiago, 2007-2008).
  • At Latinotype: Elemental Sans Pro (2010). This is a redesign of his earlier typeface by the same name. The letters in the words men and him have been smacked on the right cheek by their partners.
[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Frank Adebiaye
[Velvetyne Type Foundry (or: VTF)]

[More]  ⦿

Frank Chouteau Brown

Author (b. 1876) of Letters&Lettering: A Treatise With 200 Examples (1921, Bates&Guild Co, Boston). This book shows many decorative alphabets. Alternate URL. Yet another URL.

Examples from that book: Alphabet after Serlio, An outline caps face, A Roman caps face. The best page on Chouteau Brown, complete with all images from his 1921 book. Some of Chouteau Brown's own lettering from that 1921 book: Incised English Script, 15th Century English Gothic Blackletter, 16thCentury German Blackletter, Capitals adapted from Renaissance era medals, Classic Roman Capitals, English Gothic Letter 15th Century, English Incised Script from a tombstone in Westminster Abbey, 18th Century French Script Capitals, German Blackletter (from brass), Italian Renaissance Capitals from a Marsuppini tomb, Italian Renaissance Capitals from Santa Croce, Florence, Italian Uncial Gothic Capitals from the 14th century, Modern American Letters, Modern American Letters for rapid use, Modern American Lowercase, Modern German blackletter, Modern German capitals, Spanish Script from the latter part of the 17th century, Spanish Script capitals, early 18th century, Uncial Gothic Capitals 13th century, Uncial Gothic Capitals 14th century, Uncial Gothic Initials 12th century, Venetian Gothic Capitals 15th century.

The Siamese style in Brown's 1912 book inspired Nick Curtis's digital font Owah Tagu Siam (2007). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Frank Denman

Author of The Shaping of our Alphabet (1955, Alfred A. Knopf, New York), a 228-page type history book. His oeuvre. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Frank Heine
[UORG]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Frank J. Romano

Author of Typencyclopedia: A User’s Guide to Better Typography . A type guru, he is Professor emeritus of Rochester Institute of Technology and founder of Electronic Publishing Magazine in 1976. He occasionally writes on early printing technology, such as here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fred Africkian

Aka Fred Afrikyan. Yerevan, Armenia-based architect, letterer and type designer who wrote The Art of Letter-Type by Fred Africkian. 120 Tables of Armenian decorative types (1984). See also here. Taboo (Canada Type) is a Latin typeface inspired by lettering from Africkian's book. Patrick Griffin of Canada Type writes: Virtually unknown in the West, Africkian was one of the most talented eastern block artists. Though mainly a calligrapher working with traditional tools, he embraced geometry on multiple occasions for the sake of drawing simple modern Armenian and Cyrillic alphabets. Though he normally tried to maintain in his work a certain homage to Mesrop Mashtots (5th century Armenian monk who invented the Armenian alphabet), his late 1970s experiments made use of so many modern elements that the results were hailed as "real art mingled with science." Examples of his lettering: A, B, C, D, E, F, G. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fred Smeijers
[OurType]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Frederic Goudy
[Typologia]

[More]  ⦿

Frederic Warde

Born in Wells, Minnesota as Arthur Frederick Ward, 1894, d. New York, 1939. He enlisted in the United States Army in 1915 and attended the Army School of Military Aeronautics at the University of California, Berkeley during 1917-1918. On demobilisation he worked as a book editor for Macmillan&Co before undergoing training on the Monotype machine, after which he worked for the printers Edwin Rudge. He had met Beatrice Becker in 1919 and they married in December 1922. Warde was Printer for Princeton University (1922-1924). The couple moved to England in late 1924 for Warde had been offered work by the typographer Stanley Morison, designing for The Fleuron and the Monotype Recorder. The marriage did not last; they separated in 1926, and quickly divorced, though the break-up was an amicable one. Afterward Warde lived in France and Italy, where he became involved in Giovanni Mardersteig's Officina Bodoni. In 1926 Mardersteig printed The Calligraphic Manual of Ludovico Arrighi - complete Facsimile, with an introduction by Stanley Morison, which Warde issued in Paris while working for the Pleiad Press. He had his name changed several times, first his last name to Warde, and then his first name first to Frederique and then to Frederic. Warde returned to America permanently and he worked again for Edwin Rudge from 1927 to 1932, and also designed for private presses such as Crosby Gaige, the Watch Hill Press, Bowling Green Press, the Limited Editions Club and Heritage Press. Warde worked as production manager for the American office of the Oxford University Press from 1937 until his death in 1939. His typographic work: Based on the fifteenth century letters of Nicolas Jenson, Centaur (originally called Arrighi) was first designed by Bruce Rogers in 1914 for the Metropolitan Museum, and parts of the face (like the italic) were done by Warde in 1925. This was called Arrighi Italic (a smooth version of Blado) but became Centaur Italic (Monotype, 1929). Warde was inspired by the italic forms on the Italica of Ludovico Vicentino, a 16th century typeface. However, his capitals are more freely formed (not vertical, for example). Warde designed a revival of the chancery cursive letter forms of Renaissance calligrapher Ludovico degli Arrighi. This italic, titled Arrighi, was designed as a companion to Bruce Roger's roman typeface Centaur. Author of Monotype Ornaments (1928, Lanston Monotype Corp) [this book is freely available on the web thanks to Jacques André]. Many ornaments in this book have been digitized; see, e.g., Arabesque Ornaments (for the 16th century material) and Rococo Ornaments (for the 18th century ornaments). Warde also published the following privately in 1926 with Stanley Morison: The calligraphic models of Ludovico degli Arrighi, surnamed Vicentino - a complete facsimile and introduction by Ludovico degli Arrighi. Digital fonts based on his work include LTC Metropolitan (Lanston), Centaur (Monotype and Linotype versions) and Arrighi BQ (Berthold). Wiki page. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Frederich Friedl

In 1998, Frederich Friedl, Nicholas Ott and Bernard Stein wrote the voluminous book, Typography: An Encyclopedic Survey of Type Design and Techniques Through History (Black Dog & Leventhal). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Freeman Gage Delamotte

Author, artist, photographer and wood engraver, b. Sandhurst, 1814, d. London, 1862. He published The Book of Ornamental Alphabets, Ancient and Mediaeval (1879, Crosby Lockwood and Co., London), which has plenty of 8th to 11th century alphabets and initials. See also here, here, and here. Another book is Examples of Modern Alphabets, Ornamental and Plain (1864, C. Lockwood and Co, London), which was scanned in and can now be downloaded for free. Further texts: The book of ornamental alphabets, ancient and modern, from the eighth to the nineteenth century, with numerals (1859, E. and F.N. Spon), Medieval alphabets and intials for illuminators (1861, E. and F.N. Spon), and A primer of the art of illumination for the use of beginners (1860, E. and F.N. Spon). Most of his lettering is typical of the Victorian tradition that adds ornament to simple silhouettes. Example: 16th century wood engaving. An Italian alphabet (1864).

Digital typefaces based on his work include Museum Initials (2007, John B. Wundes) and Bad Situation (Intellecta Design, 2007: based on an 1864 design called Example Alphabet). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Friedrich Bauer

German type designer (b. Dorste, 1863, d. Schönberg, 1943). In 1882, he becomes the type director at the foundry of Schelter&Giesecke in Leipzig, until 1890, and again from 1896-1898. From 1898 until 1911, he is the head of printing at Genzsch&Heyse, first in München and then in Hamburg. From 1911-1924, he taught at the Staatlichen Gewerbeschule Hamburg. At Genzsch&Heyse, he designed Albingia (1906), Bürgerschafts Fraktur (1907; Schnelle claims 1913), Genzsch Antiqua (1906), Genzsch Kursiv (1906), Genzsch Antiqua halbfett (1908), Genzsch Kursiv halbfett (1908), Genzsch Antiqua fett (1910), Genzsch Antiqua schmallfett (1910), Genzsch Fraktur (1931), Genzsch Fraktur halbfett (1932), Heyse Antiqua (1921), Heyse Antiqua halbfett (1924), Heyse Kursiv (1921), Senats Fraktur (1907), Senats Fraktur halbfett (1908), Germanische Antiqua (1911), Germanische Antiqua halbfett (1912), Germanische Kursiv (1911), Hamburger Druckschrift (1904; halbfett and fett in 1908).

The first appearance of Nordisk Antiqua (or Genzsch-Antiqua) was in 1906 with a single weight under the name of "Nordisk Antiqua". In 1912 a family of seven weights was announced under the name "Genzsch-Antiqua" honoring the foundry in Hamburg where Bauer had been the manager of composing and printing since 1900. As the foundry Genzsch&Heyse had a lot of customers in Scandinavia, their Nordisk Antiqua became widely spread over the north of Europe. Gerhard Helzel has a digital revival of the Genzsch Antiqua family, in mager, halbfett and kursiv.

All his other faces appeared at J.D. Trennert&Sohn: Fortuna (1930), Friedrich-Bauer-Grotesk (1933), Friedrich-Bauer-Grot. kräftig (1934), Friedrich-Bauer-Grot. halbfett (1934), Friedrich-Bauer-Grotesk fett (1934), F.-Bauer-Grot. schmalhalbfett (1934), Friedrich-Bauer-Grotesk licht (1934), Trennert Antiqua (1926), Trennert Kursiv (1927), Trennert Antiqua halbfett (1927), Trennert Antiqua fett (1929), Trennert Kursiv fett (1930), Trennert Antiqua schmalhalbfett (1929), Trennert Latein (1932).

Author of Chrobik der Schriftgiessereien in Dutschland und den deutschsparchigen Nachbarländen (1928, Offenbach am Main). A PDF file exists that was made and expanded by Hans Reichardt in 2011.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Frits Knuf Antiquarian Books

Dutch/French book seller with hundreds of old type books for sale. Their outlet is at 26, Rue des Béguines, 41100 Vendôme, France. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fritz Funke

Author of Schrift mit Zirkel und Richtscheit (Leipzig, 1955). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fritz Genzmer

Author of Das Buch des Setzers (1948), an overview of the hand composition typefaces available by German type foundries at the end of World War II:

  • From Frankfurt: Bauersche Giesserei, Ludwig&Mayer, D. Stempel.
  • From Berlin: H. Berthold, Norddeutsche Schriftgiesserei.
  • From Hamburg: Genzsch&Heyse.
  • From Offenbach: Gebr. Klingspor.
  • From Leipzig: J.G. Schelter&Giesecke, Ludwig Wagner.
  • From Dresden: Brüder Butter.
  • From Altona: J.D. Trennert und Sohn.
  • From Stuttgart: C.E. Weber.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Fritz Grögel

Fritz Grögel (b. 1974) studied graphic design and typography at the University of Applied Sciences in Potsdam, Germany. In his graduation work French Délice, he explored the history of French letterpainting. After several years of work as a corporate designer, he attended the TypeMedia master course of KABK The Hague where he researched the German letterpainting tradition. Together with Elena Albertoni, he founded the studio LetterinBerlin in 2011. The following year he conducted extensive research at Berlin's Kunstbibliothek on the history of German lettering which is the subject of his talk at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam. That talk is based on the content of the book Karbid From lettering to type design (2013) by Verena Gerlach and Fritz Grögel published by Ypsilon Éditeurs and released on the occasion of the Amsterdam conference. [Google] [More]  ⦿

From Old Books

Great service in which many old books woith alphabets have been fully scanned. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Fundición Tipográfica Bauer (or: Bauertypes)

Distributor in Barcelona of Neufville fonts, est. 1995. The fonts can also be bought at MyFonts. Ownership: the successors of Georg and Carlos Hartmann: Wolfgang and Vivian Hartmann. Digital type production director is Antoni Amate. Bauertypes also has a nice set of books and typoe catalogs for sale. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Gail Anderson

Coauthor with Steve Heller of New Ornamental Type. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gérard Blanchard

Influential French type activist, b. Le Florez, 1927, d. Paris, 1998. Author of Aide au choix de la typo-graphie (Atelier Perousseaux, Reillanne, 1998) and Pour une sémiologie de la typographie (1979). Well-known for leading the Rencontres internationales de Lure for many many years.

In 2014, Sabrina Ekecik developed a typeface, Blanchard, that is based on Blanchard's handwriting. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Geen Bitter
[Thom Janssen]

Geen Bitter (Den Haag, The Netherlands) consists of Thom Janssen, Jorn Henkes and Rogier van der Sluis. All three are graduates of the Graphic Design course at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague, The Netherlands. The work of Geen Bitter has a strong typographical influence and covers designing typefaces, books, websites and identities, all with a typographic approach.

In 2013, they published Gewone letters Gerrit's early models. The blurb: A couple of years back, while cleaning the letterpress workshop at the KABK in The Hague, we had an amazing find. A package that hasn't been opened for some time. We opened it and found eighteen printing plates in mint condition. The printing plates, we soon found out, were made by Gerrit Noordzij and date back to the late 1960s. They contain a brief lesson about writing with the broad nib and, once familiar with this basis, writing and drawing some different techniques. Since it seemed the plates are never published before, we decided to do so and made a book containing prints from the plates. Next to the plates we asked former students if they still had old work and sketches with comments by Gerrit Noordzij. The result is a collection of sketches and material, together with five writings about the plates, Gerrit Noordzij and his contribution to the field of type and typography. The text has contributions by Albert-Jan Pool, Frank E. Blokland, Aad van Dommelen, Huug Schipper, and Petr van Blokland. It was published in 2013 by Uitgeverij De Buitenkant, Amsterdam.

Their commercial typefaces:

  • Bex (2013). This sans typeface family is based on Thom Janssen's graduation project.
  • Cramp (2012). A casual hand-printed typeface by Rogier van der Sluis.
  • Herman (2013, Rogier van der Sluis). An elliptical monospaced signage typeface family with possibilities of layering and shadow effects. It is quite attractive and one of the finest typefaces in its genre.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Gems of Penmanship by Williams&Packard

Penmanship book written in New York in 1867 by D. Williams and S.S. Packard. It has a few blackletter and other alphabets, and many freehand drawings of birds and animals. Selected alphabets: Grand Capitals, Italian Capitals, Ladies Hand, Roman Capitals, Italian, Half Block, Williams Style German Text, Williams and Packard's Steel Pen German Text, Old English, Williams and Packard's Church Text [this inspired C. Lee's Ornate Alphabet], Beveled Alphabet, Ribbon Alphabet, (continued), Soft and Twisted Alphabet, (continued), Rustic Alphabet, (continued). Selected drawings: a hand, a bird, a deer, a swan. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gene Gable
[The Best Type Book with No Typesetting]

[More]  ⦿

Geoffrey Dowding

Author of An Introduction to the History of Printing Types (London, 1998). The original publication was in 1961.

He also wrote Finer Points in the Spacing & Arrangement of Type (Classic Typography Series) (Hartley & Marks; Revised edition, 1998). [Google] [More]  ⦿

George Bickham

UK engraver and penman, 1684-1769, who wrote the manual The Universal Penman (published in parts from 1733 to 1741, reprinted complete in 1743). The full title is The Universal Penman Or the Art of Writing Made Useful To the Gentleman and Scholar, as well As the Man of Business . . . Written With the friendly Assistance of several of the most EminentMastersAndEngravedbyGeo.Bickham. That book also contains work by Bickham's collaborators, such as Joseph Champion, Wellington Clark, Nathaniel Dove, Gabriel Brooks, and William Leckey. Book cover. A free interpretation of the copperplate script styles of The Universal Penman can be seen in the monumental font Penabico (2010, Intellecta Design). Images: From The Universal Penman, Roundhand Script (ca. 1740), Greek Writing (1743).

Digital typefaces based on Bickham's scripts include 1739 Bickham (2010) and 1741 Bickham (2013) by Klaus-Peter Schäffel, Bickham Script (1997, Richard Lipton), Penabico (Intellecta Design), and interpretations such as Poem Script (Sudtipos). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

George J. Becker

Philadelphia, PA-based author of The American system of penmanship ... In ... ten numbers (1842, Uriah Hunt and Son, Philadelphia), Becker's System of Penmanship, Comprising Manual and Elementary Excercises, Business and Epistolary Writing, and Ornamental Penmanship. In Twelve Numbers. No. 10 (1856, Uriah Hunt and Son, Philadelphia), and Ornamental Penmanship Analytical and Finished Alphabets (1854, Uriah Hunt and Son), a lettering manual.

In 2013, James Puckett (Dunwich Type Founders) revived five typefaces from this manual as digital typefaces in his Becker Gothics collection. They include Egyptian, Egyptian Rounded, Stencil, Tuscan and Concave. All have Western and wood type influences. In 2009, Becker's 1854 book was used by Monogram Fonts Co in the creation of Noir Monogram (2009), which was based on Becker's Pearl type.

Downloads of his 1854 book: University of Michigan scan. For a Facsimile, see Becker's ornamental penmanship. A series of analytical and finished alphabets [FACSIMILE]. Free PDF file of the latter book.

In 1993, Dover reprinted 23 complete alphabets in Ornamental Calligraphy [With 50 Plates] (Dover Books on Lettering, Graphic Arts & Printing). Local download of his 1854 book. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Georgia Mansbridge

Author of Bruce Rogers: American Typographer (New York, The Typophiles, 1997). Afterword by Ronald, Jane, and Bruce Mansbridge. Distributed for the Typophiles by Oak Knoll Press. Oak Knoll writes: Short biography of Bruce Rogers (1870-1957), a reprint of the 1965 Masters Thesis by Mansbridge, who was acquainted with Mr. Rogers during the last decade or so of his life. (Facing the title page is a photo of the author and Mr. Rogers.) There is no discussion of books designed by Mr. Rogers, but a concluding chapter quotes various comments, positive and negative, by others on the work of Rogers. Concludes with notes, primary and secondary bibliographies (not updated since the original publication). Printed at the Stinehour Press. Bruce Rogers' colophon device is gilt-stamped on the front cover. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Georgina Llados

Designer in Barcelona, who published a small booklet enttled Sixties and Type. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gerald Cinamon

ATypI writes: Gerald Cinamon was born in Boston, received his MFA Degree in Design at the School of Art and Architecture, Yale University, and has lived in London since 1961. He freelanced for numerous publishers and eventually became Chief Designer at Penguin Books for almost 20 years. His books regularly were chosen for the Best Books of the Year shows. He has written studies of designers and is now especially interested in lettering and design history.

He wrote Rudolf Koch: Letterer, Type Designer, Teacher (2000, Oak Knoll Press and The British Library) and E.R. Weiss: The Typography of an Artist, Oldham: Incline Press, 201 and E.R. Weiss: The Typography of an Artist, Oldham: Incline Press, 2011. Speaker at ATypI 2003 in Vancouver on Koch's work. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gerrit Noordzij

Gerrit Noordzij (b. 1931, Rotterdam) is a Dutch graphic designer, typeface designer, author, teacher, calligrapher, and design artist who made drawings, wood and copper engravings, and postage stamps. From 1960-1990 he taught writing and type design at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague. One of his many students there was Lucas de Groot. Noordzij has worked as graphic designer for various Dutch publishers. Since 1978 he has been the house designer for the publishing company Van Oorschot. His intellectual influence is matched by his physical heritage, in the form of two talented sons in the field of type design, Christoph and Peter Matthias. The Gerrit Noordzij Prize, a prize given to typographers and type designers for extraordinary contributions to the field, is named after him. He was also the first person to receive this prize in 1996. In 2013, Gerrit Noordzij reveived the TDC Medal at the ATypI in Amsterdam.

The influence he had on Dutch type design is based on a theoretical system he called The stroke of the pen, and his position as the main teacher of type design in the country for three decades. Books on his system include The stroke of the pen: fundamental aspects of western writing (1982), and De Streek: Theorie van het schrift (1985) (translated by Peter Enneson in 2005 at Hyphen Press in London: The Stroke: Theory of Writing). His point in his oeuvre is that letterforms are rooted in handwriting.

Other publications: Letterletter (Vancouver, Hartley&Marks Publishers, 2000), De Staart van de Kat (1988,GHM, Leersum), De Handen van de Zeven Zusters (with Willem Dijkhuis: Van Oorschot, Amsterdam, 2001), Das Kind und die Schrift (Typographische Gesellschaft, München, 1985).

His typefaces:

  • Gerrit designed what some consider the perfect font, Ruit, but it is nowhere to be had.
  • Dutch Roman (1980).
  • Batavian (1980).
  • Remer.
  • Ruse: a huge text family that started out based on Gerrit's own handwriting, published at TEFF, or The Enschedé Font Foundry. He writes: From 000 to 100 the family is divided into 11 variants of increasing contrast. Each variant contains four different kinds of figures (supplied in four font layouts - HgTb, HgTx, LnTb and LnTx) and a special version for ligatures (Lig). HgTb is a version that has old style figures with identical widths, HgTx has old style figures with individual widths, LnTb has lining figures with identical widths and LnTx has lining figures with individual widths. Any typesetting job for figures, whether it be in tables or plain text, can be carried out easily with Ruse. Each variant is available in roman, italic and small capitals. The complete family consists of 154 fonts.
  • The bastarda face Burgundica (1983, TEFF). He writes: The design of Burgundica emerged from analyzing the elongated version of the Burgundian Bastarda appearing firstly in manuscripts from the calligraphic workshop of Jacquemart Pilavaine in Bergen (Hainaut) in 1450. The Burgundian bookproduction of the time owed much of its splendor to this elegant script. In Burgundica I followed the shapes of the Burgundian bastarda rather closely. Of course, there was no use for the shapes of the bastarda in the roman and italic fonts of Tret; instead I adapted the spatial proportions of the calligraphic pattern to the shapes of that typeface. (Note: Tret is to be released by TEFF, currently in production). In the last quarter of the 15th century the first bastarda typefaces were cut in Bruges. Many similar typefaces followed that were founded on the typefaces by such predecessors as Caxton, Mansion and Brito. Contrarily Burgundica has its origin in the script itself.

In 2013, Geen Bitter (Thom Janssen, Jorn Henkes and Rogier van der Sluis) copublished Gewone letters Gerrit's early models at Uitgeverij De Buitenkant, Amsterdam. The text has contributions by Albert-Jan Pool, Frank E. Blokland, Aad van Dommelen, Huug Schipper, and Petr van Blokland. The blurb: A couple of years back, while cleaning the letterpress workshop at the KABK in The Hague, we had an amazing find. A package that hasn't been opened for some time. We opened it and found eighteen printing plates in mint condition. The printing plates, we soon found out, were made by Gerrit Noordzij and date back to the late 1960s. They contain a brief lesson about writing with the broad nib and, once familiar with this basis, writing and drawing some different techniques. Since it seemed the plates are never published before, we decided to do so and made a book containing prints from the plates. Next to the plates we asked former students if they still had old work and sketches with comments by Gerrit Noordzij. The result is a collection of sketches and material, together with five writings about the plates, Gerrit Noordzij and his contribution to the field of type and typography.

Scan of a 1974 postage stamp by Noordzij. Klingspor link. Letterror link. Flickr group with Noordzij photographs. Interview by Robin Kinross, 2001. The Enschedé Font Foundry link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Gerry Leonidas' reading lists

Type reading lists compiled by Gerry Leonidas, who teaches at the University of Reading. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gert Wiescher
[Wiescher Design]

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Giambattista Bodoni
[Manuale Tipografico: 1818 (full)]

[More]  ⦿

Giambattista Bodoni
[Manuale Tipografico: 1818 (partial)]

[More]  ⦿

Gilbert Powderly Farrar
[Intertype]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Giovambattista Palatino
[Libro di M. Giovambattista Palatino cittadino romano]

[More]  ⦿

Giovanbattista Palatino

Or Giovanni Battista Palatino. Giovanbattista Palatino, b. Rossano, Italy, d. ca. 1575, Naples. The calligrapher's calligrapher, was the most prolific designer in the first half of the sixteen century. Palatino designed 29 different scripts, and also designed, not only Latin but, German, Hebrew, Chaldee, Arabic, Greek, Egyptian, Syrian, Indian, Cyrillic and several other alphabets. In 1540 he published a writing instruction and lettering book entitled Libro nuovo d'imparare a scrivere. In 1566, he wrote Compendio dl Gran Volume.

Palatino is also the name of a famous typeface designed in 1948 by Hermann Zapf at Linotype. Akira Kobayashi, the Palatino typeface family was expanded. Linotype released the Palatino Nova in 2005 and Palatino Sans and Palatino Sans Informal in 2006 as a joint effort of Hermann Zapf and Akira Kobayashi. Copies or near-copies of Zapf's paltino include Book Antiqua (by Monotype, distributed by Microsoft---this face did not have Zapf's blessing and may well have led Zapf to resign from ATypI), URW Palladio L (on which Zapf collaborated), TeX Gyre Pagella (free), Zapf Calligraphic 801 (by Bitstream, approved by Zapf), Zapf Renaissance Antiqua (by Scangraphic), Paltus (URW), Palladium (Compougraphic), Palm Strings (Corel), Parlament (Scangraphic), Patina (Alphatype), pal (GoScript), Palladio (by SoftMaker), palazzo (by SoftMaker), and FPL Neu (based on URW Palladio L).

View various digital implementions of Zapf's Palatino. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Glossary of Typesetting Terms

Glossary of Typesetting Terms (1994, University of Chicago Press) was written by Richard Eckersley, Charles M. Ellertson, Richard A.ngstadt and Richard Hendel. Downloads: i, ii, iii. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Google Books

Google's book scanning project. Books available starting in August 2006 include Jan Middendorp's Dutch Type and hundreds of others. The pages come in low quality JPG format, about 90k per page. Furthermore, the right-click download function is disabled. The only way to get an entire book is to click on every page in the browser, and then check the cache on your computer, which should have each page in its JPG format---a painful process that will take a good hacker to automate. Text pages are sometimes in PNG format. Grabbing text for quotations, as one can do in PDF files for example, is impossible. So, in summary, Google Books is useful for advertising purposes, to make one buy the book. It is useless for those wishing to do some serious reading or those interested in the fine details of type specimen or other images. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Graham Moss and Kathy Whalen

Authors of A Collation of Specimens Displaying the Types&Typography of Broadsheets and some other Ephemeral Printing all now hung out to dry (2007, Incline Press, Oldham). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Greg Ruffa

New Jersey-based author of The Art of Wood Type (2008), which is easily the most valuable---and beautiful---text on wood type ever written. Born in Raritan, NJ, in 1925, he served in the US Air Corps in 1943 and strudied at Michigan State College and the Aret Career School (New York City), class of 1949. He settled in Scotch Plains, NJ in 1964 and set up Gergory Ruffa Advertising.

Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gregor Stawinski

Author of Retrofonts (2010, Mark Batty Publ.), a 560-page book that comes with a CD that contains 222 fonts. These are basically old freeware and shareware fonts by Dieter Steffmann, Nick Curtis, and others---all easily found on web archives. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gruso

Gruso Schriftenmappe: Eine Auswahl schöner Gebrauchsschriften für Maler, Graphiker, Schaufensterdekorateure und verwandte Berufe. Heft 3 and Heft 4 (1952) are booklets with tens of alphabets. They were scanned in by Michael Stoll. I cleaned up a subset of the scans, reorganized the set, and commented on them. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gunnlaugur S.E. Briem

Briem is a fantastic Icelandic calligrapher and type designer! Some of his work may be viewed at Adobe, in particular Adobe's multiple master font Briem script. Fonts include BriemGauntlet (1997). He designed BriemTimes in 1990, which was the basis for Times Millenium, used by The Times (read about the controversy at that page). He also made BriemAkademi (1997-2002), BriemGauntlet, BriemMono (2001, typewriter face), BriemOperina and BriemScript.

Home page. Books for sale. Keynote speaker at ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Gunnlaugur S.E. Briem
[The Icelandic Method]

[More]  ⦿

Gustav Mori

Type designer (1872-1950) who reconstructed Gutenberg-Textura (1928, Stempel).

In 1916, he published a book on the Frankfurt-based foundry of Benjamin Krebs, Nachfolger, Die Schriftgiesserei Benjamin Krebs Nachf., Frankfurt a.M. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte des Frankfurter Schriftgiesser-Gewerbes.

Die Hochdeutschen Schriften aus dem 15ten bis zum 19ten Jahrhundert der Schriftgiesserei und Druckerei was published in 1919 at Elsevier. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gustavo Machado
[Type for Change]

[More]  ⦿

Gutenberg Bible

The Gutenberg Bible on-line, free! This is a book with an unreadable layout and annoying typography, an example of what not to do when you set a book. Its only interest is that it was a historical milestone. At the British Library. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Günter Schuler

Günter Schuler is a German author interested in good typography. Among the things he seels are the Cleverprinting DTP-Typomter (a handy sheet for measuring type sizes, both absolute and relative), TypeSelect Schriftenfächer (a wall paint-style foldout with typefaces), and Grundkurs Typografie und Layout (an introductory book on typography). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Guy Oring

Coauthor with Paul Carlyle of Letters and Lettering (1938). This book was a big source of inspiration for Nick Curtis. For example, he created the typeface Shishka Bob NF (2005) based on the experimental calligraphy in that book. TaraBulbous NF (2008) is a fat-lettered font by Nick Curtis, also based on Carlyle-Oring lettering. Guinness Extra Stout NF (1999, Nick Curtis) is also based on a Carlyle-Oring script. Kynges X NF (2004, Nick Curtis) is a blackletter semi-Lombardic face based on other work by Carlyle and Oring. Dathan Boardman made Afternoon Tea (2010) based on an art deco design from the book. Anton Scholtz created the art deco typeface Nocturne in 2012 based on work by Carlyle and Oring. The caps in Astoria Titling (Nick Curtis) are based on a 1938 typeface by Carlyle and Oring. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Gwyn Headley

London-based larger than life Welsh bon vivant, and author of Encyclopaedia of Fonts (December 2005, Cassell Illustrated, London), a book that can be considered as a digital successor of Jaspert, Berry & Johnson. The coverage is up to the present. The fonts are classified in one of about 40 styles, and are shown in chronological order within each style. Gwyn has worked on it for four years. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Gyöngyi Bujdosó

Hungarian professor at the Department of Computer Graphics and Library and Information Science, Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary. She is a frequent speaker on Hungarian typography at EuroTEX and TUG metings. Author of Contemporary Hungarian Types and Designers (TUGboat, vol. 24, 2003, pp. 527-529). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hackberry Font Foundry (Was: NuevoDeco Typography, or: Bergsland Design)
[David Bergsland]

In 2009, Hackberry Font Foundry grew out of NuevoDeco Typography, which in turn was a commercial foundry that formed part of Bergsland Design located in Las Lunas, NM and run by David Bergsland (b. 1944, Buffalo, NY), a 1971 graduate of the University of Minnesota. The newest address is in Mankato, MN. Identifont link. Author of Practical Font Design: 2nd Edition: Rewritten for FontLab 5. Klingspor link. His fonts:

View David Bergsland's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Handwriting Models
[Benedikt Gröndal]

Handwriting Models An Icelandic Manual, 1883, was written by Benedikt Gröndal (1826-1907), an Icelandic poet, painter, draftsman, calligrapher and library historian. After a master's degree in Scandinavian Studies from the University of Copenhagen in 1863, he taught, wrote, and published a periodical, Gefn. In 2007, a foreword and useful introduction to handwriting models was added by Gunnlaugur Briem, and he placed all on his web site for free download. I quote: In 1875, Denmark changed handwriting models, replacing blackletter cursive by copperplate. This extended to its Icelandic dominion, where copybooks and model sheets in the new style were in short supply. Eight years later, a much needed handwriting manual by Benedikt Gröndal was published. The old style and the new are similar in appearance but have different letterforms. This picture shows the old blackletter cursive (top) and the new copperplate (bottom)---it was taken from Almanak Hins íslenzka þjóðvinafélags, Copenhagen (1877). Gröndal's copperplate and Gröndal's ronde. The foreword by Briem also shows a Danish ronde that appeared in Rundskrifts-Bogen; til Skolebrug og Hjemmeøvelse, ca. 1880. He also grabs the opportunity to showcase the most handsome of all Icelandic copperplate models done by Jón Þórarinsson in Skrifbók með forskriftum, 1. hefti (Reykjavík, ca. 1896). The American Palmer method, more open but less gracious, is illustrated in this alphabet from 1922 by Steingrímur Arason (from Litla skrifbókin, Reykjavík. Variants of this are shown in the alphabets of Guðmundur I. Guðjónsson, published between 1939 and 1953. Briem concludes: Handwriting based on copperplate was largely abandoned in Icelandic schools in 1984. It was replaced by italic, a modern monoline version of renaissance handwriting that owes much to Ludovico Arrighi's approach. A large selection of model sheets in this style is available for free download from the internet. He also shows Italiuskrift05, his own suggestion for schools. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hans Lijklema

Graphic design graduate of the Academy of Fine Arts Minerva, Groningen, The Netherlands. With Karolina Lijklema, he runs the studio Lijklema Design in Warsaw, Poland. Author of Free Font Index (2008, The Pepin Press, Amsterdam). It contains comprehensive letterproofs of more than 500 fonts from 35 type foundries in 17 countries and interviews with 6 font designers. All fonts contained in the book are included on the accompanying CD and are licensed for personal and commercial use. The following have contributed fonts to this CD: Astigmatic One Eye Typographic Institute, Brain Eaters Font Co, Brode Vosloo, Bumbayo Font Fabrik, Dieter Steffmann, Fenotype, Flat-it type foundry, Fonthead Design Inc., GUST e-foundry, Grixel, Igino Marini, Janusz Marian Nowacki, La Tipomatika, Larabie Fonts, Manfred Klein Fonteria, MartinPlus, Misprinted Type, Nick's Fonts, Objets Dart, Reading Type, Rob Meek, SMeltery, Shamfonts, Sonntag Fonts, Typedifferent, Typodermic Fonts, VTKS DESIGN, Vic Fieger, WC Fonts, Yanone, boodas.de, defaulterror, eightface, exljbris, pizzadude.dk. As far as I can tell, all these fonts can be downloaded for free from the usual web archives. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hans Peter Willberg

Co-author with Friedrich Forssman of "Erste Hilfe in Typographie. - Ratgeber für den Umgang mit Schrift," Mainz: Hermann Schmidt, 1999. He wrote 15 books in all, including, e.g., Wegweiser Schrift, "Schriften erkennen" (with Monika Müller, Ravensburg, 1981), "Buchkunst im Wandel" (Frankfurt, 1984), "Lesetypografie" (with Friedrich Forssman, Mainz, 1997), and was an influential figure in the German printing scene. Willberg died on 30 May 2003 in Eppstein near Frankfurt. Obituary by Erich Alb. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hans Reichardt

Type historian in the Frankfurt area. He has diligently compiled information on most German typefaces ever made. In 2008, Spatium Magazin has just released a DVD containing a collection of 3,000 images scanned from the pages of many 20th century German type foundry catalogs. The news announcements and forum discussions are positive. Four DVDs in all are planned. Included are scans of type specimen cards, brochures, and catalogs from various foundries, such as Bauer, Klingspor, Ludwig & Mayer, Stempel, C. E. Weber, Berthold, Genzsch & Heyse, Joh. Wagner, Flinsch and Schelter & Gieseke. In addition, books like Seemann's Handbuch der Schriftarten, Abraham Horodisch's Die Schrift im schönen Buch unserer Zeit, and Emil Wetzig's Ausgewählte Druckschriften in Alphabeten are scanned as well. Table of contents. All images on the DVD are at 150 dpi resolution. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hans Rudolf Bosshard

Born in 1929 in Balm/Lotstetten, Germany. He studied typefounding in Schaffhausen from 1944-1948, and worked as typesetter in printing shops in Zürich and Stockholm from 1951-1959. From 1959-1994, he taught typographic design in various schools, and from 1993-1998, he was a free-lance book designer associated with Niggli. Author of "Der typografische Raster The Typographic Grid" (Zürich, 2000), and "Typografie Schrift Lesbarkeit" (Verlag Niggli AG, Switzerland, 1996). The latter (highly recommended) book surveys legibility issues in type choices, and closes with a classification of post-1945 typefaces. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hans-Jürgen Wolf

Born in Berlin in 1938, Hans-Jürgen Wolf studied graphic arts and painting with Richard Blank at the Design Institute of Berlin. As a graphic artist, he joined the studio of Schering AG in Berlin. Author of Geschichte der Typographie (Historia, 1999) and Geschichte der graphischen Verfahren (Historia, 1990), a detailed work on the history of typesetting and printing machine companies.

Designer of Wolf Antiqua (1966, VGC). This typeface is available as Justine (NovelFonts) and OPTI Julie (Castcraft). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Harald Haarmann

Author of Universalgeschichte der Schrift (Campus-Verlag, Frankfurt, 1991), a book that deals with the history of type and many typeface systems. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Harald Süß

Author of Deutsche Schreibschrift, Lehrbuch (2002). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Harry C. Pears
[Typeface Research Pty Ltd]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Harry Carter

Father of Matthew Carter, typographic historian, and archivist of the Oxford University Press, who lived in the UK from 1901-1982. Author in 1969 of "A view of early typography: up to about 1600". This will be reissued by Hyphen Press in 2002 and is reviewed by Andy Crewdson. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Hartley E. Jackson

Author of the technical textbook "Newspaper typography", Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA, 1942. [Google] [More]  ⦿

H.C. Martin

Author of Martin's Complete Ideas (1930s). Creator of the art deco alphabet Modern Thick and Thin. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hebrew Calligraphy

Book by Jay Seth Greenspan. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Heidrun Osterer

Heidrun Osterer (b. 1966, Switzerland) is a graphic designer and CEO of Feinherb Visuelle Gestaltung. She is also the co-founder of the Swiss Foundation Type and Typography. In addition, she is a part-time lecturer of screen typography at the Vocational School of Design in Zürich. Consultant of the Swiss Typographic Magazine STM. Since 2001, she carried out research on the professional career of Adrian Frutiger. Her book, coauthored with Philipp Stamm, on Frutiger's life is Adrian Frutiger - Typefaces The Complete Works (2009, Birkhäuser). She spoke about this work at ATypI 2008 in Petersburg. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Helmut Schmid

Author of Japanische Typographie und Schweizer Typographie, published in Comedia, edition 03-1, 2003. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hendricus Theodorus Wijdeveld

Hendrik Wijdeveld was a Dutch architect and art deco paper artist (1885-1987). His lettering inspired Wendingen AF (1998, ACME Fonts: LED simulation; named after Wijdeveld's art deco magazine which he founded and headed from 1918-1931) and Architectuur NF (2006, Nick Curtis: based on this). Check Wijdeveld H Th - Art Deco Design on Paper by Hans Oldewarris (2010 Publishers, 2003). That book shows stencil-like art deco faces such as Wendingen and Amsterdam Deventer, both designed in the 1920s. He designed many letter types for special projects, such as book covers, buildings, and letterheads. Examples: a poster entitled Architectuur Tentoonstelling (1931), a poster entitled Internationaal Theater Tentoonstelling (1922), and an illustration for De Bijenkorf (1922). Alternate URL. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Hendrik D.L. Vervliet

Prolific Belgian type expert who was librarian at the University of Antwerp and professor at the University of Amsterdam. His work includes bibliography and books on humanism and book history. Author of

  • Sixteenth-Century Printing Types of the Low Countries. With a Foreword by Harry Carter, Amsterdam, 1968. This book has 267 facsimile-illustrations depicting 147 typespecimens.
  • Civilité Types (with Harry Carter, 1966, Oxford, University Press), for The Oxford Bibliographical Society).
  • Cyrillic & oriental typography in Rome at the end of the sixteenth century: an inquiry into the later work of Robert Granjon (1578-90) (1981, Berkeley Poltroon Press).
  • The Palaeotypography of the French Renaissance Selected Papers on Sixteenth-Century Typefaces (Library of the Written Word, 2008). This is a 565-page 2-volume oeuvre about which the publisher writes: This collection of thirteen essays examines sixteenth-century type design in France. Typefaces developed during this period were to influence decisively the typography of the centuries which followed, and they continue to influence a great many contemporary typefaces. The papers' common goal is to establish the paternity of the typefaces described and critically to appraise their attributions, many of which have previously been inadequately ascribed. Such an approach will be of interest to type historians and type designers seeking better-documented attributions, and to historians, philologists, and bibliographers, whose study of historical imprints will benefit from more accurate type descriptions. The papers and illustrations focus on the most important letter-cutters of the French Renaissance, including Simon de Colines, Robert Estienne, Claude Garamont, Robert Granjon, Pierre Haultin, and also include a number of minor masters of the period.
  • French Renaissance Printing Types: A Conspectus (New Castle, Delaware, and London: Oak Knoll Press, The Bibliographical Society, and The Printing Historical Society 2010). This conspectus aims at surveying exhaustively and regardless of aesthetics, all Roman, Italic, Greek, Hebrew, and Arabic typefaces made in France during the sixteenth century. Such a survey will be of interest to historians, bibliographers, and philologists wishing to identify the types used in the imprints they are investigating, as well as to type historians or type designers wishing to base their attributions on documentary evidence. The conspectus consists of introductory chapters on the sources available, the evolution of sixteenth-century type-casting and letter-engraving, biographical notices of 17 punchcutters (both famous ones, such as Colines, Garamont, Granjon, and lesser known ones, such as Vatel, Gryphius, or Du Boys) and the methodology used. The main part of the book consists of the facsimiles of 409 typefaces (216 Romans, 88 Italics, 61 Greeks, 41 Hebrews, 2 Arabics, and one phonetic) each with a short identifying notice, describing their letter family, size, punchcutter (or eponym), their first appearance in books or type-specimens, the surviving materials such as punches or matrices, and finally (for about two-thirds of them), the recent literature. Every typeface has been illustrated, several with multiple examples of their use.
  • Vine Leaf Ornaments in Renaissance Typography: a survey (2012, New Castle, Delaware : Oak Knoll Press and HES & DE GRAAF Publishers). The blurb: This new survey deals with the birth and early history of the typographical ornament commonly known as a vine leaf or Aldine leaf. Starting in 1505, the introduction sketches the fleurons beginnings in handwritten form onwards to printed epigraphical handbooks. These small ornaments originated as type-cast sorts in the first decade of the sixteenth century in Augsburg and Basle at presses that attended to the interests of a humanist reading public. From the 1520s onwards, the design evolved into an all-purpose decorative motif fitting for any publication. Venice and Paris designers, such as Garamont and Granjon, cut new designs that can still be found in most digital fonts today. The main part of this book is a comprehensive catalogue of all sixteenth-century type-cast vine leaf designs. It provides a descriptive notice of each fleuron, irrespective of its aesthetic merit or country of origin.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Henry Caslon

British typefounder from the famous Caslon family. Author of Specimen of Printing types (1841), which showcases the typefaces of Caslon, Son and Livermore. PDF file of that book. Excerpts: Albion No. 1, Double Pica No. 3, Five Line Pica Open, Four Line Pica Shaded, Italian [this is a famous Western face, dating from 1821, and entitled the Italian Monstrosity by James Clough (who considers it not a monstrosity at all---the title refers to bad reputation of Caslon's Italian in the eyes of type critics such as T.C. Hansard and Nicolete Grey)], Nine Line Pica, Ornament No. 113, Ornament No. 159, Seven Line Pica Italian, Sixteen Line Pica Compressed, Ten Line Pica Compressed, Two Line Letters No. 4, Two Line Pica Chessmen.

Images of some type specimen from Henry Taylor Wyse's book of 1911: AngloSaxon, Antique Old Style, Baskerville, Black No. 4, Cheltenham, Cheltenham Bold Outline, Cheltenham Heavy Italic, Cheltenham Old Style, Cheltenham Old Style, Lining Carlton, Morland, Morland Italic, Old Face, Old Face Heavy, Old Face Italic, Original Black, Ornaments. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Henry Shaw

Author (1800-1873) of The Handbook of Mediaeval Alphabets and Devices (Bernard Quaritch, London, 1853; and Henry George Bohn, London, 1856) and Alphabets&Numbers of the Middle Ages (London, 1845). cover page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Henry Sylvester Jacoby

Author of A text-book on plain lettering (1901, The Engineering News Publishing Company). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Henry Taylor Wyse

Scottish author of Modern type display and the use of type ornament (1911, Edinburgh), a book which can be found in full on the web. See also here. PDF of that book, and the text file. Most of the specimens discussed in the text are from H.W. Caslon Typefounders, Stephenson Blake, Charles Reed and Miller & Richard. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Herbert Spencer

Herbert Spencer (1924-2002) was a designer, editor, writer and photographer. Working in London, Spencer launched Typographica in 1949 and wrote for it for 18 years. He is the author of The Visible Word: Towards a new alphabet. Visual Communication Books (Hastings House Publishers, 1968-1969) and Pioneers Of Modern Typography (1969).

Creator of the De Stijl like alphabet NPL, Epps+Evans in the former book, which was digitized in 1997 by Michael Hernan.

New York Times obituary. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Hermann Delitsch

Typography professor in Leipzig, who lived from 1869-1937. He was the teacher of Jan Tschichold in 1919. Faces based on his work were created by Manfred Klein (Delitsch Initialen, 2004) and Petra Heidorn (Delitsch Antiqua, 2004). Both can be found here. The originals are Ramses (1912, Klinkhardt, an Antiqua face revived in 2012 by Chiron as TbC Ramses-Antiqua), Delitsch Antiqua (1911, Klinkhardt), and Delitsch-Kanzlei (1903, Klinkhardt).

He is credited with Antiguo Manuscrito, a semiscript family, at the Richard Gans Foundry. The latter was digitized by Paulo W (Intellecta Design) as Gans Antigua Manuscrito (2006).

Author of Schribschriftnormen (1928, K.W. Hiersemann), Delitzsch-Antiqua: eine künstlerische Schriftgarnitur mit Initialen und Schmuck für zeitgemässe Buchausstattung (1915). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Hermann Hoffmann

German type designer, b. 1856, Hildesheim, d. 1926, Berlin. He settled in the 1890s in Berlin and founded Maschinenfabrik Heidenheim & Hoffmann. In 1895 he became head of H Berthold AG in Berlin. He designed Bloc (Berthold, 1908) [digitization and Cyrillization by Tafir Safayev, 1997; see also Block Berthold at BertholdTypes, and FB Hermes (1995, Matthew Butterick at Font Bureau); FB Hermes was extended by Butterick in 2010]. Bloc was similar to Hermes at Schriftguss and Woellmer. Bitstream's Gothic 821 (1990) is based on Bloc. The Softmaker version is called Boulder.

In 1901, he designed Herold Reklameschrift at Berthold (Berlin), an art nouveau advertising typeface developed until 1907 with schmal, fett and Kontur substyles. Digitizations of this:

  • Vladimir Yefimov at Paratype digitized it in 1993 and included Cyrillic characters.
  • Berthold's own Herold Reklameschrift BQ.
  • Heraut AS (2003, Andreas Seidel) is based on Herold Reklameschrift.
  • Herold (2008) by Tom Wallace (HiH).
  • Herman (SoftMaker).

He also designed Kaufhaus-Fraktur (1906, Berthold).

Books: Das Haus Berthold 1858-1921 (1921, Berlin) and Der Schriftgiesser (1927, Leipzig).

FontShop page. Klingspor link. FontShop link.

Oddity: The names Heinz Hoffmann and Hermann Hoffmann are used by two subcommunities. MyFonts, Font Bureau, etc. use Heinz, while Erik Spiekermann, Klingspor, and German media use Hermann. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Hermann Zapf

The prolific master designer (born in Nuremberg, 1918, lives in Darmstadt), who made many Antiqua faces and Grotesk faces at URW++ (such as URW Grotesk) and is best known for Palatino, Optima, Melior, Zapf Dingbats, and ITC Zapf Chancery. From 1990 dates URW Palladio Regular. And look at the gorgeous calligraphic font Zapfino (Linotype, 1999, winner of the 1999 Type Directors Club award), released on the occasion of his 80th birthday. Linotype write-up. Zapf lives in Darmstadt, Germany. Pictures of his 80th birthday party at Linotype. Winner of the Gutenberg Prize in 1974.

Author of Manuale Typographicum (1954), of which only 1000 copies were printed. Author of Typografische Variationen (1963, Stempel), of which only 500 copies were printed.

Zapf's drawing of a blackletter alphabet in Feder und Stichel (1949, Trajanus Presse, Frankfurt) and Feder und Stichel (1952). Zapf's design of a postage stamp depicting Ottmar Mergenthaler in 1954.

List of his typefaces:

  • Alahram Arabisch.
  • Arno (Hallmark).
  • Aldus Buchschrift (Linotype, 1954): Italic, Roman. Digital version by Adobe.
  • Alkor Notebook.
  • Attika Greek.
  • Artemis Greek.
  • Aurelia (1985, Hell).
  • AT&T Garamond.
  • Book (ITC New York). Samples: Book Demi, Book Demi Italic, Book Heavy, Book Heavy Italic, Book Medium Italic. The Zapf Book, Chancery and International fonts are under the name Zabriskie on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, 2002.
  • Brush Borders.
  • Comenius Antiqua (1976, Berthold; see C792 Roman on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, 2002).
  • Crown Roman (Hallmark).
  • Chancery (officially called ITC Zapf Chancery): Bold, Demi, Italic, Light, Liht Italic, Mediu Italic, Roman.
  • Civilité (Duensing). Mac McGrew on the Zapf Civilité: Zapf Civilite is perhaps the latest face to be cut as metal type, having been announced in January 1985, although the designer, Hermann Zapf, had made sketches for such a face as early as 1940, with further sketches in 1971. But matrices were not cut until 1983 and 1984. The cutting was done by Paul Hayden Duensing in Kalamazoo, Michigan. The first Civilité typeface was cut by Robert Granjon in 1557, based on a popular French handwriting style of the time. Other interpretations have been made from time to time, notably the Civilité (q.v.) designed by Morris Benton in 1922 for ATF. The new Zapf design has the same general character but with a more informal and contemporary feeling. A smooth flow between weights of strokes replaces the stark contrast of thick-and-thin in older interpretations. There are several ligatures, and alternate versions of a number of characters, including several terminals. Only the 24-point Didot size is cut or planned.
  • Charlemagne (Hallmark).
  • Digiset Vario (1982, Hell): a signage face.
  • Edison (Hell), Edison cyrillic. Scans: Bold Condensed, Book, Semibold Italic, Semibold, Book Italic.
  • Euler (American Mathematical Society). Zapf was also consultant for Don Knuth on his Computer Modern fonts. In 1983, they produced the more calligraphic set now called AMS Euler (+Fraktur, Math Symbols, +script). Taco Hoekwater, Hans Hagen, and Khaled Hosny set out to create an OpenType MATH-enabled font Neo-Euler (2009-2010), by combining the existing Euler math fonts with new glyphs from Hermann Zapf (designed in the period 2005-2008). The result is here.
  • Firenze (Hallmark).
  • Festliche Ziffern (transl: party numbers).
  • Frederika Greek.
  • Gilgenart Fraktur (1938, D. Stempel).
  • Heraklit Greek.
  • Hunt Roman (1961-1962, Pittsburgh). A display face exclusively designed for the Hunt Botanical Library (Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation since 1971), situated on campus of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, to accompany their text face Spectrum. Review by Ferdinand Ulrich.
  • International (ITC, 1977). Samples: Demi, Demi Italic, Heavy, Heavy Italic, Light, Light Italic, Medium, Medium Italic.
  • Janson (Linotype).
  • Jeannette Script (Hallmark).
  • Kompakt (1954, D. Stempel).
  • Kalenderzeichen (transl: calendar symbols).
  • Kuenstler Linien (transl: artistic lines).
  • Linotype Mergenthaler.
  • Melior (1952, D. Stempel; see Melmac on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, 2002). Samples: Bold, Bold Italic, Italic, Roman.
  • Michelangelo (1950, D. Stempel, a roman caps face; a digital version exists at Berthold and at The Font Company).
  • Marconi (1975-1976, Hell; now also available at Elsner&Flake and Linotype; according to Gerard Unger, this was the first digital type ever designed---the original 1973 design was intended for Hell's Digiset system; Marconi is a highly readable text face).
  • Medici Script (1971).
  • Musica (Musiknoten, transl: music symbols; C.E. Roder, Leipzig).
  • Magnus Sans-serif (Linotype, 1960).
  • Missouri (Hallmark).
  • Novalis.
  • Noris Script (1976; a digital version exists at Linotype).
  • Optima (1955-1958, D. Stempel--Optima was originally called Neu Antiqua), Optima Greek, Optima Nova (2003, with Akira Kobayashi at Linotype, a new version of Optima that includes 40 weights, half of them italic). Samples: Poster by Latice Washington, Optima, Demibold Italic, Black, Bold, Bold Italic, Demibold, Extra Black, Italic, Medium, Medium Italic, Regular, Italic. Digital clones: Zapf Humanist 601 by Bitstream, O801 Flare on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD (2002), Opus by Softmaker, Columbia Serial by Softmaker, Mg Open Cosmetica, Ottawa by Corel, October by Scangraphic, CG Omega by Agfa compugraphic, Chelmsford by URW, Classico by URW and Optus by URW.
  • Orion (1974).
  • Palatino (1948, D. Stempel; the original font can still be found as Palazzo on Softmaker's XXL CD, 2002), Palatino Nova (2005, Linotype), Palatino Sans (2006, Linotype, with Akira Kobayashi), Palatino Greek, Palatino Cyrillic. In 2013, Linotype released Palatino eText which has a larger x-height and wider spacing. Palatino samples: black, black italic, bold, bold italic, italic, medium, roman, light, light italic. Poster by M. Tuna Kahya (2012). Poster by Elena Shkarupa. Poster by Wayne YMH (2012).
  • Phidias Greek.
  • Primavera Schmuck.
  • Pan Nigerian.
  • Quartz (Zerox Corporation Rochester, NY).
  • Renaissance Antiqua (1985, Scangraphic). Samples: Regular, Bold, Book, Light Italic, Swashed Book Italic, Swash Italic.
  • Saphir (1953, D. Stempel, see now at Linotype).
  • Sistina (1951, D. Stempel).
  • Sequoya (Cherokee redesign).
  • Scriptura, Stratford (Hallmark).
  • Sequoya (for the Cherokee Indians), ca. 1970. This was cut by Walter Hamady and is a Walbaum derivative.
  • Linotype Trajanus Cyrillic (1957).
  • Textura (Hallmark).
  • URW Grotesk (1985), URW Antiqua. The URW Grotesk family today contains 59 styles.
  • Uncial (Hallmark Kansas City).
  • Virtuosa Script (1952, D. Stempel: Zapf's first script face; revived in 2009 as Virtuosa Classic in cooperation with Akira Kobayashi).
  • Venture Script (Linotype, 1966; FontShop says 1969).
  • Winchester (Hallmark).
  • World Book Modern.
  • ITC Zapf Dingbats [see this poster by Jessica Rauch], Zapf Essentials (2002, 372 characters in six fonts: Communication, Arrows (One and Two), Markers, Ornaments, Office, based on drawings of Zapf in 1977 for Zapf Dingbats).
  • Zapfino (Linotype Library GmBH 1998): a set of digital calligraphic fonts. Zapfino Four, Zapfino Three, Zapfino Two, Zapfino One, ligatures, Zapfino Ornaments (with plenty of fists). Poster by Nayla Masood (2013).

Pictures of Hermann Zapf: with Lefty, with Rick Cusick, in 2003, with Frank Jonen, with Jill Bell, with Linnea Lundquist and Marsha Brady , with Rick Cusick, with Rick Cusick, with Stauffacher, a toast, with Werner Schneider and Henk Gianotten, with Chris Steinhour, at his 60th birthday party.

Linotype link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Hibernia Type
[Christopher Burke]

Hibernia Type is run by Christopher Burke (b. 1967), the British designer of the text face Celeste (FontFont, 1999-2000) and Celeste Sans (2004). His balanced sans serif text face Pragma ND (1995) is available from Neufville. Chris got a Ph from, and later taught typography at the University of Reading from 1996-2001. He was instrumental in setting up the MA program in type design at Reading. In 2002, he finished Parable, which was published at FontFont as FF Parable.

Author of Renner, Paul: The Art of Typography, Hyphen Press, 1999 (U&LC review). His essay Jan Tschichold&Sabon, written in the specimen book Linotype Sabon Next (Linotype, 2002), is is a must for anyone wishing to understand Tschichold. FontFont bio. FontShop link. MyFonts listing. Chris lived (still lives?) in Barcelona.

Klingspor link.

View Christopher Burke's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Hildegard Korger

Calligrapher (b. 1935, Reichenberg) and professor of calligraphy and writing at HGB Leipzig. MyFonts link. Klingspor link. Hildegard Korger was a teacher and professor at the Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst Leipzig since 1968. Her calligraphic face Daphna, aka Typo-Skript, was published by Typoart in 1965. See also here. Picture. Author of Handbook of Typer and Lettering (1992, Design Press), a translation of the sixth edition of Schrift und Schreiben (Fachbuchverlag GmnH Keipzig, 1986)

Digital revivals: Ingo Preuss revived Daphne as Daphne (2004). ARTypes revived it as Typoskript AR in 2010. And Ralph M. Unger created his own revival, Typoskript Pro (2010). Another calligraphic hand was turned into a typeface by Ingo Preuss, who called it Korger Hand (2004). Other creations include Kis Antiqua. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Histoire de la typographie

French books on the history of typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

H.M. Lambert

Author of Introduction to the Devanagari script (London: Oxford University Press, 1953). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Honoré de Balzac
[Imprimerie H. Balzac]

[More]  ⦿

Huda Smitshuijzen AbiFarès

Huda Smitshuijzen AbiFarès, was born in Beirut in 1965. Author of Arabic Typography A Comprehensive Sourcebook (Saqi Books, London, 2001), Experimental Arabic Type (Saatchi&Saatchi, Dubai, 2002), Typographic Matchmaking (BIS Publishers, Amsterdam 2007), Arabic Type Specimen Book (2008) and a number of articles on multilingual communication in the Middle East such as Arabic Type: a challenge for the 2nd millennium (1998). She holds degrees in graphic design from Yale University School of Art and Rhode Island School of Design, and specializes in bilingual typographic research and design. She has worked as a designer for a number of years, in the USA, Amsterdam, France and Beirut. She has taught typography and graphic design at the American University of Beirut. She was the Chair of the Visual Communication Department for three years at the American University in Dubai and founded the Khatt Foundation, Center for Arabic Typography in Amsterdam. She curates exhibitions, organizes collaborative design research projects between Europe and the Middle East, and is editor of the Khatt Foundation online network of Arab/Middle Eastern designers (www.khtt.net). She is currently pursuing a PhD at Leiden University while working between Europe and the Middle East as a typography and design consultant on projects of cultural relevance. She has art directed and collaborated on the design of several contemporary Arabic fonts for magazines like Aleph (London) and companies in the Gulf. Typefaces include Alef Caps (2008), done with Pascal Zoghbi. KHTT link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Huda Smitshuijzen AbiFarès
[Typographic Matchmaking]

[More]  ⦿

H.W. Caslon&Co Ltd
[Justin Howes]

H.W. Caslon&Co Ltd was Justin Howes' foundry based in Rushden, UK, with one product, Founders Caslon, in several optical ranges: 1776, Text and Display are the main subfamilies (PC and Mac, truetype, type 1 and opentype). Justin Howes' Lino page.

Justin (b. Solihull, 1963; d. London, 2005) was director of the Type Museum until 2005, when he moved to the Plantin-Moretus Museum, and then to Reading for postgraduate work. He published "Johnston's Underground Type" for the London Transport Museum in 2000. Justin was a typographer as well as a printing historian. He was responsible for designing many books. He was chair of the Friends of St. Bride from 1998-2003. He died in February 2005 at age 42. Obituary. Quote by Nick Shinn: "Founders Caslon is a trompe l'oeil masterpiece, a carefully crafted amalgam of subtle judgements as to what will best mimic the desired patina of 18th century typography." Obituary at St. Bride. Old URL (now occupied by squatters). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Hyphen Press

Books on type. See also here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Iampeth

Free copies in PDF format of many rare books on calligraphy and penmanship, typically from the 19th century:
Ames' Guide to Self-Instruction in Practical and Artistic Penmanship, Daniel T. Ames, Author and Publisher, 1884
Ames - The Daniel T. Ames Notebook, A wonderful collection of penmanship from the early 1860s from one of America's preeminent penmen and teachers
Arm Movement Method of Rapid Writing, The, Charles Paxton Zaner, 1904
Art of Penmanship, Eleazer Huntington, 1821
Art of Writing, The, John Jenkins, 1813
Bible Pearls of Promise, Real Pen-Work Publishing, 1867
The Blue Book, Compiled by L.E. Stacy, 1907  Text-converted PDF
C.C. Canan Collection of Penmanship - The Canan Book, Canan/Zanerian College, 1921, Copyright by Zaner-Bloser, Inc.
Champion Method of Practical Business Writing, Mary L. Champion
Clinton Clark Scrapbook, Clinton H. Clark: Part One, Part Two, Part Three.
Compendium of Spencerian or Semi-Angular Penmanship, Platt Rogers Spencer, Sr., 1866
Complete Compendium of Plain Practical Penmanship, L.M. Kelchner, 1901
Francis B. Courtney Scrapbook, F.B. Courtney, courtesy of Bob Hurford
Gaskell's Compendium of Forms (the section on writing), G.A. Gaskell, 1883
Gems of Flourishing, Charles Paxton Zaner, 1888
Gems of Penmanship, John S. Duncun, 1858
Gems of Penmanship, J.D. Williams and S.S. Packard, 1867
How To Become A Good Penman, An advertising packet by F.W. Tamblyn
IAMPETH Scrapbooks, A remarkable collection of Golden Age penmanship: Scrapbook 1, Scrapbook 2.
L'écriture Américaine par D'Avignon - "American Writing" by D'Avignon, circa 1840
Lessons in Advanced Engraver's Script, penned by Louis Madarasz, published by C.W. Jones
Lessons in Engraver's Script, C.W. Jones, editor, 1914
Lessons in Ornamental Penmanship, C.P. Zaner, 1920
Lessons in Ornamental Penmanship, P.Z. Bloser (Copies by E.A. Lupfer), 1948
Lessons in Practical Penmanship , H.P. Behrensmeyer
Madarasz Book, - The Secret of the Skill of Madarasz, Madarasz/Zanerian College, 1911, Copyright by Zaner-Bloser, Inc.
Metodo Palmer de Caligrafia Comercial, A.N. Palmer Company, 1949.  Donated by Mauricio Aguilar.  Please visit his website www.VintagePen.net
Modern Business Penmanship, Edward C. Mills, 1903
Muster Alphabete, circa 1885
New Spencerian Compendium, Spencerian Authors, 1879
New Standard Practical Penmanship, Spencer Brothers, 1881
New Zanerian Alphabets, C.P. Zaner, 1900
Ninety-five Lessons in Ornamental Penmanship, C.W. Jones, editor, 1914
Noyes's Penmanship, Enoch Noyes, 1839
Oberlin Business College - Compendium of Penmanship, C.A. Barnett, J.T. Henderson and J.N. Yocom, 1901
Palmer Method of Business Writing, A.N. Palmer Company, 1935
Palmer's Penmanship Budget, A.N. Palmer, 1919
Penmanship Made Easy, George Comer & Oliver Linton, 1864. See also here.
Penman's Leisure Hour, McDonald Business Academy, penwork by F.F. Wildish, 1894
Portfolio of Ornate Penmanship, The A.N. Palmer Company
Practical Penmanship Being A Development of the Carstairian System, Benjamin Franklin Foster, 1830
Real Pen Work - Self Instructor in Penmanship, Knowles and Maxim, publisher, 1881
Real Pen Work Compendium of Penmanship, Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor and Co., publisher, 1880
Recueil Méthodique de Principes d' Ecriture "A Methodical Collection of Principles of Writing", P. Meyrat, circa 1920's
Spencerian Script and Ornamental Penmanship, Volume I, Chapters 1,2 and 8, Michael R. Sull, 1989.  .
Steel Pen Trade 1930-1980, A.A.S. Charles, 1983.  .
Studies in Pen Art, W.E. Dennis, 1914
Sykes's Manual of Penmanship, Sykes, circa 1885
Theory of Spencerian Penmanship, Spencer Authors, 1874
19th Century Swedish Copybook, dated December 9, 1858 and penned by Carl Damm, a tutor, this copybook contains 12 pages of handwritten forms of Copperplate/Engraver's Script. Contributed by Evan Lindquist.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Idea mag

Great Japanese design magazine, possibly the best design mag out there today, often featuring articles on typography. It published Typography Today, a book edited by Helmut Schmid that introduces selections from 88 designers. It traces the course of modern typography from Lissitzky, Tschichold, Zwart, Emil Ruder, Karl Gerstner, Herb Lubalin, to Wolfgang Weingart, Wim Crouwel and Kohei Sugiura. The new edition includes art by Neville Brody, April Greiman and Ahn Sang-Soo. See also IDEA NO. 305: Type Design Today (2004), which has articles by

  • Robin Kinross: "Some features of the font explosion"
  • Jean-François Porchez: "Type design that changed the outlook of Paris"
  • Fred Smeijers: "From punchcutting to digital type design"
  • Akira Kobayashi: "Originality and Redesign of Typeface"
  • André Baldinger: "Succeeding experimental typefaces"
  • LettError: "Twin Cities - Typeface represent a city"
  • François Rappo: "Didot Elder - Radical revival of Historical Typefaces"
  • Matthew Carter: "Yale University Typeface Project"
[Google] [More]  ⦿

ILAB--LILA

Searchable sire of 2000 antique book sellers over the world. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ilene Strivzer
[The Type Studio]

[More]  ⦿

Ilene Strizver

From Westport, CT, Ilene Strizver is the founder of The Type Studio. She consults on type, designs type and writes about typography and visual communication. She co-designer ITC Vintage (1996) with Holly Goldsmith. She was the Director of Typeface Development for International Typeface Corporation (ITC) where she developed more than 300 text and display typefaces with type designers such as Sumner Stone, Erik Spiekermann, Jill Bell, Jim Parkinson, Tim Donaldson, and Phill Grimshaw. Her essay on spacing and kerning. Essay on rags (ragged lines), orphans (short last lines) and widows. She published "Type Rules! The designer's guide to professional typography". [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Imprimerie H. Balzac
[Honoré de Balzac]

Honoré de Balzac (1799-1850), a famous author, got involved in printing in 1826 when he André Barbier (b. 1793), a typesetter, set up a printing and publishing business on the Rue de Marais-Saint-Germain in Paris. At one time, thirty workers were employed at Imprimerie H. Balzac which was funded with 70,000 Francs in borrowed money from Balzac's mother, as well as from his mistress, Laure De Berny. Link. The printing business thrived. In 1827, he bought Laurent's typesetting firm in order to extend his immediate control over all aspects of the printing business. In 1827, he published a specimen book with many Egyptian letter types. Another publication was Specimen des divers caracteres vignettes et ornemens typographiques de la Fonderie de Laurent et De Berny (now republished with a foreword by J. Dreyfus). Earlier that year, he had also bought the famous foundry of Joseph-Gaspard Gillé. See also here. Balzac spent most of his income to access the social circles of his mistress, Duchess d'Abrantès. Barbier left the business in 1828. The Imprimerie went bankrupt that same year. Luckily, Balzac's first mistress, Louise-Antoinette-Laure De Berny (1777-1836), forgave her loan and took over the print shop. As the wife of a high-ranking official in the French royal court and god-child of Queen Marie-Antoinette, Laure De Berny had sufficient financial resources. She entrusted the business to her 19 year-old son, Alexandre De Berny (1809-1881). Balzac left the type and printing business. Laurent&Deberny was born. References include Balzac: A Life (Graham Robb, 1994: New York: W. W. Norton& Company), and an article in Caractère in 1975 entitled Deberny et Peignot: La Belle Époque de la Typographie. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ina Saltz

Ina Saltz is an art director, author and professor (of Electronic Design and Multimedia at The City College of New York) whose areas of expertise are typography and magazine design. She is currently serving as the Chair of the Art Department at CCNY. For over 22 years, Ina was an editorial Design Director at Time Magazine's International Editions, Worth, Golf Magazine and others. Ina has authored several books: BODY TYPE: Intimate Messages Etched in Flesh, (Abrams, 2006), BODY TYPE 2: More Typographic Tattoos, (Abrams, 2010), TYPOGRAPHY ESSENTIALS: 100 Design Principles for Working With Type, (Rockport, 2009), and she is co-author of TYPOGRAPHY REFERENCED: A Comprehensive Visual Guide to the Language, History and Practice of Typography, (Rockport, 2012). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Index Book

Book publisher in Barcelona, which has an active section on typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Indie Fonts

Indie Fonts is a series of two books covering the work of many independent foundries. In 2003, it was followed by Indie2, which includes a number of free fonts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Indra Kupferschmid

German type personality (b. 1973, Fulda) who studied visual communication at the Bauhaus University in Weimar. She is involved in type at the Museum für Druckkunst Leipzig and in the DIN committee for type classification. Founder of Kupferschrift, a type expertise firm based in Weimar and Düsseldorf. Alternate URL. She is a professor of Kommunikationsdesign und Typografie and head of the department FB Design at the HBK (Hochschule der Bildenden Künste) Saar. She researches the classification of typefaces, the history of grotesks and legibility.

She is co-author of Helvetica Forever (Lars Müller Publishers) and Buchstaben kommen selten allein, a typographic reference book.

Speaker at ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik. Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam. At the latter meeting she introduces Type Record, a data base on typefaces run by her and Nick Sherman. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Institut d'Histoire du Livre

List of books on typography and calligraphy, covering 1450-1830. In French. The institute is part of the Musée de l'imprimerie de Lyon. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Institute of typography engineering research

Institute in Cologne where this book was published: Typecosmic digital type collection serif (1994, 798 pages). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Internet Archive

Free downloads of oldbooks. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Intertype
[Gilbert Powderly Farrar]

Defunct foundry. One of its typographic directors was Gilbert Powderly Farrar (1886-1957), who designed Bert Black. Intertype's typefaces include Monterey (1958, Rand Holub, its "version" of Murray Hill; available from Bitstream now), Imperial (designed by Ed Schaar; now a Bitstream font), Intertype Vogue (ca. 1930, see Am Sans by Volker Busse for a free digital version), Stuyvesant (1940, now available from Bitstreeam), and Nuptial Script (now an Adobe font).

MyFonts writes: Harris inherited the Harris-Intertype library, made up of the faces cut by Intertype to compete with Mergenthaler from the First World War. A small group of original typefaces centers on newspaper faces and scripts. In the thirties C.H. Griffith at Mergenthaler believed the linecaster to be unsuitable for the development of scripts, which led Ed Schaar at Intertype to claim this market as their own. Intertype became Harris-Intertype ca. 1960, and Harris ca. 1975.

Cyrillic faces in their library, ca. 1930. The firm still exists as Harris Corporations in Melbourne, FL, but is no longer producing fonts.

Leonard Spencer, in his article Linotype / Intertype Linecasting Machines How They Differ writes: Intertype started as International Typesetting Machine Company in 1911. Many of first machines were rebuilt Linotype bases with improvements patented by the new company. When World War I broke out, International Typesetting Machine Company was reorganized as the Intertype Corporation, and by 1917 had three machines for sale: Model A one magazine, Model B two magazine, Model C three magazine. Intertype was first in cold type with its Fotosetter in 1950. This machine continued the circulating matrix principle but had film image instead of the punched character. Stuart Sandler adds this piece of information: The Harris-Intertype Fotosetter was the first photo typesetting machine invented. It marks the beginning of the Cold Type era and is the machine responsible for it . . . Incidentally this is the machine that inspired the creation of the Filmotype by its inventor Allan Friedman when he saw it unveiled to US audiences in 1948. Instead of lead slugs, the Intertype which was a Linotype machine had replaced them with small film negatives and proceeded to set type as you would imagine the bastardization of a lead type and photo type machine only could. There are many reasons Cold Type caught on and it became the standard some time after that period till digital typesetting machines like the Alphatype came into their own. It wasn't until the release of the first MacIntosh in 1984 when Cold Type was eclipsed by desktop publishing.

Mac McGrew: Ideal (originally called Ideal News) was designed by Herman R. Freund for Intertype in 1926, for the New York Times. It has much the appearance of Century Schoolbook, but with shorter ascenders and squattier capitals. The italic is a little closer to Century Expanded Italic, providing more contrast with the roman. Sturdy serifs, substantial hairlines, and open loops make it a practical face for the demanding production requirements of high-speed newspaper use. Ideal Bold is heavier than the Century bold faces.

View a few digital typefaces with roots in the Intertype collection.

Another famous type is Cairo. Mac McGrew: Cairo is Intertype's adaptation of Memphis, originally designed by Rudolf Weiss for Stempel in Germany about 1929, and first imported into the United States as Girder. Except for Litho Antique, this was the first of the modern square-serif faces, which are revivals of older faces known as Egyptians. The Intertype faces appeared in 1933 to 1940. Lining Cairo features several sizes of caps on 6- and 12-point bodies in the manner of Copperplate Gothic. Compare Memphis, Stymie, Karnak.

Farrar is also the author of The Typography of Advertisements That Pay (1917, D. Appleton and Co., New York). Local download. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Issuu

A place where one can share publications. There is a subgroup on typography---no direct limk though. First click on design, then graphic arts, and then typography. The design and navigation is painful, as is the way books are shown. Downloads are nearly impossible. In short, the design of this design site gets an F. But there are some interesting publications there. Subgroups: Fonts (which has the FontFont 2009 catalog), Muestras tipograficas (which has about 60 specimen booklets), MICA (Comps of Form/Counterform and Type Specimen books for Tony Rutka's Typography 1 class at MICA, Spring 2010). [Google] [More]  ⦿

italic 1.0
[Silvia Sfligiotti]

"Italic 1.0 Il disegno di caratteri contemporaneo in Italia Contemporary Type Design in Italy" is an English-Italian book edited by Paola Lenarduzzi, Mario Piazza and Silvia Sfligiotti and published by AIAP in 2002. It summarizes the state of typography in Italy in 2002. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Italic 2.0

Italic 2.0 is an Italian blog and type project, very central to all that is happening on the type scene in Italy. There is also a book by the same title, dated 2008, edited by Marta Bernstein, Luciano Perondi, and Silvia Sfligiotti, with articles by Giovanni Lussu, James Clough, Antonio Cavedoni, Marta Bernstein, Luciano Perondi, Giangiorgio Fuga, and Silvia Sfligiotti. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ivan Vartarian

Author of Typo-Graphics: The Art and Science of Type Design in Context (2003, RotoVision). In this collective work, contributions are by Contributors: Weisbeck/Surface, Bionic Systems, Lorem Ipsum, Offica Ludi, Fidel Castro/LOMO, Buro Destruct, Norm, Electrosmog, Emigre/Rudy VanderLans, Zuzana Licko, Test Pilot Collective, Kyle Cooper, Tycoon Graphics, Power Graphixx, Graph, Dainippon Type Organization, Cyclone Graphics, and Superlow/Function. [Google] [More]  ⦿

J. Ben Lieberman

Author of Type and Typefaces: A Treasury of Typography Book (New Rochelle: The Myriade Press, 1978), Types of Typefaces (New York Sterling Publishing Co, 1967) and Type and Typefaces and how to recognize them (New York Sterling Publishing Co, 1968). [Google] [More]  ⦿

J. Eric S. Thompson

Author of A Catalog of Maya Hierogrlyphs (1962, University of Oklahoma Press). It is a catalogue of most of the glyphs known up to the time of its publication. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jacek Mrowczyk

Polish designer of Danova (2011). He wrote Niewielkiego slownika typograficznego, and edits the 2plus3d magazine. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jack Curry

New York City-based type and brand designer, who has a BFA (2008-2011) from California State University at Long Beach, and used to work in Los Angeles. He studied typeface design at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in 2011.

Author of articles Typodarium 2012 (Verlag Hermann Schmidt Mainz, August 2011), The 3D Type Book (Laurence King Publishing, June 2011), and Typography 31 / TDC 2010 Annual (Collins Design, Dec. 2010). He published Foundation: Process and Reflection (2011, The Cooper Union).

His typefaces:

  • Foundation Grotesque (2011-2012). Developed at The Cooper Union, it is vaguely based on an early 20th century typeface by Linotype called Philadelphia Gothic.
  • Dash (2010). A free octagonal typeface.

His blog. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jack W. Stauffacher

Hunt Roman is a type designed by Hermann Zapf in the early sixties in collaboration with Jack Stauffacher. Jack wrote a lot about typography, e.g., Janson, a Definitive Collection (The Greenwood Press, 1954), Hunt Roman: the birth of a type, (1965), and Inscriptions at the Old Public Library of San Francisco (2003, edited by Jack). Jack was at Carnegie Tech (now Carnegie Mellon) during the early 1960's. He started the Laboratory Press and taught the creative possibilities of letterpress. He left there about 1964. He now runs the Greenwood Press in San Francisco.

Robert Harlan describes Jack Stauffacher's involvement in Sumner Stone's "Cycles" font.

John Berry on Jack Stauffacher and his use of large wooden letters in illustrations. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jacob I. Biegeleisen

Coauthor with Dan X. Solo of Classic Type Faces And How To Use Them: Including 91 Complete Fonts (1995, Dover Press), a book which includes 91 typefaces. He also wrote The book of 100 type face alphabets A guide to better lettering (1965, The Signs of the Times Publ. Co., Cincinnati, OH), Art Directors' Book of type Faces (1973), and The ABC of Lettering (1965, Harper & Row Publishers, NY). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jacqueline Svaren

Author of Written Letters 22 Alphabets for Calligraphers (1975, The Bond Wheelwright Company, Freeport, ME). Scans of some poages by Gordo. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jacques André
[Bibliothèque virtuelle de livres de typographie]

[More]  ⦿

Jacques André

French type professor (b. 1938) who designed some experimental fonts such as Delorme (1989). Jacques André has been working in the field of structured documents and digital typography since 1980. He was the leader of the European Didot Project concerned with the digitization of types. He is Research Director at INRIA (the French National Institute on Computer Science) in Rennes, and his work covers the digitization of ancient books and the encoding of their fonts and glyphes.

Author of Histoire de l'écriture typographique: Le XIXe siècle français (2013, with Christian Laucou). From the blurb: Pour montrer toute la richesse de cette période, les auteurs ont choisi d'en raconter les aventures successives: les Anglais avec l'invention des caractères gras, des égyptiennes et des sans-sérifs; la fonderie Gillé qui devient celle de Balzac puis de De Berny et qui rejoindra, à l'aube du XXe siècle, celle des Peignot; la saga des Didot, de la rigueur de Firmin à l'extravagance de Jules; l'Imprimerie royale, puis impériale ou nationale, ses caractères orientaux et ceux de labeur, qui perdureront tant qu'il y aura du plomb; Louis Perrin, qui réinvente les elzévirs; les grandes fonderies françaises, qui rivalisent d'invention et de copies, et, enfin, les évolutions techniques de tout le siècle. [Google] [More]  ⦿

James Craig
[Designing with Type]

[More]  ⦿

James Eckmann

Type historian who wrote in Printing and Graphic Arts between 1957 and 1961 on "The Keystone Type Foundry, 1888-1917", "The Chicago Type Foundry of Marder, Luse&Company 1863-1892", "Chicago Type Foundry Specimen Books", "The Inland Type Foundry, 1894-1911" and "The Great Western Type Foundry of Barnhart Brothers&Spindler, 1869-1933". [Google] [More]  ⦿

James Mosley

From 1958 until 1999, Mosley was librarian of St Bride Printing Library, London. He is Visiting Professor in the Department of Typography and Graphic Communication at the University of Reading, UK, 1964-present. He was a founding member of the Printing Historical Society and the first editor of its Journal. He is currently a faculty member in the Rare Book School, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, and in the Ecole de l'Institut d'histoire du livre, Lyon. He is a Senior Research Fellow in the Institute of English Studies, University of London. A specialist of type history from 1400 until today, he has written many articles, including "Les caractères de l'Imprimerie Royale" in "Le romain du roi: la typographie au service de l'état, 1702-2002" (2002, Lyon: Musée de l'Imprimerie). Among his recent writings are studies of the Italian 16th-century calligrapher Giovan Francesco Cresci, the origins in England of the modern sans serif letter, and notes to a facsimile edition of the Manuel typographique (17646) of Fournier le jeune. Speaker at ATypI 2007 in Brighton. He has a blog. At ATypI 2010 in Dublin, he spoke about the types of the Proclamation of the Irish Republic. Pic. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

James Ronaldson
[Binny&Ronaldson]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

James Walker Puckett
[Dunwich Type Founders]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Jan Hendrik Scholte

Dutch author, b. 1874, who edited Die Hochdeutschen Schriften aus dem 15ten bis zum 19ten Jahrhundert der Schriftgiesserei und Druckerei (1919, Enschedé en Zonen, Haarlem), a publication which has four articles:

  • Gustav Mori: Christian Egenolff, der erste ständige Buchdrucker in Frankfurt a/M
  • Christian Münden: Von den ersten Franckfurter Bruchdruckern
  • Gustav Mori: Geschichte und Entwicklung des Schriftgiesserei-Gewerbes in Frankfurt a/M
  • Charles Enschedé: Die Druckerei der Elsevier und ihre Bezichung zu der Lutherschen Schriftgiesserei
This book is mainly about the development and history of blackletter types. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jan Middendorp

[More]  ⦿

Jan Tschichold

Born in Leipzig (1902), died in Locarno, Switzerland (1974). Influential German type designer whose typefaces include these:

  • Sabon (for Stempel, 1964). The most famous digital version of Sabon is Linotype's Sabon Next. See also Sabon eText Pro (2013, Linotype).
  • Transit and Transito (1931). Transito has been remade by Nick Curtis in 2009 as Waddem Choo NF, and by Paulo Heitlinger in 2008 as Transito.
  • Zeus (1931). Pleks Zeus (2008) is a revival of Zeus by Hans Munk.
  • Saskia (1931, Schelter&Giesecke).
  • Uher Standard Grotesque.
  • Between 1926 and 1929, he designed a "universal alphabet" to help with non-phonetic spellings in the German language. For example, he devised new characters to replace "ch" and "sch". Long vowels were indicated by a macron below them. The alphabet was presented in one typeface, which was sans-serif and without capital letters. Leicht und schnell konstruierbare Schrift (1930) is a Bauhaus-style geometric revived in 2008 by Sebastian Nagel as Iwan Reschniev.
Links about him: Graphion's site. Textism site. Nicolas Fabian's page on him. Links to his work. Bio at Linotype. Wikipedia site. Publications include:
  • Die neue Typographie (Berlin, 1928). Quote from this book: Type production has gone mad, with its senseless outpouring of new types. Only in degenerate times can personality (opposed to the nameless masses) become the aim of human development,
  • Typographische Gestaltung (Basel 1935).
  • Geschichte der Schrift in Bildern (Basel 1941).
  • Schriftkunde, Schreibübungen und Skizzieren (Basel 1942, Berlin 1952).
  • Schatzkammern der Schreibkunst (Basel 1946).
  • Meisterbuch der Schrift (Ravensburg 1953).
  • Erfreuliche Drucksachen durch gute Typographie (Ravensburg 1960).
  • Willkürfreie Maßverhältnisse der Buchseite und des Satzspiegels (Basel 1962).
  • Ausgewählte Aufsätze über Fragen der Gestalt des Buches und der TypographyJan Tschichold, Leben und Werk (Dresden 1977).
  • Jan Tschichold. Schriften 1925-1974 (Berlin 1991).
  • Recommended is this short essay entitled Consistent Correlation Between Book Page and Type Area.
Pic. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Jaroslav Andel

Czech art historian and author of Avant-Garde Page Design 1900-1950 (Delano Greenidge Editions, 2002). This book presents a comprehensive visual lexicon of early 20th-century page design. Illustrations include designs by Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Wassily Kandinsky, Marcel Duchamp, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Lázló Moholy-Nagy, El Lissitzky, and Jan Tschichold. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jean de Beauchesne

Influential French master penman, 1538-1620. Jean de Beauchesne and John Baildon published the first writing manual in England: A Booke containing divers sortes of hands, as well the English as French secrataries with the italic, roman, chancelry&court hands (1570-1571, London: Thomas Vautrollier). In 1580, he published Le Tresor d'escriture, auquel est contenu tout ce qui est requis&necessaire à tous amateurs dudict art. His third book was La Clef de l'escriture laquelle ouvre le chemin à la jeunesse, pour bien apprendre à excrire la vraye lettre françoyse&italique (1595, London: G. Boulengier). He also published Specimens manuscrits anglais dédiés à Mme Elizabeth fille unique du roi de Grande Bretaigne (1610, England).

Sample of his batarde angloise (1570). Digital typefaces based on his examples include Piacevole (2008, Marc H. Smith). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jean Joseph Marcel

At one point director of the "imprimerie de la république". Author of "Alphabet irlandais, précédé d'une notice historique, littéraire, et typographique" (Paris, Imprimerie de la République, nivôse an XII [1804]). This book explains the Irish alphabet, but has little in terms of typographic information. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jean Joveneaux

Author of La lettre dans la peinture et la publicité (1957, Editions Charles Massin, Paris: see also here and here). His Futura Stencil-like Le Pochoir (plate 40) was digitally remade by Toto as Le Pochoir (2011), and also by Jan Gerner as Pochoir (2006). Author also of La lettre dans le décor. An art deco face from that book was digitally revived by Toto and Dick Pape in 2011 under the name La lettre dans le décor. Free download here.

The alphabets of La lettre dans la peinture et la publicité (1957) include many styles, from art deco to blackletter, Victorian and retro. Joveneaux gave them names, so I will list them in alphabetical order: 1erEmpire, AnDeGrace1320, Antiquites, Aquarium, ArtsGraphiques, BalDeNuit, Bar, BeauxArts, Cafe, CompositionDecorative, Constellation, CoursDeStenotypie, DerniereHeure, EclairageFluorescent, Editorial, ElectroStatique, EnExclusivite, Exposition, Illustration, InitiationSportive, JeuDeDominos, LaGrandeParade, LePochoir, LettresOrnees, Massif, Meubles, ModeDEte1950, Motos, Nouvelle, Ordonnance, OrpheeAuxEnfers, PrestigeDeLaSoie, Promotion52, RealisationsGraphiques, RobesDEte, SalonMai1953, Samedi23Mai1953, TissusTousColoris, TouteUneGammeDeLaines, ZoneInterdite. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jean Méron

Author of "Orthotypographie : recherches bibliographiques", Convention typographique, 2002. A 416 page opus on the history of the book, printing, writing, and typography. A great handwritten preface by Fernand Baudin. See also here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jean-Antoine Alessandrini

Type designer, graphic designer and illustrator, born in Marseille in 1942. Allessandrini (sometimes spelled Alessandrini in various publications) used to work at Paris Match, Lui and Elle. His typefaces: Akénaton 1969 (Hollenstein Phototypo) (1975, VGC??), Alias 1977 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Allessandrini 7 1972 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Anarchiste (Mécanorma), Andronique 1984 (Mécanorma), Astronef 1976 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Circus World, (Mécanorma), Cléopatre 1984 (Mécanorma), Combinat 1976 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Éclipso 1982 (Mécanorma), Electric-Type 1977 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Futuriste 1977 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Germain 1969 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Grand Dadais 1977 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Grand Large 1977 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Graphic Man 1973 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Grossium 1977 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Gyptis 1977 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Hypnos 1969 (Hollenstein Phototypo: a psychedlic face), Legitur, Mikado 1977 (Mécanorma: oriental simulation), Mirago 1970 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Priam 1976 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Showbiz 1969 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Sigle (Mécanorma), Technos 1984 (Mécanorma), Trombinoscope 1964, Vampire 1969 (Hollenstein Phototypo), Wotan, (Mécanorma).

Inventor of the classification system Codex 1980 that provoked heated responses from luminaries such as Vox, baudin, Blanchard and Mendoza.

Author of Typomanie / Jean Alessandrini; préface de Massin (Paris: La Noria, DL, 1977).

In 2013, David Rault wrote the monograph Jean Alessandrini Le poète de la lettre.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Jean-Luc Dusong

Coauthor with Fabienne Siegwart of "Typographie, du plomb au numérique" (Dessain et Tolra, 2003). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jean-Luc Froissart

Grandson of Georges Peignot, b. 1926. Author of L'or, l'âme et les cendres du plomb: L'épopée des Peignot, 1815-1983 (2004). It paints the history of the Peignot family of typefounders from 1815 until 1983. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jean-Michel Papillon

French wood engaver, b. 1698, Paris, d. 1776, Paris. Son of Jean Papillon, the famous manufacturer of fine wallpapers. He was for a long time employed by the Imprimerie Royale as wood engraver. There, he created numerous ornaments. Author of Traité historique et pratique de la gravure en bois (1766, Paris). Chapters cover cutting of the block, inking and printing, monograms, xylography and block books, cutter's tools, and chiaroscuro prints.

Digital typefaces that are based on his work include

  • Papillon 1760 (2007, Dick Pape). A free font. First shown in Paris in 1760, and reprinted by Clarence P Hornung in Dover Pictorial Archive Series: Early Advertising Alphabets, Initials and Typographic Ornaments (1956, Dover Publications). Hornung's images inspired Pape's typeface.
  • Papillon Woodcuts (2013, Jose Jimenez). A commercial font based on the same sample from 1760.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Jean-Pierre Lacroux

Jean-Pierre Lacroux (1947-2002) had a wonderfully informative site with tons of useful links, many to French sources, and many concerned weith orthotypography. Subpages: Bibliography on pens, paper and writing. Bibliography on ancient and modern typography. Sadly, on November 12, 2002, Lacroux passed away. His pages remain on the web, a testimony to the many hearts he touched with his kindness. A tribute entitled Typographique tombeau de Jean-Pierre Lacroux (148 pages, 2003, PDF file) was published under the editorship of Thierry Bouche and Éric Angelini. Look for Lacroux's principle: the minimal typographic quality of a text is inversely proportional to its literary value. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jef Tombeur

Typographic afficionado who contributes links to the St. Bride Printing Library in London. This page has links to the main type sites on the web.

I can't resist this wonderful short autobiography of Jef, and I do not want to translate it, because it would lose its punch: Jef Tombeur, ex-vagabond professionnel&auto-stoppeur en Europe, au Moyen-Orient et en Amérique du Nord depuis l'âge de 15 ans, s'est rapidement tourné vers le journalisme par désoeuvrement. Vendre à la criée The International Times et The Black Dwarf à Londres, puis Le Monde à Strasbourg, l'y incita. Laissant tomber facs et école de journalisme, il contribua à rédiger, composer, gérer l'hebdomadaire franco-alsacien Uss'm Follik (Issu du Peuple), ce que facilitèrent ses origines bretonnes. Repéré ensuite à Belfort, Niort, Reims, devenant progressivement grand reporter et de moins en moins pigiste pour Libération et d'autres. Chef de desk à l'Agence Centrale de Presse, il en diffusa la dernière dépêche puis retourna à la rue et aux facultés. Ayant traduit divers auteurs anglophones au passage, tel Tom Coraghessan Boyle (cf. www.tcboyle.net), il s'est de nouveau passionné pour la typographie, en devenant le seul journaliste spécialisé français (notamment pour Création Numérique ou Pixelcreation.fr). Envisage de devenir chômeur en fins de droits et propagandiste plénipotentiaire pour Phil Martin en Afrique avant d'avoir atteint, prochainement, si possible, 55 ans. Localisé fréquemment chez Ali (bar La Gitane, près de Strasbourg-Saint-Denis, Paris) ces temps derniers.

Author in 2004 of Femmes&métiers du Livre, Women in the Printing Trades, which appeared with Talus in Belgium. It describes women typographers and printers throughout history. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jeff Level

Worked at Autologic under Sumner Stone. Then moved to Monotype where he art director many fonts. Author, with Bruce Newman and Brenda Newman, of The Precision Type Font Reference (1995, Precision Type Inc). Rumoured to be working on version 6 of that book. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jennifer Bass

Daughter of Saul Bass. Author with Pat Kirkham of Saul Bass: A Life in Film&Design (2011). The book's blurb: This is the first book to be published on one of the greatest American designers of the 20th Century, who was as famous for his work in film as for his corporate identity and graphic work. With more than 1,400 illustrations, many of them never published before and written by the leading design historian Pat Kirkham, this is the definitive study that design and film enthusiasts have been eagerly anticipating. Saul Bass (1920-1996) created some of the most compelling images of American post-war visual culture. Having extended the remit of graphic design to include film titles, he went on to transform the genre. His best known works include a series of unforgettable posters and title sequences for films such as Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo and Otto Preminger's The Man With The Golden Arm and Anatomy of a Murder. He also created some of the most famous logos and corporate identity campaigns of the century, including those for major companies such as AT&T, Quaker Oats, United Airlines and Minolta. His wife and collaborator, Elaine, joined the Bass office in the late 1950s. Together they created an impressive series of award-winning short films, including the Oscar-winning Why Man Creates, as well as an equally impressive series of film titles, ranging from Stanley Kubrick s Spartacus in the early 1960s to Martin Scorsese s Cape Fear and Casino in the 1990s. Designed by Jennifer Bass, Saul Bass's daughter and written by distinguished design historian Pat Kirkham who knew Saul Bass personally, this book is full of images from the Bass archive, providing an in depth account of one of the leading graphic artists of the 20th century. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jerry Kelly

Author of various books on typography and type design. In 2011, he wrote About More Alphabets: The Types of Hermann Zapf (New York, The Typophiles). In 2007, he published Spend your alphabets lavishly! The work of Hermann & Gudrun Zapf (The Typophiles and RIT Cary Graphic Arts Press). The latter book is a catalogue of an exhibition at the Melbert B. Cary, Jr. Graphic Arts Collection of the Rochester Institute of Technology, and presents a survey of work by Hermann and Gudrun Zapf. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jerry Kelly and Alice Koeth

Editors of "Artist&Alphabet : 20th Century Calligraphy&Letter Art in America", a nice book on calligraphy. [Google] [More]  ⦿

J.F. Coakley

J. F. Coakley is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and on the staff of Houghton Library, at Harvard University. His private press, the Jericho Press, occasionally makes use of Syriac and other exotic types. In 2006, he wrote The Typography of Syriac: a Historical Catalogue of Printing Types, 1537-1958 (Oak Knoll Press, New Castle, DE). Oak Knoll writes: Syriac, a dialect of the ancient Aramaic language, has a remarkable Christian literature spanning a thousand years from the fourth to the thirteenth century, including important versions of the Bible. It remains the liturgical language of several churches in the Middle East, India, and the West, and 'Modern Syriac' is a vernacular still in use today. It is no wonder that this language has a long and rich printing history. The challenge of conveying the beautiful cursive Syriac script, in one or another of its three varieties, was taken up by many well-known type-designers in the letterpress era, from Robert Granjon in the sixteenth century to the Monotype and Linotype corporations in the twentieth, as well as by many lesser-known ones. This study records and abundantly illustrates no fewer than 129 different Syriac types, using archival documents, type-specimens, and the often scattered evidence of the print itself. The Typography of Syriac will be of interest not only to scholars of Middle Eastern languages and scripts but also to all historians of type and printing. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jim Byrne

Author of Accessible Web Typography. The web page corresponds to the book. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jim Felici

Jim Felici discusses extreme letter spacing. He is the author of The Complete Manual of Typography (Peachpit Press, 2003). This book is reviewed by John Berry. [Google] [More]  ⦿

J.J. Augustin

Author of Schriftproben: Orientalischer Typen wie auch Phonetische Akzente (1933, Glückstadt and Hamburg). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jodocus Hondius

Penman. Author of Theatrvm Artis scribendi, Varia Svmmorvm Nostri Seculi, Artificum exemplaria complectens (1594), a book with many European script specimens. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Joep Pohlen
[Polka Design / Letterfontein]

[More]  ⦿

Joep Pohlen
[Letterfountain: Bibliography]

[More]  ⦿

Johan Kroeger

German type expert who wrote a short survey paper in 1985 entitled Deutsche Schrägschriften. In it, he deals with cursive faces made between 1900 and 1935 in Germany. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Johann Friedrich Unger

German type designer, b. 1750, Berlin, d. 1804, Berlin. He had a press in Berlin, which he founded in 1780. His foundry started in 1791. He made Unger-Fraktur (1793-1794), which was revived by the following foundries: D. Stempel (1919), Julius Klinkhardt (Berthold) (1907), Otto Weisert (1927), Norddeutsche Schriftgiesserei, Schiftguss (1928), Delbanco (as DS-Unger-Fraktur), SoftMaker (2002: see J790 Blackletter on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD), Berthold (as Unger Fraktur BQ), and Ralph M. Unger (Unger Fraktur (2010); includes fett and mager). The metal font Kabinett-Fraktur (1938-1939, available from Johannes Wagner, for example) is identical. MyFonts page.

He became a professor of woodcutting at the Akademie der Künste in 1800. Brief bio by Harald rösler, 1999.

Unger's publications: Etwas über den Buchhandel, Buchdruckerey und den Druck außerhalb Landes (1787), Etwas über die Holz- und Formschneidekunst, und ihren Nutzen für den Buchdrucker (1788), Einige Gedanken über das Censur-Edikt vom 29. December 1788 (1789), Vorschlag, wie Landkarten auf eine sehr wohlfeile Art können gemeinnütziger gemacht werden (1791), Probe einer neuen Art deutscher Lettern (1793), Die neue Cecilia. Letzte Blätter von Karl Philipp Moritz. Zweite Probe neu veränderter deutscher Druckschrift (1794).

Samples of Unger-Fraktur: a poem, full alphabet, a blurb, uppercase, lowercase. Heinrich Heeger wrote in 1973 about the story of Unger Fraktur and Kabinett Fraktur.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Johann Jacob Losenawer

Author of Vorschrift Deutsch-Lateinisch und Franczösischer Schriften Geschrieben (Stuttgart, 1719, later edition in 1739). It has several calligraphic alphabets, and many elaborate initial caps: Sample, another sample, ample, and one more, and still more, and a final one for the road. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Johann Neudörffer

German writing master, 1497-1563, aka Johann Neudörffer The Elder, who founded his writing school in Nürnberg, and printed his first plates ca. 1519. These prints eventually became the foundation for a new kind of writing education throughout Europe. His writing manual and teachings helped further the development of blackletter. Author of Anweijsung einer gemeiner hanndschrift. Durch Johann Neudoerffer, Burger vnd Rechenmeister zu Nurmberg geordnet und gemacht (Nürnberg, 1538). Some of his methods are still alive in contemporary type design.

Oliver Linke, an expert on Neudörffer, and Christine Sauer published Zierlich schreiben Der Schreibmeister Johann Neudörffer der Ältere und seine Nachfolger in Nürnberg (2007, Beiträge zur Geschichte und Kultur der Stadt Nürnberg 25, Typographische Gesellschaft München / Stadtbibliothek Nürnberg). Several blackletter type families are named after him, such as Helmutt Bomm's Neudoerffer Fraktur (2009, Linotype) and 1519 Neudoerffer Fraktur (2012, Klaus-Peter Schäffel).

Samples: Fraktur-Versalien (1538), Initialen (1519). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Johanna Balusikova

Johanna Balusikova (b. 1974, Slovakia), now Johanna Bilak, studied typography at Atelier National de Création Typographique in Paris and at the Bratislava Art Academy in her native Slovakia, as well as at the Jan van Eyck Akademie in the Netherlands. She now works as a freelance graphic designer in The Hague, where she has lived since 1999. She designed Jigsaw (2000) at Typotheque: this was originally intended as a Multiple Master font that varies from roman to stencil.

At ATypI 2004 in Prague, she spoke about "Experiment and typography". Alternate URL. Co-editor with Alan Zaruba of We Want You To Love Type (2004, e-a-t). Since 2003 she is a partner in Peter Bilak's Typotheque. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Johanna Drucker

Author of "The Alphabetic Labyrinth : The Letters in History and Imagination". See also here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

John A. Lane

John A. Lane is a type historian, who often writes on typography. One of his crowning achievements is the book "Letterproeven van Nederlandse gieterijen" (1998), which shows Dutch typefounders' specimens from the Library of the KVB and other collections in the Amsterdam University Library with histories of the firms represented. It is coauthored with Mathieu Lommen, a noted type librarian and historian. Discussion of the text. Coauthor with Mathieu Lommen in 2003 of "Bram de Does Boektypograaf&Letterontwerper" (Amsterdam, 2003). Author of Early Type Specimens in the Plantin-Moretus Museum (New Castle and London: Oak Knoll Press and the British Library, 2004). [Google] [More]  ⦿

John D. Berry

Ex-developer of U&lc, the well-known type magazine at ITC in New York. After ITC's demise, he moved to San Francisco, and is best known nowadays for his excellent articles on typography at CreativePro.com. He is the author and designer of Dot-font: Talking About Fonts and Dot-font: Talking About Design (Mark Batty Publisher, 2006), and the editor of Language Culture Type (ATypI/Graphis, 2002), Contemporary Newspaper Design, and U&lc: influencing design&typography. He also wrote Now Read This (Microsoft, 2004), a book about Microsoft's ClearType project.

He writes and consults extensively on typography, and he has won numerous awards for his book designs. He lives in Seattle with the writer Eileen Gunn.

John Berry was on the board of the Type Directors Club from 1999 to 2003. At ATypI in Rome in 2002, he spoke about the Bukvaraz type competition. At ATypI 2004 in Prague, he spoke about newspaper type. John was the closing plenary speaker at ATypI 2007 in Brighton. In 2008, he joined Microsoft as a Program Manager in the typography team. Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam. President of ATypI from 2007 until 2013. Pic. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

John Gustave Dreyfus

Born in London in 1918, died in London in December 2002. Assistant University Printer, Cambridge University Press 1949-56 Cofounder of ATypI with Charles Peignot in 1957. He was the typographic advisor to The Monotype Corporation (now Agfa Monotype) from 1955-1982, having taken over from Stanley Morison. President, Association Typographique Internationale 1968-1973. Sandars Reader in Bibliography, Cambridge University 1979-1980. He was a great writer about typographic matters. Author of Aspects of French Eighteenth Century Typography (The Roxburghe Club, Cambdridge, 1982). Obituary and biography by Nicolas Barker. Winner of the Gutenberg Prize in 1996. Reflections on his life by various typographers. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

John H. Bowman

Programme Director for Library and Information Studies at University College, London. At the meeting in Thessaloniki in June 2002, he spoke about The fine printing of Greek in Britain and its types. Author of Greek printing types in Britain, from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century (Thessaloniki : Typophilia, 1998). That book is based on the author's thesis completed in 1988 for the Department of Typography and Graphic Communication at the University of Reading, England. [Google] [More]  ⦿

John J. Palmer
[Palmer and Rey]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

John M. Bergling

Great American calligrapher and engraver. He wrote several books, including "Engraving Designing Etching" (1914) and Art Alphabets and Lettering (1914). He was Master Engraver with the renowned C.D. Peacock jewelers in Chicago around 1900. Creator of many art alphabets, Bergling is also noted for state seals of the United States and many seal crests of foreign countries. His great-grandchildren set up Bergling Publishing and are selling directly or through Amazon most of his oeuvre. Other texts include "Art Monograms and Lettering" (1912), "Heraldic Designs for Artists and Craftspeople", and "Ornamental Designs and Illustrations".

Digital fonts based on Bergling's work: One Good Urn NF (2005, Nick Curtis) is based on his art nouveau lettering from 1914. Morocco (1914) provided the caps of Funky Tut NF (2005, Nick Curtis), and Keramic Text (1914) provided the lower cases characters of the latter font. Chantilly Lace NF (2005, Nick Curtis) uses uppercase letters by Bergling and lowercase letters by Roland W. Paul. His Nibs NF is a digital font by Nick Curtis (2007) based on the calligraphy of Bergling, ca. 1914. Carson Monogram (2009, Brian J. Bonislawsky) is based on Bergling's New Antique 53 from the book Art Monogram and Lettering. Bergling (2010, Scriptorium) is a floriate script based on Bergling's work. Other (art nouveau style) Scriptorium fonts based on Bergling include Boetia, Belgravia and Beaumains (2011). LHF Bergling Panels (2012, John Davis) is based on Bergling's work. Initials Bergling (2012, Alter Littera) is a comprehensive set of initials (usually referred to as Uncials, Lombardic Initials, or Lombards) of the French variety, adapted from Bergling's book Art Alphabets and Lettering (Second Edition) (1918, Chicago: Blakely-Oswald Printing Company). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

John Neal Booksellers

This bookseller from Greensboro, NC, specializes in calligraphy. "We supply calligraphers, lettering artists, illuminators, bookbinders and papercraft enthusiasts with books, tools and supplies including fine papers. Our selection of calligraphy books and supplies is unequaled in the world." [Google] [More]  ⦿

John Ryder

Prolific British author (b. 1917), who published, e.g., A suite of fleurons : or a preliminary enquiry into the history&combinable natures of certain printers' flowers (London : Phoenix House, 1956). Pictures, including cover page. This site has a font, Fleurons-A (based on A Suite of Fleurons by John Ryder, developed by S. G. Moye v1.6 July 14, 1991). [Google] [More]  ⦿

John S. Fass

American typographer. In 1954, he wrote Hammer Creek. The Hammer Creek Press Type Specimen Book (NY). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Johnson Ball

Author of "Wiliam Caslon 1693-1766" (Kineton: The Roundwood Press, 1973), a 494-page magnum opus on Caslon's life. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Johnston's Underground Type
[Edward Johnston]

Greg Fleming, upon the publication of his open source version Railway Sans (2012) of Edward Johnston's Railway Type of 1916, recalls the history of the typeface, and adds valuable references. The text below is his.

The face was commissioned between 1913 and 1915 by Frank Pick (1878-1941), Commercial Manager of the Underground Electric Railways Company of London, UERL, also known as The Underground Group, as part of his plan to strengthen the company's corporate identity. Frustrated at the diversity and seemingly endless variations of poor or unsuitable type- faces that were, at that time, in use across the system, one of his first key actions was to introduce a standardised approach to advertising and lettering. Pick's brief to Johnston was essentially that a typeface was needed that would ensure that the Underground Group's posters would not be mistaken for advertisements; it should have the bold simplicity of the authentic lettering of the finest periods and yet belong unmistakably to the twentieth century. Johnston's New Sans face first appeared in a poster of July 1916. Inspired by the proportions of classical Roman lettering, based on square and circular forms, it is a vehicle of bold clarity and a perfect example of typography as a powerful, authoritative information tool. It has been used, almost unchanged in essence, continuously and timelessly in signage, posters and publicity for nearly a century.

In 1933, The Underground Group was absorbed by the London Passenger Transport Board and the typeface was adopted as part of the London Transport brand. The typeface was originally called Underground. It became known as Johnston's Railway Type, and later, simply, Johnston or New Johnston Sans. Today, Transport for London uses updated versions in many weights of the original face, known as New Johnston Sans. This is not commercially available, except under strict TfL license. Railway is not based on or derived from the official New Johnston Sans in current use by Transport for London. Instead, it predates New Johnston by sixty-three years.

The references:

  • Justin Howes: Johnston's Underground Type. Harrow Weald: Capital Transport. 2000.
  • Oliver Green and Jeremny Rewse-Davies: Designed for London: 150 years of transport design. London: Laurence King. Pages 81-82. 1995.
  • Christian Barman: The Man Who Built London Transport: A Biography of Frank Pick. David & Charles. Page 43. 1979.
  • Colin Banks: London's Handwriting: The development of Edward Johnston's Underground railway block-letter. London Transport Museum. 1994.
  • Eiichi Kono: Pen to Printer --- New Johnston Sans. University of Brighton, Arts Faculty Staff member page.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Jordan Davies Books

New antiquarian type book seller. They offer, for example, a nearly complete collection of works by Eric Gill. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jorge de Buen Unna

Jorge de Buen (b. 1956, Mexico City) studied Graphic Design in Mexico City. In 1994 he moved to Tijuana to work in marketing and communication projects for the Agua Caliente race and sports books. He has conducted several workshops and conferences at many important Latin American institutions. The second edition of his book Manual de diseno editorial (Santillana, 2000) is published in 2003, and the third edition in 2009. He spoke at ATypI 2003 in Vancouver on a new approach to typometry, and at ATypI 2009 in Mexico City on quotation marks (las comillas), where he pointed out that the <<...>> used in Spanish were just a natural evolution of the standard quotation marks (66...99).

He designed Unna Romana (2003), Unna (2004, serif family, done at Imprimatur) and Bardahlkia (1994). He often shows up in LA for type activities.

He moved to Querétaro in 2009 and is graphic designer there---his studio is called Imprimatvr. The first typeface published at Imprimatvr is Caliente (2012).

In 2011, he placed Unna up for free download at the Google Font Directory, and started cooperating with Hector Gatti and Pablo Cosgaya at Omnibus Type.

At Tipos Latinos 2012, Jorge won an award in the text category for Unna regular.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

José Cruzado

Spanish author of Muestraio de los caracteres de la imprenta / José Cruzado (Madrid, 1990, 147 pages). [Google] [More]  ⦿

José Gestoso Pérez

Author of Documentos para la historia de la primitiva tipografia mexicana, La Andalucía Moderna, 1908. [Google] [More]  ⦿

José Luis Martín Montesinos

Author of Ricard Girald Miracle. El diálogo entre la tipografía y el diseño gráfico. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Joseph Balthazard Silvestre

Author of Alphabet Album Collection de soixante feuilles d'alphabets historiques et fleurons (Paris, 1843). Creator of an alphabet in 1834 in which each letter consists of human figures. See also here. The alphabet is referred to as the Silvestre-Girault alphabet, because it was etched by Girault. A digitization by Character (2006) is called SilvestreBodies. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Joseph Bertram Jowitt

Author of Modern Show Card Writing (1922, National Drug Clerk). One Victorian alphabet served as a model for Nick Curtis's Shangri-La NF (2000, 2008). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Joseph Kiermeier-Debre

Joseph Kiermeier-Debre and Fritz Franz Vogel wrote Menschenalphabete. Nackte Models, Wilde Typen, Modische Charaktere (2001, Jonas Verlag, Marburg), about alphabets made up of people. See also here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Joseph Thorp

British author who died in 1962. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Joshua Langman
[Orbis Typographicus]

[More]  ⦿

Jost Hochuli

Swiss typographer and book designer, b. 1933, Sankt Gallen. After study at the Kunstgewerbeschule St.Gallen, he trained as a compositor with the printer Zollikofer and at the Kunstgewerbeschule Zürich; his education as completed in 1959 in Adrian Frutiger's class at the École Estienne. Since then he has practised as a freelance graphic designer, eventually specializing in book design. In 1979 he co-founded the co-operatively run publishing company VGS Verlagsgemeinschaft St.Gallen, for which much of his book design work has been done. He has taught at the schools at Zurich and then St.Gallen since 1967.

His publications include Book Design in Switzerland, "Book Design: Theory and Practice", Detail in typography (Agfa Compugraphic, Wilmington, 1987), Designing Books: Practice and Theory (with Robin Kinross, 1996), "Book typography" (Agfa Compugraphic, Wilmington, 1990), "Jost Hochuli's Alphabugs" (Agfa Compugraphic, Wilmington, 1990), "Jost Hochuli: Printed matter, mainly books", Buchgestaltung in der Schweiz, "Kleine Geschichte der geschriebenen Schrift" (Verlag Typophil, St. Gallen, 1991, Agfa Compugraphic-Reihe), Das Detail in der Typographie. Buchstaben, Buchstabenabstand, Wort, Wortabstand, Zeile, Zeilenabstand, Kolumne (Compugraphic Corp., Wilmington, 1987), "Bücher machen. Eine Einführung in die Buchgestaltung, im besonderen in die Buchtypographie" (Compugraphic Corp, Wilmington, 1989). Winner of the Gutenberg Prize in 1999.

He is part of the type foundry ABC Litera together with Roland Stieger and Jonas Niedermann. at ABC Litera, he designed the sans family Allegra (2011). Earlier in his career, he designed quite a few typefaces, including a Trajan woodcut that served Roland Stieger as model for his typeface Alena (2012).

Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Juan-José Marcos García
[Alphabetum]

[More]  ⦿

Judith Schalansky

Ex-student from the Fachhochschule Potsdam and the Freie Universität Berlin, b. 1980. Author of Fraktur Mon Amour (Hermann Schmidt Verlag, 2006, and Princeton Architectural Press, 2008), in which blackletter is discussed and shown at length. Interview. List of Fraktur fonts on the CD. Fraktur Mon Amour won several awards, such as the 2007 Award for Typographic Excellence of the Type Directors Club of New York, and a silver medal from the Art Directors Club Deutschland, also in 2007. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Juhuj

This site has over 500 million PDF files on all topics. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jukka Korpela
[Tutorial on character codes]

[More]  ⦿

Jules Didot

Fourth generation Didot dynasty member in Paris, 1794-1871. Son of Pierre Didot. Jules Didot is famous for his invention of round-edged initials, to take the place of the sharp-edged ones. In 1825 he took his printing plant to Brussels and founded the Royal Printing House there. Relevant here is the publication Specimen des caractères de la fonderie normale à Bruxelles, provenant de la fonderie de Jules Didot et de son père Pierre Didot (Haarlem: Joh. Enschedé en Zonen, 1914). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Jules Didot
[Fonderie Normale]

[More]  ⦿

Julian Rothenstein and Mel Gooding

Authors of ABZ: More Alphabets and Other Signs (Chronicle Books), a 221-page book full of strange alphabets. Scan of a Tamilianized Latin alphabet. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Julien Gineste

In 2010, Sandra Chamaret, Julien Gineste and Sébastien Morlighem Morlighem wrote Roger Excoffon et la fonderie Olive. see also here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Julius Rodenberg

Author of In der Schmiede der Schrift Karl Klingspor und sein Werk (1940, Buchmeister Verlag, Berlin), a German book set in blackletter. It tells a bit of Karl Klingspor's story through his involvement at the Rudhardsche Giesserei in Offenbach a.M. (1892-1905) (with sections on Heinz König, Otto Eckmann and Peter Behrens), his startup of Gebr. Klingspor in 1906 (with sections on Otto Hupp, Rudolf Koch and Walter Tiemann). He also penned Die Deutsche Schriftgiesserei (Verlag der Gutenberg-Gesellschaft, Mainz, 1927), which describes the foundries in Germany at the time. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Just Another Foundry
[Tim Ahrens]

Just Another Foundry was established in 2005 by Tim Ahrens (b. 1976, Heidelberg, Germany). He studied architecture at the University of Kasrlsruhe and type design at the University of Reading (2007). He now lives in Oxford, where he works as a type designer and architect. In 2005 he established Just Another Foundry. His typefaces:

  • Mashine (2005). An octagonal / mechanical family.
  • His MA project in Reading was based on Herb (2007), a hookish display face. Herb was extended in 2010 into a full family, which is still genetically linked to blackletters.
  • Facit (2005, sans family).
  • Zalamander (2006). An angular comic book family. Scans: i, ii, iii, iv.
  • Lapture (2004). A redesign of Albert Kapr's (angular, calligraphic) Leipziger Antiqua of 1971.
  • With Brian Jaramillo, he designed JAF Peacock from 2007-2010. It was inspired by the Flair typefaces of the 1970s and contains 1200 glyphs and alternates.
  • JAF Domus Titling (2011). Designed with Shoko Mugikura, this is a rounded typeface with classical Roman proportions.
  • The sans serif family Linotype Aroma (1999).
  • JAF Bernini Sans (2012), a winner at TDC 2013. A corporate humanist sans family consisting of tens of styles, from compressed to narrow and regular, and partitioned into a serious JAF Bernino Sans and a more playful JAF Bernina Sans. The ample choices, especially in degrees of compression, makes this a prime candidate for the 2012 Oscars.

At ATypI 2008 in St. Petersburg, he spoke about Font Remix Tools and on Optical Sizes. In 2010, he started a web font service. In 2011, I found his name listed as an employee of the web font service Typekit.

Author of Size-specific Adjustments to Type Designs: An Investigation of the Principles Guiding the Design of Optical Sizes (2008, Mark Batty Publisher). Technical image from that book.

Abstract Fonts link. MyFonts page. FontShop link. Linotype page. Home page. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Justin Howes
[H.W. Caslon&Co Ltd]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Jürgen F. Schopp

From the University of Tampere, Finland, Jürgen F. Schopp's list of books on typography. He also has a nice page on type classification. For "broken" typefaces (gebrochene Schriften), Schopp proposes this:

  • Gotisch: e.g., Cloister Black, Engravers Old English, Manuskript-Gotisch, Weiß-Gotisch, Wilhelm-Klingspor-Schrift.
  • Rundgotisch: e.g., Rhapsody, Weiß-Rundgotisch, Wallau.
  • Schwabacher: e.g., Alte Schwabacher.
  • Fraktur: e.g., Kanzlei fett, Neue Luther-Fraktur, Zentenar-Fraktur, Unger-Fraktur, Walbaum-Fraktur.
  • Frakturvarianten: e.g., American Text.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Jürgen Siebert

In 1995, Siebert (b. 1956) designed Ampelmaennchen for FontShop International. Jürgen Siebert is co-editor of the FontBook typeface encyclopaedia, a member of the FontFont Typeboard and, since November 2001, the Chief Marketing Officer of FontShop AG. Bio. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Kai F. Oetzbach
[Typo Knowledge Base (tkb)]

[More]  ⦿

Karel Dyrynk

Czech designer and book artist (1876-1949). Director of the state press Statni Tiskarna. Author of these books: Typograf o Knihach (1925, Prague), Rules of Typesetting (Pravidla sazby), The Book Beautiful (Krasna Kniha).

Typefaces include Dyrynk Lateinschrift (1928, A. Gregr typefoundry---Dyrynkova Latinka in Czech; Burian mentions that it is from 1930), Malostranska Antiqua (1927), Malostranska Italic (1928), Gregr Roman (1930), Gregr Italic (1931), Otakar Brezina (1946, Statni Tiskarna), Biblicke pismo (1933, unpublished), Konupek Italic (1946, unpublished), and a set of pictograms (1933, Statni Tiskarna).

Digitizations: Dyrynk Lateinschrift was the basis of P22 Dyrynkova-Latinka (2003), and P22 Dyrynk Roman and Italic (Richard Kegler, P22, 2004).

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Karen Cheng

Graphic designer and associate professor in the visual communications program at the University of Washington, Seattle. Author of Designing Type (2005, Yale University Press). Karen Cheng is Associate Professor in the Visual Communication Design program at the University of Washington in Seattle, where she teaches type design and typography. She was previously an instructor at the School of Design at the University of Cincinnati, where she received her Masters degree in Graphic Design. Speaker at ATypI 2007 in Brighton on Teaching type in the city. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Karl Gerstner

Born in Basel in 1930, Gerstner designed Gerstner Programm (1967), Privata, and Gerstner Original (1987, Berthold; see Gerling on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, 2002), as well as the Akzidenz-Grotesk family (1962, Berthold) and Akzidenz-Grotesk Buch (see Atkins on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, 2002). In the 1980, he designed a didone for IBM's identity. That typeface is now available from URW++ under the name IBM Bodoni.

Gerstner is best known for his eccentricity in design, and his use of equally eccentric type (often Grotesk) to accompany his designs. The designer as programmer Karl Gerstner Review of 5x10 Years of Graphic Design is a book on Gerstner's influence as a designer, edited by Manfred Kröplien Hatje Cantz. He was trained under Armin Hofmann and Emil Ruder at the School of Design in Basel. He co-founded the advertising agency GCK which has been responsible for a number of promotional campaigns and corporate identities.

His books include Integral Typography (1959), The New Graphic Art (1959), Designing Programs (1963), and Compendium for Literates (1970). In 1972, an entire issue of Typografische Monatsblatter was devoted to Gerstner. Also in 1972, he wrote Kompendium für Alphabeten (last edition: 2000, Verlag Niggli AG).

BERTLib now sells his KG Privata and KG Vera type families (Vera is a new name). Berthold markets his extensive sans family Gerstner Next (2007, with Dieter Hofrichter), which is based on Gerstner Original BQ (1987).

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Karl Klimsch

Type designer, b. 1867. He created Flinsch-Germanisch (1876, Flinsch), a blackletter face. Dover republished two books by this author: 2,100 Victorian Monograms (1994), and Florid Victorian Ornament (1977). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Karl Vöhringer

Author of Druckschriften kennenlernen, unterscheiden, anwenden (Verlag Form und Technik, Stuttgart). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Karl-Erik Forsberg

Calligrapher and type designer, born in Munsö, Sweden, in 1914. He died in 1995 in Nyhamslaege [note: MyFonts states 1998]. Studied at the Gewerbeschule in Basel from 1946-1947. He became Sweden's grand master of the book arts. His best-known typeface is Berling. His typefaces:

  • Berling. This consists of Berling Anitkva (1951) and Berling Bold (1951-1958). Digital revivals: Bestseller, Belfast Serial (on the SoftMaker MegaFont XXL CD, 2002 and at Infinitype), Bitstream's Revival565, Berling SB (2004, Scangraphic), Berling Nova (Text and Display) (2003-2004, Linotype, by Örjan Nordling and Fredrik Andersson, with advice from Akira Kobayashi).
  • Parad (1936-1941).
  • Lunda (1938-1942). A tribute to Berlingska Stilgjuteriet in Lund, a Swedish type foundry (1837-1980) which supported Forsberg from the start. Lunda Modern (1998, Stefan Hattenbach) is an extension of Lunda.
  • Ericus.
  • Aros Antiqua (for "Tryckcentra i Västerås").
  • Carolus (1953-1954). Pen-drawn capitals for Letraset/Mecanorma systems. See C653-Deco on the SoftMaker Megafont CD, or Carleton by Corel.
  • An early unnamed and unfinished face of Forsberg formed the basis of the Remontoire family (1998, Stefan Hattenbach).

His books in Swedish include

  • Antiqua, Vandring bland bokstavsformer, Norstedts 1957.
  • Exlibris, monogram och andra märken, Norstedts 1981.
  • Bokstaven i mitt liv, Norstedts 1982.
  • Mina bokstäver, Wikens förlag, 1983.
  • Skrift, Handledning i kalligrafi, Norstedts 1986.
  • Schrift, Wittig Verlag, Hamburg, 1987.
  • Bokstaven och ordet, Wikens förlag, 1990.
  • Vandring bland bokstavsformer, Norstedts, 1992.
  • Alpha Magica, Calligrafia förlag, 1994.

FontShop link. Klingspor link. CV. Linotype page. Bio in Swedish by Curt Ahnström. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Kate Clair

Coauthor with Cynthia Busic-Snyder of A Typographic Workbook A Primer To History Techniques and Artistry (Second Edition: 2005, John Wiley, NY). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Kees Broos

Kees Broos and David Quay wrote Wim Crouwel Alphabets (Amsterdam, BIS, 2003). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ken Lunde

Dr. Ken Lunde is Manager of CJKV Type Development at Adobe Systems Incorporated, San Jose, CA. He holds a Ph.D. (1994) in Linguistics from The University of Wisconsin-Madison. He wrote Understanding Japanese Information Processing (O'Reilly&Associates, 1993), and CJKV Information Processing (O'Reilly&Associates, 1999). He also wrote CJKV Information Processing: Chinese, Japanese, Korean&Vietnamese Computing 9O'Reilly). In 2010, Adobe will release the first genuinely proportional Japanese font, Kazuraki (by Japanese type designer Ryoko Nishizuka), which was developed at Adobe in 2009 under his management. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Khatt Books

Book publisher in the Middle East that specializes in typography and type design, both for Latin and Arabic. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Klimis Mastoridis

Director of the University of Macedonia Press and Chairman of AlterVision, Typography and Visual Communication Ltd. Author of various books, including "Casting the Greek newspaper" (Hellenic Literary and Historical Archive, Thessaloniki, 1999), and editor of "Hyphen, a typographic forum". The Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Typography&Visual Communication were published in 2004 by University of Macedonia Press. Articles in English by John Bowman, Justin Howes, Yannis Haralambous, Ole Lund, Petra Cerne Oven, Milena Dobreva, Manolis Savidis, James Mosley, Barry Roseman, Peter Karow, Maria Nicholas, Stephan Fuessel, Mary Dyson, Victor Koen, Michael Twyman, Phil Baines, Andrew Boag, Paul Stiff, Karel van der Waarde, Jannis Androutsopoulos, Petr van Blokland, Garrett Boge, Evripides Zantides, Alan Marshall, Christopher Burke, Jean-François Porchez, Simon Daniels, David Lemon, Hrant Papazian, Sadik Karamustafa and others, and edited by Klimis Mastoridis. The loneliness of Greek typography: Myth or reality? is the title of his talk at ATypI 2008 in St. Petersburg. Founder of the International Conference on Typography and Visual Communication (ICTVC) that was until 2007 held in Thessaloniki, Greece. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Knowles and Maxim

Authors in Pittsfield, MA, of Real Pen Work---Self Instructor in Penmanship (1881). Selected alphabets: Slanted Letters, Business Letters, Capitals, Ornamental Alphabet, Rustic Alphabet, German Text, Old English, Marking Alphabet, Steel Pen Capitals. Additional drawings: Fists, afish, a lion, a deer, a horse, two horses, flourished heads. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Kurt Weidemann

Born in Eichmedien, Masuren, East Prussia in 1922, Kurt Weidemann died on arch 31, 2011. He studied at the State Academy for Fine Arts in Stuttgart, 1953-1955. From 1965-1985, he was professor at the Staatliche Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Stuttgart. From 1987 onwards, corporate identity consultant to Daimler-Benz. Weidemann also helped with the identities of companies such as Porsche, Zeiss, and Deutsche Bahn. From 1991 onwards, he taught at the Hochschule für Gestaltung at the Zentrum für Kunst- und Medientechnologie in Karlsruhe. Author of Wo der Buchstabe das Wort führt Ansichten über Schrift und Typographie (Stuttgart, 2000). He lived in Stuttgart, and enjoyed a reputation as an outspoken and lively speaker.

FontShop link. Video by Die Gestalten. Picture. Another image. Smiling. At home during the Die Gestalten interview. Painting of him.

He had great ideas about type and book design. For example, he always started designing the most frequently used letters, in this order: enirstadu, and claimed that the other letters are much less important. His typefaces:

  • Biblica (1979). Commissioned by the German Bible Society.
  • The extensive Corporate A (serif), E (slab) and S (sans) series (1985-1990), available from URW (since 1998), MyFonts, and Berthold. The Corporate series was exclusively designed for DaimlerChrysler as a corporate font. URW++ enhanced the Corporate ASE family in regular, bold, italic, and bold italic by Greek, Cyrillic, and all additional Latin characters to cover Eastern Europe. Corporate ME for the Middle East was released by URW in 2012.
  • ITC Weidemann (1983, a digital version of Weidemann's Biblica face.

Klingspor link.

Kurt Weidemann's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Kvartira Belogo

A goldmine with full scans of many old Russian books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

La Operina
[Ludovico Vicentino degli Arrighi]

Full e-text of the first book on writing, La Operina (Ludovico Vicentino degli Arrighi, 1522), a 32-page book about Arrighi's calligraphic lettering. Comments by G. Briem. Briem writes: The author was a copyist, papal scribe, publisher and type designer. He called himself Ludovico Vicentino, and wrote the name eight times into his short text. Yet we know him as Arrighi, a name that appears nowhere in the book. Operina shows great handwriting on every page. It is more than a set of model sheets, however. It describes Arrighi's underlying forms and two basic entry movements. It covers the spacing of lines, words and letters. It deals with slant and joins. Operina is a slim volume of 32 pages. It teaches italic handwriting and is still essential reading. Each page was printed from a separate woodcut by Ugo da Carpi, who is best known as a master of chiaroscuro engraving. Title page. Page 20. Page 26. Page 27. Page 28. Page 29. Page 30. Last page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ladislas Mandel

Born in 1921 in Transylvania, he trained at the Fine Arts Academy of Budapest (Hungary) and then at the Beaux-Arts in Rouen (Normandy, France). Ladislas Mandel was a stonecutter, painter and sculptor. However, he spent his life in France, mostly as a type designer at Deberny&Peignot, where he worked since 1954. In 1955, he headed the type atelier. He was taught by and cooperated with Adrian Frutiger during nine years at Deberny, finally succeeding Frutiger in 1963 as type director. In 1955, he was in charge of the transformation of the Deberny type repertoire from lead to phototype. He created original designs under the label International Photon Corporation, and turned independent designer in 1977. After that, he specialized in typefaces for telephone directories, and made, e.g., Colorado in 1998 with Richard Southall for US West. He cofounded the ANCT in Paris in 1985 and taught there and at Paris VIII. In 1998, he published the book Ecritures, miroir des hommes et des sociétés (éditions Perrousseaux), which was followed in 2004 by Du pouvoir de l'écriture at the same publisher. He died on October 20, 2006. Olivier Nineuil's description of his achievements.

  • His faces for the Lumitype-IPC (International Photon Corporation) catalogue include originals as well as many interpretations of famous typefaces: Arabica Arabic (1975), Aster (1960-1970), Aurélia (1967), Baskerville (1960-1970), Bodoni (1960-1970), Bodoni Cyrillic (1960-1970), Cadmos Greek (1974), Cancellaresca, (1965) Candida (1960-1970), Caslon (1960-1970), Century (1960-1970), Clarendon (1960-1970), Edgware (1974), Formal Gothic (1960-1970), Frank Ruehl Hebreu (1960-1970: this became one of the most popular Hebrew faces ever), Gill Sans (1960-1970), Gras Vibert (1960-1970), Hadassah (1960-1970), Haverhill (1960-1970), Imprint (1960-1970), Janson (1960-1970), Mir Cyrillic (1968), Modern (1960-1970), Nasra Arabic (1972), Néo Vibert (1960-1970), Néo-Peignot (1960-1970), Newton (1960-1970), Olympic (1960-1970), Plantin (1960-1970), Rashi Hebreu, Sofia (1967), Sophia Cyrillic (1969), Sphinx (1960-1970), Textype (1960-1970), Thai (1960-1970), Thomson (1960-1970), Times Cyrillic (1960-1970), Univad (1974), Weiss (1960-1970).
  • Types done or revived at Deberny&Peignot: Antique Presse (1964, Deberny&Peignot), Times (1964).
  • Types for phone directories: Clottes (1986, Sneat - France Telecom), Colorado (1998, U.S. West, created with the help of Richard Southall), Galfra (1975, Seat, Promodia, Us Seat, English Seat: there are versions called Galfra Italia (1975-1981), Galfra Belgium (1981), Galfra UK (1990), and Galfra US (1979-1990)), Lettar (1975, CCETT- Rennes), Letar Minitel (1982-1983), Linéale (1987, ITT-World Directories), Lusitania (1987, ITT-World Directories), Nordica 1985 (ITT-World Directories: Nineuil says that this is done in 1987-1988), Seatypo Italie (1980).
  • Other typefaces: Portugal, Messidor (1983-1985, old style numerals font for the Imprimerie Nationale), Solinus (great!!, 1999), Laura (1999).
Ladislas Mandel, l'homme derrière la lettre is Raphael de Courville's thesis in 2008 at Estienne. In 1999, Olivier Nineuil wrote Ladislas Mandel: Explorateur de la typo français (Etapes graphiques, vol. 10, pp. 44-64). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Lars Müller

Lars Müller edited the book HELVETICA---Homage to a typeface (Lars Müller Publishers, Baden, Swtzerland, 2002). Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Lars Olof Laurentii

Born in Stockholm in 1941, he is a Swedish lithographer, left-handed calligrapher, type and graphic designer, artist and teacher or ex-teacher at the following schools: Beckman Design School, Bergs Design School, and his own Schola Laurentii. One of Sweden's main graphic designers, he has created 1300 logos in Sweden, some of which have won awards, most notably from TDC in 1975. From 1974-1984 he developed the ten weight classic text family called Jonsson Roman. In 1983, he changed his name to Lars Olof Laurentii.

Author of Textning, grundbok i kalligrafi (Forma Publishing Group f.d.ICA-förlaget, 2001-03). He currently runs Flora&Lettera AB and Schola Laurentii. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Laura Meseguer

Designer (b. Barcelona, 1968) at type-o-tones in Barcelona. She publishes as well as promotes all her type designs through her own type foundry, Type--Tones. In 2003-2004, she took a year off and took the postgraduate Type and Media course at KABK (Royal Academy of Art) in The Hague, Holland. She is a professor of typography in Spain. Author of TypoMag. Typography in Magazines (IndexBook) and co-author of Cómo crear tipograías. Del boceto a la pantalla (Tipo E). MyFonts link. Fontshop link. Her typefaces:

  • Adelita.
  • Cortada: her first typeface. In 2012, she published the angular signage face Cortada Dos at Type O Tones.
  • Dauro (2013), a corporate typeface done for the olive oil brand Dauro. From the original typeface in use, Chronicle Bold Condensed, she designed an outline version, then Lingotillo (Little gold bar: beveled) and finally Grabado (engraved).
  • Frankie (1992, a grunge font done with Juan Dávila). Frankie is the result of a process of erosion, photocopying, scanning and digitisation based on the Franklin Gothic type (1904, Morris Fuller Benton).
  • Gallard.
  • Guapa (2011). A thin monoline curlified display face with an art deco aroma. Followed in 2012 by Guapa Deco.
  • Lola (2013). A comic book face started in 1997 based on an alphabet found in Schriftschreiben Schriftzeichnen by Eugen Nerdinger and Lisa Beck. Lola won an award at TDC 2013. Its outgrowth, Lalola (1997-2013), won a TDC 2014 Certificate of Excellence.
  • Multi (2012). A magazine type family, with weights from hairline to black.
  • Rumba (2003-2007): this semi-script family won an award at the TDC2 2005 type competition.
  • In 2009, the low-to-zero contrast Alexander Girard family was published by House Industries. It consists of Girard Sky, Girard Script, Girard Display, Girard Sansusie and Girard Slab in many weights and styles. It was created by Laura Meseguer based on the lettering used to announce the textile designs that Alexander Girard did for Herman Miller in 1955.
  • Magasin (2013, Type o Tones) is a connected retro-chic upright script typeface. She writes: Some examples that have inspired me are Corvinus (Imre Reiner, 1934) and Quirinus (Alessandro Butti, 1939) and the later Fluidum (1951), a kind of non-connected script version of Quirinus, also designed by Alessandro Butti for Nebiolo foundry.

Interview by MyFonts.

Behance link.

Interview by Unostiposduros. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Laure Bernard

Author of "Lettres de pierre" (2004, ed. Alain Paccoud). This book describes the stone engraving art of Jean-Claude Lamborot (b. 1921), who works in Beaujeu in the Beaujolais region. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Laurent Pflughaupt

French author (b. Algrange, 1964) of Lettres Latines (Éditions Alternatives, 2003). Calligrapher and activist for calligraphy in the streets of Paris. [Google] [More]  ⦿

L'aventure des écritures

Pages (in French) on the history of writing printing. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Lawrence Wallis

British freelance writer, lecturer, consultant and columnist for Print Week, d. 2008. For 20 years he was Director of International Marketing for the Pre-press Division of AM International, and was Typesetting Systems Advisor to Crosfield Electronics and Monotype.

Author of Electronic Typesetting: a quarter century of technological upheaval (1984), Leonard Jay: Master Printer-Craftsman (1963), Type Design Developments 1970-1985 (1985), Dictionary of Graphic Arts Abbreviations (1986), A Concise Chronology of Typesetting Developments 1886-1986 (1988), A Modern Encyclopedia of Typefaces 1960-1990 (1990), and Typomania (1999).

He also wrote The Monotype Chronicles.

Phil Baines: He was one of the good guys, always generous with his time and advice. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Lazydogs: Bitte Setzen

Author of Bitte setzen! The Typefaces Of The Letterpress Printshop Fliegenkopf (2013). The blurb: The Fliegenprobe---probably one of the last letterpress specimens---was released in a limited edition, consisting of two volumes and an accompanying box with large format prints. The project was started under the appeal »bitte setzen!« in summer 2008 bMunich Designschool in collaboration with the letterpress printshop Fliegenkopf. The ambitious goal was to create a specimen of the approximately 170 different typefaces of the workshop. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Lazydogs Typefoundry
[Oliver Linke]

Lazydogs Typefoundry is a German foundry located in Augsburg, est. 2005, by Oliver Linke, Robert Strauch and Kai Büschl. They do custom type work. Oliver Linke (b. 1971, Odenwald, Germany) studied graphic design at the University of Applied Sciences Augsburg, Germany and the University of Missouri, Kansas City (19931-1998). He continued his studies in art history, art education and philosophy (2000-2005) at the University of Augsburg. He teaches type design and typography in München (at the Blocherer Schule) and Augsburg.

Lazydogs published some commercial faces, such as Fabiol (2005, Robert Strauch), a winner at the TDC 2005 type competition. Oliver Linke created the Lazydogs Finn family (2006, a gorgeous delicate sans).

At ATypI 2007 in Brighton, he spoke about Masterpieces of Johann Neudörffer the Elder (1497-1563). In 2007, Oliver Linke and Christine sauer published Zierlich schreiben Der Schreibmeister Johann Neudörffer der Ältere und seine Nachfolger in Nürnberg (Beiträge zur Geschichte und Kultur der Stadt Nürnberg 25, Typographische Gesellschaft München / Stadtbibliothek Nürnberg).

Other typefaces: Pandera (2008, Robert Strauch), Fabiol (2005, Robert Strauch), Vela (2010, a text typeface), North (2008, Trine Rask).

Typefaces from 2013: Streets of London (a complete lapidary font family out of a capital alphabet designed by the British stone cutter and type designer David Kindersley (1915-1995), a former apprentice of Eric Gill).

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Lee Hendrix

Lee Hendrix and Thea Vignau-Wilberg wrote The Art of the Pen Calligraphy from the Court of the Emperor Rudolf II (2002, Getty Publications, Getty Museum, Los Angeles). The promotional blurb about this beautiful booklet: The court of Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II produced nothing more amazing than the Mira colligrophioe monumenta, a flamboyant demonstration of two arts-calligraphy and miniature painting. The project began when Rudolf's predecessor commissioned the master calligrapher Georg Bocskay to create a model book of calligraphy. A preeminent scribe, Bocskay assembled a vast selection of contemporary and historic scripts. Many were intended not for practical use but for virtuosic display. Years later, at Rudolf's behest, court artist Joris Hoefnagel filled the spaces on each manuscript page with images of fruit, flowers, insects, and other natural minutiae. The combination of word and images is rare and, on its tiny scale, constitutes one of the marvels of the Central European Renaissance. The manuscript is now in the collections of the Getty Museum. Forty-eight of its pages are reproduced in this book, containing samples of classic italic hands; historical, invented, and exhibition hands; Rotunda, a classicizing humanist script based on Carolingian minuscule; classically based scripts; and Gothic blackletter and chancery. Other publications include An Abecedarium: Illuminated Alphabets From The Court Of Emperor Rudolf Ii An Abecedarium: Illuminated Alphabets From The Court Of Emperor Rudolf II (1997). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Les Chiffres et Festons de Modes&Travaux

Volume I in the collection "Recke" (Editions Edouard Boucherit) has 45 alphabets. Scans of the pages are now publically available. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Leslie Cabarga
[Flashfonts]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Letterfountain: Bibliography
[Joep Pohlen]

The type design and typography bibliography of Letterfontein, Joep Pohlen's successful book. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Letterhead Studio YG
[Yuri Gordon]

Letterhead is Yuri Gordon's (b. Moscow, 1958) Moscow-based foundry which publishes mainly Cyrillic fonts. Its coowners are Valery Golyzhenkov and Olga Vassilkova and it was established in 1998. It evolved from Garbage Type Foundry. Not to be confused with Chuck Davis' Letterhead. The main designer is Yuri (or: Jury) Gordon, the Moscow-based designer of the Type Directors Club 1999 award-winning designs Dve Kruglyh and FaRer Cyrillic, available from Paratype. URL at Yakovlev's Foundry. Picture. Article in the Moscow Times (2006), in which he proclaims: Better to make five fun and tasty new display fonts than one old, boring (and you thought it would look fresh!) text font. He is a graphic designer, illustrator, type designer, engraver and copyrighter. He is Art Director of several magazines.

  • Yuri Gordon created AntiQuasi (2008, a nice lightly slabbed serif family), Babaev [1996; inspired by the Russian Art Nouveau typefaces, initially created as a part of a corporate identity programme for Babayevskoye AO of Moscow], Artemius (custom designed family for Art Lebedev Studio), Barrizmo (2004), Bistro (1997, handprinted), Chantage (2000, handwriting), Conqueror Text, Conqueror Slab and Conqueror Display (large families), Conqueror Sans (2005-2010), Conqueror Text (2005-2010), Costa Brava (fun script), Costa Dorada, Dva Probela (1997-1998), Dve Kruglyh (1997), Excession (1999), FaRer [1996; art deco face inspired by the work of Russian graphic artists Vladimir Favorsky (1886-1964) and Ivan Rerberg (1892-1957), especially by Favorsky's lettering of 1924 and by Rerberg's of 1935. Dedicated to the Moscow Underground (Metro). Obtained an award at the 1997 TDC competition], Forward No. 10 (1995-1996), Forward Grotesque No. 9 (1998-2000), Gordoni (his take on Bodoni), hAndy, HotSause (1997, irregular handwriting), Karkas (2004, a manly sans), Little Shift (1999), Method (2002, a sans family), Minusmanscript (1998, calligraphic), Mr. Mixter (2011), Non System (2000), OptiMyst (1997), ResPublicana (1999), Sivtzev Vrazhek (1999, + mono), Michelle (2004, medieval), Naylorville (2004), Probel (1997-1998).
  • Illarion Gordon made the fun fonts Strelochnik (1996, irregular hand), Probbarius (1996), Monte Summa (1997), as well as Rahit (1998, kid's handwriting), Rough (2000, blotchy hand), Simpel (kid's hand), St. Valentin (2001), Accept (1998), Kartofel (2000, irregular handwriting), LangobardR (1999), Ospa (1997, funky handwriting), pLatinum (1999, informal script).
  • Valery Golyzhenkov's fonts from before 2000 are typically destructionist. He made 04.07 (1998), Bort#1 (2000), CardHolder (1997), Chellebrity (2004, screen), Cracker (1997), Cubes (2000), Dead Metro (1997), Do Not Touch (1997), Dream Team (2000), Formalist (2001), Gamering (+Sans, 2009: a game font), Garbage (12997), GarbEdge (1997), Garmony (1997), Grammatika (1997), HandsOn (1997), Hole Down (1997), Hot Sauce (2009, Yuri Gordon), Ice Cola (2000), Kabotage (1998, octagonal), Kassa (2002, octagonal), Kren (1998), Laborant (2000), Lavert Noise (1997), Matrrolla (2001, octagonal), Mono (2000), Musor (1997), OneCode (1998), Primitiv (1998), Principal (1998-1999), Recruit (2004, octagonal), Remont (2000), Rounds (basic dingbats), Silver Winer (2000), Sklad (2000), Stampit (2000), Upadok (1997, futuristic), YE Stencil (2009), Zaplyv (1997), Zanoza (2005).
  • Custom faces for companies or special projects: 19 o'clock, AlfaBank, Always, Anteus, Artemius, Alexey, Atlas-1904, Bat Sans, Bat Roman, Calendarus, Carlis, Cifirki, CTC Screen, Digrol, Digimag, Esquire, Gulliver UTS, Gurmania_MA (2004, handwriting), Hi Afisha, In CaST, Ka, Kater, Komet, Kostro, Lumene Script, N.B.T., Nochnoi Dozor, Odessa, Progress Custom, Redd's, Robb Report New, Rolling Stone 2003, Rolling Stone 2005, Romb (2010), Rosbank Sans, RMA 2006, Salon Script (2007, calligraphic), Salon Antiqua (2007), Seventeen, N.Side, W.Side, Sivtzev Vrazhek, Snickers, Sovereign, STS Vizion, Svyaznoy RF (2008, sans), ToShi, Trust, Whiskas lettering, Zabava.
  • Typefaces and/or lettering from 2009: Barocco Mortale (curly script), Barocco Mortale Borders, Alfavita (ornamental caps by Goluzhenkov), Fleurs du mal, DBL Cheque (by Goluzhenkov), Medved (by Goluzhenkov), YE Stencil (by Goluzhenkov), 21Cent (or 21st Century; +Cyrillic; +Thin; +Black; advertised as not Century, not Clarendon, this fresh family is sure to win awards), Antiquasi, Around the world, Bazaarban, Blacksteel, EsqGuardi (for Esquire), the curly Naska, with accompanying dingbats Naska Kozliki, the bird dingbats Udo Birdo, and more at Flickr.
  • Production in 2012: Baroque Mortale (an award-quality ornamental alphabet), Red Square (constructivist), Red Ring (art deco sans).

Author of the acclaimed 384-page book Book of Letters From  to ” (2007, Art. Lebedev Studio).

Behance link. Art by Yuri. Issuu link. Klingspor link. Behance link.

View Letterhead YG's typefaces. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Lettering books

List of lettering books at Amazon. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Letterjuice
[Pilar Cano]

Letterjuice is the British typefoundry of Pilar Cano, who graduated from the University of Reading, 2006, but started out life in Barcelona. After graduation, still in 2006, she co-founded Mídori, a graphic design studio specialised in editorial design. Letterjuice is based in Brighton, UK.

Coauthor, with Marta Serrats, of Typosphere (2007, Harper Collins). Creator of these typefaces:

  • Edita (2006), an informal sans family that also covers kana for Japanese. This typeface was finally published in 2009 at Type Together. It was followed in 2011 by additional weights in Edita Book.
  • Techarí (2006, +Extra) comes from a commission in which the brief consisted of the creation of a typeface family to be used for the design of the third disc of the band called Ojos de Brujo based in Barcelona. This disc was called Techarí, which means free in Caló, the language of the Spanish gypsies---it also has a stencil version.
  • In 2010, she is working on an elliptical sans that covers Latin, Cyrillic and Greek.
  • Techarí (2010) is an extremely elegant custom family.

    Xuppis (2012) is a commissioned logotype for a candy shop in El Masnou, Barcelona.

    Together with Lluis Sinol, she designed the custom sans typeface SEAT (2013) for Latin, Greek and Cyrillic.

  • Quars (2013). This angular typeface family, codesigned with Ferran Milan, grabs elements from Scotch Roman and old Dutch typefaces.
  • Sampi (2013). A custom typeface for the Sami children.

Interview by Unostiposduros. Cargo Collective link. MyFonts link. Behance link. Wiki page. Klingspor link. Behance link for Letterjuice. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Lewis Blackwell

British author of 20th Century Type (Rizzoli, 1992), The End of Print: The Graphic Design of David Carson (with David Carson, Chronicle Books, 1996), G1: New Dimensions in Graphic Design (with Neville Brody, Rizzoli, 1997), 20th Century Type: Remix (Laurence King, 1999), and Edward Fella: Letters on America (Princeton Architectural Press, 2000). Creative director at Getty Images. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Lewis Foreman Day

Lettering artist and author, 1845-1910. His books include Alphabets Old and New: Containing Over One Hundred and Fifty Complete (1902, B.T. Batsford), which has a large number of historic alphabets, initials, blackletter examples, and new alphabets by the author himself. Other books: Alphabets Old And New For The Use Of Craftsmen (1910, B.T. Batsford, London), Lettering in ornament (B.T. Batsford, 1902), The anatomy of pattern (B.T. Batsford, 1895), Penmanship of the XVI, XVII&XVIIIth centuries (1911, B.T. Batsford, London: Local download), and Nature and Ornament (B.T. Batsford, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1892).

He created numerous pen-drawn alphabets. I am using the descriptive names he used in his own book, Alphabets Old and New: Modern Brush Letters, Blunt Brushwork, Blunt Twisted Brushwork, Japanese Brushwork, Modern Capitals for engraving on metal, Modern Capitals, more Modern Capitals, and yet more Modern Capitals, Modern early Gothic Capitals for engraving on metal, Modern Early Spanish Letters, Modern Foliated Capitals, Modern Gothic Capitals, Modern Minuscule Gothic, Modern Roman Capitals, Modern Roman Italics, Modern Twisted Letters, Numerals (set 1), Numerals (set 2), and Numerals (set 3).

In 2012, Dick Pape created a number of typefaces based on alphabets found in Alphabets Old And New For The Use Of Craftsmen (1910). These include LFD14thCItalian75 (drawn by J. Vinycomb), LFD15thCFrenchRelief91, LFDAlphabetUndOrnamente216 (after roman capitals by Otto Hupp), LFDAsianStencilling205 (an art nouveau stencil based on an original by E. Grasset and M. Verneil), LFDBlockCapitals213 (based an alphabet by Walter John Pearce), LFDEngravingonSilver196 (a Foreman Day original designed for engraving on silver), LFDFreehand170 (based on an alphabet by Bailey Scott Murphy, architect), LFDFrenchPrintedType189 (based on a type by E. Grasset), LFDFrenchType209 (a caps face by Lewis Foreman Day), LFDIncisedinWood114 (a Foreman Day original Elizabethan lettering aklphabet based on an inscription incised in wood at North Walsham, Norfolk), LFDMetalEngraving187 (another original by Foreman Day, for engraving on metal), LFDModernCaps210 (an original), LFDPainted148 (a sketched face that was painted in 1727 on the wooden drug-drawers of an old apothecary's shop and kept in the Germanisches Museum, Nuremberg), LFDPenAlphabet222 (an art nouveau alphabet by Foreman Day), LFDPenwork160 (after an original monstrosity by Walter Crane), LFDPenwork181 (based on an alphabet of Roland W. Paul), LFDPenwork206 (based on lettering by Franz Stuck), LFDQuasiJapanese203 (an oriental art nouveau design by Foreman Day), LFDRomanCapitals224 (based on lettering by Franz Stuck), LFDScriptStencil219 (an oriental art nouveau design by Foreman Day), LFDSquareCut202 (an original pixelish face by Foreman Day), LFDThinFrench208 (based on an alphabet by John Vinycomb). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Liam Quin
[Liam's Pictures from Old Books]

[More]  ⦿

Liam's Pictures from Old Books
[Liam Quin]

Liam Quin's pictures from old (now copyright-free) books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Library Digitization Projects and Copyright

Mary Minow explains the law about which old books are in the public domain. Rule of thumb: public works from before 1922 are in the public domain and can be freely digitized. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Libreria AIAP

Italian publishing house specializing in type. Edited by Stampa Alternativa / Graffiti and led by Giovanni Lussu. Titles include:

  • Caterina Marrone: "I geroglifici fantastici di Athanasius Kircher" (2002). About hieroglyphs.
  • M. Rattin&M. Ricci: "Questioni di carattere. La tipografia in Italia dal 1861 agli anni Settanta".
  • M. Zennaro: "Calligrafia Fondamenti e procedure".
  • R.O. Blechman: "Tutto esaurito".
  • Roy Harris: "L'origine della scrittura".
  • James Mosley: "Radici della scrittura moderna" (2001).
  • Adrian Frutiger: "Il mondo dei simboli Passeggiate tra i segni".
  • Adrian Frutiger: "Segni&simboli Disegno, progetto e significato".
  • Marco Delogu: "Nature Scritti nel tempo".
  • F. Ascoli and G. De Faccio: "Scrivere meglio". How to improve your handwriting.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Libro di M. Giovambattista Palatino cittadino romano
[Giovambattista Palatino]

This jewel of a book was published in 1550 by Antonio Blado asolano in Rome. It is now available on the web and contains of complete alphabets, from chancery scripts, to blackletter and roman. There are also Greek, Hebrew, Cyrillic, Syrian, Arabic and other alphabets. Selected pics to make you drool. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Lida Lopes Cardozo
[The Cardozo Kindersley Workshop]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Linn Boyd Benton, Morris Fuller Benton, and Typemaking at ATF

Article by Patricia A. Cost in APHA vol. 16, No. 2, 1994. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Literat

List of German type books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Literaturliste Typographie

German page on type books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Livres Anciens&Belgicana

Rare type books at this Belgian bookstore. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Livres Typographie

Lists of type books in French and English. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Los Logos

A 444 page book of logos edited by Robert Klanten, Mika Mischler and Nicholas Bourquin in 2002. See also here or here. A special site didicated to this book. The sequel is Dos Logos (2004) by Robert Klanten, Nicolas Bourquin and Roland Muller. Followed by Robert Klanten's Tres Logos. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Louis Perrin

French punchcutter (1795-1865) who lived in Lyon. He designed Lyons Titling (1846, a roman titling font published by Chiswick Press) and Augustaux, about which René Ponot published a book, Louis Perrin: L'Enigme des Augustaux (Editions des Cendres, Paris, 1998). The book contains a history of Perrin as a printer and typographer, with special attention to Perrin's Augustaux type. It contains two fold-out Augustaux type specimens and several examples of Perrin's printing in black-and-white. The preface is by Fernand Baudin, and it is printed in Perrin type redesigned by L'Atelier National de Création Typographique in 1986. See also Etude sur Louis Perrin, Imprimeur Lyonnais (Editions des Cendres, Paris, 1994) by Jean-Baptiste Monfalcon.

The Elzevir style of typeface originated with Louis Perrin.

Hrant Papazian writes: While I was looking for something else I ran into the single most important publication about Perrin that I know of: Audin's book on the 1923 Perrin exhibition in Lyon. It's quite rare - it seems only 61 copies were printed. There's a very extensive text (120 pages), a complete catalog of works, and some great facsimiles (as well as actual prints -like pressmarks- from Perrin's own engravings). The paper is very yellowed though. There are two things in there that will probably interesting you most: (1) A facsimile of Perrin's famous specimen sheet, showing two sizes that are basically Marquet's designs: the 11 and the second 14. Some scans shown below were published by Hrant Papazian.

Digital typefaces directly linked to Louis Perrin include the all caps typeface Grand Central by Tobias Frere-Jones (1998, Font Bureau), and the great contemporay revival of Augustaux by Mathieu Cortat simply called Louize (2013, +Display).

FontShop link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Louise Fili

Louise Fili Ltd is a New York-based graphic design firm specializing in food packaging, restaurant identities, logos, and book design. The web page is just out of this world, and the calligraphy and type exquisite. With Steve Heller, she published "Typology Type Design from the Victorian Era to the Digital Age" (Chronicle Books, San Francisco, 1999), "Italian Art Deco", "Dutch Moderne", Streamline, "British Modern", "French Modern", "German Modern", "Deco Type", "Deco Espana", "Typology", "Belles Lettres" and "Cover Story". Her book cover (done with Jessica Hische) won a design award at TDC 55. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Lubomir Longauer

Slovak professor, who is curating an exhibition called "20th century Slovak typography, part 1: 1918-1970" from October 8th 2004 until January 2nd 2005, in Bratislava's Mirbachov Palace. He has done a pioneering job on historical research of typographical work done by Slovak artists since the beginning of the Czechoslovak state in 1918.

Author of Modernost Tradicie (or: Modernity of Tradition) (2012, Slovart), about which Typotheque writes: This book uncovers the largely forgotten history of Slovak graphic design since 1918. After a slow start, cultural life in Central Europe underwent an unprecedented development, as is documented in the works of Martin Benka, Andrej Kovacik, Jaroslav Vodrazka, Karol Ondreicka, Jozef Cincik, Stefan Bednar and Rudolf Fabry. The works are placed in their historical context and are accompanied by historical facts and descriptions of the cultural and political situation in the country.

Designer of hundreds of book covers.

Author of Martin Benka, the first designer of the Slovak National Myth. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Luc's Library

My own type library, open to all McGill University students. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ludlow Typefaces

A type specimen book of the Ludlow Typograph Company (2032 Clybourn Avenue, Chicago), published between 1940 and 1958. The list of typefaces shown: Artcraft, Bodoni (Bold, Black), Bodoni Campanile, Bodoni Modern, Bookman, Cameo, Caslon, Caslon Old Face Heavy, Caslon Heavy Italic, Century, Chamfer Gothic, Cheltenham Oldstyle, Cheltenham Cursive, Cheltenham Wide, Commerce Gothic, Condensed Gothic, Coronet, Clearface Bold, Cushing Antique, Delphian Open Title, Eden, Eleven, Engravers Bold, Eusebius, Extra Condensed, Franklin Gothic, Fraktur No. 16, Garamond, Gothic Bold Condensed Title, Gothic Extra Condensed, Greenwich, Hauser Script, Headline Gothic, Hebrew Modern, Karnak, Lafayette Extra Condensed, Laureate, Lining Litho, Lining Plate Gothic, Ludlow Black, Mandate, Mayfair Cursive, Medium Condensed Gothic, Number 11, Old English, Plantin, Powell, Radiant, Record Gothic, Samson, Square Gothic, Stellar, Stencil, Stygian Black, Tempo, True-Cut Caslon, Ultra-Modern, Umbra, Underwood Bold, Victoria Italic. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ludovico Vicentino degli Arrighi da Vicenza

Influential Italian printer, writing master and calligrapher, b. ca. 1475-1480, d. 1527, aka Ludovico Vicentino (degli Arrighi), or Ludovico il Vicentino. Around 1510 he was a bookseller in Rome. He was employed as a scribe at the Apostolic Chancery in 1515. Author in 1522 of the writing manual La Operina, da imparare di scrivere littera cancellarescha, which was the first one for popular use. La Operina contains the first printed example of Chancery Cursive. In 1523, he wrote a sequel, Il modo de temperare le penne, a beautiful and influential typographic manual.

Roderick Cave writes in his The Private Press: The first part of this was printed entirely from wood blocks, but the second part, Il Modo di Temperare le Penne, contains several pages printed in a very fine italic typeface modeled on the cancellaresca formata hand. The type was fairly obviously derived from the hand used by Arrighi himself; it seems likely that the punches were cut by his partner, who can with reasonable certainty be identified as Lautizio de Bartolomeo dei Rotelli, of whose skill as an engraver of seals Benvenuto Cellini speaks with respect in his Autobiography. He started printing in 1524 and designed his own italic typefaces for his work, which were widely emulated.

His letterforms were revived in the 20th century by designers such as Plumet (1925), Stanley Morison (Monotype Blado (1923, Stanley Morrison) is based on Arrighi's lettering---it was unfortunately named after the printer Antonio Blado who used the type in the 1530s; the name Monotype Arrighi would have been more appropriate), Frederic Warde (in his Arrighi Italic, 1925), Robert Slimbach (one could say that his memory lives on through fonts like Adobe Jenson Multiple Master), Ladislav Mandel (Cancellaresca), Willibald Kraml (Vicentino, 1992), Paulo W (as Volitiva), Gunnlaugur S.E. Briem (Briem Operina), James Grieshaber (P22 Operina), Michelle Dixon (Arrighi Copybook), Gilles Le Corre (1522 Vicentino, 2011) and Jonathan Hoefler (Requiem Text).

Arrighi's last printing was dated shortly before the sack of Rome (1527), during which he was probably killed.

Sample pics: Fantastic ornamental capitals (1522), roman capitals (1522), Italian capitals, Italian minuscule. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ludovico Vicentino degli Arrighi
[La Operina]

[More]  ⦿

Ludwig Petzendorfer

Born in 1851, Ludwig Petzendorfer published Jugendstil Schriftenatlas (1905) at the Stuttgart house of Julius Hoffmann. He also edited a follow-up in 1903, called Neue Folge, perhaps the greatest collection of art nouveau type styles collected in one book. In 1984, Dover Publications published a a facsimile of the latter book under the title Treasury of Authentic Art Nouveau Alphabets, Decorative Initials, Monograms, Frames and Ornaments. That affordable book was bought by many with the result that most of the alphabets in the book have now been digitized by people like Claude Pelletier (as free fonts) and Tom Wallace (commercially). [Google] [More]  ⦿

M. Moullet

Author of 100 Alphabets Publicitaires Dessinés par M. Moullet (1946, Editions Caboni, Bruxelles). Alphabets from that book include Letters in relief, Fancy Character, Ornamental Antique (art deco), Fancy Antique (multiline art deco), Fancy Antique 2 (a different style altogether), Pochoir (stenciled).

Free digitizations of these alphabets were made by Pape in his Mindofone / French Advertising Alphabets series of 2011-2012. Pape's fonts: FAA3DLettresEnRelief, FAAAllongees, FAAAllongeesBold, FAAAntiqueAllongee, FAAAntiqueGrasse, FAAAntiques, FAAAntiquesGrasses, FAABaroque3DInitiales, FAABlockLettresEnRelief, FAACameoHollow, FAACaracteresdeFantaisie, FAAChevauchantes, FAACubiques, FAAEcossaises, FAAEcritureGrasseEmoussee, FAAEgyptienneGrasse, FAAEgyptiennesEmoussees, FAAFantaisie, FAAFantaisieBlaireau, FAAFantaisieHardi, FAAFantaisieHaut, FAAFantasio, FAAFloralGothiqueInitiales, FAAFrenchMecane, FAAItalianHeavySlab, FAALettresAuCrayonItalic, FAALiberty, FAANormandes, FAANormandesAllongees, FAAOmbreeEnRelief, FAAOnciale, FAAOrientales, FAAPochoir, FAARomainClassique, FAARomainTypographique, FAScenesPaysannes, FAASerifEgyptienne, FAAVetteFantasieAntieke.

Download page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mac Font Vault Bookstore

Books and book reviews at the Mac Font Vault. Maintained by Erik Carlson. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mac McGrew

Author of American Metal Typefaces of the Twentieth Century (New Castle, Delaware, Oak Knoll Books, 1996), which describes every known American typeface designed and cast in metal during the 20th century. See also here and here. M.F. McGrew (1912-2007) was also the author of over 300 articles on typography, which ran in trade journals. He wasd born in Chattanooga, TN, grew up in Pennsylvania, and died in Pittsburgh. His 500-strong book collection was donated to The Museum of Printing in North Andover, Massachusetts, near Boston, where the public can consult them. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Macclesfield Alphabet Book

This is decribed as an advertising book for a XVIth century design studio. It has some elaborate sets of initials. The British Library paid 600,000 pounds for a copy in 2009---hard to believe for something did the Italians did more often and more elegantly. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Magdalena Frankowska

Magdalena Frankowska is the cofounder, with Artur Frankowski, of Fontarte in Warsaw, Poland, in 2004. Fontarte developed several typefaces including contemporary new designs as well as Polish avant-garde revivals. Graphic designer and type designer. Her M.A. from Warsaw University dealt with women artists in the surrealist movement (1997). Creator of these typefaces:

  • FA Cindy (2002): shoe dingbats.
  • FA Desiconz (2005): dingbats.
  • FA Domestic Godess (2005): domestic dingbats.
  • Saturator FA (2007): hand-made lettering and signs from the Polish communist republic period.
  • Mobie FA (2008). A decorative fat face.
MyFonts link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Magma Books

London-based booksellers with a small typography selection, but many books on design. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mai-Linh T. Troung

Coauthor with Erik Spiekermann and Juergen Siebert of FontBook, Fourth edition (2006). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Manoel Andrade de Figueiredo

Portuguese penman of the 17th century, 1670-1722. Some say 1670--1735. Andrade de Figueiredo was born in Espirito Santo, where his father was Governor of the Capitania. His work follows the style of the great Italian masters in its use of clubbed ascenders and descenders, and of Diaz Morante, the famous Spanish writing master, in its very elaborate show of command of hand. He was known as the Morante portugues.

Author of Writing Book (1721, in Portuguese), in which we can find exceptional flourish work. This horseman was drawn in one stroke in 1722. See also these Versalien (1722).

Author of Nova Escola para aprender a ler, escrever, e contar. Offerecida a Augusta Magestade do Senhor Dom Joao V. Rey de Portugal (Lisboa Occidental: na Officina de Bernardo da Costa de Carvalho, Impressor do Serenissimo Senhor Infante, 1722).

His work inspired Ventura da Silva, a Portuguese typographer who published Regras Methodicas in 1803, who redesigned some of Figueiredo's type specimens.

Digital descendants include Dino dos Santos's Pluma (2005), Andrade Pro (2006, a modern) and Andrade Pro Script (2006) typefaces. Intellecta Design's Invitation Script (2013) is based on Andrade's 1722 book. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Manuale Tipografico: 1818 (full)
[Giambattista Bodoni]

In 1788, Giambattista Bodoni published his masterpiece, the Manuale Tipografico (look at it here), which contained 291 alphabets, and was full of ornaments and borders. In 1818, 5 years after his death, his wife Margherita Dall'Aglio published a second edition, which contained 373 alphabets. He was influenced by Fournier and Firmin Didot. All images of the 1818 book are here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Manuale Tipografico: 1818 (partial)
[Giambattista Bodoni]

In 1788, Giambattista Bodoni published his masterpiece, the Manuale Tipografico (look at it here), which contained 291 alphabets, and was full of ornaments and borders. In 1818, 5 years after his death, his wife Margherita Dall'Aglio published a second edition, which contained 373 alphabets. He was influenced by Fournier and Firmin Didot. Some images of the 1818 book are in this page. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Manuela Rattin and Matteo Ricci

Authors of a thesis entitled Questioni di Carattere: La tipografia in Italia dal 1861 agli anni Settanta (1997, Stampa Alternativa&Graffiti). It surveys the history of Italian typography and type design. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Marc H. Smith
[Ménestrel]

[More]  ⦿

Marcos Rafael Blanco-Belmonte

Author of "El maestro Ibarra: Homenaje que la casa Gans al celebrar sus bodas de oro, dedica al gran impresor Joaquin Ibarra" (Madrid: Richard Gans, 1931). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Margaret Richardson

Author of Type Graphics (2000). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Margaret Shepherd

American calligrapher whose blog contains almost 200 calligraphic alphabets drawn by her in 2013. lives in Boston, where she created the Boston Calligraphy Trail.

Author of Learn calligraphy, Learn World Calligraphy, Calligraphy Alphabets Made Easy, Using Calligraphy, Calligraphy Made Easy. She also wrote Capitals for Calligraphy: A Sourcebook of Decorative Letters (1981).

The alphabets from the first half of 2013: 4penheavyBookhand, 7-11Segmentdisplay, 7segmentdisplay, 8712Roman, A+C, AngularItalic, Antiquarr, AssortedGothicfromLC, Aura_caps, Backhand, Bamboo, Beady1, Benedictus, BigKid, Blister, BoldBookhand, Bookshelf, BrightIdeaupperleft, BrightIdeaupperright, Brightideaoverhead, Caroling, Celticcaps, Celticcommoncase, Celticlc, Coiltic, Continuo, Coopywithpens, Copperlight.png, Cuts, DNA, Database, DeadCenter, DecoMono, Deflated,inflatedshortGothic, DeflatedGothic, DisjoinedNeuland1, Double-cross, Dryland, Durercaps, Dx6Italic1, Dx7Italic, Easterncapitals, Echo, Endless, EnglishTwo-ply, FastForward, FatUnc, Fatshadow, FlatGothic, Fleurdelis, Fraktur, FriendlyRoman, Frills, Glisten, Gothichighlightblack+gold, HalfGothic, HappyKid, Hearty, HeavyCopper, Heavycoppercaps, Heavyland, Heavyland1, Heftybutnimble, Heraldrybasic, Houseplant, Icelandictwoply, Interruptus, Italicambigramat180, Italicextralean, Italicswashcapitals6PW, Jan2Waity, Jan7Mesh, Jan8Roadside, KingArthur, Legendelc, Letterbox, LightweightItalic, LowerKingdom, Magdalene, MargaretShepherd-Pic, Masquerades, Minimalist, Miscellaneous, Moneon, MonoItalic, Morse, Mx26initials, NewYorker, Optimal, Papyruscaps, Pencildraft, Pencilrough, PlainGothic, Radiantidea, RectangularGothic, RetouchedRomans, Robot, Roman6PW, Romanalphabet, Romanshadow, Rondecaps, Rondelc, RoundedGothic, Runes, ShadyGothic, Shamrock, Shamrockcap, Shatteredalphabet, Shortcuts, Simplesplitcaps, Simplestitalic, SkinnyGothic, SlantedBookhand, Softsquare, SplitItalic, SplitSwash, Spray, Sprung, StainedGlassGothic, StarsandStripes, Staves, Studs, Superceltic, Swashcaps, Swashitalic, Talluplight, Thistle, ThuPhapred, TouchedupGothic, TowelDry, Truncatecaps, Truncatelc, Twinings, Uprightitalic1.1, Versalcircles, Versals, VerylightRoman, Vivaldi, Vivaldicaps, Yeoman, Zap, abItalicfromlc, blot, bookhand, coopylc, donut, fatcaps, legendecaps, stringy, typewriter. [Google] [More]  ⦿

María Esther Pérez Salas

Author of "La primera tipografía mexicana" (2003, Editorial Designio) and "El establecimiento tipográfico de ignacio cumplido: 1832 - 1896" (2003, Editorial Designio). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mariko Takagi

From her CV: Having lived and worked as a half-Japanese and half-German in Germany for a long time, the focus of my artworks was to create books about Japanese culture. The intention of writing and designing books about Japanese topics was to make German readers curious about the strange and foreign culture and to give them insights into it. In the last eleven years I have published six books talking about Japanese culture. Since 1998, I ran my own design office with a focus on corporate design, corporate publishing and catalogue design. Since 2002 I was teaching at several Universities in Germany. Moving to Hong Kong and teaching as an assistant professor at the Academy of Visual Arts of Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) since 2010 gives me new influences and inspiration for starting research projects focused on Chinese typography. My background of teaching typography as well as graphic design in Germany over eight years gives me the necessary background for starting a research project not only to learn more about my new cultural environment, but also to make the Hong Kong design culture more visible to international audiences.

At Typography Day 2012 she spoke on Typographic Culture of Hong Kong.

Speaker at ATypI 2012 in Hong Kong: Typography between Chinese complex characters and Latin letters. Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam: Hanzigraphy. In the latter talk, she deals with the problem of the joint use of latin and Chinese on pages. The research project Hanzi-Graphy: Typographic translation between Latin letters and Chinese characters will be published late in 2013 by a publisher in Hong Kong. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mario Piazza

Italian graphic designer (b. 1954) and architect who published La Grafica su Marte 2000 (Milan,1996), Universo Balan (Milan, 2001) and Progettare il marchio (Turin, 2001). In 1996, he founded the 46xy studio in Milan. He also teaches graphic design at the Politecnico in Milan. Since 1992, he is the president of AIAP, the Italian Visual Communications Design Association. At ATypI in Rome in 2002, he spoke about contemporary type design in Italy. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Marion Bataille

Author of Popup (2008), a book (and video) with popups of the letters of the alphabet. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Marius Audin

Type historian from Lyon, 1872-1951. He had a major influence on the French typographical world before World War II. His son Maurice founded the Musée de l'imprimerie et de la banque in Lyon in 1964, starting from the family's archives. Author (1872-1951) of many books on typography and printing, including

  • Les livrets typographiques des fonderies françaises créées avant 1800 Étude historique et bibliographique (Paris: A l'Enseigne de Pégase, 1933), republished in 1964 by Gérard Th. van Heusden, Amsterdam. This book is a historian's dream, offering a complete genealogical picture of French foundries. Font page.
  • Le Livre (two volumes, 1924 and 1926).
  • Les caractères de civilité de Robert Granjon et les imprimeurs flamands (1921, with Dr. Maurits Sabbe, conservateur du Musée Plantin, à Anvers'; Lyon : impr. M. Audin&Co; Anvers : A la Grande Librairie, 1921).
  • Histoire de l'imprimerie par l'image (4 volumes, Henri Jonquières éditeur, Paris, 1928-1929).
  • In 1948, Audin edited the book Somme typographique. The second volume of that work appeared in 1949.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Mark Batty

Ex-president of International Typeface Corporation (ITC) and of ATypI from 1995-2004. In 2004, he became Honorary President of ATypI. He published a book on the life and work of Gudrun Zapf von Hesse: Gudrun Zapf von Hesse Bindings - Handwritten Books - Typefaces Examples of Lettering and Drawings (West, New York, 2002). He published WARNING (2005) on the warning signs and the multitude of funny/sad ways in which people can end their lives. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Markus Rathgeb

Markus Rathgeb wrote Otl Aicher (2006, Phaidon Press Limited, London), which is about Aicher's life as a graphic designer, and has little about his type design. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Marta Erica Bernstein

Graduate of the Type and Media program at KABK, 2009. There, she designed the serif family Alice, specifically for magazines. She is working on Bolano in 2010 about which she writes: It is based on my brush calligraphy, tamed down to a book typeface. She is back in Milan now where she works at LS Design. She wrote A Hundred Years of Type 1813-1908 Typefounders and Printers in Italy from Bodoni's death to the foundation of Augusta company in Turin (Master degree dissertation developed with Emanuela Conidi. Supervisor: Prof. James Clough at Politecnico di Milano, July 2006; in Italian: Cento Anni di Caratteri 1813-1908). Scans of Alice: i, ii, iii, iv, v. Scans of Bolano: i, ii, iii.

Cargo Collective link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Martin Kaye

Born in 1932 in London, Martin Kaye was well-known for his sturdy posters which he made from 1972 until 1983 for Paradiso in Amsterdam. A set of 1100 of these posters owned by Stichting Martin Kaye Alphabet Index&Library is being managed by Affichemuseum in Hoorn, The Netherlands. He was also a type expert, and had started a catalog of typefaces, having made a listing of 60,000 typefaces when he was murdered in 1989 during a robbery. His work included also many unique complete alphabets. The book Facade AlphaBets et Cetera is the only published book document. At Amazon, we read about his book: Although out of print Martin Kaye's work deserves some recognition for his part in the world of typographic design. This book of some 90 pages reflects his work throughout 20 years. With typographic studies to reproductions of some of Kaye's Paradiso posters, this is perhaps the best example of of a lifetime's work by this artist. It is unfortunate this item remains out of print since it remains a definitive example of typographic inovation and inspiration. It is with great sadness that the book, published in 1985, four years prior to his death, remains as his only epitaph. Since only 1000 copies were ever printed it may never be seen by as many as might apreciate such a work. Examples of Kaye's work do hang in the Rock Museum in Amsterdam. But for me this book is a must for anyone interested in typography. This was done in the days before computers. Martin would hand cut the designs in 'red film' a method by which screenprint templates would be made. The intricacy of his designs and skill would astound anyone seeing him at work, the results of which would shine out from poster stands all over Amsterdam. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Martin Kuckenburg

Author of Die Entstehung von Sprache und Schrift (1996, Dumont Taschenbücher), which deals with the origins of various scripts. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Martin Lowry

Author of Nicholas Jenson and the rise of Venetian publishing in Renaissance Europe [Oxford, UK; Cambridge, Mass., USA : B. Blackwell, 1991].

From Book News Inc: Chronicles the story of how printing came to Venice in the 15th century and transformed the Italian city into the most commercially advanced power in Europe, publishing a fifth of the continent's books only 40 years after Gutenberg developed moveable type. Examines the values and careers of printing's financial backers, and the printers themselves. Focuses on the immigrant French printer, Jenson, his design concerns and business activities, the transition from manuscript to printed page, William Morris' championing of his typefaces in the 19th century, and the significance of those typefaces today. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, OR. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Martin Majoor

Dutch type designer born in 1960. Showcase of his most popular typefaces. Type designs:

  • His 1993 Scala text family (which includes both sans and serif sub-families, as well as goodies such as the fist font FF Scala Hands, 1998) is great and well-balanced---one of the best fist fonts ever made.
  • He designed Telefont List and Telefont Text for the Dutch phone company PTT Telekom in 1994.
  • He created Scala Jewels in 1997.
  • FF Seria and FF Seria Sans (2000). These families received awards at the Bukvaraz 2001 competition.
  • In 2004, he published FF Nexus Mix, FF Nexus Sans, FF Nexus Serif, and FF Nexus Typewriter.
  • He started a project with Pascal Zoghbi on the development of Sada (2007), an Arabic companion of FF Seria. In 2009, Sada was renamed FF Seria Arabic and published by FontFont.
  • In 2010, he started work on Questa Sans (a face with a special y). The Questa project is a type project of Jos Buivenga and Martin Majoor---Questa is a squarish Didot-like font that Jos originally had planned in one display style only. It turned out to be a perfect basis to apply upon Martin's type design philosophy about the form principle of serif and sans.

Interview.

To understand Majoor, read his article My type design philosophy. He works in Arnhem and Warsaw. At ATypI 2004 in Prague, he spoke about his experiences as a designer and type designer in Poland.

The text José Mendoza y Almeida (Martin Majoor and Sébastien Morlighem, introduction by Jan Middendorp, 2010, Bibliothèque typographique) describes Mendoza's contributions to type design.

Majoor's Flickr page. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. His type design blog.

MyFonts catalog. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Massimo Vignelli

Famous Italian typographer and graphic designer, b. 1931, Milan. Designer, with Tom Carnase, of WTC Our Bodoni (1989). In 1966, he set up Unimark International in New York City, which became the largest diseign firm of its day. He left Uimark in 1971, to set up Vigneeli Associats in New York City with his wife Lelli.

He dismissed Emigre as a garbage pail of design. Famous for his designs and opinions, he once said that a designer should only use these five typefaces: Bodoni, Helvetica, Times Roman, Century and Futura. Another quote along the samne lines: In the new computer age, the proliferation of typefaces and type manipulations represents a new level of visual pollution threatening our culture. Out of thousands of typefaces, all we need are a few basic ones, and trash the rest.

In his Vignelli Canon (free PDF book on design), he mentions these six: Garamond (1532), Bodoni (1788), Century Expanded (1900), Futura (1930), Times Roman (1931) and Helvetica (1957) [However, in that booklet he uses 8 different type families: the above six, and Gill Sans and Univers]. Yves Peters' reaction: Massimo Vignelli clearly hasn't got a clue. It's not the first time a quote of his makes me cringe. I hope you appreciate I'm trying real hard to stay polite. Frankly, if I ever heard anyone say: "a music lover should only listen to 5 artists: Elton John, Celine Dion, Billy Joel, Whitney Houston and Luciano Pavarotti" I'd go to great lengths to ridicule the billy sastard. Vignelli published New York City Transit Authority Graphics Standards Manual (1970, New York, as Unimark International).

Discussion of his work by the typophiles. Report of his presentation at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon.

Wikipedia link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Matthew Butterick

Matthew Butterick (b. 1970, Michigan) grew up in New Hampshire. He got his B.A. degree from Harvard University in visual&environmental studies, also studying mathematics and letterpress printing. His work is in the permanent collection of the Houghton Library at Harvard. Butterick started his design career at the Font Bureau as a typeface designer and engineer. At the beginning of the Internet era, he moved to San Francisco and founded website design and engineering company Atomic Vision. Atomic Vision was later acquired by open-source software developer Red Hat. More recently, Butterick got a law degree from UCLA and has been practicing civil litigation in Los Angeles, Butterick Law Corporation. He operates a web site called Typography for Lawyers.

In 2010, he published Typography for Lawyers. MyFonts link. FontShop link. Klingspor link. Font Bureau link. He has some great one-liners, such as The only good Copperplate is a dead Copperplate. Matthew Butterick's creations:

  • Agitprop: in the FUSE 12 collection.
  • Wessex (1993): A family published at Font Bureau in 1993. Font Bureau writes: Initially conceived by Matthew Butterick as a Bulmer revival, Wessex took on characteristics of Baskerville&Caledonia as design proceeded. In 1938, W.A. Dwiggins had taken the hard necessities of the non-kerning line-caster italic duplexed onto the same widths as roman, and turned them into design virtues. Inspired by the surprising beauty of his wide-bodied Caledonia italic, Butterick used it as a model for Wessex.
  • Hermes (1995, 2010, Font Bureau). Blurb at Font Bureau: Schriftguss and Wollmer called it Hermes; Berthold called it Block. Hermann Hoffmann's 1908 design inspired FB Hermes, which evokes the German grotesks that were workhorses of factory printing 100 years ago. Blunt corners suggest the wear and tear of rough presswork. Matthew Butterick created the original styles in 1995. In 2010, he added more weights, italics, and alternate glyphs to expand the family's versatility.
  • HeraldGothic (1993, Font Bureau). A condensed typeface with bevelled, or octagonal, corners.
  • Chunk.
  • Alix FB (2011, Font Bureau). A monospaced family based on two IBM selectric typewriter face, Prestige Elite and Light Italic.
  • Equity (2011) is a readable text family, based on Ehrhardt.
  • Berlin Sans (1994). Font Bureau: Berlin Sans is based on a brilliant alphabet from the late twenties, originally released by Bauer with the name Negro, the very first sans that Lucian Bernhard ever designed. Assisted by Matthew Butterick, David Berlow expanded this single font into a series of four weights.
[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Maurice Annenberg

Noted Baltimore printer and type historian. Author (1907-1979) of Type Foundries of America and their Catalogs (1955; see also New Castle, 1994), with historical accounts of each foundry. Other books: Advertising, 3000 B.C.-1900 A.D. (1969), A Typographic Journey Through the Inland Printer, 1883-1900 (1977). His extensive type collection is now at the University of Maryland. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mauro Zennaro

Rome-based graphic designer (b. 1953, Rome), who spoke at ATypI in Rome in 2002. A paleographer and calligrapher, he is the author of Calligrafia. Fondamenti e procedure (Stampa Alternativa). He adores old Roman lettering, and has become one of the world's specialists on the topic. He teaches graphic design at the Università per Stranieri (University for Foreigners) of Perugia and at the Carlo Urbany Professional High School in Rome.

His typefaces include

  • The Angelica typeface for Biblioteca Angelica.
  • The Farfa typeface (2008, with Paolo Campanelli) for the city of Fara in Sabina. This typeface, with historical and Carolingian roots, was published at Eurotypo.
  • The Equa typeface for the Città dell'altra economia (Town of Alternative Economy) for the city of Rome.
[Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Max Bruinsma

Dutch typographer and graphic designer. In 2000-2001, he published a piece on the erotics of type, and reviewed the book Sex Appeal: The art of allure in graphic and advertising design (Steve Heller, Allworth Press, New York, 2000). He spoke at ATypI 1998 in Lyon on Words on screens. Ed Annink and Max Bruinsma edited the book Gerd Arntz Graphic Designer (2010, Rotterdam). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Max Caflisch

Swiss type designer and calligrapher, born in Winterthur in 1916. He died in 2004. Designer of Columna (Bauersche Giesserei, 1952-1955, originally a private face of the Benteli publishing house in Switzerland; revived in 2006 by Ari Rafaeli, and in 2011 by URW), a slightly-serifed roman capitals face. His teachers included Jan Tschichold and Imre Reiner. Trained as a compositor (1932-1936), het set some jobs from 1936-1943. In 1941-1942, he taught typography at the Allgemeine Gewerbeschule in Basle, and was art director of the Benteli printing works in Bern from 1943-1962. From 1962-1981, he was head of the graphics department and typography teacher at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Zürich He consulted on type design for IBM in New York from 1962-1966, for the Bauersche Gießerei in Frankfurt am Main from 1965-1966, and for the Dr. Rudolf Hell company in Kiel from 1972-1989. He worked as type consultant at Adobe since from 1990. Adobe published Caflisch Script (designed by Robert Slimbach). Columna is available from Elsner&Flake (as ColumnaEF), Linotype and URW. Linotype bio.

Max Caflisch, Albert Kapr, Antonia Weiss and Hans Peter Willberg published F.H.Ernst Schneidler Schriftentwerfer, Lehrer, Kalligraph (SchumacherGebler a.o., München, 2002). This publication was thoroughly mangled by SchumacherGebler, to the dismay of Caflisch. This story was written up in "Die Chronologie der Schneidler-Monographie 1985-2002: Die 16 Jahredauernde, mühselige Entstehungsgeschichte" (Max Caflisch, 2002, Theo Leuthold Press). Other publications include: "William Morris, der Erneuerer der Buchkunst", Bern 1959; "Kleines Spiel mit Ornamenten", Angelus-Druck, Bern, 1965; "Fakten zur Schriftgeschichte", Zürich1973; "Schrift und Papier", Grellingen 1973; "Typography braucht Schrift", Kiel 1978. A Berlincourt et al "Max Caflisch. Typographia practica", Hamburg 1988. MyFonts page. Rudolf Bosshard's article about Caflisch's life (Comedia, 2004, vol. 2). Linotype link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

McMurtrie: A Memorandum on Early Printing on the Island of Malta
[Douglas C. McMurtrie]

Scans of a 13-page booklet by Douglas C. McMurtrie published in Chicago in 1936: A Memorandum on Early Printing on the Island of Malta. [Google] [More]  ⦿

McMurtrie: Le Moreau-le-Jeune A Typographical Specimen with an Introduction by Douglas C. Murtrie

Scans of an 8-page booklet by Douglas C. McMurtrie published in Chicago in 1936: Le Moreau-le-Jeune A Typographical Specimen with an Introduction by Douglas C. Murtrie. McGraw writes about Caslon Openface: Caslon Openface was originated by BB&S in 1915, where it was first called College Oldstyle. It started out as a reproduction of a delicate 18th century French face known as Le Moreau le Jeune, by the foundry of G. Peignot&Son, but in the American version some strokes are heavier. In a later ad, BB&S said, "Placing it in the Caslon group of types is taking a liberty, but it assuredly 'belongs.' " Actually it has somewhat more affinity for the Cochin types. Caslon Shaded was adapted by ATF from Heavy Caslon in 1917, by W. F. Capitain. Caslon Shadow Title was adapted from Caslon Bold by Monotype about 1928. Compare Cameo, Cochin Open, Gravure, Narciss. [Google] [More]  ⦿

McMurtrie: The Didot Family of Typefounders
[Douglas C. McMurtrie]

Scans of an 8-page booklet by Douglas McMurtrie published in Chicago in 1935: The Didot Family of Typefounders. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ménestrel
[Marc H. Smith]

French medieval and paleotypographic jump page, mostly edited by Marc Smith, École nationale des chartes, Sorbonne, Paris. Marc Smith wrote Du manuscrit à la typographie numérique (Gazette du livre médiéval, no. 52-53, 2008, pp. 51-78), in which he describes the history of digital type and makes interesting comments on their roots and classification. The site is quite extensive---medievalists can spend weeks visiting links and sub-pages. PDF file.

Marc Smith also designed some typefaces, notably Piacevole (2008, a 16th century cursive map script face after J. de Beauchesne), and the "ronde" La Petite Ronde (2008, after L. Barbedor). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Merijn Dietvorst

Dutch graphic designer, who graduated in 2008 from the AKV St Joost in Breda, The Netherlands, and is now at the Plantin Genootschap in Antwerp. At St. Joost he wrote an interesting thesis (in Dutch) on type revivals. Alternate URL. An excerpt from his thesis on Garamond revivals: i, ii, iii, iv, v, vi, vii, viii. [Google] [More]  ⦿

mfutils

Bernard Desgraupes' free metafont utilities for the Mac. These include metapostMode and metafontMode for use with the Alpha text editor on the Mac. Compatible with Tom Kiffe's CMacTex, and Andrew Trevorrow's OzMetafont. He is also the author of "Metafont - guide pratique", Editions: Vuibert, Paris, 1999. [Google] [More]  ⦿

M&H Type (or: Mackenzie&Harris Typographers and Typefounders)

Mackenzie&Harris Typographers and Typefounders since 1915. Located in the Presidio in San Francisco, they offer metal type. Their 119-page catalogue was published in 1994. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Michael Brandt
[The Evolution of Type]

[More]  ⦿

Michael Leary

Designer at and cofounder of the Galapagos Design Group. Coauthor of Leary, M., Hale, D.&Devigal A., Web Designer's Guide to Typography (Indianapolis: Hayden Books, 1997).

Hinting specialist. Designed the Startrek font Galaxy at Bitstream. He began his career more than 20 years ago at Compugraphic Corp. where he was part of the team that developed the Intellifont scalable font format. Leary also developed typefaces while working at Bitstream. His wide range of expertise includes typographic hinting and international font development. In 2004, he joined Agfa Monotype. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Michael Perry

Author of Hand Job A Catalog of Type (Princeton Architectural Press, New York, 2007). This lovely book, entirely done by hand, has many hand-drawn alphabets by a number of lettering artists. Some of these were sketches for fonts, and others, no doubt, will be imitated by font designers in the future. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Michael S. Macrakis

Editor of the book Greek Letters: From Tablets to Pixels (Oak Knoll Press). This book contains essays by notable scholars and type designer such as Hermann Zapf, Matthew Carter, Nicolas Barker and Nicolaos Panayotakis. Macrakis was born in 1924 and died in 2001. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Michiel Drost

Dutch author (b. 1950, Amsterdam) of Typage (2007, Herr Druck, Switzerland), a 256-page book on typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Miguel Pedraza

Author, ca. 1945, of Rotulacion Decorativa no. 1 (Ediciones ARS, Barcelona) and Rotulacion Decorativa no. 5 (Ediciones ARS, Barcelona). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mika Mischler

Designer at Die Gestalten of Brother (stencil) and T-Star Mono Round (monowidth). In 2002, he coedited Los Logos, a 444 page book of logos (with Robert Klanten and Nicholas Bourquin). In 2007, the typewriter face Generell TW was added.

At Binnenland, he has Relevant (Michael Mischler and Nik Thoenen, 2007; loosely influenced by 'Record Gothic', created by R. Hunter Middleton for the Ludlow Typograph Company in 1927), T-Star Pro, T-Star TW Pro (typewriter face, 2002), Korpus (2012, with Nik Thoenen), and Catalog (Michael Mischler and Nik Thoenen, 2005).

Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Mike Rohde
[Roh Design]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Mitja Miklavčič
[Three chapters in the development of Clarendon---Ionic typefaces]

[More]  ⦿

Modern Typography
[Paul Barnes]

Modern Typography is a dot com web presence organized by the London-based type designer and graphic designer, Paul Barnes, typophile extraordinaire. It is promised to have plenty of material for the typophile. Author of Swiss Typography: The typography of Karl Gerstner and Rudolf Hostettler (Modern Typography, 2000).

His typefaces:

  • The (free) font Pagan Poetry (2001), done for one of the sleeves on Björk's albums. The font was made for Show Studio (see also here and here).
  • Codesigner with Christian Schwartz in 2005 of the 200-font family Guardian Egyptian for The Guardian, about which he spoke at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon.
  • In 2007, he worked with Peter Saville on the Kate Moss brand. As a font, he suggested a variation on Brodovitch Albro, a typeface by Alexey Brodovitch, the famous art director of Harper's Bazaar from 1934-58. The Creative Review reactions to this typeface are a bit negative though.
  • In 2003, he created Austin, a high-contrast modern typeface. Now available at Schwartzco and at Commercial Type, Christian Schwartz writes: When hired to design a new headline typeface for Harper's&Queen, Britain's version of Harper's Bazaar, Paul thought to flick back through the pages of its 60's precursor, the über cool Queen. The high contrast serif headlines were lovely, but a little too expected in a contemporary fashion magazine. Some time poring through specimens in St Bride's Printing Library inspired the perfect twist: rather than taking our cues from Didot or Bodoni, we would start with Austin's first creation, turn up the contrast, tighten the spacing and make a fresh new look that would look bold and beautiful in the constantly changing world of fashion. The end result is Richard Austin meets Tony Stan, British Modern as seen through the lens of late 1970s New York.
  • Dala Floda (1997-now) is based on gravestone inscriptions, and was turned in 2010 into a logotype stencil family at Commercial Type. As a stencil family, it is praised by the typophile community. Realted is the semi-stencil typeface family Dala Moa.
  • Publico was designed from 2003-2006 with Christian Schwartz, Ross Milne and Kai Bernau. Originally called Stockholm and then Hacienda, and finally Publico for a Portuguese newspaper by that name.
  • Brunel (1995-now): an English modern, this is an anthology of the late eighteenth and nineteenth century English foundries. It was drawn from original source material, most notably the Caslon foundry and the work of John Isaac Drury).
  • Marian (2012) is a type experiment based on Garamond, consisting of 19 hairline styles with names referring to dates between 1554 and 1812. Commercial Type writes: Marian is a series of faithful revivals of some of the classics from the typographic canon: Austin, Baskerville, Bodoni, Fournier, Fleischman, Garamont, Granjon, Kis and van den Keere. The twist is that they have all been rendered as a hairline of near uniform weight, revealing the basic structure at the heart of the letterforms. Together they represent a concept: to recreate the past both for and in the present. [...] Faithful to the originals, Marian comes with small capitals in all nine roman styles, with lining and non-lining figures, with swash capitals (1554, 1740, 1800&1820), alternate and terminal characters (1554&1571). And like the hidden track so beloved of the concept album, Marian is completed by a Blackletter based on the work of Henrik van den Keere.
  • His classics series, mostly influenced by old Britsh type foundries, includes Figgins Sans (original 1832), Besley Grotesque, Caslon Antique, Fann Street Clarendon, Caslon Italian, Blanchard, Thorowgood Sans, Antique No. 6, Antique No. 3, and Ornamented (original c. 1850 at Caslon, Barnes use a Steven Shanks interpretation).
  • VF Didot (2013) is a custom Didot by Paul Barnes and Christian Schwartz for Vanity Fair, as requested by its design director, Chris Dixon. Based on work of Molé Le Jeune, a punchcutter used by the Didot family in the early part of the 19th century, VFDidot has 7 optical sizes and up to 5 weights in each size, plus small caps and even a stencil style.

    Early in 2014, Christian Schwartz, Paul Barnes and Miguel Reyes joined forces to create the manly didone typeface family Caponi, which is based on the early work of Bodoni, who was at that time greatly influenced by the roccoco style of Pierre Simon Fournier. It is named after Amid Capeci, who commissioned it in 2010 for his twentieth anniversary revamp of Entertainment Weekly. Caponi comes in Display, Slab and Text subfamilies.

His St Bride Type Foundry. Dafont link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Monika Thomas

Author of Schriften erkennen (Verlag Hermann Schmidt, Mainz, 1988), coauthored with Hans Peter Willberg. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Monsen Typographers In

Japanese publishers in 1980 of a photootype book called Display faces. Scans by Maniackers. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Morgan Press

Morgan Press is located in High Point Road, Scarsdale, New York. They published two wood type specimen books: Morgan Press Presents A First Showing of Wood Type Specimens (1955), WOOD TYPE Specimens for Reproduction from the Morgan Press (1964). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Muriel Paris

Muriel Paris (b. 1965) and Alex Singer (b. 1971) are involved in type in Paris. They co-designed the wonderful Zinzolin in 1996, a free adaptation of Polyphème, 1926. Author of Des caractères (IPA Patoux, 2003) and "Petit Manuel de Composition Typographique". [Google] [More]  ⦿

Nadine Monem

Author of Font The Sourcebook (2008, Black Dog Publishing). The publisher's blurb: The second part of Font: The Sourcebook profiles 50 of the most innovative and inspiring fonts in use today, with a short history of their origin, their inspiration and the designer who brought them to life. Each typeface entry is illustrated with an extensive library and examples of the font in use. In 2011, she published The 3D Type Book. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Nancy and Don Wansick

Authors of Identa Font (1997, PrePress innovations in Karlsruhe), a font catalog in four volumes, Sans Serif, Serif, Script and Display. Review by Delve Withrington. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Nathan Gale

U.K.-based designer of Crater (2002) and CR Gothic (2000, Agfa, with designs by Robin Nicholas). Author of Type 1 Digitale Schriftengestaltung (2002, Stiebner Verlag), a book that comes with a CD-ROM with nine fonts on it: Crater (2002, Nathan Gale), Aminta (2002, Gareth Hague), Diet (2002, Shin Sasaki, Extra Design), Metropolis (2002, Christian Küsters, Acme, a 3d modeling font developed with the help of Paul Beavis), JohnHadANightmare(LastNight) (2002, Chester, Thirstype), Circuit (2002, David Rust, Optimo, Switzerland), Studio (2002, Tom Hingston Studio, UK), Basic-21 (2002, Julian Morey, Club Twenty-One, UK), Asphalt (2002, Masahiko Nakamura, Lineto). English version: Type 1: Digital Typeface Design. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Neil Macmillan

Author of An A-Z of type designers (Yale University Press, 2006), a biography of 260 type designers from Gutenberg until today. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Nekropolis

A reprint of a book of monograms. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Nelson Beebe's bibliography on typographic fonts

[More]  ⦿

New York Pulbic Library (NYPL)

Some specimen books at the NYPL listed by Thomas G. Lannon. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Nicholas Ott

In 1998, Frederich Friedl, Nicholas Ott and Bernard Stein wrote the voluminous book, Typography: An Encyclopedic Survey of Type Design and Techniques Through History (Black Dog & Leventhal). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Nick Shinn
[Shinn Type]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Nicolete Gray

British author (b. 1911, Stevenage, d. 1997) of "Nineteenth Century Ornamented Typefaces" (University of California Press, Berkeley, CA, 1938, revised in 1976), "Lettering on Buildings" (1960) and "A History of lettering" (Phaidon, 1986). For examples from the first mentioned book, see here. She taught at the Central School of Art and Design (London) from 1964 to 1981. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Nijhof&Lee

Lots of type books for sale at Nijhof&Lee in the Netherlands. In 2008, 20 years after Nijhof&Lee opened for business, Frank Nijhof died. Warren Lee continues the business alone after that. [Google] [More]  ⦿

NOW Type
[Cláudio Rocha]

NOW Type is Cláudio Rocha, a Sao Paulo-based illustrator and designer (b. 1957). His typefaces include ITC Gema (1998) and ITC Underscript (1997, grunge). He runs Tupigrafia, a magazine dedicated to typography and calligraphy in Brazil. He designed Cashew (2000, a rounded face), Tenia, Viela Irregular, Unidin (sans display face), Rock Regular (slab face), Old Future (a brush version of Futura), Chacal Pixel, Persplextiva (2002, a bouncy hand-drawn 3d face), Liquid Stencil (brush stencil), Feijoada Light, Akrylicz Grotesk (2002, brush/paint face), Sampa (informal brush script) and Stampface. Partner of Oficina Tipografica Sao Paulo. Director of Now Design (Sao Paulo). He published the books "Projet Tipográfico" (Ed. Rosari), "Trajan e Franklin Gothic" (Ed. Rosari), and "Tipografia Comparada" (Ed. Rosari). Claudio now lives in Genoa, Italy, from where he launched the type magazine Tipoitalia in 2009.

FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Oak Knoll Bookstore: Typography

Oak Knoll Books, 414 Delaware Street, New Castle, DE 19720. This store has a lot of rare old type books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Oberlin Business College

This college in Oberlin, Ohio, was well-known in the 19th century for its penmanship studies. C.A. Barnett, J.T. Henderson and J.N. Yocom published the Oberlin Business College Compendium of Penmanship (1901). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Old German handwritten scripts

Samples of old German handwriting fonts, links to Fraktur fonts, lists of related books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Oldrich Hlavsa

Czech type designer. Author of "A book of Type and Design" (English Language version of "TYPOGRAFICKÁ PÍSMA LATINKOVA", published by the State Office of Technical Literature, Prague, 1957), Tudor Publishing, New York, 1960. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Oldrich Menhart

Czech type designer (b. Prague 1897, d. Prague 1962) who was mainly active at Grafotechna, a state foundry in Prague. Menhart was also an author who wrote about type and its history. After the World War II, he helped the communist party to promote itself. He was the author of fonts celebrating the victory of communism in hand-written manifests. Menhart considered himself foremost as a craftsman, and derived typefaces from calligraphic origins. Author of Nauka o pismu (1954) and Tvorba typografickeho pisma (1957). PDF file of Nauka o Pismu.

Veronika Burian on Menhart. FontShop link. Klingspor PDF. Oldrich Menhart's typefaces include

  • Manuskript Antikva (1944-1950, Grafotechna), Manuskript Kursiva (1951, Grafotechna). An angular and slightly irregular face with a handwritten feel. Burian places Manuscript Antikva in 1943 and Kursiva in 1946. Digitizations of Manuskript: the five-weight family by Franko Luin (1991) at Omnibus, Menhart Manuscript by Alex V. White, Manuskript Antiqua (URW++, by Ralph M. Unger), and ITC Oldrichium by George Thompson from No Bodoni Typography.
  • Menhart Antiqua and Menhart Kursiva, 1930. Menhart Antiqua was first published by the Bauersche Giesserei in 1932. We also find versions of this garalde set in 1936-1938 at Monotype. See also Grafotechna. Paul Hunt's Junius (2006) is a revival/adaptation of Menhart Antiqua. See also the beautiful revival Menhart Antiqua (2008, Albert Creus).
  • Menhart Roman (1933) and Menhart Italic (1933), published by Lanston Monotype in 1934-1935, and by Bauersche Giesserei in 1939. Bill Horton recreated Menhart-Italic and Menhart-Regular. Alexander W. White revived Menhart Italika [his revivals of Preissig Antikva, Preissig Italika, Menhart Italika and Menhart Manuscript won him awards at the TDC2 2001 competition].
  • Menhart Latein.
  • Parlament (1950, Czech Government Printing Office). Calligraphic type with lots of individuality and irregularity, first planned to be used for printing the Czech Constitution.
  • Standard Antikva and Kursiva (1959). See also at Grafotechna in 1966.
  • Victory Roman, Medium and Italic, 1942-1943. Published in 1947 at Intertype. An angular text face.
  • Triga Antikva, Kursiva and Medium (1951, published in 1954 at Sluzba Tos, Prgaue). Calligraphic text type.
  • Ceska Unciala (1944), published in 1949 at Grafotechna. An angular pseudo-Gaelic uncial. Ralph Unger's FontForum Unciala (2005, URW++) is a revival.
  • Figural Romana or Antikva (1940, published in 1949 at Grafotechna), Figural Kursiva or Italika (1948; published in 1949-1950, Grafotechna), Figural Romana (1940). Rather angular lower case letters with several slopes. Michael Gills, under the art direction of Colin Brignall, did Figural (1992) and Prague for Letraset without Grafotechna's permission, and ITC is still selling those fonts now as ITC Figural and ITC Prague. Monotype and Linotype also offer Figural. Figural and Figural Italic were also revived in 2006 by Ari Rafaeli.
  • Grazdanka (1953, Grafotechna), Grazdanka Kursiva (1954, Grafotechna). Manuscript Grazhdanka (cyrillic) was revived in 2006 by Ari Rafaeli.
  • Hollar (1939, at Jaroslav Picku, Prague).
  • Monument (1950-1952, Grafotechna). An almost pen-drawn all-caps outline face. Digital version by Ralph M. Unger called Monument (2010, Profonts). Dieter Steffmann has a free revival of Monument in 2002.
  • Vajgar (1961, Tiskarna Straz)

View the typefaces related to Oldrich Menhart. See also here. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Oliver Linke
[Lazydogs Typefoundry]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Oliver Weiss
[Walden Font]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Open Library

The Open Libray publishes scans of old royalty-free texts. Useful searches include the keywords specimen, typeface, type designer, and font. If you have a dead moment, and you are a typophile, browse this collection to give you a boost. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Orbis Typographicus
[Joshua Langman]

Orbis Typographicus is a set of twenty-nine 9x12 letterpress broadsides, designed by Hermann Zapf and printed by Philip Metzger of Crabgrass Press between 1970 and 1980. The broadsides feature quotations on art, science, nature, faith, and the human condition, from authors ancient and contemporary. The text includes poetry, prose, anagrams, and palindromes, in English, German, Spanish, French and Japanese. Hand set by Philip Metzger, the set showcases many of the typefaces of Zapf and his wife, Gudrun Zapf von Hesse.

In 2013, the web site Orbis Typographicus was set up by Joshua Langman. It features high-resolution scans, available for download, and a complete computer-searchable transcript. The web site also features an essay by Philip A. Metzger, the son of the printer, in which he shares his recollections of his father working on the project.

Joshua Langman is a freelance graphic designer and typographer based in New York. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ornamental Typography at BibliOdyssey

Subpage at Bibliodyssey. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Oscar Jennings

Author of "Early Woodcut Initials" (Methuen and Co., London, 1908), which contains over thirteen hundred reproductions of ornamental letters of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Otl Aicher

Ulm-born designer (1922-1991) at Agfa-Monotype of the Rotis family in 1988-1989 (sold by Adobe), as well as Traffic for the München public transport. He adapted Univers for Bulthaupt.

Aicher was a world expert on pictograms, having designed, e.g., the pictograms for the 1972 Munich Olympics, and his visual language system of over 900 pictograms. Robin Kinross and Erik Spiekermann discuss the pros and cons of Rotis.

Hrant Papazian sums up Rotis, a family disliked by many type designers, but that has some oomph: Rotis -the typeface- is admirable not for its typographic merit, but for its lion-hearted spirit, its golden intentions - things so totally lacking in almost every other font ever made. Norbert Florendo, who worked with him on and off, muses: If anything, Aicher was a formalist in turmoil. A philosopher in spirit who was shackled by his sense of order. He called for revolution in design and typography, but adhered to the grid (anti-nature) in distrust of chaos. He admired Adrian Frutiger immensely and one can undoubtably see how Univers influenced the Rotis matrix. If one reads deeper into Aichers Typographie, one will see Aichers concepts as being less typographic (relating to type design and type layout) and more involved with humans within a rapidly changing environment in need of new symbology and notation systems. [...] I am far more an admirer of Herr Aicher than Rotis the type family. Bio. Rotis was named after the village (Rotis über Leutkirch) in Allgäu where Aicher lived from 1972 and died in 1991. Typophile discussion. URW shows the Monotype WMF Rotis family (2007) which was exclusively used by WMF AG.

Author of these books:

This biography reveals that Aicher was a German soldier in the second world war, both on the Russian and French fronts. In 1953, he founded the HfG (Hochschule für Gestaltung) in Ulm, and he helped with the graphic design for the Olympic Games in München in 1972. Discussion of his contributions by the typophiles. Markus Rathgeb wrote Otl Aicher (2006, Phaidon Press Limited, London), which is about Aicher's life as a graphic designer, and has little about his type design.

Klingspor link. FontShop link. Linotype link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Otto Neurath

Celebrated Austrian infographics icon, a socialist who used small images, the dingbats of today, to illustrate his work in the early part of the 20th century (see Isotype Welt). Article on Neurath by Johannes Steil, who writes: Als Erfinder der Infografik wird Otto Neurath gesehen, ein Österreicher mit bewegtem Lebenslauf. Nach einem Studium der Nationalökonomie in Berlin leitet er im Ersten Weltkrieg die Abteilung für Kriegswirtschaftslehre im österreichischen Kriegsministerium, wird 1919 Leiter des Zentralwirtschaftsamtes der Ersten Münchner Räterepublik, nach deren Ende Verhaftung und Auslieferung nach Österreich. In Wien gründet er 1924 das Gesellschafts- und Wirtschaftsmuseum, wo erste Bildstatistiken entwickelt werden. 1934 nach dem Sieg der Austrofaschisten erste Emigration in die Niederlande, von wo er 1940 nach dem Einmarsch der deutschen Faschisten weiter nach Großbritannien flieht. Dort stirbt er 1945 im Alter von 63 Jahren. The main reference on Neurasth is a book by Frank Hartmann and Erwin K. Bauer: Bildersprache. Otto Neuraths Visualisierungen (Wien, 2006). [Google] [More]  ⦿

OurType
[Fred Smeijers]

OurType is Fred Smeijers' web site and foundry established in 2002. The venture was started in cooperation with Rudy Geerarts of FontShop Benelux, and today also includes Corina Cotorobai. Smeijers is research fellow at Plantin Museum in Antwerp, and professor of type design at the Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst in Leipzig. Fred Smeijers (b. 1961) studied at the Schol of Art at Arnhem. He created the following typefaces:

  • The huge (and growing) text family Quadraat (1998-2001). It has as subfamilies FF Quadraat, FF Quadraat Sans and FF Quadraat Sans Mono, and was developed from 1997-1998 as part of the FontFont library.
  • Renard (at Enschedé, after letters by Hendrik van den Keere, 1998; see discussion here).
  • DTL Nobel (with Andrea Fuchs, 1993, at the Dutch Type Library). Not to be confused with the geometric sans family Nobel, also created in 1993, by Tobias Frere-Jones (Font Bureau).
  • Arnhem (1998-2002) and Arnhem Fine, which are historically related to the Romain du roi. These were developed in collaboration with Werkplaats Typografie (Karel Martens and Wigger Bierma)---Andy Crewdson provides an insightful discussion of it. Smeijers: Arnhem was designed in 1999 for the Nederlandse Staatscourant, the daily newspaper of the Dutch state. It can be classified as a very functional design---Arnhem has been conceived for, and does work best in large quantities of running text.
  • Fresco (1998), Fresco Sans, Fresco Condensed, Fresco Informal, Fresco Informal Sans, Fresco Script (+Sans), Fresco Plus, a work horse of a family at OurType.
  • Ludwig (2010), modeled after the 19-th century grotesks.
  • Monitor (2000-2004, a sans family at OurType). Not to be confused with earlier commercial typefaces with the same name, like Henryk Sawanda's Monitor (1975-1980) or BB&S's Monitor No. 5 (1890s).
  • Eva (2010: an informal sans, done with Merel Matzinger at OurType).
  • The sans family Sansa (2005, OurType) was followed by Sansa Slab and Sansa Soft in 2006. Sansa and Arnhem are available from FontShop since 2005.
  • In 2002, OurType created the gorgeous Custodia family for use in publications of the Custodia Foundation. The typeface is called Custodia 17 because it was inspired by 17th century Dutch styles. Peter Gabor and Jonathan Munn claim that Custodia is too close to Monotype Van Dijck. However, OurType explains that this was the intention: Its pleasantly uneven rhythm captures the not-quite-perfect lettershapes of master punchcutters working in Delft, Rotterdam, Amsterdam or Haarlem in the later seventeenth century: Christoffel van Dijck, Dirck Voskens, Johan Michael Smit, Jean Baptiste van Wolschaten.
  • Denda new (2000), a family made specially for Canon. In his book, Type Now, Fred Smeijers says: A contemporary sanserif initiated in 2000 by TBWA\Designers Company for their redesign of Canon Europe packaging. This typeface comes in four weights, in roman and matching italics: for use by Canon Europe in general publicity, manuals, and packaging. It is a custom-made design, not publicly available.
  • Puncho (2012) by Fred Smeijers is based on stencil letter punches made by S.M. Spencer of Boston.
  • Bery Roman (2012): Bery Roman is based on the stencil letters of Jean Gabriel Bery. Bery Roman is part of OurType's Stencil Fonts Series of 2012. Jean Gabriel Bery was a Paris stencil maker whose atelier was located on the Pont Notre-Dame. His work is mainly known from the stencil set he supplied to Benjamin Franklin in 1781, now at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. Bery's confident sense of design and the excellent production of his stencils rank him among the best stencil makers of any period.
  • His custom type designs include bespoke typefaces and lettering for Philips Electronics, Tom-Tom, and Canon-Europe.

FontShop link.

Author of Counterpunch: making type in the sixteenth century, designing typefaces now, London, Hyphen Press, 1996, and Type Now: A Manifesto.

In February 2001, Smeijers received the (second) Gerrit Noordzij Award 2000 (an initiative of the post-graduate department Type&Media at the Royal Academy in The Hague in cooperation with the Museum Meermanno). Author of Type Now (2003, reviewed by John Berry). OurType's offices are in DePinte, Belgium.

Speaker on historical stencil forms at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon. Currently he also is professor of digital media and Dean at the Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst in Leipzig. Speaker at ATypI 2011 in Reykjavik. Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam (on Spatial relationships among 16th-century matrices (and what they tell us), a close look at surviving matrices at the Plantin-Moretus Museum). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

P. Meyrat

French author of Recueil Méthodique de Principes d' Ecriture (ca. 1920, Limoges). Samples: Fine Cursive, Fine Cursive Droite, Majuscules, Teaching tracing. [Google] [More]  ⦿

P. Moreau / Veuve Hérissant
[Pierre Moreau]

The print shop and foundry of Pierre Moreau was operational in Paris from 1640-1792. It had various directors, listed here in chronological order:

  • Pierre Moreau ran the business from 1640 until his death in Paris in 1649. In 1643 he became imprimeur ordinaire du roi. In 1640, he created (Marius Audin even says invented) a set of ronde and bastarda typefaces called Financières. There is a publication from 1643-1644 entitled Les saintes métamorphoses ov les changemens iraculeux de quelques grands saints tirez de leurs vies. Paris, en 'Imprimerie des nouueaux caracthères de P. Moreau...1643-1644. This book was selling for 15,000 Euros in 2013.
  • Denis Thierry (d. 1657) and Denis Thierry II (d. 1712, Paris) were in charge from 1648-1712. Only Lottin mentions that the business of Moreau went to Thierery, and that Thierry in 1712 passed it to Collombat.
  • Jacques Collombat (b. 1668, Grenoble, d. 1744, Paris) ran the business from 1712-1744. In 1714 he was imprimeur du roi.
  • Jacques François Collombat (b. 1701, Paris, d. 1751, Paris) was the son of Jacques. He continued the operation from 1744-1751. He too was imprimeur du roi. His early death and the early death of his wife Jacqueline Tarlé in 1752 [Veuve Collombat thus ran the foundry from 1751-1752] meant that his son Jean Jacques Etienne Collombat was not old enough to continue the foundry. In 1763, Jean Jacques Etienne passed the foundry to Jean Thomas Hérissant.
  • Jean Thomas Hérissant continued the foundry from 1763-1772. Born in Paris in 1704, he died there in 1772. He too was imprimeur du roi.
  • Veuve Hérissant, ran the business from 1772-1788. Her maiden name was Marie Nicole Estienne. She published, e.g., Epreuves des Caractères Samartains provenant de l'Imprimerie de la Veuve Hérissant (1772), and Epreuves des Caractères de la Fonderie de la Veuve Hérissant (1772). She was an imprimeur ordinaire du roi. In 1788, she passed the foundry on to Anisson.
  • Etienne Alexandre Jacques Anisson-Dupéron (b. 1749, Paris, d. 1794, Paris) was the son of Louis Laurent II Anisson. In 1788, when he took over the foundry, he was the director of the Imprimerie Royale.
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Palmer and Rey
[John J. Palmer]

Typefounders and printing press in San Francisco. The Miller&Richard Type Foundry of Scotland opened a branch in San Francisco in 1878, headed by John J. Palmer. This branch was sold to Palmer and Valentine J. A. Rey in 1882. In 1884, Palmer&Rey acquired the assets of the Pacific Type Foundry. The company then merged into American Type Founders in 1892. They published New specimen book (1884, San Francisco), in which we find several original typefaces, such as the Octic series (athletic lettering, octagonal) and the very Victorian face Oxford.

Digitizations: In 2010, Nick Curtis created a digital version of their Courier, and called it Pony Xpress NF. Rightly So NF (2011, Nick Curtis) is a squarish face based on Geometric Gothic from the 1884 specimen book of Palmer and Rey---it is hard to imagine that this almost pixelish style was around at that epoch. Oxford was revived by Nick Curtis as Palmer Oxonian NF (2011). Octic was revived in 2012 by Nick Curtis as Easy Eights NF. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Paolo Daniele Corda

Paolo Daniele Corda was born in Milan in 1975. He is currently operations room coordinator of the Central Briefing Office for the national air traffic services of northern Italy. Stefania Cantù and Paolo Daniele Corda coauthored La Scrittura Araba e il Progetto DecoType (2013, Sedizioni). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Paper and Ink Arts

Calligraphy books and supplies, Woodsboro, MD. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Patricia Córdoba

Author of La modernidad tipográfica truncada. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Patricia Cost

Author of The Bentons: How an American Father and Son Changed the Printing Industry, published in 2011 by RIT Cary Graphic Arts Press. Book review by James Puckett. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Paul Baker

Paul Baker's type-related book, right here on the web. He created Alphabet26 in 2001, an implementation of a unicase font proposal by Bradbury Thompson. Writings on "Evaluating typography and typesetting". He digitized Andromaque Uncial (1958, Victor Hammer) in 1995. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Paul Barnes
[Modern Typography]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Paul Beaujon

Pen name of Beatrice L. Warde. Born in New York in 1900, she died in London in 1969. A typographer, writer, and art historian, she worked for the British Monotype Corporation for most of her life, and was famous for her energy, enthusiasm and speeches. Collaborator of Stanley Morison. She created a face called Arrighi. She is famous for The Crystal Goblet or Printing Should be Invisible (The Crystal Goblet, Sixteen Essays on Typography, Cleveland, 1956, and Sylvan Press, London, 1955), which is also reproduced here and here. The text was originally printed in London in 1932, under the pseudonym Paul Beaujon. Here are two passages:

  • Imagine that you have before you a flagon of wine. You may choose your own favorite vintage for this imaginary demonstration, so that it be a deep shimmering crimson in colour. You have two goblets before you. One is of solid gold, wrought in the most exquisite patterns. The other is of crystal-clear glass, thin as a bubble, and as transparent. Pour and drink; and according to your choice of goblet, I shall know whether or not you are a connoisseur of wine. For if you have no feelings about wine one way or the other, you will want the sensation of drinking the stuff out of a vessel that may have cost thousands of pounds; but if you are a member of that vanishing tribe, the amateurs of fine vintages, you will choose the crystal, because everything about it is calculated to reveal rather than to hide the beautiful thing which it was meant to contain.
  • Bear with me in this long-winded and fragrant metaphor; for you will find that almost all the virtues of the perfect wine-glass have a parallel in typography. There is the long, thin stem that obviates fingerprints on the bowl. Why? Because no cloud must come between your eyes and the fiery heart of the liquid. Are not the margins on book pages similarly meant to obviate the necessity of fingering the type-page? Again: the glass is colourless or at the most only faintly tinged in the bowl, because the connoisseur judges wine partly by its colour and is impatient of anything that alters it. There are a thousand mannerisms in typography that are as impudent and arbitrary as putting port in tumblers of red or green glass! When a goblet has a base that looks too small for security, it does not matter how cleverly it is weighted; you feel nervous lest it should tip over. There are ways of setting lines of type which may work well enough, and yet keep the reader subconsciously worried by the fear of 'doubling' lines, reading three words as one, and so forth.

Drawing of her by Eric Gill. Life story.

Beatrice Warde was educated at Barnard College, Columbia, where she studied calligraphy and letterforms. From 1921-1925, she was the assistant librarian at American Type Founders. In 1925, she married the book and type designer Frederic Warde, who was Director of Printing at the Princeton University Press. Together, they moved to Europe, where Beatrice worked on The Fleuron: A Journal of Typography (Cambridge, England: At the University Press, and New York: Doubleday Doran, 1923-1930), which was at that time edited by Stanley Morison. As explained above, she is best known for an article she published in the 1926 issue of The Fleuron, written under the pseudonym Paul Beaujon, which traced types mistakenly attributed to Garamond back to Jean Jannon. In 1927, she became editor of The Monotype Recorder in London. Rebecca Davidson of the Princeton University Library wrote in 2004: Beatrice Warde was a believer in the power of the printed word to defend freedom, and she designed and printed her famous manifesto, This Is A Printing Office, in 1932, using Eric Gill's Perpetua typeface. She rejected the avant-garde in typography, believing that classical forms provided a "clearly polished window" through which ideas could be communicated. The Crystal Goblet: Sixteen Essays on Typography (1955) is an anthology of her writings. Wood engraved portrait of Warde by Bernard Brussel-Smith (1950). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Paul Carlyle

Coauthor with Guy Oring of "Letters and Lettering" (1938). This book was a big source of inspiration for Nick Curtis. For example, he created the typeface Shishka Bob NF (2005) based on the experimental calligraphy in that book. Quaint was digitized by PhotoLettering / House Industries as Quaint or Carlyle Quaint.

TaraBulbous NF (2008) is a fat-lettered font by Nick Curtis, also based on Carlyle-Oring lettering. Guinness Extra stout NF (1999, Nick Curtis) is also based on a Carlyle-Oring script. Kynges X NF (2004, Nick Curtis) is a blackletter face based on other work by Carlyle and Oring. Dathan Boardman made Afternoon Tea (2010) based on an art deco design from the book. Anton Scholtz created the art deco typeface Nocturne in 2012 based on work by Carlyle and Oring. The caps in Astoria Titling (Nick Curtis) are based on a 1938 typeface by Carlyle and Oring.

Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Paul E. Kennedy

Author of "Modern Display Alphabets: 100 Complete Fonts" (1974, Franklin Photolettering). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Paul Felton

Graphic designer who published The Ten Commandments of Typography/Type Heresy: Breaking the Ten Commandments of Typography (Merrell Publishers Ltd, 2006). Ill-received by the typophiles: Chris Lozos states: The cover is just boringly bad and needs to be excommunicated or excorcised. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Paul Frigyes

Coauthor with Bo Berndal of Typiskt typografiskt, Bokförlaget (TT Fisher & Co, 1990). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Paul McPharlin

Author (1903-1948) of Roman Numerals Typographic Leaves and Pointing Hands (1942, The Typophiles, New York), in which he traces the history of the roman numeral, the ornamental leaf and the pointing hand. He says that his main sources for the former were "History of mathematics" (D.E. Smith, 1925) and "Introduction to the study of Latin inscriptions" (James C. Egbert, New York, 1896). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Paul Shaw

Paul Shaw (b. Ann Arbor, MI, 1954) is a calligrapher and typographer working in New York City, where he runs Paul Shaw/Letter Design. He has created custom lettering and logos for many companies, including Avon, Lord&Taylor, Rolex, Clairol and Estée Lauder. Shaw has taught calligraphy and typography at New York's Parsons the New School for Design for more than a decade. He teaches the history of type at the School of Visual Arts in New York.

Designer of the Kolo LP art nouveau family (with Garrett Boge) in 1996 at Letterperfect Design. He was inspired by the lettering of Koloman Moser, Gustav Klimt, Alfred Roller, and other members of the Secession, Vienna's turn-of-the-century Art Nouveau movement, in the design of Kolo. Garrett Boge and Paul Shaw made the fun handwriting font Bermuda LP in 1996. At LetterPerfect (which he started with Garrett Boge in 1996), he co-designed Kolo (1996), Tomboy, Beata, Donatello, Ghiberti, Pietra, Pontif (roman capitals), Cresci (roman capitals), Old Claude LP and Uppsala LP (1998) with Garrett Boge. At Agfa/Monotype, you can buy his calligraphic fonts Göteborg LP (1998), Stockholm LP (1998, with Garrett Boge), and Uppsala.

Coauthor with Peter Bain of Blackletter: Type and National Identity (1998). At ATypI in Rome in 2002, he spoke about the revival of the roman capital in the 15th century, and lettering in fascist Italy.

FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Paulo Heitlinger

Portuguese author of Tipografia: origens, formas e uso das letras (2006, Paulo Heitlinger, Lisbon) and Alfabetos, Caligrafia e Tipografia (2010, Lisbon). Born in Lisbon, he studied nuclear physics in Germany. He lectured on communication design at the Universidade do Algarve. His pages (in Portuguese) are quite complete, with a great glossary, a beautiful section on the history of type, a mag called Cadernos de Tipografia, links to type design in the world in general, and in Brazil, Spain and Portugal in particular, and more general information on type. Font-making how to. Useful timeline of 16th century writing manuals. An absolute must. He has also created or revived a number of typefaces, which can be bought on-line.

An incomplete list of his typefaces:

  • Sinalética: A sober serif face for excellent legibility.
  • CantoneirosRegular (2008), Cantoneiros-Thin (2008): art deco / avant-garde.
  • Transito (2008): the famous 1930s stencil face of Jan Tschichold at Lettergieterij Amsterdam, with reinvented forms for f, g and y. [Note: the pic on the right-hand-side is Transito, as grabbed from Heitlinger's page---the grammatical error is not mine.]
  • Sturmblond-Medium (2008): Revival of simple lettering of Herbert Bayer.
  • Bayer Condensed: Revival of simple lettering of Herbert Bayer.
  • Imperatorum (2008)
  • Ratdoldt (2008): a blackletter face made from scans, and attributed to Erhard Ratdolt.
  • Valentim (2008): a blackletter face made from scans of the book Vita Christi. Named after Valentim Fernandes, a printer active in Lisbon, ca. 1480-1519.
  • Incunabulo Normalizado (2008): a blackletter face made from scans of the book Vita Christi.
  • Uhertype-Medium (2007): Revival of another Bauhaus era typeface, by Joost Schmidt.
  • Arkitekto: A Bauhaus style piano key font based on an image found in a book of Kurt Weidemann.
  • His Spanish collection includes Bastarda de Francisco Lucas, a versão espanhola da Cancelleresca italiana do século XVI. Um ponto alto da Caligrafia del Siglo de Oro.
  • Redondilla de Francisco Lucas, a penmanship font based on Arte de Escribir 91577).
  • Gótica Rotunda Gans.
  • Juan Bravo, based on azulejos (tiles).
  • Segovia, a titling font.
  • Centauro, a decorative font.
  • Kurrsiva, inspired by scripts from the 1960s.
  • Deco de Avila, an avant-garde face.Bertrand (2008): an art deco face patterened after the shop sign of Livraria Bertrand in Chiado, Lisbon.
  • Rotunda:
  • Visigotica: based on the calligraphic writings of the 10th and 11th centuries. This font has many alternates. Based on scans of a text of the 10th century called Actas de Concilio de Caledonia de 451. Styles: Imperatorum, Isidoro.
  • Typefaces based on the calligraphic work of Francisco Lucas, 1570: Bastarda de Lucas Italic (2009), Bastarda de Lucas (2009), Redondilla de Lucas (2009).
  • Uncialis (2009): a Lombardian type based on a 16th century model of Giralde de Prado.
  • Escolar Portugal (Fino, Forte) and Escolar Brasil are school fonts of the "upright connected script" style that were made in 2008. For more on didactic fonts, read the booklet Caderno de Tipografia e Design Nr. 14 (March 2009).
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Paulus Franck

Designer of a set of curly baroque initials in Nürnberg in 1601, published in Schatzkammer. Allerhand Versalien. The original book was scanned in at the BSB (Bayerische Staats Bibliothek and can be downloaded.

Joseph Kiermeier-Debre and Fritz Franz Vogel published a facsimile that can be seen at Google Books and at Amazon (Ravensburger Buchverlag, 1998).

A penmanship book due to Paulus (or Paul) Franck from 1655 under the title Kunstrichtige Schreibart: allerhand Versalien oder AnfangsBuchstaben der teütschen, lateinischen und italianischen Schrifften aus unterschiedlichen Meistern der edlen Schreibkunst zusammen getragen was published in 1655 in Nürnberg by Paul Fürst (ca. 1605-1666) and printed by Christoph Gerhard (1624-1681). This text, of which some pictures can be viewed here, consists largely of hyper-ornamental blackletter initials.

Franck's über-ornamental decorative caps were revived digitally in several typefaces:

  • PaulusFranckInitialen (2002) was created by Dieter Steffmann based on those initials, but they are apparently incomplete.
  • Paulo W (Intellecta Design) created the font Paulus Franck 1602 (2006).

Open Library link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Pedro Guitton

Author of A homage to typography (2009, Index Book, Barcelona). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Pen&Brush Lettering and Practical Alphabets

Book with many samples of alphabets, published by Blandford Press, Ltd., London, 1929. Several typefaces served as models for digital designs by Nick Curtis. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Pepe Gimeno

Spanish designer (b. Valencia, 1951) of the handwriting font Warhol, with slight calligraphic influences (possibly based on the handwriting of Andy Warhol's mother, Julia Warhol). It won an award at the TDC2 2001 competition (Type Directors Club). He also designed the curly FF Pepe family (2002). Since 1987 he has worked on a free-lance basis specialising in graphic communication, corporate identity, signposting and publication design. He has taught graphic design at the C. E. U. San Pablo University, Valencia.

Author of Cali Typography (2002, La Imprenta-Comunicación Gráfica).

Behance link. Bio at FontFont. FontShop link. Klingspor link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Pepin Van Roojen

Author of Ornamental Type (Ramboro Books, 1996). Some pictures from this book are here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Peter Bain
[Peter Bain Design (was: Incipit)]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Peter Bain Design (was: Incipit)
[Peter Bain]

Incipit, or Peter Bain Design, was Peter Bain's type and graphic design studio in Brooklyn, New York. It closed down gradually between 2007 and 2010.

Peter Bain received his M.F.A. in Design: Visual Communications from Virginia Commonwealth University. He was type director at Saatchi&Saatchi Advertising in New York, and taught at Parsons/The New School for Design and Pratt Institute in New York. After Saatchi, and before Incipit, he was freelancing. After Incipit, he relacted briefly to Virginia to attend VCU and then went on to Mississippi, where he is Assistant Professor of Art, Graphic Design at Mississippi State University. He lives in nearby Starkville, MS.

He is best known for his wonderful book Blackletter: Type and National Identity (1998, with Paul Shaw).

His photocomposition display faces were reedited and available in reproduction proofs (for a short time). The photocomposition display faces are in two-inch film format, as formerly used on machines such as the Typositor and Filmotype. They are being held in storage, and are no longer listed for that reason. PDF format list. Text format of Bain's file. Bain says he built this from the Typositor type libraries formerly offered by Techni-Process Lettering and Pastore DePamphilis Rampone, which he bought at an auction. Report on his talk in London on blackletter type (2003). MyFonts sells the 4-weight Josef Albers-inspired stencil family Gridiot (2003-2011). His thoughts about the art of Albers: Remember, any idiot can design a typeface on a grid: Gridiot.

Speaker at ATypI 2006 in Lisbon. Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam. MyFonts link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Peter Bezdek
[Rudolf Koch]

[More]  ⦿

Peter Bilak
[Typotheque]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Peter Enneson

Peter Enneson is an Art Dirctor and Graphic Designer living and working in Toronto. His work has been awarded in design competitons sponsored by the National Magazine Awards Foundation, the Art Directors Club of Toronto, and others. Recently, his Typographical exploration of Genesis was selected for inclusion in Type Culture, a Canadian competition. Peter Enneson is preparing a translation of Gerrit Noordzij's De streek: theorie van het schrift, and a book based on his ATypI 2003 presentation on Henk Krijger's work. He holds a Masters of Philosophy degree in Aesthetics. His writings include a piece on Henk Krijger's 1972 painting The survivors, and a reply to Peter Burnhill's Type spaces in Typography Papers 4, 2000.

In 2014, in collaboration wth Patrick Griffin of Canada Type, he published a meticulous revival of Henk Krijger's Raffia Initials (1952, Lettergieterij Amsterdam, where it is known as Raffia Initialen) that is based on photcopies and digtal images of the master drawings. Raffia Initialen was distributed in North America by Amsterdam Continental Types and Graphic Equipment Inc. in electrotype format, and later through VGC on strips of typositor film. Currently licensing rights are owned by the Linotype Corporation. The master drawings were located in 2001 by longtime Lettergieterij Amsterdam employee Henk Gianotten, and are now part of the Special Collections division of the Univeriteitsbibliotheek of the University of Amsterdam. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Peter Gericke

A true artist, designing wonderful Caps and initials in München. I really like the erotic initials. None of these seem to have been made into fonts though. Author of Typografische Magazin (1995), a book showing full character sets for 94 Fraktur typefaces. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Peter Holliday

Art and design historian. Author of Edward Johnston: Master Calligrapher (2007, Oak Knoll Press and the British Library). Oak Knoll's blurb: This book looks afresh at Johnston's work and legacy. It considers his friendships and his philosophy, the people he worked with and the influence he had on them and others. Importantly it gives details of the setting up of the craft community at Ditchling in Sussex and the craftspeople who were all drawn to the village as a result. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Peter Karow

Born in Stargard, Pomerania, in 1940, he was the technical director and their cofounder of URW Software&Type GmbH in Hamburg (URW stands for Unternehmensberatung Rubow Weber, after the first two of the founders, Rubow and Weber [Karow being the third one], and was succeeded by URW++), and developed the Ikarus programfor font design. Since 1988, Karow and Zapf cooperated on the hz program for micro-typography of texts. Karow published Digital Typefaces (Springer, 1994), Typeface Statistics (URW Verlag, Hamburg, 1993), and Font Technology (Springer, 1994), and is an expert in font technology. In 2013, DTL published Karow's booklet Digital Typography & Artificial Intelligence. In 2003, he was the first recipient of the Dr. Peter Karow Award established by DTL to honor people with extraordinary and innovative achievements in the field of font-related technology. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Peter Wegner

Author of American Types, 1997. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Phil Baines

Graphic designer (born in 1958 in Kendal, Westmorland) who graduated from St Martin's School of Art in 1985 and the Royal College of Art in 1987. He works as a freelance graphic designer, is Professor of Typography at Central Saint Martins College of Art&Design (now a university) in London (since 1991), runs Phil Baines Studio, maintains Public Lettering (about type found in cities), and is Typographic Advisor to the Central Lettering Record CD-Rom project.

He designed FUSE Classic 1, Can You (1989), Ushaw (FUSE 8, FontShop, 1993), Toulon (1994), Horncastle (1994), VereDignum LT Std in Alternate, Decorative and Regular weights (2003, Linotype Taketype 5 collection) and Can You Read Me (FUSE 1, 1991).

His pages on public lettering in London.

His books include Signs, lettering in the environment (with Catherine Dixon, 2003) and Type&Typography (2002, with Andrew Haslam).

Author of Rookledge’s Classic International Typefinder (Christopher Perfect, Gordon Rookledge, Phil Baines).

At ATypI 2007 in Brighton, he spoke on From the Motor Car Act to motorways. He has also a good reputation for taking people on typographic city tours, as he did in 2006 at ATypI in Lisbon, and at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. Linotype link. FontShop link. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin in which he explained how he and Catherine Dixon produced the lettering for the Pozza Palace in Dubrovnik on commission for the Serbian Orthodox Church. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Philip Bertheau

Author of "Buchdruckschriften im 20.Jahrhundert" (1995). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Philip Cade
[Cade Type Foundry]

[More]  ⦿

Philip Meggs

Coauthor with Roy McKelvey of Revival of the Fittest Digital versions of classic typefaces (New York, 2000). Modern day revivals are compared with their metal-type originals.

Coauthor with Rob Carter of Typographic Specimens: The Great Typefaces (John Wiley, 1993).

Author of Typographic Design: Form and Communication (John Wiley, 2003, with Rob Carter and Ben Day) and Typographic Specimens: The Great Typefaces (Wiley, 1993).

Meggs died from leukemia on November 24, 2002. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Philipp Luidl

Author of Die Schwabacher (2004), and Ornaments. Philipp Luidl and Günter Gerhard Lange coauthored Paul Renner (1978, Typografische Gesellschaft München). Philipp Luidl and Helmut Huber wrote Typographical ornaments (Poole, Dorset: Blandford Press; New York, N.Y.: Distributed in the U.S. by Sterling Pub. Co., 1985), a 368-page in-depth treatise on the subject. Cover page and selected images such as this end piece with tendril decorations, 17th century, this cast unit piece assembled from various elements, these great ornamented caps, and this vignette from the Academicism period. They divide type ornaments up by historical periods:

[Google] [More]  ⦿

Philipp Luidl

Prolific German author, who has written these books: "Hommage für Georg Trump" (1981, with G.G. Lange), Typographie, Herkunft, Aufbau, Anwendung (Schlütersche Verlagsanstalt, Hannover, 1989), Typographie (1998, Könemann Verlag, with Friedrich Friedl, Nicolaus Ott and Bernard Stein), Typographical Ornaments (Blandford Press, 1985, with Helmut Huber), Ornaments (1995, Bruckmann Verlag, with Helmut Huber and Lenore Lengefeld). He is docent in typography at the Akademie für das Grafische Gewerbe in Munich. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Philipp Stamm

Swiss typographer and author, b. 1966, Schaffhausen. Coeditor with Heidrun Osterer of Adrian Frutiger - Typefaces The Complete Works (2009, Birkhäuser).

Creator in 1995 of PhonogrammeF (Feinherb, Visuelle Gestaltung). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Philobiblon

Type book listing, with links to Amazon. Web links for each book! Fantastic resource. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Pierre Didot

Born in Paris in 1761, he died there in 1853. He was in the third generation of the Didot dynasty of printers, son of François-Ambroise Didot. Wikipedia: Pierre Didot was awarded a gold medal at the exhibition of 1798, for his edition of Virgil. By order of the Government, his presses were established in the Louvre, where they remained during the Consulate. The celebrated Louvre editions are Virgil, Racine, Horace, and La Fontaine. The board of examiners of the 1806 exhibition pronounced the Racine edition "the most perfect typographical production of all ages". Pierre Didot was also a poet and translated in verse the fourth book of Georgies, the first books of Horace's Odes, and wrote a number of original poems. Didot published this book in 1819: Specimen des nouveaux caractères de la fonderie et de l'imprimerie de P. Didot, l'ainé, chevalier de l'ordre royal de Saint-Michel, imprimeur du roi et de la chambre des pairs (Paris). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Pierre Moreau
[P. Moreau / Veuve Hérissant]

[More]  ⦿

Pierre-Simon Fournier

French typefounder (b. Paris, 1712, d. Paris, 1768) also called Fournier le jeune.

  • His books. Author of Manuel Typographique, two volumes published in 1764 and 1766. Nijhof&Lee write: The first volume is one of the major source books on the processes of making printing types in the era of the hand press. Volume two includes a comprehensive specimen of the types and ornaments of Fournier's own foundry, most of which he cut himself, and as such provides a record of one of the most remarkable personal achievements in the history of typefounding. The books are available as a Darmstadt Facsimile reprint (1995). He published other theoretical works, such as a 1737 manuscript on the spacing between letters for readability.
  • His life. Son of typefounder Jean-Claude Fournier, he became famous as a type theoretician. He created his own point system in 1737, 14 years after the Frenchh government decreed that types should have standards. In 1739, he created his own foundry. The king of France, Louis XIV, commissioned new types for use during his reign, and turned to Fournier. Reproduction of these types by others was not tolerated. And so, Fournier modèles des caractères were in use throughout Louis XIV's reign. They had huge contrasts (after all, they just predated the outbreak of didones) and were crammed with rococo ornaments. Other contemporaries elsewhere, such as J.M. Fleischmann and J. Enschedé, started imitating Fournier's style. In the 1750s, his career was at its peak. He advised royalty in Sweden and Sradinia on types, and set up a printing shop for Madame de Pompadour. He developed musical types in cooperation with J.G.I. Breitkopf in 1756. But other printers thoroughly disliked Fournier. There were several literary battles between rival typefounders, such as between Gando and Fournier, and between Ballard (a music symbol typfounder who held a monopoly before Fournier in that area) and Fournier. Fournier's typefoundry existed until the 19th century.
  • His typefaces. The Fournier MT family by Monotype was based on the types cut by Pierre-Simon Fournier (ca. 1742) and was called St Augustin Ordinaire in Fournier's Manuel Typographique. Narcissus-Roman (1995, Font Bureau) is based on a 1745 design of Simon Pierre Fournier, and a 1921 version of it called Narcissus by Walter Tiemann for Klingspor, and was digitized by Brian Lucid in 1995. Jim Spiece's version is called Narcissus SG. In 1768, he designed an ornamental all caps face, which Peignot produced as Fournier le Jeune. More elaborate caps were added by ATF in the 1920s, and the current digital version by P22/Lanston, also called Fournier le Jeune, is based on that [see LTC Fournier Le Jeune]. In 2007, Tjorbjörn Olsson (T4) created Museum Fournier, inspired by a set of Rococo capitals designed by Pierre Simon Fournier le Jeune, ca. 1760. The matrices are part of a set imported to Sweden by J.P. Lindh in 1818 from Breitkopf&Härtel in Leipzig, Germany. They are now in the Nordiska Museum in Stockholm. Jas Rewkiewicz's Fournier RD (2007) is an interpretation of the famous Fournier typeface. The Castcraft version of Fournier is called OPTI Fourquet.

Pauline Nuñez graduated in 2007 from Ecole Estienne with a thesis entitled Pierre-Simon Fournier, typographe absolu, typographe accompli?.

Image of Petit Canon, 1742. Klingspor link. FontShop link.

View some digital typefaces based on designs by Fournier. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Pilar Cano
[Letterjuice]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

P.K. Thomajan

Author of "American Type Designers" (1952). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Polka Design / Letterfontein
[Joep Pohlen]

Polka Design is a Dutch book design, graphic design and publishing house, run by Joep Pohlen, Dennis Schmitz and "Egor". Joep Pohlen (Roermond) and Geert Setola published Letterfontein (1994). Joep writes: We printed about 15,000 copies. In 2002 I began rewriting and expanding the book. Geert Setola did not take part anymore in this huge job where the content went from appr. 15,000 words to 150,000 words. The first Dutch print in november 2009 was sold out in a couple of weeks and in march 2010 the reprint appeared. In 2010 Letterfontein got also a red dot award and a certificate for high design quality form the Type Directors Club New York (TDC). It took about a year to get it well translated in the different languages for Taschen Publishers. For the English version we asked John A. Lane to proofread it. For the Spanish version Albert Corbeto did the proofreading. So, the other language versions: Letter Fountain (2011), Fuente de Letras (Sp), La Fontaine aux Lettres (Fr) and Letterfontäne. A new edition appeared in 2011.

In 2013, Pohlen designed Calypso PF, a free version of Roger Excoffon's Calypso, ad quite different from all existing digital versions. He explains: Most of the typefaces ever made have been digitized. Calypso was no exception. I found and downloaded Calypso Boy from Scootergraphics (digitized by Marty Pfeiffer, 1997) and Calypso by Profonts (digitized by Ralph Michael Unger, 2005). Ralph Michael Unger has added numerals, a question mark, an exclamation mark, ligatures and a lot of other useful characters, making it a complete digital font. By comparing the capitals I saw that they where quite different and it seemed to me that they were based on the Calypso silkscreen-printed rub down Letraset version because the dots were not round like on the original drawings I had seen in several publications and advertising for this typeface. Of course the original drawings were also not exactly the same as the metal type. As earlier written the punches that were cut by the Benton pantograph were retouched and because of that there were differences compared with the original drawings. So the final design had to be found in the actual cast type. I went looking for this type and found the site of D. Stempel GmbH that got the original matrices of D. Stempel AG and all the takeovers Stempel made during their existence. One of them was Fonderie Olive. I ordered a set of newly cast type from the original Olive matrices and found out that it was indeed quite different from the digital fonts that I bought. At that time Marjolein Koper was working as an intern at our design studio Polka Design and I asked her to digitize Calypso. The result was better than the fonts I bought but still I was not satisfied. After she came back to work at our studio on a steady base we photographed the metal type with a Micro Nikkor on a D800 to get the sharpest enlargement we could get. With this pictures Marjolein established the exact angle of the grid and we decided to begin again from scratch. Although it still is not an exact reproduction of the original metal type it has more detail and it can match almost the big reproductions seen in the first advertising in the French printers yearbook Caractère Noël 1957 and recent publications with original drawings.

Letterfontein link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Portfolio of Ornate Penmanship
[Austin Norman Palmer]

Penmanship book by the Austin N. Palmer Company in Cedar Rapids, IA, probably published in 1896, and edited by Austin N. Palmer. It contains numerous handdrawn alphabets. Contributors include F.A. Curtis of Hartford, CT (blackletter faces and a marking alphabet), F.B. Courtney (swashy capitals), F.W. Martin of Boston (several blackletter alphabets, one of which is called Rapid German Text, and another is is for diploma filling), W.E. Dennis of Brooklyn, NY (a bird, his signature, Austin N. Palmer's name handprinted), E.L. Brown of Rockland, ME (a bird, several calligraphic alphabets, a woody caps face, and several blackletter alphabets), G.N. Bretscher of New York (several blackletters, one of which is called Western Penman), G.W. Wallace (Normandie Script), W.C. Henning of Cedar Rapids, IA (swashy caps and a blackletter face). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Precision Type Font Reference Guide

Three CDs with 5000 fonts from Adobe/Linotype, Agfa Type, Agfa Logos, Alphabets Inc., Andersen, Bear Rock, Bitstream, Carter&Cone, Diehl Volk, EmDash, FontBureau, TheFontCompany, FranklinTypeFound, Galapagos, HandcraftedFonts, Harris Design, Headliners Int., Intecsas, Int.Typeface Cor., Isis Imaging, Jack Yan&Ass., Key Borders, Lanston Type, Letraset, Letter Perfect, Monotype, NewYorkDesign, NIMX Graphics Page Studio, PolyType, Red Rooster, Russian Type, Christian Schwartz, Stone Type, Torah, Treacyfaces, [T-26], URW, Vanguard Media, ABC Design, Adagio, Addict Inc., Aerotype, Arthur Baker, Castle Systems, Coniglio, Design Lab, DS Design, Justified Type, Lunchbox Design, Maverick Design, mindCANDY, P22, Plazm Media, Psy/Ops Type, Richard Beatty, Synstelien Design. The book "Precision Type Font Reference Guide" by Jeff Level, Bruce Newman and Brenda Newman shows more than 13,000 typefaces. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Priscila Lena Farias

Brazilian [T-26] designer (b. 1964, Sao Paulo) of Cryptocomix10, LowTech, Quadrada (1998), Seu Juca (2009, 3-d, handprinted) and Nova (a text family started in 2002). She also designed Disneybats, Ruraldings and Juca.

Born in 1964, she has a doctorate in communication from the Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Sao Paulo and is affiliated with the foundry Tipos do acaso. Graphic designer as well as typography professor at PUC Sao Paulo. She is head of the design program at SENAC Sao Paulo, and professor at FAU, USP (University of Sao Paulo's School of Architecture and Urbanism). President of the Brazilian Information Design Society (SBDI). Editor of the book Fontes digitais brasileiras: de 1989 a 2001 (Sao Paulo: ADGBrasil/Rosari).

Author of Tipografia digital: o impacto das novas tecnologias (2AB Editora, 1998). At ATypI 2009 in Mexico City, she spoke on Brazilian vernacular type design and digital technologies. Biography. Speaker at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Prix Fernand Baudin prijs

Annual prize for the best typography in a Belgian book. Named after Fernand Baudin. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Progothics

Fraktur site run by Petra Heidorn and Dieter Steffmann (in German). Books on Fraktur. Tons of history. The fonts:

  • Fontsmith et.al.: Crusades Alternate
  • Petra Heidorn: Semper Idem (2001)
  • James Fordyce: Deutsch Gothic
  • Richard Gast: LeeBee Schwarz, Swedie Cruel
  • Iconian Fonts: Uberhölme
  • Manfred Klein: Broken Brains, Frax Initials, MKaslon Textura, Civilité Edges, Very Broken Frax, Fraxx Sketch Quill (2001, inspired by the work of Imre Reiner), Cowboy Caxton (2001), TShirts for Frax.
  • Graham Meade: Heidorn Hill, Labrit
  • Darren Rigby: Bayern
  • Mickey Rossi: Bongo Fraktur
  • Dieter Steffmann: Lautenbach
  • Tepid Monkey: Benegraphic
  • Derek Vogelpohl: Gothican, Iron Gothic, Ironsides
  • Matthew Welch: Fraktur Modern
  • Sara: Hilda Sonnenschein (2001)
[Google] [More]  ⦿

Project BibOpera

Technical reports available from Project BibOpera, which is concerned with typesetting, document production, and typography. [Google] [More]  ⦿

PTF Gazette

Jean-François Porchez's great on-line newspaper about type. Great web page. Full of information. A must! Lots of links to books. [Google] [More]  ⦿

QUALCOMM

A PDF file of Typography for Mobile Phone Devices: The Design of the QUALCOMM Sans Font Family (2005, Jared Benson, Ken Olewiler, and Nancy Broden). It describes the cooperation between Punchcut and QUALCOMM to design a new sans font. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Quentin Margat
[Editions 205]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Qwerty Arts: Book Links

Book links at Qwerty Arts. Site under reconstruction. [Google] [More]  ⦿

R. H. Munsch

Author of Recueil d' Alphabets à Dessiner (1951, Eyrolles, Paris). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Raban Ruddigkeit
[Typodarium 2009]

[More]  ⦿

Ralf Hermann
[fonts.info]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ralf Turtschi
[Agenturtschi]

[More]  ⦿

Ramiro Espinoza
[Re-Type]

[MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ramiro Espinoza
[De Amsterdamse Krulletter]

[More]  ⦿

Ramon Stirling

Spanish author of the calligraphy and penmanship book Bellezas de Caligrafia (1844, Joaquin Verdaguer, Barcelona). Stirling was active in Barcelona.

This book led to the development of various modern script typefaces, such as Alejandro Paul's Bellissima Script (2013). Ramon's influence can also be seen in Ramiro Espinoza's Medusa (2013). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Raul Rosarivo

Author of Divina Proporcion Tipografica. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ray Nash

Many say that Ray Nash's book American Penmanship, 1800-1850. A History of Writing and a Bibliography of Copybooks from Jenkins to Spencer (1969, Worcester: American Antiquarian Society) is the best bibliography on the subject. The book is 303 pages long. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Rayan Abdullah

Type designer (b. 1957, Mosul, Iraq) who took part in the Linotype International Type design Contest in 2000 and lives in Germany, where he set up Markenbau in 2000. Author (with Roger Hübner) of Pictograms and Icons (2005, Herman Schmitz, Mainz) and Arabische Schriftkunst (1993, Hochschule der Künste Berlin). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Reginald Salis Hutchings

Author (b. 1915) of A Manual of Script Typefaces (New York, Hastings House, 1965: see cover page). For pictures from this book, and a listing of script faces, go here. Text with the full list of script faces mentioned by Hutchings. He also wrote A Manual of Decorated Typefaces (New York, Hastings House, 1965). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Renaissance Editions: Printing History

Discussions of books on the history of type. By David Wilson-Okamura. [Google] [More]  ⦿

René Knip

Dutch type designer. Jan Middendorp wrote A.R.K. Ten Years of Type Related Projects 1994-2004 (2004), summarizing Knip's work at Atelier René Knip, mostly experiments in type design. Knip (b. 1963) is a graduate from the St. Joost Academy in Breda. Since the 1990s, Knip has operated a design studio in Amsterdam, Atelier René Knip.

Recently, Knip and his brother Edgar formed a new company, Gebroeders Knip, which produces furniture and accessories in which letterforms are integral parts of the objects design.

One of his experiments, a unicase typeface with an Arab feel, was digitized by Nick Curtis as Turban Hey NF (2008).

In October 2012, Knip and Hahn cofounded Arktype. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

René Ponot

French type designer (b. La Houssaye, 1917, d. 2003) whose typefaces include Blason (1978), Continent (1959, Optype - Letterphot), Mopon (1965, Moreau - Lettrage Relief), Nil (1978), Psitt (1954, Fonderie Typographique Française), Castellane&Valensole (Fonderie typographique Française), Roncevalles (1955, Fundicíon Tipográfica Nacional), Solide (1958, Optype - Letterphot), Suresnes, Ulysse (1958, Optype - Letterphot), Uncialis (1950, Optype - Letterphot).

A quote from him: La typographie est un art précieux parce qu'elle forme le dernier revêtement de la pensée. Author of Louis Perrin et l'Énigme des Augustaux (Editions des Cendres, Paris, 1998). This book has a history of Perrin as a printer and typographer, with special attention to Perrin's Augustaux type. It contains two fold-out Augustaux type specimens and several examples of Perrin's printing in black-and-white, has a preface by Fernand Baudin, and is printed in Perrin type redesigned by L'Atelier National de Création Typographique in 1986. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Re-Type
[Ramiro Espinoza]

Argentinian designer Ramiro Espinoza (b. Santa Fe, 1969) dabbled in fonts at his gorgeous (but now defunct) Jazz Futurezone site. His current company is Re-type, where he heads a group of designers including Yomar Augusto, Leo Beukeboom and Ricardo Rousselot. Ramiro graduated from Universidad del Litoral (Santa Fe), and from the Type and Media's KABK (Den Haag) in 2004. He taught typography at the Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Universidad de Buenos Aires and the Escola d'Art i Superior de Disseny in Valencia, Spain. At FontShop International, he was in a team that converted more than 50 font families to OpenType. He freelances occasionally for David Quay's studio. He is currently located in Amsterdam. His typefaces:

  • Mabella (2001), a free font dedicated to the Argentinian feminist activist Mabel Bellucci. It was for some time available at Sudtipos but discontinued there. It is still at Dafont.
  • Bellucci (2008), a commercial redesign of Mabella.
  • The display font Mariabrug (2002). This too is no longer available--it was redesigned and marketed as Kurversbrug, one of the ReType's fonts. Kurversbrug (2007) is a revival of the famous letters appearing on Amsterdam's bridges: the letters were probably designed by Anton Kurvers (b. Den Haag, 23 July 1889; d. Amsterdam, 29 January 1940).
  • At Union Fonts: Lula (2002-2003).
  • Maitena (2003), a free font based on the hand of an Argentinian comic artist, Maitena Burundarena.
  • Lavigne (2004-2010): Lavigne Display is the first release of a type-family aimed at publications such as interior design and women magazines-anywhere a touch of distinction is to be desired. Lavigne Display won an award at TDC2 2010. Lavigne Display and Lavigne Text (a modern serif family) were both winners at Tipos Latinos 2010.
  • Tomate (2008) is a brush lettering / signage script font influenced by Goudy Heavyface Italic. It won an award at Tipos Latinos 2010.
  • Barbieri (2009) is a signage face.
  • Work on Severino (2004) has been abandoned.
  • Smidswater Italics (2009): Smidswater is a Dutch graphic design studio with offices in The Hague and Breda. They had a corporate font (designed by Paulus Nabbe and Onno Bevoort) but wanted to expand the package adding italics and light weights. Ramiro Espinoza was commissioned for this and now Smidswater Font is a complete set extensively used in the studio's indentity.
  • Bath (2010-2011) is a Dutch typeface developed with David Quay for the signage and orientation in the city of Bath.
  • Winco (2012) is a glyphic (flared, incise) type family created from scratch. Espinoza mentions Arpke Antiqua and Globus Cursive as indirect influences on his new type family. It won an award at Tipos Latinos 2012.
  • Krul (2012) is an interpretation of the Amsterdamse Krulletter style of calligraphic signage. This was presented at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam. A book entitled Amsterdamse Krulletter by Rob Becker and Ramiro Espinoza will be published by Lecturis.nl in 2014.
  • Dulcinea (2012), a chancery / penmanship typeface. He writes: Dulcinea looks at Spanish Baroque calligraphy's most extreme tendencies, and especially at some of those produced by the writing masters Pedro Diaz Morante and Juan Claudio Aznar de Polanco. These 17th and 18th century alphabets with their plentiful calligraphic flourishes represented a marked break with the harmonic and angular Renaissance Cancellaresca style. It was Morante who first introduced and popularized the use of the pointed quill in Spain, and although his famous text entitled Arte Nueva de escribir(first volume published in 1616) contains alphabets that have much in common with traditional broad nib Cancellaresca calligraphy, most of the examples therein are outgrowths of the new models put forward by the Italian master Gianfrancesco Cresci. The swashes are complex and intricate, but at the same time they feature a profusion of defects. Many of them sometimes come close to ugliness. However, these pages contain an artistic essence that bears a relationship to the ironic and sometimes somber character of Spanish Baroque.
  • Medusa (2013) is a delicate copperplate penmanship script based upon renowned master Ramón Stirling. Helped in the type production by Paula Mastrangelo, Ramiro looked very carefully at the original manner in which glyphs connected. This typeface will win awards. Well, I wrote the previous sentence on the day I first saw Medusa. In January 2014, I learned that it had won a TDC award. In March 2014, it won an award at Tipos Latinos 2014.
  • Laski Slab, codesigned with Paula Mastrangelo, won an award at Tipos Latinos 2014. It is based on Paula's thesis work in 2012.

MyFonts interview in 2012.

Klingspor link. Fontspace link. Dafont link. Behance link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Richard Southall

British font software specialist and type designer. A graduate in natural sciences from Cambridge (1960), he joined Crosfield Electronics Ltd in London, where he was responsible for producing photomatrices for the Photon-Lumitype direct- photography photocomposing machines sold by Crosfields in Europe. From 1974 to 1983 he was a lecturer in the Department of Typography and Graphic Communication at the University of Reading. Between then and the end of the decade he worked in California and France, at Stanford University, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center and the Université Louis-Pasteur in Strasbourg. Since then he has been a consultant type designer with the American Mathematical Society, BT, the Civil Aviation Authority, National Air Traffic Services and US West Dex (now Qwest Dex). Author of Printer's Type in the Twentieth Century Manufacturing and Design Methods (British Library Publishing, 2005). Sumner Stone reviews this book. He also wrote Designing a new typeface with METAFONT (Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 236, pp. 161-179, 1986). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Rick Poynor

London-based founding editor of Eye in 1990. Author of Typographica (2001, Princeton Architectural Press), described by the editor as follows: The magazine Typographica--brainchild of founder, editor, designer, and renowned typographer Herbert Spencer--had a brief life, a total of 32 issues published over nineteen years. But its influence stretched--and stretches--far beyond its modest distribution and print runs of the time. Indeed, for many graphic designers, Typographica is something of an obsession, to be collected if and when found, savored, and poured over for designs and techniques not seen since. Remarkably, Spencer never intended to turn a profit, so no expenses were spared in the making of the magazine. Different papers, letterpress, tip-ins, and more were all employed in the presentation of an eclectic range of subject matter: Braille, locomotive lettering, sex and typography, typewriter faces, street lettering, matches, and avant-garde poetry all found their way into the magazine. Rick Poynor, founding editor of Eye, recreates the excitement of Typographica in this carefully researched, accessibly written, and beautifully illustrated book that pays tribute to the man and the magazine that changed the course of graphic design.

Author of Typography Now: the Next Wave (1991), and frequent invited speaker at meetings. His other books include The Graphic Edge, Design Without Boundaries, and Obey the Giant. At ATypI 2004 in Prague, he spoke about the crossroads of civilizations. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Rob Becker

Born, in 1965, bert is a photographer and graphic designer. Coauthor with type designer Ramiro Espinosa of Amsterdamse Krulletter (2013). Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam where he explains: This book by Rob Becker and Ramiro Espinoza will explore and illustrates the origins of the exuberant lettering style created by Dutch letter painter Jan Willem Joseph Visser at the end of the 1940s, which decorates many traditional 'brown bars' of Amsterdam. Although there are still numerous examples of this style scattered through some of the most beautiful Amsterdam's districts, many have been destroyed and with the almost complete extinction of the sign-painting profession, the survival of the "Krulletters" is certainly under threat. The aim of the book is to document the "Krulletters" in its present state and to highlight the cultural relevance of lettering in the construction of Amsterdam's identity, in the hope that this will lead to a renewed interest in it and a continuation of the tradition. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Rob Carter

Author with Philip B. Meggs and Ben Day of Typographic Design: Form and Communication (John Wiley, 2003). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Rob Dewey's list of books on graphic design

A list, with prices and ordering information. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Rob Roy Kelly

Rob Roy Kelly (b. Nebraska, 1925, d. Tempe, AZ, 2004) collected wood type from local printers for use by his students at the Minneapolis College of Art&Design. He began gathering the types in the late 1950s and continued adding to the collection over the next decade. He started researching the history, manufacture, and use of the growing collection partly in response to questions that arose from working with his students. His research was first published in the 1963 issue of Design Quarterly (No. 56), and was followed in 1964 by a limited-edition folio of specimen sheets from the collection, entitled American Wood Types 1828-1900, Volume One. Kelly's research would culminate with the publishing in 1969 of American Wood Type, 1828-1900: Notes on the Evolution of Decorated and Large Types and Comments on Related Trades of the Period. Since 1993, his substantive wood type collection resides at the University of Texas. At Dover, he published 100 Wood Type Alphabets. Kelly's final work with the Collection came in the early 1990s when he was asked by Adobe Systems to participate in a project to develop digital revivals of historic wood types as part of the Adobe Originals program. As consultant to the project, Kelly helped select, from his own collected materials, the type styles that would be made into digital fonts. Kelly died in January 2004.

Obituary, which states: He studied design at the University of Nebraska and the Minneapolis School of Art and served in the Army during the Korean War. Later he did graduate work at the School of Art and Architecture at Yale, where he studied with Josef Albers, Alvin Eisenman, Alvin Lustig, Herbert Matter, Leo Lionni, Lester Beall and Alexey Brodovitch. He both taught and administered graphic design programs at the Minneapolis College of Art, Kansas City Art Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Western Michigan University and, most recently, at Arizona State University. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Robert Banham

Senior Lecturer in the Department of Typography & Graphic Communication at the University of Reading where he teaches history of graphic communication and design practice. He obtained his PhD from that same institute. His main research interests are the design of printed ephemera, the influence of technology on design, and the history of colour printing. He edits and designs The Ephemerist, the journal of the Ephemera Society (UK) and from 2002 to 2009 was Chairman of the Friends St Bride Library.

At ATypI 2003 he spoke about Experiments in wood: early 19th Century wood-engraved lettering and wood types: A brief introduction to the work of jobbing printers Frederick Gye and Giles Balne, innovative London based jobbing printers in the first half of the nineteenth century. Gye and Balne were printers for the State Lottery and Vauxhall Gardens, the former in particular being a driving force behind developments in advertising including new display types. The focus of the talk will be on the contribution made by Gye and Balne (and some of their rivals) to developments in type design in the form of wood-engraved letterforms and wood types which influenced the metal types produced by the type founders.

Coauthor with Fiona Ross of Non-Latin Typefaces at St Bride Library, London and Department of Typography&Graphic Communication, University of Reading (2008, London: St Bride Library).

Speaker at ATypI 2013 in Amsterdam on wood type and lettering in the UK between 1800 and 1850. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Robert Bringhurst

Author of The Elements of Typographic Style (1992), by many considered as the best book in typography ever written. Revisions were done in 1996, 2004, 2005 and 2008 [review, web, lecture]. Interview with Delve Withrington. He is also a prize-winning poet. Other books by him include A Short History of the Printed Word (1999, with Warren Chappell).

Biography, from which I quote: Robert Bringhurst was born in Los Angeles in October 16, 1946 and spent his years growing up in the border provinces and states between Western Canada and the United States. He acquired a BA from Indiana University in 1973 and an MFA from the creative writing program at UBC in 1975, where he later taught. Bringhurst collaborated with West Coast artist Bill Reid on a book of Raven Myths, and Bringhurst later wrote a book about Reid's sculpture. Bringhurst is known not only as a poet but also in the fields of typography, linguistics, art history and Native studies. He received the Macmillan Prize for Poetry in 1975 and currently resides in Vancouver. He has some memorable type quotes, such as this one: By all means break the rules, and break them beautifully, deliberately, and well. That is one of the ends for which they exist. He spoke at ATypI 2008 in St. Petersburg and at ATypI 2010 in Dublin. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Robert Chwalowski

Polish type design pages by Robert Chwalowski. On-line type book on good and bad typography by Robert Chwalowski, in Polish. He is the author of Typografia typowej ksiazki (2001) (Typography of a typical book). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Robert Fauver
[Typeology]

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Robert Lee
[Web Museum of Wood Types]

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Roberto de Vicq de Cumptich

Brazilian graphic and type designer. Bembo's Zoo is Roberto de Vicq de Cumptich's children's book with all drawings integrated with glyphs from Bembo. He also published Men of Letters and People of Substance (David R. Godine, 2007). The promotional blurb states: de Vicq takes the designs of type and ornaments (known affectionately in the trade as "dingbats") and common linecuts to form the faces of his literary heroes. In the second part he combines type ornaments and icons to suggest a face with singular attributes: pride, fear, fanaticism, and surprise. But these are not drawings; they are images arranged from the combination of specific and discrete graphic forms. They are created on a computer and not in a composing stick. Designer at Muccatypo of Bastardo, Wet and Genealogy.

He wrote Words at Play (with Matteo Bologna, Adobe, 2004), about which he says: This book showcases type portraits of well-known writers in a playful homage to the power of words and the beauty of typography. In 2010, he designed a PDF brochure for TDC in New York entitled How To Make Love To Your Type [and the typophiles as a group are a cranky bunch without a sense of humor]. Typographic picture by TDC, 2009. Another URL. Klingspor link. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Robin Kinross

British typographer, editor and writer. After graduating from the Department of Typography, University of Reading, he wrote a thesis on Otto Neurath and Isotype in 1979. Author of Modern Typography (1992, here is the second edition) and Unjustified Texts (2002). He works for Hyphen Press. Interviewed by Andy Crewdson. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Robin Williams

Type personality, columnist at Adobe and Eyewire, and author of several books on typography, including A Blip in the Continuum (with John Tollett), How to Boss Your Fonts Around, The Non-Designer's Design Book (with Carole Quandt), The Non-Designer's Type Book (with Nancy Davis), and several Mac books.

Alternate URL. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Roger Chatelain

Born in 1938, From 1965-2000, he was typography professor at Porrentruy, Genève and Lausanne. Author of Rencontres typographiques (2003, Editions Eracom, Lausanne), coauthor of "Guide du typographe" (1993 and 2000). Author of "Dossier photocomposition" (1976) and "la Typo du journaliste" (1991, 1996). Coauthor of "L'imprimé" (1991), "Le livre à Lausanne, Cinq siècles d'édition et d'imprimerie" (1993), "En français ... dans le texte" (1994), "La lutte continue, 125e anniversaire du Gutenberg" (1997), "Empreintes 25e anniversaire de l'Ecole romande des arts graphiques" (1997). Ex-editor of Revue suisse de l'imprimerie. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Roger Druet

Famous French calligrapher who wrote "La civilisation de l'écriture" with Herman Grégoire (Fayard, 1976). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Roger Walton

Author of the books "Typographics 1" through "Typographics 4". [Google] [More]  ⦿

Roh Design
[Mike Rohde]

Mike Rohde (Roh Design, Milwaukee, WI) writes on sketching, drawing, technology, travel cycling and books. Author of The Sketchnote Handbook, the illustrated guide to visual note taking (2013, The Peachpit Press). For this book, he created a hand-printed typeface family, Sketchnote (2013), which can be bought from Delve Fonts. He also created Sketchnote Dingbats (2014). Creative Market link. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ron Eason

Prolific author. With Sarah Rookledge, he wrote "Rookledge's International handbook of typedesigners: a biographical directory" (1991) and "Rookledge's International Directory of Type Designers" (1994). [Google] [More]  ⦿

Rosemarie Kloos-Rau

German designer who made Wiesbaden Swing Dingbats and the neat handwriting Wiesbaden Swing in 1992. In 1993, she published Schreibschriften (Bruckmann, München), a collection of 500 calligraphic alphabets. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ross F. George
[Ross F. George: Speedball 10 (1927)]

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Ross F. George

Inventor of the speedball pen. Lettering artist from Seattle, influenced by W.H. Gordon. His alphabets appeared in the Speedball Lettering catalogues, published from 1935-1948. The Speedball Text Book series's 10th through 17th editions were published at regular intervals from 1927-1956, and have many of his alphabets. Link related to his art deco alphabets. Some of the alphabets in Speedball Lettering have been digitized. To name a few:

  • Toto's K22 TriLine Gothic (2011) is a free multiline font based on Ross F. George's TriLine Gothic from 1956.
  • Jim Parkinson created Wigwag (2003, a display family inspired by Ross George as well as the work of Samuel Welo and Cecil Wade).
  • Jason Walcott made Baroque Text JF (2003, a great Fraktur font based on a hand-lettered alphabet drawn by Ross George).
  • Nick Curtis added Xanthippe NF (2006, an "exuberant" blackletter face).
  • Garrett Boge revived Free Roman.
  • Nick Curtis designed Catty Wumpas NF (2004).
  • Nick Curtis created Gnarly Dude NF (2005).
  • Nick Curtis created Hacky Sack NF (2009), after Ross George's Stunt Roman.
  • Harold Lohner published Milky Way (2001) and MilkyWayTwo (2001).
  • Michael Stacey created the brushy face ITC Wisteria (1995), an almost exact reproduction of one of George's brush faces which appeared in many publiactions from 1938-1952 (see here).
  • Heller and Fili give him credit for Chop Suey (1935), an oriental simulation face which has found its way into the free font world under several guises.
  • Jim Spiece (Spiece Graphics) created the Wild West family Cactus Flower SG.
  • Paulo W created Speedball Western Letters (2009), Speedball Metropolitan Caps (2010) and Speedball Metropolitan Poster (2010). Sunamy (2007, Iza W) is a ninja font made after an example of George.
  • Nick Curtis made the monoline script face Nellie Kay NF (2011).
  • The art deco face Blue Jay Way NF (2011, Nick Curtis) was also inspired by Ross F. George.
  • Big George NF (2011, Nick Curtis) is a fat comic book style face that revives another of George's creations from Speedball Text Book.
  • Dick Pape created these typefaces based on the 17th Edition: Split Caps by George was revived by Nick Curtis as Spread Out NF (2011).
  • Speedball America, Speedball Architects Italic, Speedball Architects, Speedball Block, Speedball Brush Bold Italic, Speedball Built Up Style, Speedball Bulletin Dusted, Speedball Bulletin Heavy, Speedball Bulletin Plain, Speedball Bulletin Squiggley, Speedball Carnival, Speedball Carved Caps, Speedball Cond Bold Italic, Speedball Cond Poster Gothic Bold, Speedball Decorative Initials, Speedball Decorative Ransom, Speedball Draftsman's Art, Speedball Formal Roman, Speedball Free Roman, Speedball Gay Nineties A, Speedball Gay Nineties B, Speedball Line Gothic, Speedball Metropolitan Poster, Speedball Power, Speedball Roman Italic, Speedball Rough, Speedball Slant Script, Speedball Speed D Italics, Speedball Squeezed Headline, Speedball Stencil Italic, Speedball Variation. Download here.

Examples of his Speedball Text Book alphabets: Speedball Title Display 1 (1927), SpeedballTitle Display 2 (1927), Easter Suggestion (1935), Speedball Title 1 (1938), Speedball Title 2 (1938), untitled lettering (1941), Poster Gothic 5 (1935), Postrie Caps (1938), Roman 2 (1935), Roman 3 (1935), Roman 4 (1935), Roman 7 (1935), Roman 7 (1938), Symphony 1 (1935), Symphony 1 (1952), Symphony 2 (1938), Symphony 2 (1948), Modern 1 (1938), Modern 2 (1941), Modern 2 (1948), Line Gothic (1938), Tri-Line Gothic (1956). [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Ross F. George: Speedball 10 (1927)
[Ross F. George]

Ross F. George's book Speedball 10, published by C. Howard Hunt Pen Co. in Camden, NJ in 1927, was scanned in 2014 by Lee Littlewood, a signpainter in Portland, OR, who runs Lee's Better Letters [2915 NE 21st A, Portland, OR 97212]. The PDF file [59 MB] is made available with his permission. I extracted some useful images from that file. For further information on Ross F. George, see here. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Roumond

This page has a number of scans from a booklet by signpainter Roumond entitled 32 Alphabets Modernes, published in Paris by A. Charayron and Léon Duran, some time in the 1930s. There are lots of alphabets with art nouveau and art deco influences.

In 2011-2012, Dick Pape digitized all 32 fonts from that booklet. They can be downloaded here.

Pape's 32 fonts are FAModerne0369, FAModerne0562a, FAModerne0562b, FAModerne0946aBold, FAModerne0946bBold, FAModerne1367a, FAModerne1367b, FAModerne2021a, FAModerne2021b, FAModerne2491a, FAModerne2491b, FAModerne2491c, FAModerne2491d, FAModerne4441, FAModerne5204, FAModerne5204a, FAModerne5204b, FAModerne5204c, FAModerne6183a, FAModerne6183b, FAModerne6518a, FAModerne6518b, FAModerne6518c, FAModerne6518d, FAModerne7287a, FAModerne7287b, FAModerne7666, FAModerne7798, FAModerne9002a, FAModerne9002b, FAModerne9321a, FAModerne9321b. [Google] [More]  ⦿

Ruari McLean

Scottish typographer and scholar, b. near Newton Stewart, Galloway, 1917, d. 2006. Author of "Jan Tschichold: Typographer" (1975). He wrote the classic "The Thames&Hudson Manual of Typography," originally published in 1980. He also wrote "True to Type: A Typographical Autobiography," published by Oak Knoll Press in the United States and Werner Shaw in the UK. McLean was raised in Oxford and spent most of his life in London. Obituary. [Google] [MyFonts] [More]  ⦿

Rudolf Hostettler

Swiss type designer. Author of "The Printer's Terms", designed by Jan Tschichold. And of Technical Terms of the Printing Industry (5th edition was printed in 1995) and Type: eine Auswahl guter Drucktypen; 80 Alphabete klassischer und moderner Schriften (Teufen, Ausser-Rhoden: Niggli, 1958). He also wrote "Type: A Selection of Types" (1949, fgm books, R. Hostettler, E. Kopley, H. Strehler Publ., St. Gallen and London) in which he highlights type made by European houses such as Haas, Enschedé, Deberny and Nebiolo. Jost Hochuli wrote his biography, Epitaph für Rudolf Hostettler (St. Gallen: Typotron, 1993). Selected shots fr